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SAMHSA.gov Disaster Response

Annotated Bibliography:

Technological Disasters

American Psychological Association. (2010). Shore Up Your Resilience to Manage
Distress Caused by the Oil in the Gulf.  Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/oil-disaster.aspx Exit Disclaimer

This fact sheet provides tips for handling the stress one is feeling due to the Gulf Coast oil spill. It includes information for how to be resilient.


American Psychological Association. (2010). The gulf oil disaster: Developing a positive outlook in the face of tragedy. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/oil-outlook.aspx Exit Disclaimer

This fact sheet provides tips for coping and developing hope in the wake of the Gulf Coast oil spill. It includes information on understanding loss and building resilience.


National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. (2010). NIEHS Oil Spill Cleanup Initiative: Safety Awareness for Oil Spill Cleanup Workers.  Retrieved from http://tools.niehs.nih.gov/wetp/index.cfm?id=2495

This Web site provides awareness-level health and safety resource training tools in English, Spanish, and Vietnamese for those who are working to clean up the oil. It helps workers understand the following: what an oil spill is, characteristics of an oil spill response, and how to identify and control hazards pertaining to the response and cleanup activities associated with an oil spill.


National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (2010). Hurricanes and the Oil Spill.
Retrieved from http://response.restoration.noaa.gov/book_shelf/2076_hurricanes_oil.pdf 

This National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration fact sheet explains what may happen when a hurricane runs through an oil spill and why it is not likely that an oil spill will have a significant impact during future hurricanes.


Prince William Sound Regional Citizens’ Advisory Council. (2009). Coping with
Technological Disasters.  Retrieved from http://www.pwsrcac.org/projects/osrplan/coping.html  Exit Disclaimer

This brief narrative addresses some of the mental health issues that were experienced following the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill off the coast of Alaska in 1989. The DVD training course “Coping with Technological Disasters: Peer Listener Training” is offered.


Prince William Sound Regional Citizens’ Advisory Council. (2009). Coping with
Technological Disasters: A User Friendly Guide Book.  Retrieved from http://www.pwsrcac.org/docs/d0001001.pdf  Exit Disclaimer

This guidebook helps community officials and individuals throughout a region affected by a technological disaster recognize, identify, and mitigate the adverse psychological effects associated with these events. Included are culturally appropriate outreach and community healing strategies.


Prince William Sound Regional Citizens’ Advisory Council. (2009). Coping with
Technological Disasters: Appendices.  Retrieved from http://www.pwsrcac.org/docs/d0001002.pdf  Exit Disclaimer

The appendices are a companion document to Coping with Technological Disasters: A User Friendly Guide Book. This document includes community surveys, newspaper articles, in-service training, information directories, and reports.

Exxon Valdez Lessons Learned

Ahern, Jennifer, & Galea, Sandro. (2006). Social context and depression after a disaster:
the role of income inequality. Journal of Epidemiol Community Health, 60, 766-
770. Retrieved from
http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/41236/1/ahern_social%20context%20and%20depression%20after%20a%20disater_2006.pdf Exit Disclaimer

This article discusses the relationship between income inequality and higher rates of depression following a disaster.


Alaska Resources Library and Information Services. (2010). Exxon Valdez Oil Spill:
FAQs, Links, and Unique Resources at ARLIS. Retrieved from http://www.arlis.org/docs/vol2/a/EVOS_FAQs.pdf 

This document contains a collection of materials and information related to the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989.


Alaska Resource Library and Information System. (2009). Exxon Valdez Oil Spill:
 Resources for Teachers and Students. Retrieved from
http://www.evostc.state.ak.us/Universal/Documents/Publications/EVOS%20Resources%20for%20Teachers%20%20Students%203%2016%2009pp.pdf

This document contains a list of resources: books, videos, Web sites, and articles from a variety of sources pertaining to the Exxon Valdez oil spill and related topics chosen for their appeal to teachers, students, and the general public.


Miller, Pamela. (1999). Exxon Valdez Oil Spill: Ten Years Later. Retrieved from
http://arcticcircle.uconn.edu/SEEJ/Alaska/miller2.htm

This narrative examines the Exxon Valdez oil spill, what happened, the effect it had, and how it was still having an effect 10 years after the spill. 

Retraumatization

Kammerer, Nina, and Mazelia, Ruta. (2006). Resource paper: Trauma and Retraumatization. Presented at the After the Crisis Initiative: Healing from Trauma After Disasters Expert Panel Meeting. Retrieved from http://www.gainscenter.samhsa.gov/atc/text/papers/trauma_paper.htm

West, H. (2006). White paper: Addressing the traumatic impact of disaster on individuals, families, and communities.  Presented at the After the Crisis Initiative: Healing from Trauma After Disasters Expert Panel Meeting. Retrieved from http://www.nh.gov/safety/divisions/hsem/behavhealth/documents/atc_white_paper.PDF


Guidance for First Responders

Self-Care

American Psychological Association. (2008). Managing traumatic stress: Tips for recovering from disaster and other traumatic events. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/disaster-tips.aspx Exit Disclaimer

This tip sheet discusses normal reactions to a disaster or traumatic event and the steps taken to alleviate stress.


Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress. (n.d.). Leadership stress management. Retrieved from http://cstsonline.org/csts_items/CSTS_leadership_stress_management.pdf Exit Disclaimer

This fact sheet discusses tips leaders can use to monitor and minimize their stress when managing teams during traumatic events.


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2002). Traumatic incident stress: Information for emergency response workers. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2002-107/pdfs/2002107.pdf

This fact sheet outlines symptoms of traumatic incident stress and what the emergency response worker can do on site and at home to cope with disaster response.


National Center for PTSD. (2007). Working with trauma survivors: What workers need to know. Retrieved from http://ncptsd.va.gov/ncmain/ncdocs/fact_shts/fs_working_disaster.html

This tip sheet provides information on the importance of understanding traumatic stress when working with trauma survivors.


National Communications System. (2007). Stress management for responders [Training teleconference]. Retrieved from http://www.ncs.gov/tpos/esf/no/Stress%20Management.ppt

This presentation discusses how first responders can deal with the stress felt when responding to a disaster during and after deployment.


New Jersey Center for Public Health Preparedness. (2005). First responders: Self-care, wellness, health, resilience, and recovery dealing with stress. Retrieved from http://www.njcphp.org/legacy/drup/index.php?q=node/115 Exit Disclaimer

This presentation discusses how first responders can deal with the stress they feel while helping their communities respond to and recover from a disaster, how they can prepare for the pressure they face, and how they can help their families.


North Carolina Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services. (2007). Understanding the role of the first responder. Retrieved from http://www.dhhs.state.nc.us/ MHDDSAS/crisis_services/library/crsis-firstresponder07.pdf

This presentation discusses the role of a first responder and his or her part in crisis intervention.


U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2005). Managing stress: Tips for emergency and disaster response workers (HHS Publication No. NMH05-0209). Rockville, MD: Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Retrieved from http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/disasterrelief/pubs/manstress.asp

This tip sheet outlines the common signs of stress so that disaster response workers can monitor their own mental health and that of their coworkers. It also provides stress reduction strategies.

Deployment Guidance

Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress. (n.d.). Natural disasters: Optimizing officer and team performance. Retrieved from http://cstsonline.org/csts_items/CSTS_law_enforcement_natural_disasters.pdf Exit Disclaimer

This tip sheet is intended to help managers and supervisors manage and limit officer stress resulting from disaster response.


National Center for PTSD. (2007). Disaster rescue and response workers. Retrieved from http://ncptsd.va.gov/ncmain/ncdocs/fact_shts/fs_rescue_workers.html

This fact sheet explains the different stressors that affect disaster response workers and tips on how to cope with stress during, after, and upon returning home from a disaster.


Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. (2004). Becoming a couple again: How to create a shared sense of purpose after deployment. Retrieved from http://www.usuhs.mil/psy/RFSMC.pdf

This tip sheet aids the entire family in reuniting after a member returns home from deployment.


U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2005). A guide to managing stress in crisis response professions (HHS Publication No. SMA 4113). Rockville, MD: Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Retrieved from http://mentalhealth .samhsa.gov/publications/allpubs/SMA-4113/default.asp

This is a pocket guide designed for first responders that provides information on signs and symptoms of stress and offers simple, practical techniques for minimizing stress responses prior to and during disaster response.


U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2005). A post-deployment guide for supervisors of deployed personnel (HHS Publication No. NMH05-0218). Rockville, MD: Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Retrieved from http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/emergencypreparedness/resilience_resources/support_documents/ supervisorhome/returninghome_brochure_supervisors.pdf

This guide is intended to assist supervisors in transitioning deployed employees back into their regular work situations.


U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2005). A post-deployment guide for emergency and disaster response workers (HHS Publication No. NMH05-0219). Rockville, MD: Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Retrieved from http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/emergencypreparedness/resilience_resources/support_documents/ postdeploy/er_disaster_workers_nmh05-0219.pdf

This guide is intended to assist deployed employees when transitioning back into their regular work situations after deployment.

Acute Interventions

Association of Professional Chaplains. (2006). Guidelines for coping with disaster and mass casualty. Retrieved from http://www.professionalchaplains.org/uploadedFiles/pdf/Guidelines%20for%20 Coping %20with%20 Disaster%20and%20Mass%20Casualty.pdf Exit Disclaimer

This tip sheet is for first responders working with faith-based organizations. It will assist individuals and organizations in coping during a crisis.


Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress. (n.d.). Guidelines on notifying families of dead or missing loved ones. Retrieved from http://www.cstsonline.org/csts_items/CSTS_guidelines_missing_death_ notification.pdf Exit Disclaimer

This fact sheet provides guidance for first responders assisting in the recovery efforts for events with large numbers of dead, injured, and missing persons. It offers guidelines for notifying families of dead or missing loved ones.


Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress. (2008). Courage to care: Psychological first aid: Helping victims in the immediate aftermath of disaster. Retrieved from http://cstsonline.org/ csts_items/CTC_psychological_first_aid.pdf Exit Disclaimer

This tip sheet was designed for first responders working in international emergency situations. It outlines guidelines for proper use of psychological first aid.


Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress. (2008). Psychological first aid: How you can support well-being in disaster victims. Retrieved from http://www.cstsonline.org/csts_items/CSTS_psychological_ first_aid.pdf Exit Disclaimer

This tip sheet offers first responders quick tips for going through Psychological First Aid.


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2005). Disaster mental health for responders: Key principles, issues and questions. Retrieved from http://www.bt.cdc.gov/mentalhealth/pdf/ responders.pdf

This fact sheet highlights mental health related information that will be beneficial for a first responder in recovery efforts after a disaster.


National Center for PTSD. (2008). Early mental health intervention for disasters. Retrieved from http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/pages/early-intervention-disasters.asp

This fact sheet offers information on crisis intervention, psychological first aid, and information on obstacles that prevent a survivor from seeking services.


National Center for PTSD. (2008). Helping survivors in the wake of disaster. Retrieved from http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/pages/helping-survivors-after-disaster.asp

This tip sheet offers information on normal reactions to disasters, more severe reactions, and goals for first responders in a disaster.


National Center for Refugee & Immigrant Children. (2005). Developing a professional relationship with a child [PowerPoint slides]. Retrieved from http://www.refugees.org/data/nationalcenter/docs/ John_Tuskan.ppt Exit Disclaimer

This presentation discusses how mental health professionals can work with children recovering from a disaster event.


New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. (2005). Psychological first aid. Retrieved from http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/downloads/pdf/mhdpr/mhdpr-pfa.pdf

This tip sheet offers quick “do’s and don’ts” regarding psychological first aid and offers self-care tips for first responders.


Psychological first aid for first responders: Tips for emergency and disaster response workers(HHS Publication No. NMH05-0219). Rockville, MD: Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Retrieved from http://download.ncadi.samhsa.gov/ken/pdf/ katrina/Psychological.pdf

This pamphlet provides a brief explanation of psychological first aid for first responders and information for working in the field.

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Last Update: 6/26/2010