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Early Childhood Materials

Part II: Topic Specific Resources: Jobs and the Economy

  • Financial Crisis: Tips for Parents and Other Caregivers
    (http://www.aap.org/disasters/economy-parents.cfm) Exit Disclaimer
    American Academy of Pediatrics
  • From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development – Chapter 10: Family Resources
    (http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9824&page=267) Exit Disclaimer
    Committee on Integrating the Science of Early Childhood Development, National Research Council and Institute of Medicine
    Drawing from new findings, this book presents important conclusions about nature-versus-nurture, the impact of being born into a working family, the effect of politics on programs for children, the costs and benefits of intervention, and other issues.
  • Helping Children Cope in Unsettling Times: The Economic Crisis—Tips for Parents and Teachers
    (http://www.nasponline.org/families/unsettlingtimes.pdf [PDF format]) Exit Disclaimer
    National Association of School Psychologists
    During the economic crisis, parents and teachers can use this tip sheet to help children understand what is happening factually, how events do or do not impact their lives, and how to cope with their reactions.
  • Poverty and Brain Development in Early Childhood
    (http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_398.html) Exit Disclaimer
    National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health
    This research provides information on what the impact of poverty on brain development is and what can be done.
  • Real Life Calls for Real Books: Literature to Help Children Cope with Family Stressors
    (http://www.naeyc.org/files/yc/file/200809/Crawford.pdf [PDF format]) Exit Disclaimer
    National Association for the Education of Young Children
  • Resources for Helping Children, Families, and Early Childhood Educators Build Coping Skills
    (http://www.naeyc.org/files/yc/file/200809/CopingSkillsResources.pdf [PDF format]) Exit Disclaimer
    National Association for the Education of Young Children
  • Resources to Promote Social and Emotional Health and School Readiness in Young Children and Families—A Community Guide
    (http://www.buildinitiative.org/files/tcl05_text.pdf [PDF format]) Exit Disclaimer
    National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health
    This guide provides resources and strategies that families, childcare providers, teachers, and others can use to help children develop the social and emotional skills they need to succeed in school. It specifically focuses on resources for children in low-income communities.
  • Responding to Children Under Stress: A Skill-Based Training Guide for Classroom Teams
    (http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/custom/portlets/recordDetails/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=ED399008&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=ED399008)
    Office of Head Start, Administration for Children and Families
    This skill-based staff development program was developed to help classroom teams address the needs of children and families from multi-stressed environments. The program has two purposes: (1) to suggest practical strategies for working with children who live in multi-stressed environments; and (2) to provide ongoing support for classroom teams.
  • The Productivity Argument for Investing in Young Children
    (http://jenni.uchicago.edu/papers/Heckman_Masterov_RAE_2007_v29_n3.pdf [PDF format]) Exit Disclaimer
    James J. Heckman and Dimitriy V. Masterov
    This article presents the case for investing more in young American children who grow up in disadvantaged environments.

If you or someone you know is in crisis and needs to talk, please call 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255).

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