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Early Childhood Materials

Part I: Comprehensive Early Childhood Web Sites

  • Bright Futures in Practice: Mental Health
    (http://www.brightfutures.org/mentalhealth/) Exit Disclaimer
    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University
    This two-volume set considers the mental health of children in a developmental context, presents information on early recognition and interventions for specific mental health problems and mental disorders, and provides a toolkit with hands-on tools for health professionals and families for use in screening, care management, and health education.
  • Bright Futures: Health Care Professionals Tools and Resources
    (http://www.brightfutures.aap.org/) Exit Disclaimer
    American Academy of Pediatrics
    Bright Futures is a national health promotion and disease prevention initiative that addresses children's health needs in the context of family and community.
  • Building Early Childhood Systems Resources
    (http://gucchd.georgetown.edu/67639.html) Exit Disclaimer
    Center for Child and Human Development, Georgetown University
    This Web site includes interdisciplinary resources for service, training, research, community outreach, technical assistance, and public policy for improving the quality of life for all children and youth, children with special needs, adults with developmental and other disabilities, and their families.
  • Child & Family WebGuide
    (http://cfw.tufts.edu/) Exit Disclaimer
    Tufts University
    This directory of child development, adolescent, and family sites is based on thousands of Web sites' systematic evaluation by graduate students and faculty in child development. The site includes child development research, articles, tips, guides, and more on a host of issues.
  • Child and Adolescent Mental Health
    (http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/child/childhealth.asp)
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
    SAMHSA's mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America's communities. SAMHSA's child and adolescent mental health resources include programs, publications, data, and more.
  • Children's Mental Health in Primary Care
    (http://www.aap.org/mentalhealth/) Exit Disclaimer
    American Academy of Pediatrics
  • Children's Mental Health Publications
    (http://nccp.org/publications/mentalhealth_pubs.html) Exit Disclaimer
    National Center for Children in Poverty
    These publications address a range children's mental health topics including school readiness, social-emotional development, intervention, trauma, maternal depression, financial challenges, and policy.
  • COSA Resource List
    (http://womenandchildren.treatment.org/documents/cosa-resource-508v.pdf [PDF format]) Exit Disclaimer
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    This resource list is designed for children of substance abusers but is applicable to a range of mental health challenges for young children.
  • Early Childhood Resources
    (http://www.tapartnership.org/COP/earlyChildhood/resources.php) Exit Disclaimer
    Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health
  • Head Start Bulletin #73: Child Mental Health
    (http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/resources/ECLKC_Bookstore/Bulletin73Chi.htm)
    Office of Head Start, Administration for Children and Families
    This issue of the Head Start Bulletin describes some of the most current interventions and issues affecting pregnant women, father involvement, and children from birth to age five, as well as some innovative program models.
  • Head Start Bulletin #80: Mental Health
    (http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/resources/ECLKC_Bookstore/MBulletin80Me.htm)
    Office of Head Start, Administration for Children and Families
    This issue of the Head Start Bulletin focuses on fostering the mental health of children, families, and staff; prevention of the onset of mental illness; reduction of the risk of mental illness; early intervention; effective service delivery; and perhaps most important, strengthening resilience. It is divided into sections focusing on services; children, parents, and family; life-changing events; program approaches; staff; and resources.
  • Maternal and Child Health Library Knowledge Path: Social and Emotional Development in Children and Adolescents
    (http://www.mchlibrary.info/knowledgepaths/kp_mental_healthy.html) Exit Disclaimer
    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University
    This knowledge path is aimed at health professionals, program administrators, policymakers, educators, and families, and it is updated periodically. It offers a selection of current, high-quality resources about the promotion of healthy social and emotional development in infants, children, and adolescents. Resources tap into the health, education, and social services literature. Separate sections present resources by age group and cover topics such as developmental stages; factors that impact social and emotional development; policies and programs to promote social and emotional well-being in homes and community settings; and strategies for integrating health, developmental, and educational services. The final section presents parent-education materials.
  • The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning
    (http://csefel.vanderbilt.edu/) Exit Disclaimer
    Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL)
    CSEFEL is focused on promoting social-emotional development and school readiness for young children birth to age five. CSEFEL is a national resource center funded by the Office of Head Start and Child Care Bureau for disseminating research and evidence-based practices to early childhood programs across the country.
  • The National Association for the Education of Young Children
    (http://naeyc.org/) Exit Disclaimer
    The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)
    NAEYC is dedicated to improving the well-being of all young children, with a particular focus on the quality of educational and developmental services for all children from birth through age eight. NAEYC also provides a wealth of social and emotional development resources at http://www.naeyc.org/store/taxonomy/term/1450.
  • ZERO TO THREE: Key Topics
    (http://www.zerotothree.org/site/PageServer?pagename=key_keytopics) Exit Disclaimer
    ZERO TO THREE
    ZERO TO THREE's mission is to support the healthy development and well-being of infants, toddlers, and their families. Their resources inform, educate, and support adults who influence the lives of infants and toddlers. ZERO TO THREE provides a wealth of information about social-emotional development at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/PageServer?pagename=key_social and mental health-specific resources at http://www.zerotothree.org/site/PageServer?pagename=key_mental.

If you or someone you know is in crisis and needs to talk, please call 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255).

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