Highlights of Substance Abuse and Mental Health Reports
Released in 2005

bulletAll reports by year of release

bulletAll reports released in 2005 (listed from most recent to earliest release):

  •  An estimated 9% of adolescents aged 12 to 17 (approximately 2.2 million adolescents) had experienced at least one major depressive episode during the past year as reported in SAMHSA's 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Among adolescents aged 12 to 17 who experienced at least one major depressive episode during the past year, 40.3% reported having received treatment for depression during the past year. Adolescents who had experienced a major depressive episode in the past year were more than twice as likely to have used illicit drugs in the past month than their peers who had not experienced a major depressive episode in the past year (21.2% vs. 9.6%).2% vs. 9.6%). See The NSDUH Report:  Depression among Adolescents
  • Of the approximately 78,000 admissions aged 12 to 17 in the 26 States that reported presence or absence of co-occurring problems to SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS), about 16,000 (21%) were admissions with a co-occurring psychiatric problem in addition to an alcohol and/or drug problem. Adolescent admissions with co-occurring disorders were more likely to be female than adolescent admissions for only substance use disorders (38% vs. 28%). Nearly three-quarters of adolescent admissions with co-occurring disorders were White (72%) compared to half of adolescent admissions for only substance use disorders (51%). Criminal justice system referrals for treatment were the most common source of referral for both adolescent admissions with co-occurring disorders (48%) and adolescent admissions for only substance use disorders (57%). See The DASIS Report:  Adolescents with Co-Occurring Psychiatric Disorders:  2003
  • Based on annual averages from SAMHSA's National Surveys on Drug Use and Health in 2002, 2003, and 2004, an estimated 1.2 million adults aged 18 or older (0.6%) were arrested for any serious violent or property offense in the past year. Serious violent or property offenses were defined as Part I violent and property offenses in the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Program. Part I violent offenses include arrests for murder, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Part I property offenses include arrests for burglary, theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. Adults who were arrested in the past year for any serious violent or property offense were more likely to have used an illicit drug in the past year than those who were not arrested for serious offenses (60.1% vs. 13.6%). Adults who had been arrested for serious violent or property offenses in the past year were more likely than those not arrested for serious offenses to have used marijuana (46.5% vs. 10.0%) and cocaine, crack cocaine, hallucinogens, methamphetamines, heroin and prescription drugs nonmedically. See  The NSDUH Report:  Illicit Drug Use among Persons Arrested for Serious Crimes
  • Of the 13,454 facilities that reported in 2004 to SAMHSA's National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS), 283 served the American Indian and Alaska Native population specifically and were operated either by a Tribal Government (172 facilities), the Indian Health Services (34 facilities), or another type of public/private organization (77 facilities) that offered substance abuse treatment services in an American Indian or Alaska Native language. Of the 32 States with at least one substance abuse treatment facility that specifically served American Indian or Alaska Native clients, most were in the Midwest and West: Arizona (36 facilities), New Mexico (30 facilities), California (26 facilities), Washington (24 facilities), Oklahoma (23 facilities), Alaska (21 facilities), Wisconsin (16 facilities), Michigan (15 facilities), and Oregon (12 facilities). Substance abuse treatment facilities that specifically served American Indian or Alaska Native clients were more likely than other substance abuse treatment facilities to offer aftercare counseling (91% vs. 78%) and family counseling (85% vs. 76%). Substance abuse treatment facilities that specifically served American Indian or Alaska Native clients were less likely than other substance abuse treatment facilities to offer specially designed programs for criminal justice clients (24% vs. 31%). See The DASIS Report: American Indian and Alaska Native Substance Abuse Treatment Services:  2004
  • Of the substance abuse treatment facilities reporting to SAMHSA's National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS) in 2004, 31% offered a special program for driving under the influence (DUI), driving while intoxicated (DWI), or other drunk driving offenders. Among the substance abuse treatment facilities that offered DUI/DWI programs, most were privately operated (90% for DUI/DWI-only facilities and 86% for multi-programs facilities). Multi-program facilities were more likely than DUI/DWI-only facilities to offer urine screening (82% vs. 57%) and blood alcohol testing (65% vs. 52%). See The DASIS Report:  Facilities with DUI/DWI Programs, 2004
  • In 2003, 64% of all substance abuse treatment admissions reported to SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) involved alcohol, and 42% involved alcohol as the primary substance of abuse.  Among primary alcohol treatment admissions aged 21 or older, admissions for only alcohol were more likely to be White than admissions for alcohol plus a secondary drug (70% vs. 58%). Substance abuse treatment admissions aged 21 or older for alcohol plus a secondary drug were almost twice as likely to enter residential/rehabilitative services as admissions for alcohol only (20% vs. 11%).  As a proportion of all substance abuse treatment admissions aged 21 or older, admissions for alcohol only and admissions for alcohol plus a secondary drug decreased from 1993 to 2003. See The DASIS Report: Primary Alcohol Admissions Aged 21 or Older - - Alcohol Alone vs. Alcohol Plus a Secondary Drug, 2003
  • As reported in SAMHSA's 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an estimated 8% of adults aged 18 or older (approximately 17.1 million adults) had experienced at least one major depressive episode during the past year. Among adults aged 18 or older who experienced at least one major depressive episode during the past year, 65.1% reported having received treatment for depression during the past year. The rate of past month illicit drug use was nearly twice as high among adults who had experienced a major depressive episode in the past year (14.2%) compared with adults who had not experienced a major depressive episode in the past year (7.3%). See The NSDUH Report:  Depression among Adults
  • Data from SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) were used to compare substance use, dependence and treatment among veterans and non veterans. In 2003, an estimated 56.6% of veterans used alcohol in the past month compared with 50.8% of comparable nonveterans. An estimated 13.2% of veterans reported driving while under the influence of alcohol or illicit drugs in the past year compared with 12.2% of comparable nonveterans. An estimated 18.8% of veterans reported that they smoked cigarettes daily in the past month compared with 14.3% of comparable nonveterans. See The NSDUH Report: Alcohol Use and Alcohol Related Risk Behaviors among Veterans
  • SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health found that in 2003, an estimated 3.5% of veterans used marijuana in the past month compared with 3.0% of their nonveteran counterparts. Past month heavy use of alcohol was more prevalent among veterans (7.5%) than comparable nonveterans (6.5%). Estimated rates of dependence on alcohol and/or illicit drugs did not differ significantly between veterans and nonveterans. An estimated 0.8% of veterans received specialty treatment for a substance use disorder (alcohol or illicit drugs) in the past year compared with 0.5% of comparable nonveterans. See The NSDUH Report: Substance Use, Dependence, and Treatment among Veterans
  • SAMHSA's National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS) is an annual census of all known public and private facilities in the U.S. that provide substance abuse treatment. In 2004, of the 13,454 substance abuse treatment facilities that responded to SAMHSA's National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services, 31% provided HIV testing, 56% offered HIV education/ counseling/ support groups, and 12% offered special programs or groups for persons with HIV/AIDS. Among the private for-profit organizations, 20% provided offered HIV testing, 44% offered HIV education/counseling/support groups, and 10% offered special programs or groups for persons with HIV/AIDS. Among facilities offering outpatient services, those offering outpatient methadone maintenance were the most likely to offer HIV/AIDS services. Facilities operated by the Department of Veterans Affairs were most likely to offer HIV testing (94%). See The DASIS Report:  Availability of HIV Services in Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities: 2004
  • Between 1993 and 2003, the number of admissions in SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) that reported phencyclidine (PCP) as the primary substance of abuse increased from 3,300 to 4,000; but the proportion of PCP admissions remained constant at about 0.2% of all substance abuse treatment admissions during this decade. The regional distribution of primary PCP admissions shifted between 1993 and 2003. In 2003, about a third of all primary PCP admissions were in the West (down from 37% in 1993), 27% were in the Northeast (up from 23%), 23% were in the South (down from 33%) and 18% were in the Midwest (up from 7%). In 1993, the most common secondary substance of abuse reported by primary PCP admissions was alcohol (41%), followed by cocaine (26%), and marijuana (24%). By 2003, marijuana (42%) was the most common secondary substance of abuse reported by primary PCP admissions, followed by alcohol (31%), and cocaine (15%). See The DASIS Report:  Trends in Admissions for Phencyclidine (PCP): 1993-2003
  • The National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS) is part of SAMHSA's Drug and Alcohol Services Information System (DASIS), a cooperative program between the State substance abuse agencies and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to collect data on the location, characteristics, and utilization of services at alcohol and drug abuse treatment facilities (both public and private) throughout the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and other U.S. jurisdictions. This report provides data from the 2004. See National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS): 2004 Data on Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities
  • SAMHSA's National Surveys on Drug Use and Health from 2002, 2003, and 2004 were combined to get annualized averages in order to compare past year illicit drug use among college students and nonstudents at each age from 18 to 22. Past year illicit drug use rates among young adults aged 18 to 22 were similar for full-time college students (37.5%), part-time college students (38.5%), and nonstudents (38.4%).    Among males, the rate of past year illicit drug use was lower for full-time college students than nonstudents (40% vs. 43%); but among females, the rate was higher for full-time college students than nonstudents (35% vs. 33%).  Full-time college students were less likely than nonstudents to be past year users of cocaine (6.3% vs. 8.2%), crack cocaine (0.4% vs. 1.4%), pain relievers used nonmedically (11.6% vs. 13.9%), and methamphetamine (0.8% vs. 2.6%). See The NSDUH Report:  College Enrollment Status and Past Year Illicit Drug Use among Young Adults: 2002, 2003, and 2004
  • Of the approximately 668,000 male admissions in the 29 States that reported presence or absence of co-occurring problems to SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS), about 103,000 (15%) were male admissions with co-occurring problems. Male admissions with co-occurring problems were more likely to report alcohol as the primary substance of abuse than male admissions for substance abuse alone (48% vs. 43%). Male admissions with co-occurring problems were more likely to be White than were male admissions for substance abuse alone (69% vs. 57%). Only 28% of male admissions with co-occurring problems were referred to treatment through the criminal justice system compared to 45% of male admissions for substance abuse alone. See The DASIS Report:  Male Admissions with Co-Occurring Psychiatric and Substance Use Problems,  2003
  • Based on SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health, in 2004, persons aged 12 or older who lived in metropolitan areas were more likely to abuse or be dependent on alcohol or an illicit drug during the past year than those living in non-metropolitan areas. Males living in metropolitan areas were more likely to abuse or be dependent on alcohol or an illicit drug than males living in non-metropolitan areas. Rates of past year substance abuse or dependence changed little between 2002, 2003, and 2004 in either metropolitan or non-metropolitan areas. See The NSDUH Report:  Substance Abuse or Dependence in Metropolitan and Non-Metropolitan Areas, 2004 Update 
  • There were 115,000 substance abuse treatment admissions to facilities in rural areas in 2003 (6% of all admissions) based on SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS). Rural substance abuse treatment admissions were more likely than urban substance abuse treatment admissions to report alcohol as the primary substance of abuse (52% vs. 40%). Rural substance abuse treatment admissions were more likely than urban substance abuse treatment admissions to be referred to treatment by the criminal justice system (47% vs. 35%). See The DASIS Report:  Treatment Admissions in Rural Areas, 2003
  • In 2003, there were 237,000 substance abuse treatment admissions for injection drug use (13% of all admissions reported to SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set [TEDS]). Opiates accounted for 77% of admissions for injection drug use, followed by stimulants (16%) and cocaine (6%). Most substance abuse treatment admissions for injected opiates were self/individually referred to treatment (58%); while most admissions for injected stimulants were referred by the criminal justice system (44%). See The DASIS Report:  Treatment Admissions for Injection Drug Use, 2003
  • Based on SAMHSA's 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 1.4 million persons aged 12 or older (0.6% of the population) had used methamphetamine in the past year, and 600,000 persons (0.2% of the population) had used methamphetamine in the past month. Although the number of past year and past month methamphetamine users did not change significantly between 2002 and 2004, the number of past month methamphetamine users who met criteria for abuse or dependence on one or more illicit drugs in the past year increased from 164,000 (27.5% of past month methamphetamine users) in 2002 to 346,000 (59.3%) in 2004. The average age of first use among new methamphetamine users was 18.9 years in 2002, 20.4 years in 2003, and 22.1 years of age in 2004. See The NSDUH Report:  Methamphetamine Use, Abuse, and Dependence:  2002, 2003, and 2004
  • In SAMHSA's 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an estimated 14% of youths aged 12 to 17, approximately 3.5 million youths, had experienced at least one major depressive episode in their lifetime. Over 7%, an estimated 1.8 million youths, had lifetime major depressive episode and thought about killing themselves at the time of their worst or most recent episode. An estimated 712,000 youths had tried to kill themselves during their worst or most recent major depressive episode; this represents 2.9% of those aged 12 to 17. See The NSDUH Report:  Suicidal Thoughts among Youths Aged 12 to 17 with Major Depressive Episode
  • By combining data from SAMHSA's National Surveys on Drug Use and Health in 2002 and 2003, SAMHSA estimated the annual average rates of driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol or illicit drugs and of DUI arrests among adults aged 21 or older. An estimated 30.7 million persons aged 21 or older (16.6% of adult drivers) reported driving under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs during the past year; of these, 1.2 million (0.6% of adult drivers) were arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol or illicit drugs during the past year.  Among drivers aged 21 and older, 5.9% of those reporting that they had driven under the influence of both alcohol and illicit drugs during the past year had been arrested for DUI in the past year, 4.8% of those driving under the influence of only illicit drugs, and 2.9% of those who had driven under the influence of only alcohol during the past year had been arrested for DUI in the past year. See The NSDUH Report:  Arrests for Driving Under the Influence among Adult Drivers
  • Binge drinking is defined as 5 or more drinks on the same occasion at least one day in the past month. Based on annual averages from SAMHSA's 2002 and 2003 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health, there were approximately 7.2 million persons under the legal drinking age who were past month binge alcohol users. Rates for current underage binge drinking among those aged 12 to 20 was lowest in Utah (13.7%) and highest in North Dakota (32.5%). Among binge drinkers aged 12 to 20, 49.3% reported binge alcohol use on 1 or 2 days in the past month, 18.7% reported 2 or 3 days, 11.5% reported 5 or 6 days, and 20.5% reported binge drinking on 7 or more days in the past month. See The NSDUH Report:  Binge Alcohol Use among Persons Aged 12 to 20:  2002 and 2003 Update 
  • Based on SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) in 2002 and 2003, Hispanic youths aged 12 to 17 were less likely to report past month alcohol use and past month marijuana use than non-Hispanic youths. Among Hispanic youths, Cuban youths had the highest rates of past month alcohol use while Puerto Rican youths had the highest rates of past month illicit drug use. Hispanic youths who were born in the United States were more likely to have used illicit drugs in the past month than Hispanic youths born outside the United States. See The NSDUH Report:  Substance Use among Hispanic Youths
  • Based on SAMHSA's 2003 Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS), Hispanic admissions were more likely to report opiate abuse than non-Hispanic admissions (28% vs. 16%). A greater proportion of Hispanic admissions were male (78%) than non-Hispanic admissions (68%). Puerto Rican admissions most frequently reported opiates as the primary substance of abuse, while other Hispanic admissions most frequently reported alcohol as the primary substance of abuse.  See The DASIS Report:  Hispanics in Substance Abuse Treatment, 2003
  • Based on SAMHSA's 2002 and 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, more than 5.9 million Americans aged 12 or older (2.5) used cocaine in the past year. Cocaine use rates ranged from 1.6% in Idaho to 3.9% in Colorado. Males were more than twice as likely as females to have used cocaine in the past year and to have met the criteria for abuse of or dependence on cocaine in the past year. See The NSDUH Report: Cocaine Use:  2002 & 2003
  • Based on SAMHSA's 2003 National Survey on Drug Use & Health, an estimated 5.9% of women aged 18 or older met criteria for abuse of or dependence on alcohol or an illicit drug in the past year. American Indian or Alaska Native women aged 18 or older had higher rates of abuse or or dependence on alcohol or an illicit drug than women aged 18 or older in other racial or ethnic groups. Women aged 18 or older who were married had a lower rate of substance (alcohol or illicit drug) abuse or dependence than women of any other marital status. See The NSDUH Report:  Substance Abuse and Dependence among Women
  • Based on SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health in 2003, most youths have been exposed to some kind of substance abuse prevention message - - whether having seen or heard an alcohol or drug prevention message or talked with a parent about the dangers of tobacco, alcohol, or drug use. About 84% of youths aged 12 to 17 (20.8 million) in 2003 reported having seen or heard an alcohol or drug prevention message from sources such as posters, pamphlets, radio, or TV in the past 12 months. About 59% of the youths (14.6 million) reported having talked with at least one of their parents during the past year about the dangers of tobacco, alcohol or drug use. Youth who had talked with a parent about the dangers of tobacco, alcohol, or drug use in the past year were less likely to report past month alcohol use, binge alcohol use, or illicit drug use than youths who had not talked with a parent. See The NSDUH Report:  Youths' Exposure to Substance Use Prevention Messages, 2003
  • Between 1992 and 2002, substance abuse treatment admissions reporting tranquilizers as their primary substance of abuse to SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) increased 79% from 4,600 admissions in 1992 to 8,300 in 2002. Among the additional 32,800 admissions which reported tranquilizers as a secondary or tertiary substance of abuse in 2002, opiates (46%) and alcohol (30%) were the most common primary substances of abuse. Primary tranquilizer admissions were most frequent in the South (40%) and least frequent in the West (12%) and Midwest (15%). See The DASIS Report:  Characteristics of Primary Tranquilizer  Admissions: 2002
  • Based on SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health in 2002 and 2003, about 94% of persons aged 21 or older were classified as drivers. Among adult drivers aged 21 or older, 71% reported using alcohol during the 12 months prior to survey, and 12.6% reported having used an illicit drug during the past year. An estimated 30.7 million persons aged 21 or older (16.6% of adult drivers) reported driving under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs during the past year.  Among drivers aged 21 and older, 15.7% had driven under the influence of alcohol during the past year, 4.3% had driven under the influence of illicit drugs, and 3% had driven under the combined influence of alcohol and drugs during the past year. Drivers aged 21 and older living in the Midwest (20.5%) were more likely to have driven under the influence or alcohol or illicit drugs in the past year than those living in the West (17.1%), Northeast (15.6%) or the South (14.3%). See The NSDUH Report:  Driving Under the Influence among Adult Drivers
  • The criminal justice system was the principal source of referral in SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) for substance abuse treatment admissions reporting marijuana as their primary substance of abuse. The proportion of criminal justice referred treatment admissions increased from 48% of all marijuana admissions in 1992 to 58% of all marijuana admissions in 2002. Marijuana treatment admissions referred by the criminal justice system were more likely than marijuana admissions referred by all other sources to be admitted to ambulatory (outpatient) treatment services (86% vs. 79%) and less likely to be admitted to residential/rehabilitation (13% vs. 16%) or detoxification services (1% vs. 4%). See The DASIS Report:  Differences in Marijuana Admissions Based on Source of Referral, 2002
  • By combining three years of data from SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health from 1999 to 2001, SAMHSA's Office of Applied Studies was able to produce subState estimates of substance use. In 1999 to 2001, past month use of marijuana varied from 2.3% in Northwest Iowa and 2.6% in Southern Texas to 10.3% in Boulder, Colorado and 12.2% in Boston. Of the 15 subState areas with the highest rates of past month marijuana use in the United States, five were in Massachusetts, three were in California, and two were in Colorado.  See The NSDUH Report:  Marijuana Use in SubState Areas
  • Annual averages based on SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use & Health conducted in 2002 and 2003 found that women aged 15 to 44 who were currently pregnant were less likely to currently use an illicit drug, smoke cigarettes, or drink alcohol then either recent mothers or nonpregnant women in this age group.  Pregnant women aged 15 to 25 were more likely to have smoked cigarettes in the past month and to have used an illicit drug during the past month than pregnant women aged 26 to 44. Among pregnant women aged 15 to 44, 9.8% reported drinking alcohol during the past month, 4.1% reported binge alcohol use, and less than 1% reported heavy alcohol use. See The NSDUH Report: Substance Use During Pregnancy: 2002 and 2003 Update
  • Of the 860,000 admissions in 2002 reported to SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) with known income or support sources, 9% reported public assistance as the primary source of income, 31% reported wages/salary, 4% reported disability, 1% reported retirement/pension, 24% reported other sources of income and 31% reported none. Public assistance admissions to substance abuse treatment were more likely to report opiates (20% vs. 13%) and less likely to report marijuana as the primary substance of abuse than other admissions to substance abuse treatment. Public assistance admissions were more likely to be female (43% vs. 28%) than were other admissions to substance abuse treatment. See The DASIS Report:  Treatment Admissions Receiving Public Assistance: 2002
  • SAMHSA's Substance Abuse Treatment Facility Locator is an on-line searchable directory of more than 11,000 addiction treatment programs throughout the U.S. The Locator was created to help people find treatment for substance abuse addiction or problems with alcohol. It is located at http://findtreatment.samhsa.gov It also contains links to SAMHSA's Buprenorphine Physician Locator and to SAMHSA's Mental Health Facility Locator. See Using the Substance Abuse Treatment Facility Locator  for description and guidance.
  • In 2002, based on SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS), females accounted for 30% of substance abuse treatment admissions. The average age at substance abuse treatment admission for female admissions was slightly younger than male admissions (33.3 vs. 34.2 years). Female admissions were more likely than male admissions to be in treatment for opiates or cocaine and less likely to be substance abuse treatment for alcohol or marijuana. The expected source of payment for treatment for female admissions was equally distributed (about 25% each) between self-payment, Medicaid/Medicare, and other government payments. In contrast, the expected source of payment for treatment for male admissions was most frequently self-payment (34%) or other government payments (28%). See The DASIS Report:  A Comparison of Female and Male Treatment Admissions: 2002
  • Based on SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health in 2002 and 2003, an annual average of 18 million women aged 18 or older lived with a biological, foster, step, or adoptive child aged 12 to 17. About 11.9% of mothers (2.1 million) living with youths aged 12 to 17 had serious mental illness during the past year. About 3.2% of the mothers had both serious mental illness and also reported illicit drug use, binge alcohol use, or heavy alcohol use during the past month. Youths living with a mother who had serious mental illness (SMI) were more likely to have used alcohol or an illicit drug during the past month (26.7%) than youths living with a mother who did not have SMI (18.8%). See The NSDUH Report:  Mother's Serious Mental Illness and Substance Use among Youths
  • Trends in the substance abuse treatment admissions of adults age 55 or older reported to SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) show an increase of 32% in the number of older adult admissions between 1995 to 2002. Alcohol was the most frequently reported primary substance of abuse among older adults for each of these years. Primary alcohol admissions among older adults increased 19% for men and 24% for women: from 33,100 men and 7,000 women in 1995 to 39,300 men and 8,700 women in 2002. Primary drug admissions among older adults increased 106% for men and 119% for women: from 6,200 men and 1,600 women in 1995 to 12,800 men and 3,500 women in 2002. Substance abuse treatment admissions rates among older adults tended to be highest in northern and northeastern States. See The DASIS Report: Older Adults in Substance Abuse Treatment 1995-2002 trends
  • Based on SAMHSA's 2002 and 2003 National Surveys on Drug Use & Health (NSDUH), an estimated 90.8 million adults (42.9%) aged 18 or older had used marijuana at least once in their lifetime. Among lifetime marijuana users aged 18 or older, 2.1% reported that they first used marijuana before age 12; 52.7% reported first marijuana use between ages 12 and 17, and 45.2% reported first marijuana use at age 18 or older. About 12.5 % of persons aged 18 or older who reported lifetime marijuana use were classified as having a serious mental illness (SMI) in the past year. Adults who first used marijuana before age 12 (21%) were twice as likely as adults who first used marijuana at age 18 or older (10.5%) to be classified as having a serious mental illness in the past year. See The NSDUH Report:  Age at First Use of Marijuana and Past Year Serious Mental Illness
  • Prevalence rates of alcohol and of illicit drug use in the past month and past year were lower for foreign born compared with U.S. born individuals aged 18 or older in a study of respondents to SAMHSA's National Surveys on Drug Use & Health conducted from 1999 to 2001. There were no statistically significant differences in alcohol use or past month illicit drug use between immigrants who had been in the U.S. for fewer than 5 years compared with immigrants in the U.S. For 5 or more years. However, past year illicit drug use was higher among immigrants in the U.S. For 5 or more years compared with immigrants in the U.S. For fewer than 5 years. See Immigrants and Substance Use:  Findings from the 1999-2001 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health (HTML) 
  • According to SAMHSA's 2003 National Survey on Drug Use & Health, about 2.1 million persons aged 12 or older (0.9%) reported using Ecstasy at least once in the past year. Almost all (97.5%) of the persons age 12 or older who used Ecstasy in the past year also reported past year use of alcohol compared with 65.2% of those who had not used Ecstasy in the past year. Over 90% of past year Ecstasy users reported also using other types of illicit drugs in the past year compared with 13.8% of the those who did not use Ecstasy in the past year. About 22.8% of the past year Ecstasy users used one other illicit drug, 50.3% used two to four other illicit drugs, and 17.9% used five or more illicit drugs during the past year. See The NSDUH Report:  Substance Use among Past Year Ecstasy Users
  • Based on SAMHSA's 2002 and 2003 National Surveys on Drug Use & Health (NSDUH), an annual average of 13.7 million persons aged 50 or older (17.1%) smoked cigarettes and 36 million (45.5%) drank alcohol during the past month. About 12.2% of older adults reported binge alcohol use and 3.2% reported heavy alcohol use. Among older adults, 1.4 million (1.8%) used an illicit drug during the past month. Marijuana was the most commonly used illicit drug (used by 1.1% older adults), followed by prescription-type drugs used nonmedically (0.7%), and cocaine (0.2%). See The NSDUH Report:  Substance Use Among Older Adults: 2002 & 2003 Update 
  • Of the 683,000 primary alcohol admissions aged 21 or older admitted to treatment and reported to SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) in 2002, more than one third reported their age of first alcohol intoxication as between 15 and 17 years old. In TEDS age of first use of alcohol is defined as the age of first intoxication. Primary alcohol admissions with an age of first alcohol use prior to age 12 were more likely than all other age groups to have had five or more prior treatment episodes. Among primary alcohol admissions aged 21 or older, the average age of first alcohol use for males was 16.7 years old and for females 18.0 years old. The average age of first alcohol use varied greatly by racial and ethnic group with American Indian / Alaska Native primary alcohol admissions starting at the earliest age (mean age 15.1 years old), followed by White (mean age 16.6 years old), Black (mean age 17.2 years old), and Asian/ Pacific Islander admissions (mean age 17.9 years old). Hispanic primary alcohol admissions reported the latest age of first alcohol use: 19.7 years old. See The DASIS Report: Characteristics of Primary Alcohol Admissions by Age of First Use of Alcohol: 2002
  • Based on SAMHSA's 2002 and 2003 National Surveys on Drug Use & Health (NSDUH), an annual average of 354,000 persons (0.2%) aged 12 or older used a needle to inject heroin, cocaine, methamphetamines, or other stimulants during the past year. NSDUH data on needle sources indicated that 140,000 (39.5%) past year injection drug users bought a needle from a pharmacy the last time they injected drugs and 59,000 (16.7%) obtained a needle from a needle exchange program. About 73,000 (20.5%) were given their needle or stole it from another person and another 24,000 (6.8%) were given their needle or stole it from a location. The last time injection drug users used a needle for injecting drugs, 13.1% of past year injection drug users knew or suspected someone else had used the needle before them and 18.1% used a needle that someone used after them. An estimated 64.4% of past year injection drug users did not clean the needle with bleach before the last time they had used one to inject drugs. See The NSDUH Report:  Injection Drug Use Update: 2002 and 2003
  • Youths who reported heavy alcohol use in the past month were the most likely to have participated in any of the six delinquent behaviors assessed in SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Heavy drinking was defined as drinking five or more alcoholic beverages on the same occasion on each of 5 or more days in the past 30 days. All heavy alcohol users are also binge alcohol users, i.e., drank five or more drinks on the same occasion on at least one day in the past 30 days. In 2003, an estimated 9 million (36.1%) youths aged 12 to 17 had engaged in at least one delinquent behavior in the past year. Almost 6 million (23.8%) took part in a serious fight at school or work; 4.5 million (18.1%) took part in a group-against-group fight; 2.1 million (8.3%) attacked someone with the intent to seriously hurt them; 1.1 million (4.5%) stole or tried to steal something worth more than $50; over 900,000 (3.6%) sold illegal drugs; and over 900,000 (3.6%) carried a handgun during the past year. See The NSDUH Report:  Alcohol Use and Delinquent Behaviors among Youths
  • Among the 1.9 million admissions reported to SAMHSA's 2002 Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS), more (56%) reported the abuse of multiple substances (polydrug use) than abuse of any single substance. Alcohol was the most common substance reported (76%) by the polydrug admissions, marijuana was second (55%), followed by cocaine (48%), opiates (27%) and other drugs (26%). Younger admissions were more likely to report polydrug abuse than older admissions: 65% of those younger than age 20 reported polydrug abuse compared with 41% of those aged 45 or older. See The DASIS Report:  Polydrug Admissions: 2002
  • SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use & Health found that in 2002 and 2003, an annual average of 718,000 (8.6%) youths aged 12 or 13 had used an inhalant in their lifetime. Youths aged 12 or 13 who used inhalants in their lifetime were more than twice as likely to have been in a serious fight at school or work during the past year than youths their age who had never used inhalants. About 35% of youths aged 12 or 13 who used inhalants in their lifetime also used another illicit drug compared with 7.5% of youths aged 12 or 13 who had never used inhalants in their lifetime. See The NSDUH Report:  Inhalant Use and Delinquent Behaviors among Young Adolescents
  • The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Office of Applied Studies collects and reports on national and State data to assist policymakers, treatment providers and patients make informed decisions regarding the prevention and treatment of mental and substance use disorders.   This short report provides an overview of the SAMHSA's Office of Applied Studies and its data collection systems. See The OAS Report:  The Office of Applied Studies
  • SAMHSA's Office of Applied Studies (OAS) has created a website for "Quick Statistics," where you can find the latest available State and jurisdiction level data on substance abuse treatment admissions and substance abuse treatment facilities. The States submitted these data to SAMHSA for the Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) and the National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS). Using Quick Statistics, you can run tables for individual States and for all States combined. See The DASIS Report:  Quick Statistics
  • The National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS) is part of the Drug and Alcohol Services Information System (DASIS), a cooperative program between the State substance abuse agencies and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to collect data on the location, characteristics, and utilization of services at alcohol and drug abuse treatment facilities (both public and private) throughout the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and other U.S. Jurisdictions More than 60% of the facilities surveyed in 2003 were operated by private non-profit entities, one-quarter were operated by private for-profit organizations, and the remainder were operated by Federal, State, local, or tribal governments. Eighty percent of the facilities provided outpatient care, 28% provided residential treatment, and 7% offered hospital inpatient care. This report provides highlights from the 2003 N-SSATS report. See The DASIS Report:  The National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS): 2003
  • Based on SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS), substance abuse treatment admission rates for marijuana as their primary substance of abuse increased nationally by 162% from 45 admissions per 100,000 persons aged 12 or older in 1992 to 118 admissions per 100,000 persons aged 12 or older in 2002. Overall, the primary marijuana treatment admission rates increased in 41 States and decreased in 3 States between 1992 and 2002. The number of States with marijuana treatment admission rates of 139 or more per 100,000 persons aged 12 or older increased from no States in 1992 to 21 States in 2002. The number of States with rates less than 50 per 100,000 decreased from 26 States in 1992 to six States in 2002. See The DASIS Report:  Trends in Marijuana Treatment Admissions by State: 1992-2002
  • Of the 1.9 million substance abuse treatment admissions reported to SAMHSA's 2002 Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS), 13% reported cocaine as their primary substance of abuse. Of these treatment admissions with primary cocaine abuse, 73% reported smoking cocaine and 27% reported other routes of administration. Most of the primary cocaine admissions (70% of the smoked cocaine admissions and 73% of the non-smoked cocaine admissions) reported a secondary substance of abuse. Alcohol was reported as the secondary substance of abuse by 44% of the smoked cocaine admissions and 39% of the non-smoked cocaine admissions. Marijuana was reported by 18% of the smoked cocaine admissions and 21% of the non-smoked cocaine admissions. Smoked cocaine admissions were more likely to report daily use compared to non-smoked cocaine admissions (42% vs. 29%). See The DASIS Report:  Smoked Cocaine vs. Non-Smoked Cocaine Admissions: 2002
  • About 680,000 youths (2.7%) aged 12 to 17 in the U.S. have ever been in foster care. Based on SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health, youths who have ever been in foster care had higher rates of any illicit drug use than youths who have never been in foster care (33.6% vs. 21.7%). Youths aged 12 to 17 who were in need of substance abuse treatment in the past year were more likely to have received treatment if they had ever been in foster care. See The NSDUH Report:  Substance Use and Need for Treatment Among Youths Who Have Been in Foster Care
  • In 2002, SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) received reports of 39,463 American Indian / Alaska Native substance abuse treatment admissions. Of these admissions, 34,324 (87%) were American Indians and 5,139 (13%) were Alaska Natives. The percentage of American Indian or Alaska Native admissions entering treatment for illicit drugs increased from 23.6% of all American Indian or Alaska Native admissions in 1994 to 37.1% of all such American Indian or Alaska Native admissions in 2002. In 2002, alcohol remained the primary substance of abuse for American Indian / Alaska Native substance abuse treatment admissions. American Indian or Alaska Native admissions were more likely to report alcohol as their primary substance of abuse than all other admissions (63% vs. 42%) and less likely to report opiates (8% vs. 18%) or cocaine (13% vs. 5%) than all other admissions. American Indian / Alaska Native substance abuse treatment admissions were more likely to initiate substance use at age 14 or younger (46% vs. 32%) compared with all other racial / ethnic groups. See The DASIS Report: Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions Among American Indians and Alaska Natives:  2002
  • Based on SAMHSA's 2003 National Survey on Drug Use & Health, 20.8 million Americans aged 12 or older (8.8% of that population) had used prescription-type stimulants nonmedically at least once in their lifetime. An estimated 378,000 persons in the United States met the diagnostic criteria for dependence on or abuse of stimulants in the past year. Lifetime use of methamphetamines was reported by 12.3 million (5.2% of the population), prescription diet pills by 8.7 million (3.6%), Ritalin® or methylphenidate by 4.2 million (1.8%), and Dexedrine® by 2.6 million (1.1%). Use of a stimulant in their lifetime varied by race/ethnicity. Whites (10.7%), Native Americans/ Alaska Natives (10.2%), and Native Hawaiians/ Pacific islanders (8.3%) had the highest rates of any stimulant use in their lifetime and Hispanics (5%), Asians (2.8%), and Blacks (2.7%) had the lowest rates. See The NSDUH Report: Stimulant Use:  2003
  • Based on SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS), admission rates for primary cocaine treatment decreased nationally by 24% between 1992 and 2002 from 133 admissions to 101 admissions per 100,000 persons aged 12 or older. Between 1992 and 2002, cocaine treatment admissions decreased by 60% or more in five States (Massachusetts, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, and Idaho) and increased 100% or more in four States (Arkansas, Iowa, North Dakota, and Wisconsin). See The DASIS Report:  Trends in Cocaine Treatment Admissions by State: 1992-2002
  • While both oxycodone and heroin are classified as "opiates," the prevalence of lifetime nonmedical use of oxycodone increased significantly from 2002 to 2003 while the prevalence of lifetime heroin use remained stable. Based on SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use & Health, an estimated 11 million Americans aged 12 and older had used only oxycodone nonmedically at least once in their lifetime, 1.9 million had used only heroin in their lifetime, and 1.7 million had used both oxycodone and heroin in their lifetime. See The NSDUH Report: NonMedical Oxycodone Users:  A Comparison with Heroin Users
  • SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health estimated that 88.2% of persons aged 21 or older (175.6 million) had used alcohol in their lifetime and 11.8% (23.5 million) had not used alcohol in their lifetime. Among those who had used alcohol, 52.7% had used one or more illicit drugs at some time in their life while only 8% of the nondrinkers had used an illicit drug. Nonmedical use of pain relievers was the illicit drug used most often by lifetime nondrinkers; whereas marijuana was the illicit drug used most frequently by adults who had ever drank alcohol in their lifetime. See The NSDUH Report:  Illicit Drug Use Among Lifetime NonDrinkers and Lifetime Alcohol Users
  • Based on SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS), the rate of the primary methamphetamine/ amphetamine treatment admissions reporting smoking methamphetamines or amphetamines was 50% in 2002 compared with 12% in 1992. In 2002, only one State (Ohio) had a decrease in the proportion of methamphetamine/ amphetamine admissions that smoked methamphetamines or amphetamines. Hawaii continued to have over 90% of its methamphetamine/ amphetamine admissions that smoked the drug. In nine States, over 50% of the methamphetamine/ amphetamine admissions smoked the drug in 2002 and for five of these States (Colorado, Iowa, Nevada, Utah, and Washington State) their rate of smoked methamphetamine/ amphetamine was 10% or less in 1992. See The DASIS Report:  Smoked Methamphetamine / Amphetamines, 1992-2002

This page was last updated on December 30, 2008.