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FY 2012 Grant Request for Applications (RFA)

Targeted Capacity Expansion Program: Substance Abuse Treatment for Racial/Ethnic Minority Populations at High-Risk for HIV/AIDS
Short Title: TCE-HIV

INITIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

Request for Applications (RFA) No.: TI-12-007
Posting on Grants.gov: June 15, 2012
Original Receipt date: July 20, 2012

Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) No.: 93.243

Key Dates

Application Deadline Applications are due by July 20, 2012
Intergovernmental Review (E.O. 12372) Applicants must comply with E.O. 12372 if their State(s) participates. Review process recommendations from the State Single Point of Contact (SPOC) are due no later than 60 days after application deadline.
Public Health System Impact Statement (PHSIS) / Single State Agency Coordination Applicants must send the PHSIS to appropriate State and local health agencies by application deadline. Comments from Single State Agency are due no later than 60 days after application deadline.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment is accepting applications for fiscal year (FY) 2012 Targeted Capacity Expansion Program: Substance Abuse Treatment for Racial/Ethnic Minority Populations at High-Risk for HIV/AIDS grants. The purpose of this program is to facilitate the development and expansion of culturally competent and effective community-based treatment systems for substance use and co-occurring substance use and mental disorders within racial and ethnic minority communities in States with the highest HIV prevalence rates (at or above 270 per 100,000). The expected outcomes for the program include reducing the impact of behavioral health problems, reducing HIV risk and incidence, and increasing access to treatment for individuals with co-existing behavioral health, HIV, and Hepatitis conditions. This program will ensure that individuals who are at high risk for or have a substance use or co-occurring substance use and mental disorder and who are most at-risk for or are living with HIV/AIDS have access to and receive appropriate behavioral health services. Grant funds must be used to serve people diagnosed with a substance use disorder as their primary condition.

This grant program is part of the Congressional Minority AIDS Initiative, which was developed to improve HIV-related health outcomes for racial and ethnic minority communities disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS and to reduce HIV-related health disparities. The program also supports the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy.

Three key findings from National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Research Report indicate that the interactions of drug abuse and HIV/AIDS extend far beyond injection drug use. First, drug abuse impairs judgment and good decision making, leaving people more prone to engage in HIV risk behaviors, including risky sexual behavior and non-adherence to HIV treatment. Second, drug abuse adversely affects health and may exacerbate disease progression. Third, and most important, because of these linkages, we must recognize that drug abuse treatment is HIV prevention, https://www.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/rrhiv.pdf. According to combined data from 2005 to 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) about one in six individuals with HIV/AIDS had used an illicit drug intravenously in their lifetime (16.60 percent); nearly two thirds had used an illicit drug but not intravenously (64.44 percent), and 18.96 percent had never used an illicit drug; and one in four of those living with HIV reported use of alcohol or drugs at a level that warranted treatment, http://www.samhsa.gov/data/2k10/HIV-AIDS/HIV-AIDS.htm.

The National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) clearly articulates the need for resources to be strategically concentrated in areas with high rates of HIV infection, and the need for targeting specific population subgroups at higher risk, such as young minority men who have sex with men. Key goals of the NHAS include: 1) reducing the number of people who become infected with HIV, 2) increasing access to care and optimizing health outcomes for people living with HIV, and 3) reducing HIV-related health disparities (p. vii, National HIV AIDS Strategy, Office of National AIDS Policy, the White House, Washington, DC, 2010).

In support of the NHAS, the goals of the Minority AIDS Initiative and SAMHSA's mission to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America's communities, applicants eligible to apply for this grant opportunity are limited to domestic public and private nonprofit, community-based organizations (CBOs) and Federally recognized Tribes and tribal organizations, in States and Territories with HIV prevalence rates of 270/100,000 or higher.1 The following 22 States and Territories meet this criterion: District of Columbia, New York, U.S. Virgin Islands, Florida, Puerto Rico, Maryland, New Jersey, Georgia, Louisiana, Delaware, South Carolina, Connecticut, California, Mississippi, Nevada, Texas, Virginia, North Carolina, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Alabama. Note: Federally recognized Tribes may be partially or entirely located in one of the 22 identified States and Territories. Federally recognized Tribes that are not located in one of these 22 States and Territories, but can demonstrate an HIV prevalence rate of 270/100,000 or higher (using local tribal epidemiologic data) are also eligible to apply. To determine eligibility, provide local tribal prevalence data in Attachment 7.

Using data from the local health department, all applicants must provide evidence of the need for the provision of substance use and/or co-occurring substance use and mental disorders treatment in their community, that the population(s) of focus are highly impacted by HIV/AIDS, and that they will primarily serve racial and ethnic minority populations, in Section A of the Project Narrative.

This program will also align with goals of the HHS Action Plan for the Prevention, Care & Treatment of Viral Hepatitis2 related to addressing the need for reducing viral hepatitis related to drug use behavior. HIV-infected persons, MSM, and intravenous drug users (IDUs) are disproportionately affected by viral hepatitis and related adverse health conditions. Grantees will be required to integrate efforts to prevent new viral hepatitis infections, identify hepatitis infected persons, and to provide better linkages and referrals to care and treatment. Grantees should try to identify persons infected with viral hepatitis early in the course of their disease. All clients who are considered to be at risk for viral hepatitis (B and C) as specified by CDC recommendations for hepatitis B (CDC, 2008)3 and hepatitis C (CDC, 1998)4 should be tested for hepatitis (B and C). All clients testing positive for viral hepatitis (B or C) should be referred for treatment.

SAMHSA is particularly interested in providing services to focus on young MSM. According to recent CDC data5, young MSM are particularly affected by HIV, representing one quarter of all new HIV infections. You are not required to focus on young MSM. However, if young MSM is your sole population of focus, you will be able to earn up to 5 points in Section B of the Project Narrative. In this section, applicants who propose to provide services to young MSM are asked to describe their experience and effectiveness in serving this population. (See Section V-I of the RFA, Priority Population-Young MSM).

Applicants must propose to provide substance use and/or co-occurring substance use and mental disorders treatment and recovery support services to racial and ethnic minorities in one or more of the following populations at high risk for HIV or living with HIV:

  • Young men who have sex with men (MSM) (ages 18-29);
  • Adult heterosexual women and men; and
  • Men who have sex with men (MSM) (ages 30 and older).

In addition to providing substance use and/or co-occurring substance use and mental disorders treatment and recovery support services, HIV/AIDS testing and case management services, grantees are expected to enhance infrastructure and capacity to improve the community's response to HIV/AIDS by increasing access to care and services for racial and ethnic minorities at high risk for or living with HIV/AIDS.

Expected outcomes for individuals with substance use and/or co-occurring substance use and mental disorders include: reduced HIV transmission; increased number of people receiving treatment for substance use and/or co-occurring substance use and mental disorders; increased number of people who, post-treatment, receive recovery support services; increased number of people who know their HIV status; and increased number of HIV positive people who are case-managed and referred to primary HIV care for antiretroviral therapy (ART) and other services necessary for optimizing health outcomes; increased number of people screened for viral hepatitis (B and C); increased number of people who know their hepatitis status; and increased number of people positive for viral hepatitis (B and C) who are referred to primary care. The TCE-Substance Abuse Treatment for High-Risk Populations program addresses a number of SAMHSA's Strategic Initiatives including Prevention of Substance Abuse and Mental Health Illness, Recovery Support, and Health Reform.

The TCE-HIV program is one of SAMHSA's services grant programs. SAMHSA intends that its services grants result in the delivery of services as soon as possible after the award. Service delivery should begin by the 4th month of the project at the latest.

The TCE-HIV grants are authorized under Section 509 of the Public Health Service Act. This announcement addresses Healthy People 2020 Substance Abuse Topic Area HP 2020-SA.

Eligibility

Eligible applicants are domestic public and private nonprofit, community-based organizations (CBOs) and Federally recognized Tribes and tribal organizations, in States and Territories with HIV prevalence rates of 270/100,000 or higher.6 The following 22 States and Territories meet this criterion: District of Columbia, New York, U.S. Virgin Islands, Florida, Puerto Rico, Maryland, New Jersey, Georgia, Louisiana, Delaware, South Carolina, Connecticut, California, Mississippi, Nevada, Texas, Virginia, North Carolina, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Alabama. Note: Federally recognized Tribes may be partially or entirely located in one of the 22 identified States and Territories. Federally recognized Tribes that are not located in one of these 22 States and Territories, but can demonstrate an HIV prevalence rate of 270/100,000 or higher (using local tribal epidemiologic data), are also eligible to apply. To determine eligibility, provide local tribal prevalence data in Attachment 7.

A community-based organization (CBO) is a public or private nonprofit organization (including faith-based organizations) representative of a community, and engaged in meeting health, behavioral health and human services needs.

Examples of CBOs7 include:

  • CBOs serving racial and ethnic minorities
  • CBOs serving lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and questioning persons (LGBTQ)
  • Faith-based CBOs

Tribal organization means the recognized body of any AI/AN Tribe; any legally established organization of American Indians/Alaska Natives which is controlled, sanctioned, or chartered by such governing body or which is democratically elected by the adult members of the Indian community to be served by such organization and which includes the maximum participation of American Indians/Alaska Natives in all phases of its activities. Consortia of Tribes or tribal organizations are eligible to apply, but each participating entity must indicate its approval.

The National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) clearly articulates the need for resources to be strategically concentrated in areas with high rates of HIV infection, and the need for targeting specific population subgroups at higher risk, such as men who have sex with men. In support of the NHAS, the goals of the Minority AIDS Initiative and SAMHSA's mission to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America's communities, applicants eligible to apply for this grant opportunity are limited to CBOs and Federally recognized Tribes and tribal organizations, in States and Territories that are highly impacted by HIV/AIDS. Federally recognized Tribes that are not located in one of these 22 States and Territories, but are also highly impacted by HIV/AIDS are also eligible to apply.

SAMHSA believes that in order to achieve the goals of this program to enhance infrastructure and capacity to improve the community's response to HIV/AIDS by increasing access to care and services for racial and ethnic minorities at high risk for or living with HIV/AIDS, grant funds must go directly to community-based organizations, Tribes and tribal organizations. Therefore, State and local governments are not eligible to apply. The statutory authority for this program prohibits grants to for-profit agencies.

Cost sharing/match are not required in this program.

Award Information

Funding Mechanism: Grants
Anticipated Total Available Funding: $26.074 million
Anticipated Number of Awards: Up to 52
Anticipated Award Amount: Up to $500,000 per year
Length of Project Period: Up to 5 years

Proposed budgets cannot exceed $500,000 in total costs (direct and indirect) in any year of the proposed project. Annual continuation awards will depend on the availability of funds, grantee progress in meeting project goals and objectives, timely submission of required data and reports, and compliance with all terms and conditions of award. These awards will be made as grants.

Contact Information

For questions about program issues contact:

David C. Thompson
Center for Substance Abuse Treatment
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
1 Choke Cherry Road
Room 5-1007
Rockville, Maryland 20857
(240) 276-1623
david.thompson@samhsa.hhs.gov

- or -

Kirk James, M.D.
Center for Substance Abuse Treatment
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
1 Choke Cherry Road
Room 5-1109
Rockville, Maryland 20857
(240) 276-1617
kirk.james@samhsa.hhs.gov

For questions on grants management and budget issues contact:

Eileen Bermudez
Team Leader
Office of Financial Resources, Division of Grants Management
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
1 Choke Cherry Road
Room 7-1091
Rockville, Maryland 20857
(240) 276-1407
eileen.bermudez@samhsa.hhs.gov

Documents Needed to Complete a Grant Application

1. REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS (RFA)

YOU MUST RESPOND TO THE REQUIREMENTS IN THE RFA IN PREPARING YOUR APPLICATION.

2. GRANT APPLICATION PACKAGE

YOU MUST USE THE FORMS IN THE APPLICATION PACKAGE TO COMPLETE YOUR APPLICATION.

Additional Materials

For further information on the forms and the application process, see Useful Information for Applicants.

Additional materials available on this website include:

 


  1. HIV Surveillance Report: Diagnoses of HIV Infection in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2010, Volume 22. National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Table 21, HIV Diagnosis by State p.21 -22. http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/surveillance/resources/reports/2010report/index.htm. HIV prevalence rates for the District of Colombia and Maryland were estimated to be over 270 per 100,000 people based on the total counts data in CDC's HIV Surveillance Report, Table 21 (see citation above) and U.S. Census estimates of population data (from July 1, 2009).
  2. Combating the Silent epidemic of Viral Hepatitis: Action Plan for the Prevention, Care & Treatment of Viral Hepatitis. http://www.hhs.gov/ash/initiatives/hepatitis/actionplan_viralhepatitis2011.pdf.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recommendations for identification and public health management of persons with chronic hepatitis b virus infection. MMWR 2008; 57(No. RR-8): 1-39. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5708a1.htm.
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recommendations for prevention and control of hepatitis c virus (HCV) infection and HCV-related chronic disease. MMWR 1998; 57(No. RR-19): 1-20. http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/HCV/GuidelinesC.htm.
  5. Prejean J, Song R, Hernandez A, Ziebell R, Green T, et al. (2011) Estimated HIV Incidence in the United States, 2006–2009. PLoS ONE 6(8): e17502. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0017502. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21826193.
  6. HIV Surveillance Report: Diagnoses of HIV Infection in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2010, Volume 22. National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Table 21, HIV Diagnosis by State p.21 -22. http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/surveillance/resources/reports/2010report/index.htm. HIV prevalence rates for the District of Colombia and Maryland were estimated to be over 270 per 100,000 people based on the total counts data in CDC's HIV Surveillance Report, Table 21 (see citation above) and U.S. Census estimates of population data (from July 1, 2009).
  7. CBOs with limited substance abuse treatment experience must have strong written agreements with established, licensed and State certified agency(s).

 

Last updated: 06/15/2012