Skip Navigation SAMHSA News - SAMHSA's Award Winning Newsletter SAMHSA News - SAMHSA's Award Winning Newsletter
SAMHSA’s Award-Winning Newsletter
May/June 2010, Volume 18, Number 3 

The Making of To Live To See the Great Day
That Dawns

Off the top of my head, I can think of 100 people who worked together on the very first draft of To Live To See the Great Day That Dawns. There were so many voices, so many people who cared. Many of them were volunteers who made sure their perspectives were heard.

The publication represents an extraordinary effort by tribal leaders, elders, youth, Plains Indians, Pueblos, Alaska Native villagers, the health sector, scientists, academicians, political leaders, and tribal government officials. All these voices were heard, as well as the mainstream grant-making Federal voices. The project was a bridge between them all.

cover of the publication To Live To See the Great Day That Dawns

Everybody worked together; no one was left out. It was truly a community effort.

One of our first goals was to make a document that instilled hope, rather than despair, in the face of the enormity of the suicide issues among young people in Indian Country.

It’s important to know that hope grew from within the culture, from within all the people who cared. American Indians and Alaska Natives have rich cultural resources, and they have extreme resilience. They are survivors. We wanted everyone to know the publication didn’t come from external sources alone.

In Indian Country, people generously gave their expertise to make this publication work. So that’s what makes it really good. We added illustrations and graphics, poetry, song, and storytelling, because they are the links to our human experience. We needed a way to capture the humanity, to find a way to give a voice to the intimate grief and extreme sorrow—layers and layers of mourning—felt by families and friends and acquaintances who lost loved ones to suicide.

This publication should be shared with pride. We can acknowledge, yes, there is this problem. But look at what we can do to help. Look at what we can do together. And we can do more. That whole rhythm of the document was initially, and still is, really important. This was a commitment we all agreed on.

The publication is a good foundation now, and it will continue to evolve as we learn more over time and build the community. To Live To See the Great Day That Dawns is really the tip of the iceberg for all the communities that came together to create it: elders, youth, friends of Indian Country, people who are Native themselves—in urban settings, on reservations, or in the Alaska Native villages.

This was an extraordinary project to be a part of. We’re all just building on what those have done before us.

Editor’s Note: Cynthia K. Hansen, Ph.D., is currently a Senior Public Health Analyst with the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response at HHS. While working on this publication, Dr. Hansen was Special Expert to SAMHSA’s Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS).


  Cover Story & Related Articles  
Promoting Wellness in Early Childhood

Promoting Wellness in Early Childhood

Project LAUNCH focuses on children from birth to age 8.


  From the Administrator  
Your Responses to What's in a Term?

Your Responses to “What’s in a Term?”

Comments are continuing to arrive in SAMHSA’s email reader-response box. Thank you! Read the responses so far.

Your Comments, Ideas, Personal Stories . . .

Your Comments, Ideas, Personal Stories . . .

SAMHSA has received more than 150 emails in response to the Administrator’s call for comments. Read selected responses.


  Health Reform  

Affordable Care Act: Implications for Behavioral Health

The Act improves services for people who have mental health and substance use disorders.



  Suicide Prevention in American  
  Indian Communities  
Helping Youth “Live To See the Great Day That Dawns”

Helping Youth “Live To See the Great Day That Dawns”

AI/AN youth are 10 times more likely to attempt suicide.

First-Person: Commitment, Hope, Community

Collaborating across tribes helped create a needed publication for AI/AN youth.



  Teens & Substance Abuse  
Adolescents Do What Every Day?

Adolescents Do What Every Day?

A day in the life may include more than texting and homework.

Tobacco Sales to Minors Increasing?

Tobacco Sales to Minors Increasing?

Sales of tobacco to minors increased nationally in 2009.

Youth Smoking & Maternal Risk Factors

Youth Smoking & Maternal Risk Factors

If a mother smokes, does that affect her teen?

Teen Smoking: New Data

Trends in young people’s smoking habits.



  Treatment  
TIP 49 in Your Pocket

TIP 49 in Your Pocket

Pocket “Quick Guides” for counselors and physicians.

By Metro Area: Treatment Data

By Metro Area: Treatment Data

Activities in 27 metro areas include Baltimore and San Diego — Metro Briefs.


  Awards  
PRISM Awards Honor Films, Television

PRISM Awards Honor Films, Television

Kudos for the realistic depiction of substance abuse and mental illness in film and TV.


  Staff in the News  
Leadership Award to Kana Enomoto

Leadership Award to Kana Enomoto

The Arthur S. Flemming Awards honors SAMHSA’s Kana Enomoto.


  Ending Seclusion & Restraint  

Organizations Making a Difference

SAMHSA honors facilities for reducing these practices.



  Drug Abuse Warning Network  
  (DAWN)  

Rise in Nonmedical Use of Pain Relievers

Emergency visits double for prescription opioid pain relievers.



  Recovery Month  
Toolkits, Posters Available

Toolkits, Posters Available

For September, planning materials at RecoveryMonth.gov.



  


Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration – 1 Choke Cherry Road – Rockville, MD 20857
AdobeTM PDF and MS OfficeTM formatted files require software viewer programs to properly read them.
Click here to download these FREE programs now.