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Worker Drug Use and Workplace Policies and Programs: Results from the 1994 and 1997 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse

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CHAPTER 4: WORKPLACE INFORMATION, POLICIES, AND PROGRAMS CONCERNING DRUG AND ALCOHOL USE

In both 1994 and 1997, NHSDA respondents who worked full-time were asked whether, at their workplaces, they had been provided with any information regarding the use of alcohol or drugs, whether there was a written policy regarding employee use of alcohol or drugs, and whether the workplaces provided access to any type of employee assistance program (EAP) or other type of counseling program for employees with alcohol or drug-related problems. The following figures provide information derived from these questions and the results from the 1994 and 1997 surveys are compared.

4.1 Overview

In both 1994 and 1997, about three-fourth (74%) of the full-time workers, age 18-49, reported that their workplaces provided information about drug or alcohol use, 70 percent of the full-time workers, age 18-49, reported that their workplaces had a written policy concerning drug or alcohol use, and one-half (50%) of the full-time workers, age 18-49, reported that their workplaces provided access to an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) on drug or alcohol use problems.

Compared to full-time workers, age 18-49 in medium (25 to 499 employees) or large size (500 or more employees) establishments, full-time workers in small establishments (1 to 24 employees) were much less likely to report that their workplaces provided information or had a written policy on drug or alcohol use (See Figure 4.1). Moreover, while more than three-fourth of the full-time workers, age 18-49, in large establishments (with 500 or more employees) and about 60% of the full-time workers, age 18-49, in medium size establishments reported that their workplaces provided access to an EAP, only about one-fourth the full-time workers, age 18-49, in small establishments reported so.

As indicated in Table 4.1, there were no significant difference between 1994 and 1997 in the percent of workers who reported that their workplaces provided information, had a written policy, or provided access to an EAP concerning drug or alcohol use. However, full-time workers, age 18-49, in large establishments were significantly less likely to report that their workplaces provided an EAP on drug or alcohol use in 1997 than in 1994 (75.4% vs. 82.5%).

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This page was last updated on December 30, 2008.