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Figure 2.1 is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use in the past month among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (10.78 to 14.15 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (9.53 to 10.77 percent) were Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, and Oklahoma. States in the midgroup (7.81 to 9.52 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (7.08 to 7.80 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Missouri, New Jersey, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (5.30 to 7.07 percent) were Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 2.1.

Figure 2.2 is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use in the past month among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (11.34 to 13.54 percent) were California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (10.34 to 11.33 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Michigan, Nevada, New York, Washington, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (9.67 to 10.33 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (8.71 to 9.66 percent) were Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Mississippi, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (6.89 to 8.70 percent) were Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 2.2.

Figure 2.3 is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use in the past month among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (25.62 to 35.09 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (22.13 to 25.61 percent) were California, Delaware, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, and North Carolina. States in the midgroup (20.03 to 22.12 percent) were Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (17.85 to 20.02 percent) were Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (11.98 to 17.84 percent) were Alabama, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 2.3.

Figure 2.4 is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use in the past month among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (8.22 to 12.00 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (6.88 to 8.21 percent) were Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, and Oklahoma. States in the midgroup (5.51 to 6.87 percent) were Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (5.04 to 5.50 percent) were Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, New Jersey, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (3.51 to 5.03 percent) were Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 2.4.

Figure 2.5 is a U.S. map showing marijuana use in the past year among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (13.99 to 17.51 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (11.27 to 13.98 percent) were California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Michigan, New Mexico, New York, and Washington. States in the midgroup (10.38 to 11.26 percent) were Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Minnesota, Nevada, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (9.28 to 10.37 percent) were Arkansas, Indiana, Kansas, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (6.94 to 9.27 percent) were Alabama, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 2.5.

Figure 2.6 is a U.S. map showing marijuana use in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (16.67 to 19.53 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (13.97 to 16.66 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, California, District of Columbia, Florida, Maine, Michigan, Nevada, New York, and Washington. States in the midgroup (13.14 to 13.96 percent) were Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (11.90 to 13.13 percent) were Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (9.27 to 11.89 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 2.6.

Figure 2.7 is a U.S. map showing marijuana use in the past year among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (36.78 to 46.35 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (31.16 to 36.77 percent) were Alaska, California, Delaware, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Michigan, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, and Pennsylvania. States in the midgroup (28.04 to 31.15 percent) were Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (25.61 to 28.03 percent) were Arizona, Georgia, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (18.52 to 25.60 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 2.7.

Figure 2.8 is a U.S. map showing marijuana use in the past year among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (9.82 to 13.92 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (7.99 to 9.81 percent) were California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Michigan, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, and Washington. States in the midgroup (7.01 to 7.98 percent) were Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (6.05 to 7.00 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Maryland, Nebraska, New Jersey, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (3.70 to 6.04 percent) were Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 2.8.

Figure 2.9 is a U.S. map showing marijuana use in the past month among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (8.87 to 11.84 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (6.99 to 8.86 percent) were California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Idaho, Michigan, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, and Washington. States in the midgroup (6.00 to 6.98 percent) were Arizona, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania. States in the next lowest group (5.34 to 5.99 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (3.11 to 5.33 percent) were Alabama, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 2.9.

Figure 2.10 is a U.S. map showing marijuana use in the past month among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (8.87 to 11.51 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (7.62 to 8.86 percent) were Alaska, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Michigan, New York, and Washington. States in the midgroup (6.88 to 7.61 percent) were Arizona, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Nevada, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (6.10 to 6.87 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (3.68 to 6.09 percent) were Alabama, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Dakota, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 2.10.

Figure 2.11 is a U.S. map showing marijuana use in the past month among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (22.72 to 32.01 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (19.02 to 22.71 percent) were California, Delaware, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Michigan, Montana, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania. States in the midgroup (17.23 to 19.01 percent) were Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (14.28 to 17.22 percent) were Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Minnesota, Nebraska, Texas, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (7.74 to 14.27 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 2.11.

Figure 2.12 is a U.S. map showing marijuana use in the past month among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (6.70 to 9.82 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (4.95 to 6.69 percent) were California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Idaho, Michigan, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, and Washington. States in the midgroup (3.97 to 4.94 percent) were Arizona, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (3.36 to 3.96 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Kansas, Maryland, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (1.90 to 3.35 percent) were Alabama, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 2.12.

Figure 2.13 is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk of smoking marijuana once a month among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (22.32 to 26.90 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (26.91 to 31.99 percent) were Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (32.00 to 33.76 percent) were Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (33.77 to 37.04 percent) were Georgia, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Tennessee. States in the highest group (37.05 to 45.18 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 2.13.

Figure 2.14 is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk of smoking marijuana once a month among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (20.44 to 26.14 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next lowest group (26.15 to 27.56 percent) were Arizona, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, and Virginia. States in the midgroup (27.57 to 31.61 percent) were Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Washington. States in the next highest group (31.62 to 34.30 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. States in the highest group (34.31 to 44.80 percent) were Alabama, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 2.14.

Figure 2.15 is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk of smoking marijuana once a month among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (10.51 to 14.70 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (14.71 to 17.18 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (17.19 to 19.16 percent) were Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Virginia. States in the next highest group (19.17 to 21.16 percent) were California, Idaho, Missouri, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the highest group (21.17 to 28.46 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 2.15.

Figure 2.16 is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk of smoking marijuana once a month among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (23.80 to 29.65 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (29.66 to 34.91 percent) were Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (34.92 to 36.55 percent) were Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (36.56 to 40.22 percent) were Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Utah. States in the highest group (40.23 to 48.92 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 2.16.

Figure 2.17 is a U.S. map showing first use of marijuana among persons aged 12 or older, by State: average annual rates based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (2.23 to 2.78 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (1.86 to 2.22 percent) were California, Delaware, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Michigan, New Mexico, Washington, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (1.80 to 1.85 percent) were Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (1.55 to 1.79 percent) were Arizona, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Texas. States in the lowest group (1.36 to 1.54 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 2.17.

Figure 2.18 is a U.S. map showing first use of marijuana among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: average annual rates based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (7.18 to 9.31 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (6.05 to 7.17 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, California, Georgia, Hawaii, Nevada, Rhode Island, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (5.65 to 6.04 percent) were Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. States in the next lowest group (5.01 to 5.64 percent) were Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (4.03 to 5.00 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 2.18.

Figure 2.19 is a U.S. map showing first use of marijuana among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: average annual rates based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (9.07 to 12.47 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (7.70 to 9.06 percent) were Alaska, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (7.03 to 7.69 percent) were California, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, South Carolina, South Dakota, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (6.38 to 7.02 percent) were Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (3.96 to 6.37 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 2.19.

Figure 2.20 is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use other than marijuana in the past month among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (4.19 to 4.75 percent) were Arizona, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (3.78 to 4.18 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Idaho, Louisiana, New Mexico, South Carolina, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (3.46 to 3.77 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Maine, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (3.27 to 3.45 percent) were Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (2.37 to 3.26 percent) were Georgia, Iowa, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Texas.

Click here to return to Figure 2.20.

Figure 2.21 is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use other than marijuana in the past month among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (4.88 to 5.52 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, California, Iowa, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (4.61 to 4.87 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Texas, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (4.38 to 4.60 percent) were Florida, Hawaii, Kansas, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (4.11 to 4.37 percent) were Connecticut, District of Columbia, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (3.56 to 4.10 percent) were Alaska, Georgia, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Utah, and Vermont.

Click here to return to Figure 2.21.

Figure 2.22 is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use other than marijuana in the past month among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (9.76 to 12.73 percent) were Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (8.50 to 9.75 percent) were Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Louisiana, Michigan, New Mexico, Ohio, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (7.92 to 8.49 percent) were California, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Utah, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (7.24 to 7.91 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Indiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (5.12 to 7.23 percent) were Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Texas.

Click here to return to Figure 2.22.

Figure 2.23 is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use other than marijuana in the past month among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (3.22 to 3.99 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, District of Columbia, Nevada, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and Washington. States in the next highest group (2.87 to 3.21 percent) were Arkansas, Colorado, Idaho, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Mexico, Tennessee, Vermont, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (2.54 to 2.86 percent) were California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Maine, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Utah, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (2.32 to 2.53 percent) were Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (1.46 to 2.31 percent) were Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 2.23.

Figure 2.24 is a U.S. map showing cocaine use in the past year among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (2.22 to 3.13 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (1.86 to 2.21 percent) were Arizona, California, Maine, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (1.66 to 1.85 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina, Texas, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (1.27 to 1.65 percent) were Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, Utah, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (0.97 to 1.26 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Tennessee.

Click here to return to Figure 2.24.

Figure 2.25 is a U.S. map showing cocaine use in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (1.08 to 1.29 percent) were Arizona, California, Colorado, Iowa, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas, Utah, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (1.03 to 1.07 percent) were Connecticut, Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Montana, Nevada, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and Washington. States in the midgroup (0.92 to 1.02 percent) were Massachusetts, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (0.86 to 0.91 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Tennessee. States in the lowest group (0.38 to 0.85 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, District of Columbia, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 2.25.

Figure 2.26 is a U.S. map showing cocaine use in the past year among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (6.26 to 9.96 percent) were Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (5.06 to 6.25 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Montana, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (4.29 to 5.05 percent) were Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (3.44 to 4.28 percent) were the District of Columbia, Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, and South Carolina. States in the lowest group (2.61 to 3.43 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Mississippi, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 2.26.

Figure 2.27 is a U.S. map showing cocaine use in the past year among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (1.78 to 3.13 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (1.44 to 1.77 percent) were Arizona, California, Florida, Maryland, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (1.26 to 1.43 percent) were Delaware, Illinois, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Oregon, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (0.90 to 1.25 percent) were Arkansas, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. States in the lowest group (0.58 to 0.89 percent) were Alabama, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 2.27.

Figure 2.28 is a U.S. map showing nonmedical use of pain relievers in the past year among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (5.68 to 7.01 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Indiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Washington. States in the next highest group (5.14 to 5.67 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, Delaware, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, New Hampshire, Ohio, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (4.57 to 5.13 percent) were Alabama, California, Kansas, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (4.24 to 4.56 percent) were the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Maine, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (3.64 to 4.23 percent) were Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Dakota, and South Dakota.

Click here to return to Figure 2.28.

Figure 2.29 is a U.S. map showing nonmedical use of pain relievers in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (7.49 to 8.52 percent) were Arizona, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Oregon. States in the next highest group (6.82 to 7.48 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Montana, North Carolina, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (6.20 to 6.81 percent) were Alaska, California, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, and Utah. States in the next lowest group (5.76 to 6.19 percent) were Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maine, Maryland, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, and Vermont. States in the lowest group (4.67 to 5.75 percent) were Connecticut, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania.

Click here to return to Figure 2.29.

Figure 2.30 is a U.S. map showing nonmedical use of pain relievers in the past year among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (13.68 to 15.65 percent) were Delaware, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (12.49 to 13.67 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, Ohio, and Vermont. States in the midgroup (11.16 to 12.48 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (10.18 to 11.15 percent) were Alabama, Connecticut, Georgia, Kansas, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (8.23 to 10.17 percent) were California, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota.

Click here to return to Figure 2.30.

Figure 2.31 is a U.S. map showing nonmedical use of pain relievers in the past year among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (4.14 to 5.30 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Washington. States in the next highest group (3.75 to 4.13 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, California, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, New Hampshire, Ohio, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (3.27 to 3.74 percent) were the District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, South Carolina, Utah, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (3.02 to 3.26 percent) were Alabama, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (2.39 to 3.01 percent) were Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

Click here to return to Figure 2.31.

Figure 3.1 is a U.S. map showing alcohol use in the past month among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (58.88 to 64.11 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (55.24 to 58.87 percent) were Delaware, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Montana, New Jersey, New York, South Dakota, and Washington. States in the midgroup (50.71 to 55.23 percent) were Alaska, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (46.84 to 50.70 percent) were Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Texas. States in the lowest group (26.42 to 46.83 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 3.1.

Figure 3.2 is a U.S. map showing alcohol use in the past month among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (16.59 to 19.15 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, Iowa, Montana, New Hampshire, New York, Oregon, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (14.73 to 16.58 percent) were Delaware, Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Jersey, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and South Dakota. States in the midgroup (13.74 to 14.72 percent) were Arkansas, California, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Nevada, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (13.03 to 13.73 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Idaho, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, Texas, Virginia, and Washington. States in the lowest group (7.58 to 13.02 percent) were Alabama, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 3.2.

Figure 3.3 is a U.S. map showing alcohol use in the past month among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (68.26 to 74.33 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (64.61 to 68.25 percent) were Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Minnesota, Montana, New York, Ohio, Oregon, and Pennsylvania. States in the midgroup (59.38 to 64.60 percent) were California, Hawaii, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Virginia, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (55.59 to 59.37 percent) were Alaska, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Texas, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (32.45 to 55.58 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Idaho, Kentucky, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 3.3.

Figure 3.4 is a U.S. map showing alcohol use in the past month among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (62.65 to 68.75 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (58.71 to 62.64 percent) were Delaware, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Washington. States in the midgroup (53.51 to 58.70 percent) were Alaska, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Nebraska, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (48.67 to 53.50 percent) were Arizona, California, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Texas. States in the lowest group (28.08 to 48.66 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 3.4.

Figure 3.5 is a U.S. map showing binge alcohol use in the past month among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (26.36 to 29.89 percent) were the District of Columbia, Iowa, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (24.31 to 26.35 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Kansas, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. States in the midgroup (23.00 to 24.30 percent) were Arizona, Delaware, Hawaii, Louisiana, Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Texas, Virginia, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (20.83 to 22.99 percent) were California, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (13.23 to 20.82 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 3.5.

Figure 3.6 is a U.S. map showing binge alcohol use in the past month among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (9.56 to 12.67 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, Iowa, Montana, New Hampshire, New York, North Dakota, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (8.81 to 9.55 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, Kansas, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and South Dakota. States in the midgroup (8.30 to 8.80 percent) were Arizona, California, Illinois, Maine, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Oregon, Virginia, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (7.65 to 8.29 percent) were Arkansas, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Texas. States in the lowest group (5.66 to 7.64 percent) were Alabama, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 3.6.

Figure 3.7 is a U.S. map showing binge alcohol use in the past month among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (46.64 to 51.28 percent) were Connecticut, District of Columbia, Iowa, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (44.79 to 46.63 percent) were Colorado, Delaware, Illinois, Maine, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Virginia. States in the midgroup (39.90 to 44.78 percent) were Alaska, Hawaii, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (37.28 to 39.89 percent) were Arizona, California, Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (23.58 to 37.27 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 3.7.

Figure 3.8 is a U.S. map showing binge alcohol use in the past month among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (24.69 to 28.78 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Iowa, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (23.12 to 24.68 percent) were Alaska, Connecticut, Illinois, Kansas, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Vermont. States in the midgroup (21.75 to 23.11 percent) were Arizona, Delaware, Hawaii, Louisiana, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, South Carolina, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (20.09 to 21.74 percent) were Alabama, California, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, New Mexico, Oregon, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (11.95 to 20.08 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 3.8.

Figure 3.9 is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk of having five or more drinks of an alcoholic beverage once or twice a week among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (33.62 to 37.65 percent) were Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (37.66 to 39.51 percent) were Colorado, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (39.52 to 42.20 percent) were Delaware, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Washington. States in the next highest group (42.21 to 45.00 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Connecticut, Maryland, Nevada, North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the highest group (45.01 to 50.82 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, South Carolina, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 3.9.

Figure 3.10 is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk of having five or more drinks of an alcoholic beverage once or twice a week among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (31.31 to 35.98 percent) were Colorado, Kansas, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (35.99 to 38.13 percent) were Idaho, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Washington. States in the midgroup (38.14 to 40.23 percent) were Delaware, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (40.24 to 42.35 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, New York, Tennessee, and Texas. States in the highest group (42.36 to 48.74 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 3.10.

Figure 3.11 is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk of having five or more drinks of an alcoholic beverage once or twice a week among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (22.93 to 27.29 percent) were Iowa, Maine, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (27.30 to 30.12 percent) were Colorado, Indiana, Kansas, Massachusetts, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Washington, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (30.13 to 32.96 percent) were Alaska, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Idaho, Illinois, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, and Virginia. States in the next highest group (32.97 to 36.09 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Hawaii, Kentucky, Maryland, Nevada, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and West Virginia. States in the highest group (36.10 to 41.49 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, California, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, South Carolina, Texas, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 3.11.

Figure 3.12 is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk of having five or more drinks of an alcoholic beverage once or twice a week among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (35.48 to 39.57 percent) were Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (39.58 to 41.18 percent) were Colorado, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (41.19 to 44.40 percent) were Delaware, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Kentucky, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Washington. States in the next highest group (44.41 to 46.76 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Connecticut, Louisiana, Maryland, Nevada, North Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the highest group (46.77 to 54.33 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, New Mexico, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 3.12.

Figure 3.13 is a U.S. map showing alcohol use in the past month among persons aged 12 to 20, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (30.22 to 34.62 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, New York, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (28.42 to 30.21 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (25.49 to 28.41 percent) were Alaska, Florida, Idaho, Louisiana, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (24.23 to 25.48 percent) were California, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (16.48 to 24.22 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 3.13.

Figure 3.14 is a U.S. map showing binge alcohol use in the past month among persons aged 12 to 20, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (21.00 to 24.20 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (19.21 to 20.99 percent) were Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Virginia. States in the midgroup (16.86 to 19.20 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Kentucky, Maine, Nevada, Ohio, Oregon, Texas, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (15.62 to 16.85 percent) were Arizona, District of Columbia, Idaho, Indiana, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (12.68 to 15.61 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 3.14.

Figure 4.1 is a U.S. map showing tobacco product use in the past month among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (31.94 to 40.22 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Oklahoma, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (30.07 to 31.93 percent) were Alaska, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and South Dakota. States in the midgroup (27.48 to 30.06 percent) were Delaware, District of Columbia, Idaho, Illinois, Maine, Michigan, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (26.25 to 27.47 percent) were Colorado, Georgia, Minnesota, Nevada, New Mexico, Rhode Island, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington. States in the lowest group (16.82 to 26.24 percent) were Arizona, California, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 4.1.

Figure 4.2 is a U.S. map showing tobacco product use in the past month among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (13.55 to 17.44 percent) were Arkansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (12.53 to 13.54 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, Iowa, Kansas, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee. States in the midgroup (11.53 to 12.52 percent) were Alabama, Colorado, Idaho, Indiana, Maine, Michigan, Nebraska, South Carolina, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (10.40 to 11.52 percent) were Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Minnesota, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Virginia, and Washington. States in the lowest group (7.28 to 10.39 percent) were California, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Texas, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 4.2.

Figure 4.3 is a U.S. map showing tobacco product use in the past month among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (47.08 to 51.73 percent) were Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (44.52 to 47.07 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, Iowa, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (42.40 to 44.51 percent) were Alabama, Colorado, Illinois, Kansas, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oregon, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (39.63 to 42.39 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Dakota, and Rhode Island. States in the lowest group (25.10 to 39.62 percent) were Arizona, California, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Maryland, Nevada, New York, Texas, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 4.3.

Figure 4.4 is a U.S. map showing tobacco product use in the past month among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (31.20 to 40.89 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (29.78 to 31.19 percent) were Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Montana, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and South Dakota. States in the midgroup (27.03 to 29.77 percent) were Delaware, District of Columbia, Idaho, Illinois, Maine, Michigan, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Dakota, and Oregon. States in the next lowest group (25.85 to 27.02 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Minnesota, New Mexico, Texas, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (16.40 to 25.84 percent) were California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Utah, and Vermont.

Click here to return to Figure 4.4.

Figure 4.5 is a U.S. map showing cigarette use in the past month among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (26.04 to 32.00 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (24.74 to 26.03 percent) were Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Michigan, Montana, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (23.23 to 24.73 percent) were Delaware, District of Columbia, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, Oregon, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (22.03 to 23.22 percent) were Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Minnesota, New Mexico, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington. States in the lowest group (15.83 to 22.02 percent) were California, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Texas, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 4.5.

Figure 4.6 is a U.S. map showing cigarette use in the past month among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (10.31 to 13.47 percent) were Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, Ohio, Oklahoma, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (9.44 to 10.30 percent) were Arizona, Arkansas, Maine, Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and South Dakota. States in the midgroup (8.78 to 9.43 percent) were Alabama, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Minnesota, Nebraska, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (7.96 to 8.77 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Louisiana, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Texas, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (5.86 to 7.95 percent) were California, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Utah, and Washington.

Click here to return to Figure 4.6.

Figure 4.7 is a U.S. map showing cigarette use in the past month among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (39.62 to 43.86 percent) were Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (37.93 to 39.61 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, Illinois, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (36.24 to 37.92 percent) were Alabama, Idaho, Iowa, Louisiana, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, Oregon, South Carolina, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (33.18 to 36.23 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Kansas, Massachusetts, New Mexico, North Dakota, Rhode Island, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (23.51 to 33.17 percent) were Arizona, California, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Maryland, Nevada, New York, Texas, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 4.7.

Figure 4.8 is a U.S. map showing cigarette use in the past month among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (26.16 to 32.34 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (24.31 to 26.15 percent) were Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Michigan, Montana, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (22.57 to 24.30 percent) were Delaware, District of Columbia, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, Oregon, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (21.11 to 22.56 percent) were Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Minnesota, New Mexico, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Texas, Virginia, and Washington. States in the lowest group (15.63 to 21.10 percent) were California, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Utah, and Vermont.

Click here to return to Figure 4.8.

Figure 4.9 is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk of smoking one or more packs of cigarettes per day among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (62.29 to 66.37 percent) were Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (66.38 to 68.71 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (68.72 to 70.96 percent) were Arkansas, Illinois, Mississippi, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Vermont, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (70.97 to 72.63 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Hawaii, Louisiana, New Mexico, Rhode Island, Texas, Virginia, and Washington. States in the highest group (72.64 to 76.41 percent) were California, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 4.9.

Figure 4.10 is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk of smoking one or more packs of cigarettes per day among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (58.74 to 62.38 percent) were Alabama, Iowa, Kansas, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (62.39 to 64.35 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Michigan, Montana, New Mexico, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Texas. States in the midgroup (64.36 to 65.63 percent) were Arizona, District of Columbia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (65.64 to 66.85 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Maryland, Nevada, North Carolina, Virginia, and Washington. States in the highest group (66.86 to 72.63 percent) were Connecticut, Hawaii, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Utah, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 4.10.

Figure 4.11 is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk of smoking one or more packs of cigarettes per day among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (55.85 to 60.46 percent) were Alabama, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (60.47 to 62.17 percent) were Arkansas, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Montana, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (62.18 to 64.48 percent) were Alaska, Illinois, Michigan, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, South Carolina, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (64.49 to 66.68 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Hawaii, Louisiana, Texas, Vermont, and Virginia. States in the highest group (66.69 to 71.14 percent) were California, District of Columbia, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 4.11.

Figure 4.12 is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk of smoking one or more packs of cigarettes per day among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (63.18 to 68.16 percent) were Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, South Dakota, Tennessee, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (68.17 to 69.95 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (69.96 to 72.66 percent) were Arkansas, Illinois, Mississippi, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Vermont, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (72.67 to 74.77 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Louisiana, Rhode Island, Texas, Virginia, and Washington. States in the highest group (74.78 to 78.24 percent) were California, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 4.12.

Figure 5.1 is a U.S. map showing alcohol dependence or abuse in the past year among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (8.06 to 9.48 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Iowa, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, and Virginia. States in the next highest group (7.72 to 8.05 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Kansas, Minnesota, Oregon, South Carolina, Vermont, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (7.23 to 7.71 percent) were Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Michigan, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (6.46 to 7.22 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Pennsylvania, and Texas. States in the lowest group (5.71 to 6.45 percent) were Georgia, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 5.1.

Figure 5.2 is a U.S. map showing alcohol dependence or abuse in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (5.25 to 6.65 percent) were California, Colorado, Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, South Dakota, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (4.83 to 5.24 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Idaho, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York, Oregon, Vermont, and Virginia. States in the midgroup (4.50 to 4.82 percent) were Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Texas, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (4.01 to 4.49 percent) were Alabama, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (3.30 to 4.00 percent) were the District of Columbia, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 5.2.

Figure 5.3 is a U.S. map showing alcohol dependence or abuse in the past year among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (18.14 to 22.93 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, Iowa, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, and Virginia. States in the next highest group (16.92 to 18.13 percent) were Arizona, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, Nevada, Ohio, Rhode Island, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (15.94 to 16.91 percent) were Delaware, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (14.17 to 15.93 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, California, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, South Carolina, Texas, and Washington. States in the lowest group (11.53 to 14.16 percent) were Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 5.3.

Figure 5.4 is a U.S. map showing alcohol dependence or abuse in the past year among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (6.70 to 8.34 percent) were California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and South Dakota. States in the next highest group (6.38 to 6.69 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Connecticut, Hawaii, Iowa, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oklahoma, and Virginia. States in the midgroup (5.99 to 6.37 percent) were Delaware, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (5.52 to 5.98 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Texas. States in the lowest group (4.58 to 5.51 percent) were Georgia, Kentucky, Maine, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 5.4.

Figure 5.5 is a U.S. map showing alcohol dependence in the past year among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (3.72 to 4.64 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, California, District of Columbia, Minnesota, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (3.49 to 3.71 percent) were Colorado, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (3.22 to 3.48 percent) were Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, New Hampshire, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (3.15 to 3.21 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (2.88 to 3.14 percent) were Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Missouri, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, and Washington.

Click here to return to Figure 5.5.

Figure 5.6 is a U.S. map showing alcohol dependence in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (2.03 to 2.54 percent) were California, Hawaii, Iowa, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, South Dakota, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (1.91 to 2.02 percent) were Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Idaho, Kansas, Massachusetts, Minnesota, and Nevada. States in the midgroup (1.75 to 1.90 percent) were Florida, Indiana, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (1.58 to 1.74 percent) were Alaska, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, Ohio, Oklahoma, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (1.34 to 1.57 percent) were Alabama, District of Columbia, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

Click here to return to Figure 5.6.

Figure 5.7 is a U.S. map showing alcohol dependence in the past year among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (7.49 to 9.76 percent) were Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (7.20 to 7.48 percent) were Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York, and Rhode Island. States in the midgroup (6.47 to 7.19 percent) were California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (5.89 to 6.46 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, Maine, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Texas, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (5.32 to 5.88 percent) were Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 5.7.

Figure 5.8 is a U.S. map showing alcohol dependence in the past year among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (3.37 to 4.37 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, California, District of Columbia, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, and South Carolina. States in the next highest group (3.02 to 3.36 percent) were Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nevada, New York, South Dakota, and Vermont. States in the midgroup (2.82 to 3.01 percent) were Alabama, Connecticut, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, Tennessee, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (2.74 to 2.81 percent) were Arkansas, Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Texas, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (2.50 to 2.73 percent) were Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Utah, and Washington.

Click here to return to Figure 5.8.

Figure 5.9 is a U.S. map showing illicit drug dependence or abuse in the past year among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (3.10 to 3.85 percent) were California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Idaho, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (2.86 to 3.09 percent) were Arizona, Connecticut, Indiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Nevada, New York, Oklahoma, Utah, and Virginia. States in the midgroup (2.71 to 2.85 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, Florida, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (2.60 to 2.70 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Missouri, Montana, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (2.03 to 2.59 percent) were Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 5.9.

Figure 5.10 is a U.S. map showing illicit drug dependence or abuse in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (4.94 to 6.80 percent) were California, Colorado, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (4.53 to 4.93 percent) were Arizona, Delaware, Idaho, Iowa, Kentucky, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah, and Virginia. States in the midgroup (4.26 to 4.52 percent) were Alaska, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Nevada, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Vermont. States in the next lowest group (3.95 to 4.25 percent) were Arkansas, Hawaii, Indiana, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Washington. States in the lowest group (3.47 to 3.94 percent) were Alabama, District of Columbia, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Dakota, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 5.10.

Figure 5.11 is a U.S. map showing illicit drug dependence or abuse in the past year among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (8.80 to 10.97 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (8.05 to 8.79 percent) were Arizona, California, Delaware, Idaho, Maryland, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (7.41 to 8.04 percent) were Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, North Carolina, and Ohio. States in the next lowest group (6.82 to 7.40 percent) were Alaska, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Louisiana, Minnesota, Nevada, South Carolina, Utah, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (5.24 to 6.81 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 5.11.

Figure 5.12 is a U.S. map showing illicit drug dependence or abuse in the past year among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (1.93 to 3.15 percent) were Arizona, District of Columbia, Idaho, Indiana, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, and South Carolina. States in the next highest group (1.77 to 1.92 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Maryland, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Rhode Island, and Tennessee. States in the midgroup (1.66 to 1.76 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, Louisiana, Michigan, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (1.51 to 1.65 percent) were Delaware, Hawaii, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (1.06 to 1.50 percent) were Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 5.12.

Figure 5.13 is a U.S. map showing illicit drug dependence in the past year among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (2.10 to 2.55 percent) were the District of Columbia, Idaho, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (2.00 to 2.09 percent) were California, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Maine, Mississippi, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Washington. States in the midgroup (1.88 to 1.99 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Utah, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (1.67 to 1.87 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Nevada, New Jersey, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (1.41 to 1.66 percent) were Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 5.13.

Figure 5.14 is a U.S. map showing illicit drug dependence in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (2.72 to 3.53 percent) were Colorado, Delaware, Idaho, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, and South Dakota. States in the next highest group (2.51 to 2.71 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, California, Montana, Nevada, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (2.37 to 2.50 percent) were Connecticut, Indiana, Nebraska, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (2.14 to 2.36 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, and North Dakota. States in the lowest group (1.93 to 2.13 percent) were Alabama, District of Columbia, Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Mississippi, New Jersey, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 5.14.

Figure 5.15 is a U.S. map showing illicit drug dependence in the past year among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (6.20 to 7.82 percent) were Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (5.65 to 6.19 percent) were California, Connecticut, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, New Mexico, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania. States in the midgroup (4.93 to 5.64 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (4.49 to 4.92 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Nevada, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (3.42 to 4.48 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 5.15.

Figure 5.16 is a U.S. map showing illicit drug dependence in the past year among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (1.42 to 2.12 percent) were the District of Columbia, Idaho, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New York, Oregon, and Rhode Island. States in the next highest group (1.30 to 1.41 percent) were Arkansas, Connecticut, Indiana, Louisiana, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Vermont, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (1.23 to 1.29 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, California, Delaware, Kentucky, Montana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (1.09 to 1.22 percent) were Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, Texas, and Utah. States in the lowest group (0.87 to 1.08 percent) were Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 5.16.

Figure 5.17 is a U.S. map showing dependence or abuse of illicit drugs or alcohol in the past eyear among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (9.68 to 12.03 percent) were California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, South Dakota, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (9.31 to 9.67 percent) were Arizona, Connecticut, Idaho, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (8.78 to 9.30 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, and Ohio. States in the next lowest group (7.97 to 8.77 percent) were Alabama, Florida, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (7.43 to 7.96 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Maine, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 5.17.

Figure 5.18 is a U.S. map showing dependence or abuse of illicit drugs or alcohol in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (8.18 to 9.95 percent) were California, Colorado, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, South Dakota, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (7.51 to 8.17 percent) were Arizona, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Nevada, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Virginia. States in the midgroup (6.72 to 7.50 percent) were Alaska, Connecticut, Florida, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and Texas. States in the next lowest group (6.18 to 6.71 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Carolina, and Washington. States in the lowest group (5.61 to 6.17 percent) were the District of Columbia, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 5.18.

Figure 5.19 is a U.S. map showing dependence or abuse of illicit drugs or alcohol in the past year among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (21.83 to 25.89 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, and Virginia. States in the next highest group (20.85 to 21.82 percent) were Arizona, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (19.84 to 20.84 percent) were California, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Indiana, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Pennsylvania. States in the next lowest group (18.49 to 19.83 percent) were Alaska, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, South Carolina, Texas, Washington, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (16.33 to 18.48 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 5.19.

Figure 5.20 is a U.S. map showing dependence or abuse of illicit drugs or alcohol in the past year among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (7.81 to 10.77 percent) were California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and South Dakota. States in the next highest group (7.37 to 7.80 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Connecticut, Idaho, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (6.90 to 7.36 percent) were Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Vermont. States in the next lowest group (6.38 to 6.89 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, North Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (5.45 to 6.37 percent) were Georgia, Kentucky, Maine, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 5.20.

Figure 5.21 is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment for illicit drug use in the past year among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (2.74 to 2.99 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Idaho, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, and Rhode Island. States in the next highest group (2.51 to 2.73 percent) were Arizona, Indiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, and Washington. States in the midgroup (2.42 to 2.50 percent) were Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, North Carolina, Ohio, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (2.30 to 2.41 percent) were Alabama, Delaware, Hawaii, Maine, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (1.84 to 2.29 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 5.21.

Figure 5.22 is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment for illicit drug use in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (4.48 to 6.29 percent) were California, Colorado, Iowa, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (4.20 to 4.47 percent) were Arizona, Idaho, Kentucky, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (4.00 to 4.19 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Nevada, New York, Ohio, and Texas. States in the next lowest group (3.67 to 3.99 percent) were Alabama, Hawaii, Indiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Washington. States in the lowest group (3.24 to 3.66 percent) were the District of Columbia, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, Tennessee, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 5.22.

Figure 5.23 is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment for illicit drug use in the past year among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (7.88 to 9.58 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (7.24 to 7.87 percent) were Arizona, California, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, New Mexico, Ohio, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (6.77 to 7.23 percent) were Delaware, Hawaii, Kentucky, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania. States in the next lowest group (6.20 to 6.76 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, District of Columbia, Florida, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Nevada, South Carolina, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (4.90 to 6.19 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 5.23.

Figure 5.24 is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment for illicit drug use in the past year among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (1.66 to 1.94 percent) were Alaska, California, District of Columbia, Idaho, Indiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Oregon, and South Carolina. States in the next highest group (1.51 to 1.65 percent) were Arizona, Florida, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and Tennessee. States in the midgroup (1.42 to 1.50 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Hawaii, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (1.32 to 1.41 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Montana, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (0.95 to 1.31 percent) were Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming.

Click here to return to Figure 5.24.

Figure 5.25 is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment for alcohol use in the past year among persons aged 12 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (7.68 to 9.21 percent) were California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Iowa, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Rhode Island, and South Dakota. States in the next highest group (7.16 to 7.67 percent) were Connecticut, Hawaii, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (6.70 to 7.15 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Idaho, Illinois, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (6.17 to 6.69 percent) were Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Mississippi, Missouri, Pennsylvania, and Texas. States in the lowest group (5.40 to 6.16 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 5.25.

Figure 5.26 is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment for alcohol use in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (4.99 to 6.13 percent) were California, Colorado, Hawaii, Iowa, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, South Dakota, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (4.59 to 4.98 percent) were Arizona, Connecticut, Idaho, Kansas, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, Oregon, Vermont, and Virginia. States in the midgroup (4.33 to 4.58 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Texas, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (3.91 to 4.32 percent) were Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (3.30 to 3.90 percent) were the District of Columbia, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah.

Click here to return to Figure 5.26.

Figure 5.27 is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment for alcohol use in the past year among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (17.78 to 21.41 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, Iowa, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, and Virginia. States in the next highest group (16.05 to 17.77 percent) were Arizona, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, Nevada, Rhode Island, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (15.00 to 16.04 percent) were California, Delaware, Idaho, Maine, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (13.54 to 14.99 percent) were Alaska, Indiana, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Washington. States in the lowest group (11.47 to 13.53 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Utah, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 5.27.

Figure 5.28 is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment for alcohol use in the past year among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (6.20 to 8.07 percent) were California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Iowa, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and South Dakota. States in the next highest group (5.90 to 6.19 percent) were Alaska, Connecticut, Hawaii, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Vermont, and Virginia. States in the midgroup (5.61 to 5.89 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Idaho, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (5.16 to 5.60 percent) were Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Texas. States in the lowest group (4.18 to 5.15 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure 5.28.

Figure 6.1 is a U.S. map showing serious mental illness in the past year among persons aged 18 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (5.63 to 6.26 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Idaho, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (5.20 to 5.62 percent) were Arizona, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Oregon. States in the midgroup (4.89 to 5.19 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Florida, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (4.60 to 4.88 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Illinois, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (4.31 to 4.59 percent) were California, Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, and Texas.

Click here to return to Figure 6.1.

Figure 6.2 is a U.S. map showing serious mental illness in the past year among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (8.26 to 9.50 percent) were Arkansas, Connecticut, Idaho, Indiana, Maine, Michigan, New Hampshire, Oregon, Utah, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (7.86 to 8.25 percent) were Colorado, Delaware, Iowa, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (7.50 to 7.85 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, California, Illinois, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (7.07 to 7.49 percent) were Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (6.01 to 7.06 percent) were Alabama, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and South Dakota.

Click here to return to Figure 6.2.

Figure 6.3 is a U.S. map showing serious mental illness in the past year among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (5.22 to 5.89 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Idaho, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (4.73 to 5.21 percent) were Arizona, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Mississippi, Nevada, New Hampshire, Ohio, Oregon, and Washington. States in the midgroup (4.48 to 4.72 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Florida, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (4.21 to 4.47 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Georgia, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (3.70 to 4.20 percent) were California, Hawaii, Illinois, Kansas, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, and Texas.

Click here to return to Figure 6.3.

Figure 6.4 is a U.S. map showing any mental illness in the past year among persons aged 18 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (21.71 to 25.35 percent) were Alabama, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (20.88 to 21.70 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, District of Columbia, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Oregon, Vermont, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (19.95 to 20.87 percent) were Arizona, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (19.15 to 19.94 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania. States in the lowest group (17.94 to 19.14 percent) were California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Texas.

Click here to return to Figure 6.4.

Figure 6.5 is a U.S. map showing any mental illness in the past year among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (31.75 to 36.66 percent) were Idaho, Indiana, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Utah, Vermont, Washington, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (31.09 to 31.74 percent) were Connecticut, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Tennessee. States in the midgroup (30.21 to 31.08 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (29.26 to 30.20 percent) were Alaska, California, District of Columbia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Nebraska, South Dakota, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (27.28 to 29.25 percent) were Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, South Carolina, and Texas.

Click here to return to Figure 6.5.

Figure 6.6 is a U.S. map showing any mental illness in the past year among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (19.98 to 23.39 percent) were Alabama, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Ohio, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (19.04 to 19.97 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, District of Columbia, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Oklahoma, Oregon, Vermont, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (18.11 to 19.03 percent) were Arizona, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (17.28 to 18.10 percent) were Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina. States in the lowest group (16.05 to 17.27 percent) were California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Texas.

Click here to return to Figure 6.6.

Figure 6.7 is a U.S. map showing the prevalence of having had serious thoughts of suicide in the past year among persons aged 18 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (4.26 to 4.99 percent) were Arkansas, Idaho, Maine, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (4.03 to 4.25 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Illinois, Michigan, Nevada, Ohio, Oregon, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (3.90 to 4.02 percent) were Alaska, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (3.58 to 3.89 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (3.12 to 3.57 percent) were California, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, and Texas.

Click here to return to Figure 6.7.

Figure 6.8 is a U.S. map showing the prevalence of having had serious thoughts of suicide in the past year among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (6.91 to 7.71 percent) were Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Utah, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (6.56 to 6.90 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (6.26 to 6.55 percent) were Arizona, California, Colorado, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, and Oregon. States in the next lowest group (5.96 to 6.25 percent) were Alaska, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Virginia, Washington, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (5.58 to 5.95 percent) were Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas.

Click here to return to Figure 6.8.

Figure 6.9 is a U.S. map showing the prevalence of having had serious thoughts of suicide in the past year among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (3.89 to 4.35 percent) were Arkansas, Idaho, Maine, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, Rhode Island, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (3.63 to 3.88 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Michigan, New Hampshire, Ohio, Oregon, and Vermont. States in the midgroup (3.38 to 3.62 percent) were Alaska, District of Columbia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (3.11 to 3.37 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Mississippi, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (2.61 to 3.10 percent) were California, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, and Texas.

Click here to return to Figure 6.9.

Figure 6.10 is a U.S. map showing the prevalence of having had at least one major depressive episode in the past year among persons aged 18 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (7.38 to 8.18 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Idaho, Indiana, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (7.03 to 7.37 percent) were Colorado, Massachusetts, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, South Carolina, Tennessee, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (6.82 to 7.02 percent) were Arizona, Delaware, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Vermont, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (6.26 to 6.81 percent) were Alaska, District of Columbia, Florida, Illinois, Kansas, Mississippi, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, and Pennsylvania. States in the lowest group (5.87 to 6.25 percent) were California, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Louisiana, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico, South Dakota, and Texas.

Click here to return to Figure 6.10.

Figure 6.11 is a U.S. map showing the prevalence of having had at least one major depressive episode in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (8.74 to 9.58 percent) were Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Missouri, New Hampshire, Oregon, South Dakota, and Washington. States in the next highest group (8.37 to 8.73 percent) were Arizona, Arkansas, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Montana, New Mexico, South Carolina, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (7.92 to 8.36 percent) were Georgia, Kentucky, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (7.62 to 7.91 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, California, Iowa, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania. States in the lowest group (6.88 to 7.61 percent) were Connecticut, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, and Wisconsin.

Click here to return to Figure 6.11.

Figure 6.12 is a U.S. map showing the prevalence of having had at least one major depressive episode in the past year among persons aged 18 to 25, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (8.99 to 10.39 percent) were Delaware, Idaho, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, Utah, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (8.62 to 8.98 percent) were Arkansas, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (7.98 to 8.61 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, North Dakota, Ohio, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (7.68 to 7.97 percent) were Alabama, Connecticut, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Nebraska, New Mexico, and Tennessee. States in the lowest group (6.53 to 7.67 percent) were the District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Nevada, New York, North Carolina, South Dakota, and Texas.

Click here to return to Figure 6.12.

Figure 6.13 is a U.S. map showing the prevalence of having had at least one major depressive episode in the past year among persons aged 26 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (7.17 to 7.90 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Missouri, Oregon, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (6.88 to 7.16 percent) were Colorado, Idaho, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (6.49 to 6.87 percent) were Arizona, Iowa, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (6.09 to 6.48 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Illinois, Kansas, Mississippi, North Carolina, North Dakota, and Pennsylvania. States in the lowest group (5.54 to 6.08 percent) were California, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Louisiana, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico, South Dakota, and Texas.

Click here to return to Figure 6.13.

Figure D.1 is a U.S. map showing alcohol use in the past month among persons aged 18 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Survey. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (59.2 to 66.1 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (56.8 to 59.1 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Illinois, Maine, Montana, Nebraska, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, and South Dakota. States in the midgroup (51.8 to 56.7 percent) were California, Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (44.2 to 51.7 percent) were Arizona, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Louisiana, Missouri, New Mexico, Texas, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (25.0 to 44.1 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure D.1.

Figure D.2 is a U.S. map showing alcohol use in the past month among persons aged 18 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (63.63 to 69.00 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (59.28 to 63.62 percent) were Delaware, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Montana, New Jersey, New York, South Dakota, and Washington. States in the midgroup (54.51 to 59.27 percent) were Alaska, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (50.39 to 54.50 percent) were Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Texas. States in the lowest group (28.93 to 50.38 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia.

Click here to return to Figure D.2.

Figure D.3 is a U.S. map showing current cigarette use among persons aged 18 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Survey. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (21.2 to 26.8 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (18.6 to 21.1 percent) were Alaska, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (16.2 to 18.5 percent) were Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (15.3 to 16.1 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Idaho, Iowa, New York, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Texas, and Vermont. States in the lowest group (9.1 to 15.2 percent) were Arizona, California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, Oregon, Utah, and Washington.

Click here to return to Figure D.3.

Figure D.4 is a U.S. map showing cigarette use in the past month among persons aged 18 or older, by State: percentages, annual averages based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (27.90 to 33.86 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (26.17 to 27.89 percent) were Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Michigan, Montana, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (24.67 to 26.16 percent) were Delaware, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, Oregon, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (23.58 to 24.66 percent) were Arizona, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, New Mexico, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Texas, Virginia, and Washington. States in the lowest group (17.17 to 23.57 percent) were California, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Utah, and Vermont.

Click here to return to Figure D.4.

Capital S R R is equal to the ratio of two quantities. The numerator is the summation of the product of w sub h h and complete sub h h. The denominator is the summation of the product of w sub h h and eligible sub h h.

Click here to return to Equation 1.

Capital I R R is equal to the ratio of two quantities. The numerator is the summation of the product of w sub i and complete sub i. The denominator is the summation of the product of w sub i and selected sub i.

Click here to return to Equation 2.

Capital O R R is equal to the product of capital S R R and capital I R R.

Click here to return to Equation 3.

The model is given by the following equation: log of pi sub a, i, j, k divided by 1 minus pi sub a, i, j, k and is equal to the sum of three terms. The first term is given by x transpose sub a, i, j, k times beta sub a. The second term is eta sub a, i. And the third term is nu sub a, i, j. Here, pi sub a, i, j, k is the probability of engaging in the behavior of interest by person-k belonging to age group-a in a State sampling region (SSR)-j of State-i. The x sub a, i, j, k denotes a vector of auxiliary variables associated with age group-a, and the beta sub a denotes the associated vector of regression parameters. The eta sub a, i and the nu sub a, i, j denote, respectively, the vectors of random effects at the State and SSR levels.

Click here to return to Equation A1.

Lower sub s and a is defined as the exponent of capital L sub s and a divided by the sum of 1 and the exponent of capital L sub s and a. And upper sub s and a is defined as the exponent of capital U sub s and a divided by the sum of 1 and the exponent of capital U sub s and a.

Click here to return to Equation A2.

Capital L sub s and a is defined as the difference of two quantities. The first quantity is the natural logarithm of the ratio of Theta sub s and a and 1 minus Theta sub s and a. The second quantity is the product of 1.96 and the square root of MSE sub s and a, which is the mean square error for State-s and age group-a.

Click here to return to Equation A3.

Capital U sub s and a is defined as the sum of two quantities. The first quantity is the natural logarithm of the ratio of Theta sub s and a and 1 minus Theta sub s and a. The second quantity is the product of 1.96 and the square root of MSE sub s and a, which is the mean square error for State-s and age group-a.

Click here to return to Equation A4.

The mean square error, MSE sub s and a, is defined as the sum of two quantities. The first quantity is the square of the difference of two parts. Part 1 is defined as the natural logarithm of the ratio of P sub s and a and 1 minus P sub s and a. Part 2 is defined as the natural logarithm of the ratio of Theta sub s and a and 1 minus Theta sub s and a. The second quantity is the posterior variance of the natural logarithm of the ratio of P sub s and a and 1 minus P sub s and a.

Click here to return to Equation A5.

The average annual rate is defined as 100 times quantity q divided by 2. Quantity q is defined as capital X sub 1 divided by the sum of 0.5 times capital X sub 1 plus capital X sub 2, where capital X sub 1 is the number of marijuana initiates in the past 24 months and capital X sub 2 is the number of persons who never used marijuana.

Click here to return to Equation A6.

The logit of pi hat sub w is equivalent to the logarithm of pi hat sub w divided by the quantity 1 minus pi hat sub w, which is equal to the sum of the following three quantities: negative 4.7500, the product of 0.2098 and capital X sub k, and the product of 0.3839 and capital X sub w.

Click here to return to Equation A7.

The logit of pi hat sub s is equal to the sum of the following three quantities: negative 4.4924, the product of 0.2960 and capital X sub k, and the product of 0.2242 and capital X sub s.

Click here to return to Equation A8.

Pi hat sub w is equal to the ratio of two quantities. The numerator is 1. The denominator is 1 plus e raised to the negative value of the sum of the following three quantities: negative 4.7500, the product of 0.2098 and capital X sub k, and the product of 0.3839 and capital X sub w.

Click here to return to Equation A9.

Pi hat sub s is equal to the ratio of two quantities. The numerator is 1. The denominator is 1 plus e raised to the negative value of the sum of the following three quantities: negative 4.4924, the product of 0.2960 and capital X sub k, and the product of 0.2242 and capital X sub s.

Click here to return to Equation A10.

The covariance between the natural logarithm of Theta 1 hat and the natural logarithm of Theta 2 hat is equal to the correlation between the natural logarithm of Theta 1 hat and the natural logarithm of Theta 2 hat multiplied by the square root of the product of the variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta 1 hat and the variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta 2 hat.

Click here to return to Equation A11.

Variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta sub i is equal to the square of quantity q. Quantity q is calculated as the difference between capital U sub i and capital L sub i divided by 2 times 1.96, where i takes values 1 and 2.

Click here to return to Equation A12.

Capital U sub 1 is defined as the natural logarithm of the ratio of 0.1555 and 1 minus 0.1555, which is −1.6921. Capital L sub 1 is defined as the natural logarithm of the ratio of 0.1110 and 1 minus 0.1110, which is −2.0806.

Click here to return to Equation A14.

Capital U sub 2 is defined as the natural logarithm of the ratio of 0.1920 and 1 minus 0.1920, which is −1.4371. Capital L sub 2 is defined as the natural logarithm of the ratio of 0.1425 and 1 minus 0.1425, which is −1.7947.

Click here to return to Equation A15.

The estimate of the log-odds ratio, lor hat sub a, is defined as the natural logarithm of the ratio of two quantities. The numerator of the ratio is p 2 sub a divided by 1 minus p 2 sub a. The denominator of the ratio is p 1 sub a divided by 1 minus p 1 sub a, where p1 sub a is 0.1316 and p 2 sub a is 0.1658. The estimate lor hat sub a is calculated to be 0.2712.

Click here to return to Equation A16.

The variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta 1 hat is equal to the square of quantity q. Quantity q is calculated as the difference between capital U sub 1 and capital L sub 1 divided by the product of 2 and 1.96. Here, capital U sub 1 is −1.6921, and capital L sub 1 is −2.0806. Hence, the variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta 1 hat is calculated to be 0.00982.

Click here to return to Equation A17.

The variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta 2 hat is equal to the square of quantity q. Quantity q is calculated as the difference between capital U sub 2 and capital L sub 2 divided by the product of 2 and 1.96. Here, capital U sub 2 is −1.4371, and capital L sub 2 is −1.7947. Hence, the variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta 2 hat is calculated to be 0.00832.

Click here to return to Equation A18.

Quantity z is the estimate of the log-odds ratio, lor hat sub a, divided by the square root of the sum of the variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta 1 hat and the variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta 2 hat, where lor hat sub a is 0.2712, the variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta 1 hat is 0.00982, and the variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta 2 hat is 0.00832. The statistic z is calculated to be 2.0134.

Click here to return to Equation A19.

The log-odds ratio, lor sub s and a, is defined as the natural logarithm of the ratio of two quantities. The numerator of the ratio is pi 2 sub s and a divided by 1 minus pi 2 sub s and a. The denominator of the ratio is pi 1 sub s and a divided by 1 minus pi 1 sub s and a.

Click here to return to Equation A20.

The estimate of the log-odds ratio, lor hat sub s and a, is defined as the natural logarithm of the ratio of two quantities. The numerator of the ratio is p 2 sub s and a divided by 1 minus p 2 sub s and a. The denominator of the ratio is p 1 sub s and a divided by 1 minus p 1 sub s and a, where p 1 sub s and a are the 2008-2009 State estimates and p 2 sub s and a are the 2009-2010 State estimates.

Click here to return to Equation A21.

Variance v of the estimate of the log-odds ratio, lor hat sub s and a, is a function of three quantities: q1, q2, and q3. It is expressed as the sum of q1 and q2 minus q3. Quantity q1 is the variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta 1 hat, quantity q2 is the variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta 2 hat, and quantity q3 is 2 times the covariance between the natural logarithm of Theta 1 hat and the natural logarithm of Theta 2 hat.

Click here to return to Equation A22.

The covariance between the natural logarithm of Theta 1 hat and the natural logarithm of Theta 2 hat is equal to the correlation between the natural logarithm of Theta 1 hat and the natural logarithm of Theta 2 hat multiplied by the square root of the product of the variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta 1 hat and variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta 2 hat.

Click here to return to Equation A23.

Variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta sub n hat is equal to the square of quantity q. Quantity q is the difference between capital U sub n and capital L sub n divided by 2 times 1.96.

Click here to return to Equation D1.

Variance v of the natural logarithm of Theta sub b hat is equal to the square of quantity q1 times the square of quantity q2. Quantity q1 is the difference between upper sub b and lower sub b divided by 2 times 1.96. Quantity q2 is the reciprocal of p sub b multiplied by 1 minus p sub b.

Click here to return to Equation D2.

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This page was last updated on June 25, 2012.