Ecstasy, Other Club Drugs, & Other Hallucinogens 

bulletAll reports on "Club Drugs", ecstasy, LSD, PCP, peyote, mescaline, and other hallucinogens

bullet"Club Drugs"   (GHB, ketamine, LSD, and MDMA)

bulletFigures and detailed data tables

bulletData source

bulletReports (listed from most recent to earliest release)

bulletCrack, heroin, ecstasy, oxycontin, etc. by State

 

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  Highlights

 
  • The NSDUH Report: Use of Specific Hallucinogens: 2006   Specific questions on the following hallucinogens were first collected in SAMHSA's 2006 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: ketamine, dimethyltryptamine (DMT), alpha-methyltryptamine (AMT), 5-methoxy-diisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-DIPT or "Foxy"), and Salvia divinorum.  Based on SAMHSA's 2006 National Survey on Drug Use and Health of persons aged 12 or older, 23 million had used LSD, 6.6 million used PCP, 2.3 million used ketamine, 1.8 million used Salvia divinorum and 0.7 million had used DMT, AMT, or Foxy at least once in their lifetime.  Among youth aged 12 to 17, females were more likely than males to have used Ecstasy in the past year (1.4% vs. 1.0%).  In contrast, male youth aged 12 to 17 were more likely than female youth to have used Salvia divinorum in the past year (0.9% vs. 0.3%).  In 2006, young adults aged 18 to 25 were more likely to be past year users of LSD, Ecstasy, and Salvia divinorum than youths aged 12 to 17 or adults aged 26 or older.
  • The NSDUH Report: Patterns of Hallucinogen Use and Initiation: 2004 and 2005  Combined data from SAMHSA's 2004 and 2005 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health indicate that an annual average of 943,000 persons aged 12 or older were recent initiates of hallucinogens (i.e., they had used hallucinogens for the first time in the 12 months before the survey).  Of these recent hallucinogen initiates, 52.3% had used psilocybin mushrooms and 42.9% used Ecstasy in the past year.
  • The DASIS Report:  Trends in Admissions for Phencyclidine (PCP): 1993-2003   Between 1993 and 2003, the number of admissions in SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) that reported phencyclidine (PCP) as the primary substance of abuse increased from 3,300 to 4,000; but the proportion of PCP admissions remained constant at about 0.2% of all substance abuse treatment admissions during this decade. The regional distribution of primary PCP admissions shifted between 1993 and 2003. In 2003, about a third of all primary PCP admissions were in the West (down from 37% in 1993), 27% were in the Northeast (up from 23%), 23% were in the South (down from 33%) and 18% were in the Midwest (up from 7%). In 1993, the most common secondary substance of abuse reported by primary PCP admissions was alcohol (41%), followed by cocaine (26%), and marijuana (24%). By 2003, marijuana (42%) was the most common secondary substance of abuse reported by primary PCP admissions, followed by alcohol (31%), and cocaine (15%).
  • The NSDUH Report:  Substance Use among Past Year Ecstasy Users   According to SAMHSA's 2003 National Survey on Drug Use & Health, about 2.1 million persons aged 12 or older (0.9%) reported using Ecstasy at least once in the past year. Almost all (97.5%) of the persons age 12 or older who used Ecstasy in the past year also reported past year use of alcohol compared with 65.2% of those who had not used Ecstasy in the past year. Over 90% of past year Ecstasy users reported also using other types of illicit drugs in the past year compared with 13.8% of the those who did not use Ecstasy in the past year. About 22.8% of the past year Ecstasy users used one other illicit drug, 50.3% used two to four other illicit drugs, and 17.9% used five or more illicit drugs during the past year.
  • The DAWN Report:  Club Drugs, 2002 Update   SAMHSA's DAWN found that the following "club drugs" (GHB, ketamine, LSD, and MDMA) collectively were involved in about 8,100 emergency department visits in 2002. Most of the patients in club drug related emergency department (ED) visits were under age 26: 56% of the GHB, 68% of the ketamine, 75% of the MDMA, and 76% of the LSD related emergency department visits. Although relatively rare, club drug related emergency department visits more than doubled from 1994 to 1999 and generally decreased from 2000 to 2002.
  • The DASIS Report:  Characteristics of Primary Phencyclidine (PCP) Admissions: 2001.  Phencyclidine (PCP) was reported as the primary substance of abuse for about 3,100 substance abuse treatment admissions reported in 2001 to SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS). The average age of primary PCP admissions was younger than that of all other substance abuse treatment admissions: 28 years of age for primary PCP admissions vs. 34 years for all other substance abuse treatment admissions. Primary PCP admissions were more prevalent in the West (36%) and Northeast (33%) than in the Midwest (22%) or the South (15%).
  • The DAWN Report:  Trends in PCP-related Emergency Department Visits  (PDF format)   According to SAMHSA's DAWN system, the growth in PCP related visits to emergency departments between 2001 and 2002 exceeded the national average in four metropolitan areas in the East:  Newark (254%), Washington, D.C. (148%), Baltimore (60%), and Philadelphia (46%). 
  • The NHSDA Report:  Racial and Ethnic Differences in Youth Hallucinogen Use  Based on SAMHSA's National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, in 2001 almost 1.4 million youth aged 12 to 17 had used hallucinogens at least once in their lifetime.  Among youth, Blacks were less likely than whites, Asians, or Hispanics to have used any hallucinogen in their lifetime.  Blacks and Hispanics were more likely than whites and Asians to perceive great risk in trying LSD once or twice. 
  • The NHSDA Report:  Ecstasy Use  In 2001, over 8 million persons aged 12 or older reported using Ecstasy at least once in their lifetime.  The majority of past year Ecstasy users were young adults 18 to 25.   Past year Ecstasy users aged 12 to 25 were more likely to have used other types of illicit drugs in the past year than those who did not use Ecstasy in the past year. 
  •  See Prevalence and Trends. The number of current Ecstasy users in 2001 was estimated to be 786,000 (0.3 percent). Initiation of Ecstasy (i.e., MDMA) use has been rising steadily since 1992 (Figure 5.2). The increase from 1.3 million new users in 1999 to 1.9 million in 2000 was statistically significant, as were the age-specific increases among 12 to 17 year olds and 18 to 25 year olds. The increase from 1998 to 1999 also was statistically significant, from 0.7 million to 1.3 million new users, as were the age-specific increases. 
 

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  National Survey on Drug Use & Health Detailed Tables

 

2004 Data: Trends in new users of Ecstasy, LSD, PCP and other hallucinogens

2003 Data: Trends in new users of Ecstasy, LSD, PCP and other hallucinogens

Detailed Tables on Hallucinogen Use from 2003 NSDUH:

2002 Data:  2002 National Survey on Drug Use & Health Detailed Tables

Lifetime, Past Year, & Past Month Hallucinogen Use:  2002 National Survey on Drug Use & Health Detailed Tables (PDF format)

  • Lifetime, Past Year, & Past Month Hallucinogen Use by Demographic Characteristics and Age Group (Tables 1.41 - 1.45,  HTML FORMAT)
  • Lifetime, Past Year, & Past Month Hallucinogen Use by Geographic Characteristics and Age Group (Tables 1.86 - 1.90,  HTML FORMAT)
Specific hallucinogen, inhalant, needle, heroin, pain reliever, tranquilizer, stimulant, and sedative use by age categories (PDF format, Go to Tables 1.106 - 1.110)

Specific Hallucinogens (PCP, LSD, Peyote, Mescaline, Psilocybin, Ecstasy) Numbers of users in lifetime     Percentages

Incidence Tables: marijuana, cocaine, heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, and psychotherapeutics Use (PDF format, Go to Tables 4.1 - 4.14)
  • Males (HTML FORMAT):
  • Females (HTML FORMAT):

2001 Data:

DAWN Emergency Department mentions 1994-2001 (Excel table):   MDMA (ecstasy), Ketamine, LSD, PCP, miscellaneous hallucinogens, Flunitrazepam (Rohypnol), GHB,  &  inhalants

Trends in PCP mentions in DAWN Emergency Departments (1994-2001)

 

 

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  Club Drugs

   Also see:  Figures and Data Tables

Also see: DAWN Emergency Department mentions 1995-2002 (Excel table):   MDMA (ecstasy), Ketamine, LSD, PCP, miscellaneous hallucinogens, Flunitrazepam (Rohypnol), GHB,  &  inhalants

  • The DAWN Report on Club Drugs (PDF format): Rohypnol,  GHB, Ketamine, LSD, Ecstasy (MDMA), Methamphetamines, Amphetamines,  Cocaine, Heroin, & Marijuana
 

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  Data Source

 

National Survey on Drug Use & Health (NSDUH), formerly called the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse:

The National Survey on Drug Abuse & Health, formerly the NHSDA, obtains information on nine different categories of illicit drug use: marijuana, cocaine, heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, and nonmedical use of prescription-type pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants, and sedatives. In these categories, hashish is included with marijuana, and crack is considered a form of cocaine. Several drugs are grouped under the hallucinogens category, including LSD, PCP, peyote, mescaline, mushrooms, and "Ecstasy" (MDMA). Inhalants include a variety of substances, such as amyl nitrite, cleaning fluids, gasoline, paint, and glue. The four categories of prescription-type drugs (pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants, and sedatives) cover numerous drugs available through prescriptions and sometimes illegally "on the street." Methamphetamine is included under stimulants. Over-the-counter drugs and legitimate uses of drugs under a doctor's prescription are not included. Respondents are asked to report only uses of drugs that were not prescribed for them or they took only for the experience or feeling they caused. NSDUH/NHSDA reports combine the four prescription-type drug groups into a category referred to as "any psychotherapeutics."

Estimates of "any illicit drug use" reported from the NHSDA reflect use of any of the nine substance categories listed above. Use of alcohol and tobacco products, while illegal for youths, are not included in these estimates, but are discussed in Chapters 3 and 4. Click here for the full 2002 NSDUH report.

Findings on Ecstasy, LSD, PCP, and other hallucinogens from the 2002 National Survey on Drug Use & Health are summarized below in Prevalence:

 

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  Prevalence

Also See: Figures and Detailed Data Tables

2004-2005 Data:

The NSDUH Report: Patterns of Hallucinogen Use and Initiation: 2004 and 2005

2003 Data:

Trends in new users of Ecstasy, LSD, PCP and other hallucinogens

2002 Data:

In 2002, hallucinogens were used in the month prior to the interview (i.e., current use)  by 1.2 million persons (0.5 percent of the population age 12 and older), including 676,000 users of Ecstasy (0.1 percent of the population age 12 and older).

Hallucinogen Use: Detailed Tables for 2002 (All are in PDF format):

2001 Data:

Prevalence of LSD, PCP, Ecstasy and Other Hallucinogen Use by Racial/Ethnic Group:

Based on SAMHSA's National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, in 2001 almost 1.4 million youth aged 12 to 17 had used hallucinogens at least once in their lifetime.  Among youth, Blacks were less likely than whites, Asians, or Hispanics to have used any hallucinogen in their lifetime.  Blacks and Hispanics were more likely than whites and Asians to perceive great risk in trying LSD once or twice.  See The NHSDA Report:  Racial and Ethnic Differences in Youth Hallucinogen Use.

Prevalence and Trends of Hallucinogen Use:

  • In 2001, an estimated 8.1 million (3.6 percent) of Americans aged 12 or older had tried "Ecstasy" at least once in their lifetime. This is more than the estimated 6.5 million (2.9 percent) lifetime users in 2000. The number of current users in 2001 was estimated to be 786,000 (0.3 percent). The 2000 NHSDA was not designed to report past month or past year use of Ecstasy.
  • The percentage of the population using illicit drugs increased from 6.3 percent in 1999 and 2000 to 7.1 percent in 2001.  Between 2000 and 2001, statistically significant increases were noted for the current use of marijuana (4.8 to 5.4 percent), cocaine (0.5 to 0.7 percent), pain relievers (1.2 to 1.6 percent), and tranquilizers (0.4 to 0.6 percent). A change in NHSDA questions on hallucinogens caused the estimated rate of use of this category of drugs to increase from 0.4 to 0.6 percent between 2000 and 2001  (Figure 2.1)

 

 

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List of Reports on Ecstasy & Other Hallucinogens

 

bulletNational Prevalence

bulletEmergency Department & Medical Examiner Data

bulletTrends

bulletTreatment

Also See: Figures and Detailed Data Tables

 

National Prevalence:

 

DAWN Emergency Department Visits:

  • The DAWN Report on Club Drugs (PDF format): Rohypnol,  GHB, Ketamine, LSD, Ecstasy (MDMA), Methamphetamines, Amphetamines,  Cocaine, Heroin, & Marijuana

 

Treatment:  Also see Treatment Admissions for Specific Drugs

 

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Trends in New Users of Ecstasy and Other Hallucinogens

 

2004 Data: Trends in new users of Ecstasy, LSD, PCP and other hallucinogens

2003 Data: Trends in new users of Ecstasy, LSD, PCP and other hallucinogens

2002 Data on Incidence (New Users):

Hallucinogens

  • The incidence of hallucinogen use has exhibited two notable periods of increase. Between 1966 and 1970, the annual number of initiates rose almost sixfold, from 168,000 to 956,000. This increase was driven primarily by use of LSD. The second period of increase in first-time hallucinogen began in 1992 when there were approximately 706,000 new users. By 2000, the number of initiates rose to 1.7 million, which is similar to the number for 2001 (1.6 million). The hallucinogen increase in the 1990s appears to have been driven by increases in use of Ecstasy (i.e., MDMA) (Figure 6.2).
  • Initiation of Ecstasy use has been rising since 1993, when there were 168,000 new users. There were 1.9 million initiates in 2000 and 1.8 million in 2001 (not a statistically significant decline).
  • LSD incidence dropped from 958,000 new users in 2000 to 606,000 in 2001.

 

Figure 6.2  Annual Numbers of New Users of Ecstasy, LSD, and PCP: 1965–2001

Figure 6.2     D

 

2001 Data:  Trends in Initiation of Ecstasy and Other Hallucinogens

Estimates of substance use incidence, or initiation (i.e., the number of new users during a given year), provide another measure of the Nation's substance use problem. Where prevalence estimates describe the extent of current use of substances, incidence data describe emerging patterns of use, particularly among young people. In the past, increases and decreases in incidence have usually been followed by corresponding changes in the prevalence of use, particularly among youths.

The incidence estimates in this report are based on National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA) data from 1999, 2000, and 2001 collected with computer-assisted interviewing methods. These data should not be compared with previously published NHSDA data based on paper-and-pencil interviewing methods. Not only is the mode of data collection different for the incidence estimates produced prior to the 1999 NHSDA, but the estimation methodology has been revised as well. The estimation methodology is described in Appendix B in Volume II and summarized below.

The incidence estimates are based on the NHSDA questions on age at first use, year and month of first use for recent initiates, the respondent's date of birth, and the interview date. Using this information along with editing and imputation when necessary, an exact date of first use is determined for each substance used by each respondent. For age-specific incidence rates, the period of exposure is defined for each respondent and age group for the time that the respondent was in the age group during the calendar year. Incidents of first use also are classified by year of occurrence and age at the date of first use. By applying sample weights to incidents of first use, estimates of the number of new users of each substance for each year are developed. These estimates include new users at any age (including those younger than age 12) and also are shown for two specific age groups—youths aged 12 to 17 and young adults aged 18 to 25. In addition, the average age of new users in each year and age-specific rates of first use are estimated.

The incidence rates are presented in this report as the number of new users per 1,000 potential new users because they indicate the rate of new use among persons who have not yet used the substance (i.e., potential new users). More precisely, the rates are actually the number of new users per 1,000 person-years of exposure. This measure is widely used in describing the incidence of disease. The numerator of each rate is the number of persons in the age group who first used the substance in the year, while the denominator is the person-time exposure measured in thousands of years. Each person's drug-specific exposure time ends on the date of first use of the respective drug. For age-specific estimates, exposure is limited to time during the year that the person was in the age group. Persons who first used the substance in a prior year have zero exposure to first use in the current year, and persons who still have never used the substance by the end of the current year had a full year of exposure to risk.

Because the incidence estimates are based on retrospective reports of age at first substance use by survey respondents interviewed during 1999, 2000, and 2001, they may be subject to several sources of bias. These include bias due to differential mortality of users and nonusers of each substance, bias due to memory errors (recall decay and telescoping), and underreporting bias due to social acceptability and fear of disclosure. See Appendix B in Volume II for a discussion of these biases. As explained in Appendix B, it is possible that some of these biases, particularly telescoping and underreporting because of fear of disclosure, may be affecting estimates for the most recent years more significantly. To account for this bias in the interpretation of the trends, a more stringent standard for determining statistical significance involving estimates from the most recent years (1997 and later) is used in this chapter. Differences are reported to be statistically significant only if they differ at the =.01 level. The usual standard in the rest of the report is the =.05 level. This is an arbitrary standard that provides some protection against incorrect conclusions in the face of potential biases that can fluctuate and even change direction from year to year. A more thorough analysis of the problem will be conducted in the future.

Because the incidence estimates are based on retrospective reports of age at first use, the most recent year available for these estimates is 2000, based on the 2001 NHSDA. Estimates for the year 2000 are based only on data from the 2001 survey, estimates for the year 1999 are based only on data from the 2000 and 2001 surveys, and estimates for earlier years are based on the combined 1999 to 2001 data. For two of the measures, first alcohol use and first cigarette use, initiation before age 12 is common. A 2-year lag in reporting for "all ages" estimates is applied for these measures because the NHSDA sample does not cover youths under age 12. The 2-year lag ensures that initiation at ages 10 and 11 is captured in the estimation.

Hallucinogens

  • The incidence of hallucinogen use has exhibited two notable periods of increase. Between 1965 and 1971, the number of initiates rose tenfold, from 90,000 to 900,000. The second period of increase began in 1990 when there were approximately 600,000 new users. By 2000, the number of initiates rose nearly threefold, to 1.5 million.
  • Initiation of Ecstasy (i.e., MDMA) use has been rising steadily since 1992 (Figure 5.2). The increase from 1.3 million new users in 1999 to 1.9 million in 2000 was statistically significant, as were the age-specific increases among 12 to 17 year olds and 18 to 25 year olds. The increase from 1998 to 1999 also was statistically significant, from 0.7 million to 1.3 million new users, as were the age-specific increases.

 

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Estimated Numbers (in Thousands) of Lifetime, Past Year, and Past Month Users of Ecstasy and other Hallucinogens for Persons Age 12 and Older: 2000 and 2001
 

TIME PERIOD

 

Lifetime

Past Year

Past Month

Drug

2000

2001

2000

2001

2000

2001

       
Age 12 and Older:      

Any Illicit Drug1

86,931b

94,140

24,535b

28,409

14,027b

15,910

    Hallucinogens2

26,125b

28,317

3,483b

4,597

971b

1,264

      LSD

19,642

20,202

1,749

1,612

403

320

      PCP

5,804

6,025

264

250

54

54

      Ecstasy

6,482b

8,131

--

3,247

--

786

-- Not available.
aDifference between estimate and 2001 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
bDifference between estimate and 2001 estimate is statistically significant at the .01 level.
1 Any Illicit Drug includes marijuana/hashish, cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or any prescription-type psychotherapeutic used nonmedically. Any Illicit Drug Other Than Marijuana includes cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or any prescription-type psychotherapeutic used nonmedically.
2 Due to a questionnaire change in 2001, comparison of hallucinogen estimates (except lifetime) with prior estimates should be interpreted with caution. See Appendix C.
Source: SAMHSA, Office of Applied Studies, National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, 2000 and 2001.

 

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Percentages Reporting Lifetime, Past Year, and Past Month Use of Ecstasy and Other Hallucinogens by Age Group: 2000 and 2001
 

TIME PERIOD

 

Lifetime

Past Year

Past Month

Drug

2000

2001

2000

2001

2000

2001

       
Age 12 and Older:      

Any Illicit Drug1

38.9b

41.7

11.0b

12.6

6.3b

7.1

    Hallucinogens2

11.7b

12.5

1.6b

2.0

0.4b

0.6

      LSD

8.8

9.0

0.8

0.7

0.2

0.1

      PCP

2.6

2.7

0.1

0.1

0.0

0.0

      Ecstasy

2.9b

3.6

--

1.4

--

0.3

       
Age 12-17:      

Any Illicit Drug1

26.9a

28.4

18.6b

20.8

9.7b

10.8

    Hallucinogens2

5.8

5.7

3.9

4.0

1.2

1.2

      LSD

3.6a

3.1

2.2

1.9

0.5

0.4

      PCP

1.1

1.0

0.5

0.5

0.1

0.1

      Ecstasy

2.6a

3.2

--

2.4

--

0.6

       
Age 18-25:      

Any Illicit Drug1

51.2b

55.6

27.9b

31.9

15.9b

18.8

    Hallucinogens2

19.3b

22.1

6.8b

9.3

1.8b

2.7

      LSD

14.0b

15.3

3.4

3.3

0.8

0.6

      PCP

2.3

2.6

0.3

0.4

0.1

0.1

      Ecstasy

9.7b

13.1

--

6.9

--

1.7

       
Age 26 and Older:      

Any Illicit Drug1

38.5b

41.2

7.1b

8.2

4.2

4.5

    Hallucinogens2

11.2

11.9

0.4a

0.5

0.1

0.1

      LSD

8.6

8.7

0.1

0.1

0.0

0.0

      PCP

2.9

2.9

0.0

0.0

0.0

*

      Ecstasy

1.8

2.0

--

0.4

--

0.1

*Low precision; no estimate reported.
-- Not available.
aDifference between estimate and 2001 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
bDifference between estimate and 2001 estimate is statistically significant at the .01 level.
1 Any Illicit Drug includes marijuana/hashish, cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or any prescription-type psychotherapeutic used nonmedically. Any Illicit Drug Other Than Marijuana includes cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or any prescription-type psychotherapeutic used nonmedically.
2 Due to a questionnaire change in 2001, comparison of hallucinogen estimates (except lifetime) with prior estimates should be interpreted with caution. See Appendix C.

Source: SAMHSA, Office of Applied Studies, National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, 2000 and 2001.

 

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Percentages Reporting Lifetime, Past Year, and Past Month Use of Ecstasy and Other Hallucinogens  by Age: 2000 and 2001

TIME PERIOD

Lifetime

Past Year

Past Month

Drug

2000

2001

2000

2001

2000

2001

Age 12-13:

Any Illicit Drug1

12.6

12.6

7.2

8.2

3.0a

3.8

    Hallucinogens2

1.3

1.3

0.8

0.9

0.2

0.2

      LSD

0.5

0.4

0.4

0.3

0.1

0.1

      PCP

0.3

0.3

0.2

0.2

0.0

0.0

      Ecstasy

0.3

0.5

--

0.4

--

0.1

Age 14-15:

Any Illicit Drug1

27.2

28.8

19.2b

21.5

9.8

10.9

    Hallucinogens2

4.9

5.1

3.7

4.0

0.9

1.1

      LSD

2.9

2.7

2.1

1.8

0.4

0.6

      PCP

1.1a

0.7

0.6

0.5

0.1

0.1

      Ecstasy

2.0a

2.7

--

2.3

--

0.5

Age 16-17:

Any Illicit Drug1

41.3a

43.6

29.8b

32.8

16.4

17.8

    Hallucinogens2

11.3

10.8

7.3

7.2

2.3

2.3

      LSD

7.5

6.4

4.1

3.7

1.1a

0.7

      PCP

1.8

1.9

0.7

0.8

0.1

0.2

      Ecstasy

5.6

6.3

--

4.4

--

1.4

Age 18-20

Any Illicit Drug1

51.5b

54.6

33.3b

36.8

19.6b

22.4

    Hallucinogens2

19.0a

20.9

9.6b

11.9

2.7b

3.7

      LSD

13.8

13.6

5.3

5.0

1.4

0.9

      PCP

2.5

2.6

0.6

0.6

0.1

0.2

      Ecstasy

10.5b

13.7

--

8.6

--

2.3

Age 21-25:

Any Illicit Drug1

51.0b

56.2

24.1b

28.5

13.2b

16.3

    Hallucinogens2

19.5b

22.9

4.8b

7.5

1.2b

2.0

      LSD

14.2b

16.4

2.1

2.1

0.4

0.4

      PCP

2.2a

2.7

0.2

0.2

0.1

0.1

      Ecstasy

9.1b

12.8

--

5.7

--

1.3

Age 26-34:

Any Illicit Drug1

50.9a

53.3

13.4b

16.1

7.8

8.8

    Hallucinogens2

15.8a

17.5

1.2b

1.9

0.4

0.4

      LSD

11.8

12.6

0.4

0.4

0.1

0.0

      PCP

1.8

2.0

0.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

      Ecstasy

4.7a

6.0

--

1.4

--

0.2

Age 35 and Older:

Any Illicit Drug1

35.5b

38.4

5.5a

6.3

3.3

3.5

    Hallucinogens2

10.1

10.5

0.2

0.2

0.0

0.0

      LSD

7.8

7.8

0.1

0.1

*

0.0

      PCP

3.1

3.1

0.0

*

0.0

*

      Ecstasy

1.1

1.1

--

0.1

--

0.0

*Low precision; no estimate reported.
-- Not available.
aDifference between estimate and 2001 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
bDifference between estimate and 2001 estimate is statistically significant at the .01 level.
1 Any Illicit Drug includes marijuana/hashish, cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or any prescription-type psychotherapeutic used nonmedically. Any Illicit Drug Other Than Marijuana includes cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or any prescription-type psychotherapeutic used nonmedically.
2 Due to a questionnaire change in 2001, comparison of hallucinogen estimates (except lifetime) with prior estimates should be interpreted with caution. See Appendix C.
Source: SAMHSA, Office of Applied Studies, National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, 2000 and 2001.

This page was last updated on December 31, 2008.