1997 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse

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Discussion

Table 9.1 Percentage Reporting Components of Dependence in the Past Year Attributed to Use of Marijuana for the Total Population, Those Who Used at Least Once in the Past Year, and Those Who Used Once a Month or More Often in the Past Year, by Age Group: 1997 Note 1: The definitions of these problems are different in number and kind from those used in the 1994 NHSDA and earlier years. Therefore, data in this table cannot be compared directly with Main Findings data prior to 1995.
Note 2: Questions asked were: In the past 12 months, indicate: (1) If you wanted or tried to stop or cut down on your use of that drug but found that you couldn't. (2) Whether you had built up a tolerance for the drug so that the same amount had less effect than before. (3) Whether you had a period of a month or more when you spent a great deal of time getting or using the drug, or getting over its effects. (4) Whether you have used that kind of drug much more often or in larger amounts than you intended. (5) Whether your use of the drug often kept you from working, going to school, taking care of children, or engaging in recreational activities. (6) Whether your use of the drug caused you to have any emotional or psychological problems-such as feeling uninterested in things, feeling depressed, feeling suspicious of people, feeling paranoid, or having strange ideas. (7) Whether your use of the drug caused you any health problems-such as liver disease, stomach disease, pancreatitis, feet tingling, numbness, memory problems, an accidental overdose, a persistent cough, a seizure or fit, hepatitis, an accidental overdose, or abscesses.

*Low precision; no estimate reported.

1 Respondents with missing data on problems were coded as not having problems.
2 Reports of past year drug-related problems were disregarded in the absence of indications of past year use on the marijuana answer sheet. The 1997 total population estimates may be somewhat lower than those reported in 1995 and 1996, which included all reports of drug-related problems in such estimates.

Source: Office of Applied Studies, SAMHSA, National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, 1997.

Table 9.2 Percentage Reporting Components of Dependence in the Past Year Attributed to Cocaine Use for the Total Population, Those Who Used at Least Once in the Past Year, and Those Who Used Once a Month or More Often in the Past Year, by Age Group: 1997

Note 1: The definitions of these problems are different in number and kind from those used in the 1994 NHSDA and earlier years. Therefore, data in this table cannot be compared directly with Main Findings data prior to 1995.
Note 2: Questions asked were: In the past 12 months, indicate: (1) If you wanted or tried to stop or cut down on your use of that drug but found that you couldn't. (2) Whether you had built up a tolerance for the drug so that the same amount had less effect than before. (3) Whether you had a period of a month or more when you spent a great deal of time getting or using the drug, or getting over its effects. (4) Whether you have used that kind of drug much more often or in larger amounts than you intended. (5) Whether your use of the drug often kept you from working, going to school, taking care of children, or engaging in recreational activities. (6) Whether your use of the drug caused you to have any emotional or psychological problems-such as feeling uninterested in things, feeling depressed, feeling suspicious of people, feeling paranoid, or having strange ideas. (7) Whether your use of the drug caused you any health problems-such as liver disease, stomach disease, pancreatitis, feet tingling, numbness, memory problems, an accidental overdose, a persistent cough, a seizure or fit, hepatitis, an accidental overdose, or abscesses.

*Low precision; no estimate reported.

1 Respondents with missing data on problems were coded as not having problems.
2 Reports of past year drug-related problems were disregarded in the absence of indications of past year use on the cocaine or crack cocaine answer sheet. The 1997 total population estimates may be somewhat lower than those reported in 1995 and 1996, which included all reports of drug-related problems in such estimates.

Source: Office of Applied Studies, SAMHSA, National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, 1997.

Table 9.3 Percentage Reporting Components of Dependence in the Past Year Attributed to Alcohol Use for the Total Population, Past Year Users, and Those Who Had Five or More Drinks on the Same Occasion on 5 or More of the Past 30 Days, by Age Group: 1997

Note 1: The definitions of these problems are different in number and kind from those used in the 1994 NHSDA and earlier years. Therefore, data in this table cannot be compared directly with Main Findings data prior to 1995.
Note 2: Questions asked were: In the past 12 months, indicate: (1) If you wanted or tried to stop or cut down on your use of that drug but found that you couldn't. (2) Whether you had built up a tolerance for the drug so that the same amount had less effect than before. (3) Whether you had a period of a month or more when you spent a great deal of time getting or using the drug, or getting over its effects. (4) Whether you have used that kind of drug much more often or in larger amounts than you intended. (5) Whether your use of the drug often kept you from working, going to school, taking care of children, or engaging in recreational activities. (6) Whether your use of the drug caused you to have any emotional or psychological problems-such as feeling uninterested in things, feeling depressed, feeling suspicious of people, feeling paranoid, or having strange ideas. (7) Whether your use of the drug caused you any health problems-such as liver disease, stomach disease, pancreatitis, feet tingling, numbness, memory problems, an accidental overdose, a persistent cough, a seizure or fit, hepatitis, an accidental overdose, or abscesses.

*Low precision; no estimate reported.

1 Respondents with missing data on problems are coded as not having problems.

2 Reports of past year drug-related problems were disregarded in the absence of indications of past year use on the alcohol answer sheet. The 1997 total population estimates may be somewhat lower than those reported in 1995 and 1996, which included all reports of drug-related problems in such estimates.

Source: Office of Applied Studies, SAMHSA, National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, 1997.

Table 9.4 Percentage Reporting Components of Dependence in the Past Year Attributed to Cigarette Use for the Total Population, Past Year Users, and Those Who Currently Smoke a Pack or More a Day, by Age Group: 1997

Note 1: The definitions of these problems are different in number and kind from those used in the 1994 NHSDA and earlier years. Therefore, data in this table cannot be compared directly with Main Findings data prior to 1995.
Note 2: Questions asked were: In the past 12 months, indicate: (1) If you wanted or tried to stop or cut down on your use of that drug but found that you couldn't. (2) Whether you had built up a tolerance for the drug so that the same amount had less effect than before. (3) Whether you had a period of a month or more when you spent a great deal of time getting or using the drug, or getting over its effects. (4) Whether you have used that kind of drug much more often or in larger amounts than you intended. (5) Whether your use of the drug often kept you from working, going to school, taking care of children, or engaging in recreational activities. (6) Whether your use of the drug caused you to have any emotional or psychological problems-such as feeling uninterested in things, feeling depressed, feeling suspicious of people, feeling paranoid, or having strange ideas. (7) Whether your use of the drug caused you any health problem-such as liver disease, stomach disease, pancreatitis, feet tingling, numbness, memory problems, an accidental overdose, a persistent cough, a seizure or fit, hepatitis, an accidental overdose, or abscesses.

*Low precision; no estimate reported.

1 Respondents with missing data on problems are coded as not having problems.
2 Reports of past year drug-related problems were disregarded in the absence of indications of past year use on the tobacco answer sheet. The 1997 total population estimates may be somewhat lower than those reported in 1995 and 1996, which included all reports of drug-related problems in such estimates.

Source: Office of Applied Studies, SAMHSA, National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, 1997.

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This page was last updated on December 30, 2008.