Receipt of Services for Behavioral Health Problems:
Results from the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health

Authors

SAMHSA: Beth Han, Sarra L. Hedden, and Rachel Lipari; RTI International: Elizabeth A. P. Copello and Larry A. Kroutil

Abstract

Background. Mental disorders and substance use disorders (SUDs) affect people from all walks of life and all age groups. However, these disorders are treatable, and people can and do recover. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) reports information from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) on substance use treatment and mental health service use to help evaluate access to and use of behavioral health services.

Methods. This report presents data from the 2002 through 2014 NSDUHs for substance use treatment and mental health service use among people aged 12 or older. Results are presented for adolescents aged 12 to 17 and for adults aged 18 or older. Where trends are presented, the report focuses on long-term trends by comparing estimates from the 2014 NSDUH with comparable estimates in 2002 to 2013 (or in 2008 to 2013 for some estimates of mental health service use). Statistically significant differences are noted between estimates in 2014 and those in prior years.

Results. Of the 22.5 million people aged 12 or older in 2014 who needed treatment for a problem related to the use of alcohol or illicit drugs, there were an estimated 4.1 million people who received any substance use treatment in the past year and 2.6 million people who received treatment at a specialty facility. These numbers represent 1.6 percent of people aged 12 or older who received any substance use treatment and 1.0 percent who received specialty treatment in the past year. The estimated number of people in 2014 who received any substance use treatment in the past year remained stable between 2004 and 2014. Nearly 20 million people needed substance use treatment in 2014 but did not receive specialty treatment; however, the large majority of these approximately 20 million people did not report that they needed treatment.

In 2014, about 35.5 million adults aged 18 or older (14.8 percent of the population aged 18 or older) received mental health care during the past 12 months. The estimate of 14.8 percent of adults aged 18 or older in 2014 who received mental health care in the past 12 months was greater than the estimates from 2002 to 2011, but it was similar to the estimates in 2012 and 2013. In 2014, an estimated 44.7 percent of the 43.6 million adults with any mental illness (AMI) and 68.5 percent of the 9.8 million adults with serious mental illness (SMI) received mental health services in the past year. A higher percentage of adults with AMI received mental health services in the past year in 2013 and 2014 compared with corresponding percentages in 2008 to 2012. The percentage of adults with SMI who received mental health services in the past year in 2014 was similar to the percentages in most years between 2008 and 2013. Among the 7.9 million adults in 2014 with co-occurring AMI and an SUD in the past year, slightly less than half received either mental health care or substance use treatment at a specialty facility in the past year.

The two most commonly reported reasons for not receiving substance use treatment among people aged 12 or older who needed but did not receive treatment at a specialty facility, despite perceiving a need for treatment, were that they were not ready to stop using or that they had no health coverage and could not afford the cost of treatment. Among all adults and among adults with AMI or among adults with SMI who had a perceived unmet need for mental health care but did not receive mental health services in the past year, the most commonly reported reason for not receiving mental health care was not being able to afford the cost of care.

In 2014, about 227,000 (0.9 percent) adolescents aged 12 to 17 received substance use treatment in the past 12 months, which was similar to the numbers in most years from 2009 through 2013. An estimated 13.7 percent of adolescents in 2014 received mental health services in a specialty mental health setting in the past 12 months, which was higher than the estimates in 2007 to 2012 and was similar to the estimate in 2013. Among the 2.8 million adolescents in 2014 who had a past year major depressive episode (MDE), 41.2 percent received treatment for depression, which was similar to the percentages in most years from 2004 to 2013.

Conclusions. Findings from NSDUH on trends in the receipt of substance use treatment and mental health services are useful for assessing whether people are receiving the services they need.


Introduction


Mental disorders and substance use disorders (SUDs), both of which are also referred to as "behavioral health problems," are common and recurrent. They often are associated with negative outcomes, such as (but not limited to) involvement with the criminal justice system,1,2 occurrence of chronic health conditions,3 and poorer health outcomes.4 Behavioral health problems affect people from all walks of life and all age groups. However, these disorders are treatable, and people can and do recover. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) leads public health efforts to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on American people.

This report contains the first release of 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) estimates on the receipt of substance use treatment or mental health service use among people aged 12 years old or older in the United States. Comprehensive 2014 NSDUH detailed tables that show additional substance use and mental health-related outcomes, including data for various subpopulations covered in NSDUH, are available separately at http://www.samhsa.gov/data/.5


Survey Background


NSDUH is an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States aged 12 years old or older.6 The survey is sponsored by SAMHSA within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The survey covers residents of households and individuals in noninstitutional group quarters (e.g., shelters, boarding houses, college dormitories, migratory workers' camps, halfway houses). The survey excludes people with no fixed address (e.g., homeless people not in shelters), military personnel on active duty, and residents of institutional group quarters, such as jails, nursing homes, mental institutions, and long-term hospitals.

NSDUH employs a stratified multistage area probability sample that is designed to be representative of both the nation as a whole and for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The 2014 NSDUH target sample size of 67,500 interviews was distributed across three age groups, with 25 percent allocated to adolescents aged 12 to 17, 25 percent allocated to young adults aged 18 to 25, and 50 percent allocated to adults aged 26 or older. In 2002 through 2013, the NSDUH sample was allocated equally across these three age groups and had the same total target sample size per year as in 2014.7

NSDUH is a face-to-face household interview survey that is conducted in two phases: the screening phase and the interview phase. The interviewer conducts a screening of the eligible household with an adult resident (aged 18 or older) in order to determine whether zero, one, or two residents aged 12 or older should be selected for the interview.8 NSDUH collects data using audio computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI), in which respondents read or listen to the questions on headphones and then enter their answers directly on the NSDUH laptop computer. ACASI is designed to encourage accurate reporting of information by providing respondents with a highly private and confidential mode for responding to questions about illicit drug use, mental health, and other sensitive behaviors. NSDUH also uses computer-assisted personal interviewing (CAPI), in which interviewers read less sensitive questions to respondents and enter the respondents' answers on the laptop.

In 2014, screening was completed at 127,605 addresses, and 67,901 completed interviews were obtained, including 17,046 interviews from adolescents aged 12 to 17 and 50,855 interviews from adults aged 18 or older. Weighted response rates for household screening and for interviewing were 81.9 and 71.2 percent, respectively, for an overall response rate of 58.3 percent for people aged 12 or older. Weighted interview response rates were 80.0 percent for adolescents and 70.3 percent for adults.9 Further details about the 2014 NSDUH design and methods can be found on the web at http://www.samhsa.gov/data/.10


Data Presentation and Interpretation


Estimates of treatment for a substance use problem and reasons for not receiving substance use treatment are presented in this report for individuals aged 12 or older. This report also presents estimates of the receipt of services for mental health issues. However, estimates for mental health service use are presented separately for adolescents aged 12 to 17 and adults aged 18 or older because adolescents and adults completed different sets of questions regarding mental health and mental health service utilization. Estimates are based on 2014 NSDUH data and single years of NSDUH data (where applicable) for 2002 to 2013, except for estimates of reasons for not receiving substance use treatment. These estimates of reasons for not receiving substance use treatment are based on combined 2011 to 2014 NSDUH data to increase the precision of the estimates.

All estimates (e.g., percentages and numbers) presented in the report are derived from NSDUH survey data that are subject to sampling errors. The estimates have met the criteria for statistical reliability. Estimates that do not meet these criteria for reliability have been suppressed and are not shown.11 This report focuses on long-term trends by comparing estimates in 2014 with estimates in each of the years from 2002 to 2013. Statistical tests also have been conducted for comparisons that appear in the text of the report. Statistically significant differences are described using terms such as "higher," "lower," "increased," or "decreased." Statements use terms such as "similar," "remained steady," or "stable" when a difference is not statistically significant. Analyses of long-term trends in this report summarize whether the 2014 estimates are different from or similar to estimates in most or all previous years,12 while minimizing discussion of anomalous differences between any 2 years that can occur due to these estimates being based on samples.13 Graphics contain estimates that support the statements in this report, and supplemental tables of estimates (including standard errors) are included in Appendix A.


Receipt of Any Substance Use Treatment


NSDUH respondents who used alcohol or illicit drugs14 in their lifetime are asked whether they ever received substance use treatment, and those who received substance use treatment in their lifetime are asked whether they received treatment in the 12 months prior to the survey interview (i.e., the past year). Substance use treatment refers to treatment received for illicit drug or alcohol use or for medical problems associated with the use of illicit drugs or alcohol. This includes treatment received in the past year at any location, such as a hospital (inpatient), rehabilitation facility (outpatient or inpatient), mental health center, emergency room, private doctor's office, prison or jail, or a self-help group, such as Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous. People could report receiving treatment at more than one location.

NSDUH also includes a series of questions about past year SUDs for respondents who reported use of alcohol or illicit drugs in the past 12 months. These SUD questions are used to classify people as having an SUD in the past 12 months based on criteria specified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV).15 The criteria include symptoms such as withdrawal, tolerance, use in dangerous situations, trouble with the law, and interference with major obligations at work, school, or home during the past 12 months.

In 2014, about 21.5 million people aged 12 or older met the criteria for an SUD in the past year, and 2.3 million people with an SUD received substance use treatment in the past 12 months (Figure 1). Thus, about 1 in 10 people with an SUD received substance use treatment in 2014. There were about 4.1 million people in 2014 who received any substance use treatment for a problem related to the use of alcohol or illicit drugs. About half of those who reported that they received treatment in the past year did not have an SUD in the past year. People who attended self-help groups in the past year or who received services in medical or mental health facilities to maintain abstinence from alcohol or illicit drugs may not meet the criteria for having an SUD in the past year. Because recovery from SUDs is a long-term process that can entail multiple interventions and involves regular monitoring, people in recovery may be participating in treatment to maintain their successful recovery despite not meeting the criteria for an SUD in the past year or not using alcohol or illicit drugs.

Figure 1. Past Year Substance Use Disorder and Receipt of Treatment for Substance Use among People Aged 12 or Older: 2014

Figure 1     D

SUD = substance use disorder.

The estimated 4.1 million people aged 12 or older in 2014 who received substance use treatment in the past year represent 1.6 percent of the population in the United States. Among those who received substance use treatment in 2014, about 1.4 million received treatment for the use of both alcohol and illicit drugs, 1.0 million received treatment for the use of illicit drugs but not alcohol, and 1.3 million received treatment for the use of alcohol but not illicit drugs (Figure 2).16 The number of people who received substance use treatment in 2014 (4.1 million) was greater than the estimates in 2002 and 2003, and it was similar to the estimates in 2004 through 2013 (Figure 3).

Figure 2. Received Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older, by Treatment for Illicit Drugs, Alcohol, or Both (in millions): 2014

Figure 2     D

Note: The total includes people who received treatment specifically for illicit drugs or alcohol, as well as people who received treatment but did not specify whether they received treatment only for alcohol use, only for illicit drug use, or for both alcohol and illicit drug use.

Figure 3. Received Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014

Figure 3     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 3 Table. Received Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014
Age Group 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
12 or Older 3,483+ 3,327+ 3,791 3,930 4,031 3,927 4,061 4,276 4,152 3,764 4,004 4,051 4,149
12 to 17    369+    362+      406+      348+      353+      341+      331+    286    290      301+    285    232    227
18 to 25  686  891    874      962+    875    864    864      984+      969+    872    841    764    764
26 or Older 2,428+ 2,074+   2,511+   2,620+ 2,803 2,721 2,867 3,006 2,893    2,591+ 2,878 3,055 3,158

By Age Group

Aged 12 to 17

In 2014, about 227,000 adolescents aged 12 to 17 (or 0.9 percent of adolescents) received treatment within the past year for a problem related to the use of alcohol or illicit drugs (Figure 3). Among adolescents who received treatment for a substance use problem in the past year, about 91,000 received treatment for the use of both alcohol and illicit drugs, 75,000 received treatment for the use of illicit drugs but not alcohol, and 16,000 received treatment for the use of alcohol but not illicit drugs (Table A.2A in Appendix A).16 Therefore, in contrast to the pattern among the population aged 12 or older, treatment only for an alcohol use problem was less common among adolescents than was treatment for an illicit drug use problem (with or without treatment for an alcohol use problem). The number of adolescents who received substance use treatment in 2014 (227,000) was lower than the estimates in 2002 through 2008, but it was similar to the estimates in most years from 2009 through 2013.

Aged 18 to 25

About 764,000 young adults aged 18 to 25 (or 2.2 percent of young adults) in 2014 received treatment within the past year for a problem related to the use of alcohol or illicit drugs (Figure 3). Among young adults who received treatment in the past year, about 244,000 received treatment for the use of both alcohol and illicit drugs, 252,000 received treatment for the use of illicit drugs but not alcohol, and 181,000 received treatment for the use of alcohol but not illicit drugs (Table A.3A in Appendix A).16 The number of young adults who received substance use treatment in 2014 (764,000) was similar to the numbers in most years from 2002 to 2013. However, greater numbers of young adults received substance use treatment in 2005, 2009, and 2010 than in 2014.

Aged 26 or Older

There were about 3.2 million adults aged 26 or older (or 1.5 percent of adults in this age group) in 2014 who received treatment within the past year for a problem related to the use of alcohol or illicit drugs (Figure 3). About 1.1 million adults aged 26 or older received treatment for the use of both alcohol and illicit drugs, 681,000 received treatment for the use of illicit drugs but not alcohol, and 1.1 million received treatment for the use of alcohol but not illicit drugs (Table A.4A in Appendix A).16 The number of adults aged 26 or older who received substance use treatment in 2014 (3.2 million) was greater than the estimates in 2002 through 2005. However, the 2014 number was similar to the numbers in most years from 2006 through 2013.

Any Substance Use Treatment for Specific Substances

Respondents who reported receiving substance use treatment in the past year had the opportunity to indicate the specific substances for which they received treatment during their most recent (e.g., last or current) substance use treatment. As shown in Figure 4, the following numbers of people aged 12 or older in 2014 were estimated to have received treatment for specific substances during their most recent treatment17,18 in the past year:

Figure 4. Substances for Which Most Recent Treatment Was Received in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older (in thousands): 2014

Figure 4     D

The remainder of this section discusses trends in the receipt of treatment for the use of marijuana, cocaine, pain relievers, heroin, and alcohol during the most recent substance use treatment.

Treatment for Marijuana Use

In 2014, about 1.0 million people aged 12 or older received treatment for marijuana use during their most recent substance use treatment in the past year (Figure 4). The number of people who received treatment for marijuana use in 2014 was similar to the corresponding numbers in 2002 through 2013 (Figure 5). Estimates in other years ranged from 845,000 to 1.2 million people who received their most recent treatment for marijuana use.

Figure 5. Received Most Recent Treatment in the Past Year for Marijuana among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014

Figure 5     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 5 Table. Received Most Recent Treatment in the Past Year for Marijuana among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014
Age Group 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
12 or Older 974 975 1,017 1,062 1,233 942 955 1,234 1,028 872 957 845 1,034
12 to 17   203+   189+      219+      185+      189+   172+ 162    159    155 165   187+ 127    117
18 to 25 264   356+      346+      332+      379+ 281 310      362+      335+ 298 279 268    238
26 or Older 507   431+      451+    546    665 490 483    714    539   409+ 491   450+    679

By Age Group

An estimated 117,000 adolescents aged 12 to 17 in 2014 received treatment for marijuana use during their most recent substance use treatment in the past year (Figure 5). The number of adolescents who received marijuana use treatment in 2014 was lower than the numbers in 2002 through 2007, but it was similar to the numbers in most years from 2008 through 2013.

In 2014, about 238,000 young adults aged 18 to 25 and 679,000 adults aged 26 or older received treatment for marijuana use during their most recent substance use treatment in the past year (Figure 5). The estimated number of young adults who received marijuana use treatment in 2014 was lower than the numbers in 2003 through 2006, and it was similar to the numbers in 2011 through 2013. However, the numbers of young adults in 2009 and 2010 who received marijuana use treatment were greater than the number in 2014.

The number of adults aged 26 or older who received marijuana use treatment in 2014 (679,000) was similar to the corresponding numbers in most years between 2005 and 2013. However, the number in 2014 was higher than the numbers in 2003 to 2004 and in 2011 and 2013.

Treatment for Cocaine Use

In 2014, about 781,000 people aged 12 or older received treatment for cocaine use during their most recent substance use treatment in the past year (Figure 4). The number of people who received cocaine use treatment in 2014 was similar to the numbers in most years from 2002 through 2013 (Figure 6). The estimated numbers of people aged 12 or older in 2002 to 2013 who received their most recent treatment for cocaine use ranged from 511,000 to 930,000.

Figure 6. Received Most Recent Treatment in the Past Year for Cocaine among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014

Figure 6     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 6 Table. Received Most Recent Treatment in the Past Year for Cocaine among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014
Age Group 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
12 or Older 796 557 884 797 930 818 664 777 706   511+ 658 584 781
12 to 17     45+     33+     41+     32+     48+     34+     23+     28+     27+   18   24   20     8
18 to 25 114 138   161+   140+   167+ 134   144+   142+   143+ 121 106 116   88
26 or Older 637   386+ 683 624 715 650 497 607 535   372+ 528   448+ 685

By Age Group

In 2014, about 8,000 adolescents aged 12 to 17, 88,000 young adults aged 18 to 25, and 685,000 adults aged 26 or older received treatment for cocaine use during their most recent substance use treatment in the past year (Figure 6). The number of adolescents in 2014 who received treatment for cocaine use was lower than the numbers in 2002 through 2010. For example, nearly 6 times as many adolescents received treatment for cocaine use in 2002 (45,000) than in 2014. The number of young adults who last received treatment for cocaine use in 2014 (88,000) was lower than the numbers in most years from 2004 through 2010, but it was similar to the numbers in 2011 to 2013. The number of adults aged 26 or older who last received treatment for cocaine use in 2014 (685,000) was similar to the numbers in most years since 2002; however, the 2014 estimate was greater than the estimates in 2003, 2011, and 2013.

Treatment for Prescription Pain Reliever Use

In 2014, about 772,000 people aged 12 or older received treatment for prescription pain reliever use during their most recent substance use treatment in the past year (Figure 4). The number of people who received treatment for prescription pain reliever use in 2014 was greater than the numbers in 2002 through 2007 (Figure 7). However, the number in 2014 was similar to the numbers in 2008 through 2013.

Figure 7. Received Most Recent Treatment in the Past Year for Pain Relievers among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014

Figure 7     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 7 Table. Received Most Recent Treatment in the Past Year for Pain Relievers among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014
Age Group 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
12 or Older 360+   415+   424+   466+   547+   565+ 604 736 761 726 973 746 772
12 to 17 37   40     60+     47+     57+   41     44+     44+     50+     51+     44+   29   22
18 to 25   75+ 136 140 137 159 131 171 207 182 228 247 190 183
26 or Older   247+   239+   224+   282+   330+ 393   388+ 485 529 447 682 527 567

By Age Group

In 2014, about 22,000 adolescents aged 12 to 17, 183,000 young adults aged 18 to 25, and 567,000 adults aged 26 or older received treatment for prescription pain reliever use during their most recent substance use treatment in the past year (Figure 7). The number of adolescents in 2014 who received treatment for prescription pain reliever use was lower than the numbers in most years from 2004 to 2012, but it was similar to the number in 2013. The number of young adults in 2014 who received treatment for prescription pain reliever use was similar to the numbers in 2003 through 2013. Among adults aged 26 or older, the number who received treatment for prescription pain reliever use in 2014 was greater than the numbers in most years from 2002 through 2008, but it was similar to the numbers in 2009 to 2013.

Treatment for Heroin Use

There were an estimated 618,000 people aged 12 or older in 2014 who received treatment for heroin use during their most recent substance use treatment in the past year (Figure 4). The number of people who received treatment for heroin use in 2014 was greater than the numbers in most years from 2002 through 2008 (Figure 8). However, the number of people in 2014 who received their most recent treatment for heroin use was similar to the corresponding numbers in 2009 through 2013.

Figure 8. Received Most Recent Treatment in the Past Year for Heroin among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014

Figure 8     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 8 Table. Received Most Recent Treatment in the Past Year for Heroin among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014
Age Group 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
* Low precision; no estimate reported.
12 or Older 277+ 281+ 283+ 326+ 467 343+ 343+ 486 422 430 450 526 618
12 to 17   6   8 10 10     5   8   9     7     3   14     9 *   12
18 to 25   39+   50+   60+ 87      67+   74+   67+   95   86 112 104 128 133
26 or Older 232+ 224+ 213+ 228+ 396 261+ 267+ 385 333 303 338 392 473

By Age Group

In 2014, there were an estimated 12,000 adolescents aged 12 to 17, 133,000 young adults aged 18 to 25, and 473,000 adults aged 26 or older who received treatment for heroin use during their most recent substance use treatment in the past year (Figure 8). The number of adolescents in 2014 who received treatment for heroin use during their most recent substance use treatment was similar to the numbers of adolescents who received heroin use treatment in 2002 through 2012.19 The numbers of young adults and adults aged 26 or older who received treatment for heroin use during their most recent substance use treatment in 2014 were greater than the corresponding numbers in most years from 2002 through 2008; however, the 2014 numbers for both age groups were similar to the numbers in 2009 through 2013. For example, the number of adults aged 26 or older in 2014 (473,000) who received treatment for heroin use during their most recent treatment was about twice the number in 2002 (232,000).

Treatment for Alcohol Use

In 2014, about 2.4 million people aged 12 or older received treatment for alcohol use during their most recent substance use treatment in the past year (Figure 4). The number of people who received alcohol use treatment in 2014 was similar to the numbers in most years from 2002 through 2013 (Figure 9). Thus, in each year between 2002 and 2014, at least 2 million people aged 12 or older reported that they last received treatment in the past year for alcohol use.

Figure 9. Received Most Recent Treatment in the Past Year for Alcohol among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014

Figure 9     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 9 Table. Received Most Recent Treatment in the Past Year for Alcohol among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014
Age Group 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
12 or Older 2,222 2,163 2,413 2,463 2,545 2,471 2,678   2,881+ 2,607 2,364 2,395 2,513 2,406
12 to 17      187+      171+      197+      171+      149+      162+      145+      135+      122+    103      122+    105      79
18 to 25    387      524+      493+      531+      556+      570+      553+      610+      537+    472    358    398    377
26 or Older 1,647   1,469+ 1,723 1,761 1,840 1,739 1,980 2,136 1,948 1,789 1,915 2,010 1,950

By Age Group

In 2014, there were an estimated 79,000 adolescents aged 12 to 17, 377,000 young adults aged 18 to 25, and 2.0 million adults aged 26 or older who received treatment for alcohol use during their most recent substance use treatment in the past year (Figure 9). The number of adolescents who received treatment for alcohol use in 2014 was lower than the numbers in most years between 2002 and 2012; however, the 2014 number was similar to the numbers in 2011 and 2013.

The number of young adults who received treatment for alcohol use in 2014 (377,000) was lower than the numbers in 2003 through 2010, but it was similar to the numbers in 2011 to 2013 (Figure 9). The number of adults aged 26 or older in 2014 who received treatment for alcohol use during their most recent substance use treatment was similar to the numbers in most years from 2002 through 2013.

Location of Receipt of Any Substance Use Treatment

In 2014, among the 4.1 million people aged 12 or older who received substance use treatment in the past year, about 2.2 million people received treatment at a self-help group, 1.7 million received treatment at a rehabilitation facility as an outpatient, 1.2 million received treatment at a mental health center as an outpatient, and 1.1 million received treatment at a rehabilitation facility as an inpatient (Figure 10).20 The number of people who received substance use treatment at a self-help group was stable between 2002 and 2014, and the number of people receiving treatment at a rehabilitation facility as an outpatient was stable between 2004 and 2014 (Table A.9A in Appendix A). The numbers of people in 2014 who received substance use treatment at a mental health center as an outpatient or who received substance use treatment at a rehabilitation facility as an inpatient were similar to the numbers in most years from 2002 to 2013. The number of people in 2014 who received treatment at a private doctor's office (780,000) was greater than the numbers in 2002 to 2005, but it was similar to the numbers in 2006 to 2013. Because over three fourths of the people in 2014 who received substance use treatment in the past year were aged 26 or older (3.2 million of the 4.1 million people who received treatment), this section of the report does not discuss locations of substance use treatment by age group.

Figure 10. Locations Where Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year Was Received among People Aged 12 or Older (in thousands): 2014

Figure 10     D

Note: Locations where people received substance use treatment are not mutually exclusive because respondents could report that they received treatment in more than one location in the past year.


Receipt of Specialty Treatment


Questions in NSDUH about the receipt of substance use treatment in the past year include whether respondents received substance use treatment at a specialty facility. Specialty treatment includes treatment at a hospital (only as an inpatient), a drug or alcohol rehabilitation facility (as an inpatient or outpatient), or a mental health center. This NSDUH definition historically has not considered emergency rooms, private doctors' offices, prisons or jails, and self-help groups to be specialty substance use treatment facilities.21

In 2014, about 2.6 million people aged 12 or older received treatment at a specialty facility for an illicit drug use problem or an alcohol use problem in the past year (Figure 11). This number represents 1.0 percent of people aged 12 or older and nearly two thirds of the 4.1 million people aged 12 or older in 2014 who received substance use treatment at any location in the past year. Of the people who received specialty substance use treatment in 2014, about 684,000 received treatment for the use of both alcohol and illicit drugs, 861,000 received treatment for the use of illicit drugs but not alcohol, and 764,000 received treatment for the use of alcohol but not illicit drugs (Table A.1A in Appendix A).16

Figure 11. Received Substance Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older, by Treatment for Illicit Drugs, Alcohol, or Both (in millions): 2014

Figure 11     D

Note: The total includes people who received treatment specifically for illicit drugs or alcohol, as well as people who received treatment but did not specify whether they received treatment only for alcohol use, only for illicit drug use, or for both alcohol and illicit drug use.

The number of people aged 12 or older who received specialty substance use treatment for illicit drugs or alcohol in 2014 (2.6 million) was similar to the numbers in most years from 2002 to 2013 (Figure 12). The number of people aged 12 or older who received specialty substance use treatment for the use of illicit drugs but not alcohol in 2014 (861,000) was similar to the numbers in most years from 2006 through 2013, but it was greater than the numbers in 2002 to 2005 (Table A.1A in Appendix A). The numbers of people aged 12 or older who received specialty substance use treatment for their use of alcohol but not illicit drugs remained stable between 2002 and 2014.

Figure 12. Received Substance Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014

Figure 12     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 12 Table. Received Substance Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014
Age Group 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
12 or Older 2,346 1,874+ 2,327 2,308 2,533 2,430 2,293 2,627 2,594 2,325 2,496 2,466 2,606
12 to 17      186+    168+      185+      181+      181+    151    145    152    139    146      157+    122    109
18 to 25    435  486    548    522    505    489    502      586+    537    567    467    458    470
26 or Older 1,724 1,221+    1,594+    1,605+ 1,846 1,790 1,646 1,888 1,919    1,613+ 1,872 1,886 2,028

By Age Group

In 2014, about 109,000 adolescents aged 12 to 17, 470,000 young adults aged 18 to 25, and 2.0 million adults aged 26 or older received treatment at a specialty facility for a problem related to the use of alcohol or illicit drugs (Figure 12). These numbers represent 0.4 percent of adolescents, 1.3 percent of young adults, and 1.0 percent of adults aged 26 or older in 2014.

The number of adolescents receiving specialty substance use treatment within the past year was lower in 2014 than in 2002 through 2006; however, the 2014 number was similar to the numbers in most years from 2007 to 2013 (Figure 12). The number of young adults in 2014 who received treatment at a specialty facility for their use of alcohol or illicit drugs was similar to the numbers in most years from 2002 to 2013. The number of adults aged 26 or older who received treatment at a specialty facility for their use of alcohol or illicit drugs in 2014 (2.0 million) was higher than the numbers in 2003 through 2005, and it was similar to the numbers in most years from 2006 through 2013.


Need for Substance Use Treatment


As noted previously, NSDUH includes questions about past year SUDs and the receipt of substance use treatment at a specialty facility in the past year. These data are used to identify people who needed substance use treatment in the past year (i.e., treatment for problems related to the use of alcohol or illicit drugs). For NSDUH, people are defined as needing substance use treatment if they had an SUD in the past year or they received treatment for the use of illicit drugs or alcohol at a specialty facility in the past year.22

In 2014, an estimated 22.5 million people aged 12 or older needed substance use treatment (Figure 13). As noted previously, there were 21.5 million people aged 12 or older in 2014 with an SUD in the past year (Figure 1). Thus, about 96 percent of the people in 2014 who needed treatment for a substance use problem were defined as such because they had an SUD in the past year, regardless of whether they received substance use treatment at a specialty facility.

Figure 13. Need for Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older, by Type of Need (in millions): 2014

Figure 13     D

Note: Numbers of people who needed treatment specifically for illicit drug use or for alcohol use are not mutually exclusive.

The 22.5 million people in 2014 who needed substance use treatment included 7.9 million people who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem and 17.6 million people who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem (Figure 13).23 These numbers represent 8.5 percent of people aged 12 or older who needed any substance use treatment, 3.0 percent of people aged 12 or older who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem, and 6.7 percent of people aged 12 or older who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem.

The number of people who needed treatment for a substance use problem in 2014 (22.5 million) was similar to the numbers in 2002 to 2013 (Figure 14). Stated another way, about 22 million to 24 million people aged 12 or older needed substance use treatment in any year between 2002 and 2014.

Figure 14. Need for Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014

Figure 14     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 14 Table. Need for Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014
Age Group 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
12 or Older 22,811 22,165 23,476 23,172 23,635 23,265 23,208 23,632 23,209 21,579 23,061 22,687 22,478
12 to 17     2,256+     2,253+     2,288+     2,096+     2,090+     1,984+     1,949+     1,784+     1,833+     1,744+     1,563+   1,340   1,284
18 to 25     6,874+     6,824+     7,047+     7,220+     7,155+     6,939+     7,054+     6,929+     6,956+     6,560+     6,681+   6,146   5,845
26 or Older   13,680+   13,088+   14,142+   13,856+ 14,390 14,342   14,204+ 14,918 14,420   13,274+ 14,817 15,200 15,349

The number of people aged 12 or older who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem in 2014 (7.9 million) was similar to the numbers in most years from 2002 through 2013 (Table A.10A in Appendix A). The number of people who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem in 2014 (17.6 million) was similar to the numbers in 2002, 2003, and 2010 to 2013. However, fewer people in 2014 needed treatment for an alcohol use problem than in 2004 to 2009.

By Age Group

Aged 12 to 17

In 2014, about 1.3 million adolescents aged 12 to 17 needed treatment for a substance use problem (Figure 14), which represents 5.2 percent of adolescents. The number of adolescents who needed substance use treatment in 2014 was lower than the numbers in 2002 through 2012, but was it similar to the number in 2013.

Among the 1.3 million adolescents in 2014 who needed treatment for a substance use problem, 894,000 needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem, and 699,000 needed treatment for an alcohol use problem (Table A.11A in Appendix A).23 The number of adolescents who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem in 2014 represents 3.6 percent of adolescents. The number of adolescents who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem in 2014 represents 2.8 percent of adolescents.

The number of adolescents who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem in 2014 (894,000) was lower than the numbers in 2002 through 2012 (Table A.11A in Appendix A). Similarly, the number of adolescents who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem in 2014 (699,000) was lower than the numbers in 2002 through 2012, but it was similar to the number in 2013.

Aged 18 to 25

About 5.8 million young adults aged 18 to 25 in 2014 needed treatment for a substance use problem (Figure 14). This number represents 16.7 percent of young adults. Stated another way, about 1 in 6 young adults needed substance use treatment in 2014. The number of young adults in 2014 who needed substance use treatment was lower than the numbers in 2002 through 2012, but it was similar to the number in 2013.

Among the 5.8 million young adults in 2014 who needed substance use treatment, about 2.5 million needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem, and 4.4 million needed treatment for an alcohol use problem (Table A.12A in Appendix A).23 The number of young adults in 2014 who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem represents 7.0 percent of young adults. The number of young adults who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem in 2014 represents 12.5 percent of young adults. Stated another way, about 1 in 8 young adults needed treatment in 2014 for problems related to their alcohol use.

The number of young adults who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem in 2014 (2.5 million) was lower than the numbers in most years from 2004 through 2012, when about 2.7 million to 2.9 million young adults each year needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem (Table A.12A in Appendix A). However, the number of young adults who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem in 2014 was similar to the number in 2013. The number of young adults who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem in 2014 (4.4 million) was lower than the numbers in 2002 through 2012. However, the number of young adults who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem in 2014 was similar to the number in 2013.

Aged 26 or Older

In 2014, about 15.3 million adults aged 26 or older needed substance use treatment (Figure 14). This number represents 7.5 percent of adults in this age group. The number of adults aged 26 or older who needed substance use treatment in 2014 was greater than the numbers in 2002 through 2005, but it was similar to the numbers in most years from 2006 to 2013.

Among the 15.3 million adults aged 26 or older in 2014 who needed substance use treatment, about 4.5 million needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem, and 12.6 million needed treatment for an alcohol use problem (Table A.13A in Appendix A).23 The number of adults aged 26 or older in 2014 who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem represents 2.2 percent of adults in this age group. The number of adults aged 26 or older who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem represents 6.1 percent of adults aged 26 or older.

The number of adults aged 26 or older who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem in 2014 (4.5 million) was greater than the numbers in each year from 2002 through 2008, but it was similar to the numbers in most years from 2009 to 2013 (Table A.13A in Appendix A). The number of adults aged 26 or older who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem in 2014 (12.6 million) was greater than the numbers in 2002 and 2003, but it was similar to the numbers in most years from 2004 to 2013.


Receipt of Specialty Treatment among People Who Needed Substance Use Treatment


The number of people who needed substance use treatment and did not receive treatment at a specialty facility is one indication of the extent of the unmet need for substance use treatment. Therefore, this section focuses on the receipt or lack of receipt of specialty treatment among people who needed substance use treatment.

In 2014, an estimated 2.6 million people aged 12 or older received treatment at a specialty facility in the past year for a problem related to their use of illicit drugs or alcohol (Figure 15). This number represents 1.0 percent of people aged 12 or older and 11.6 percent of the 22.5 million people who needed substance use treatment in 2014 (Table A.14B in Appendix A). Conversely, in 2014, about 19.9 million people aged 12 or older needed substance use treatment, but they did not receive treatment at a specialty facility.

Figure 15. Receipt of Specialty Treatment in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Substance Use Treatment: 2014

Figure 15     D

Among people aged 12 or older who needed treatment for a substance use problem, the percentage in 2014 who received treatment at a specialty facility was similar to the percentages in most years from 2002 to 2013 (Figure 16). Since 2002, therefore, only about 1 in 10 people aged 12 or older who needed substance use treatment had received specialty treatment in the past year (ranging from 8.5 to 11.6 percent).

Figure 16. Received Substance Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Substance Use Treatment, by Age Group: Percentages, 2002-2014

Figure 16     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 16 Table. Received Substance Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Substance Use Treatment, by Age Group: Percentages, 2002-2014
Age Group 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
12 or Older 10.3     8.5+   9.9 10.0 10.7 10.4   9.9 11.1 11.2 10.8 10.8 10.9 11.6
12 to 17   8.2   7.4   8.1   8.6   8.7   7.6   7.4   8.5   7.6   8.4 10.0   9.1   8.5
18 to 25      6.3+   7.1   7.8   7.2   7.1   7.0   7.1   8.5   7.7   8.6   7.0   7.4   8.0
26 or Older 12.6     9.3+ 11.3 11.6 12.8 12.5 11.6 12.7 13.3 12.1 12.6 12.4 13.2

By Age Group

Among people in specific age groups in 2014 who needed substance use treatment, 8.5 percent of adolescents aged 12 to 17, 8.0 percent of young adults aged 18 to 25, and 13.2 percent of adults aged 26 or older received substance use treatment at a specialty facility in the past 12 months (Figure 16). Among adolescents who needed substance use treatment, the percentage in 2014 who received treatment at a specialty facility was similar to those in each year from 2002 to 2013. These percentages in 2014 for receipt of substance use treatment at a specialty facility were similar to the percentages in most years from 2002 to 2013 among adults aged 18 to 25 and those aged 26 or older who needed treatment.

Receipt of Specialty Treatment for Illicit Drug Use among People Who Needed Illicit Drug Use Treatment

Among the 7.9 million people aged 12 or older in 2014 who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem (Table A.10A in Appendix A), about 1.6 million received treatment at a specialty facility in the past year for an illicit drug use problem (Figure 17).24 Thus, an estimated 6.3 million people aged 12 or older who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem did not receive specialty treatment in the past 12 months.

Figure 17. Receipt of Specialty Treatment in the Past Year for an Illicit Drug Use Problem among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Illicit Drug Use Treatment: 2014

Figure 17     D

Between 2002 and 2014, 15.0 to 20.3 percent of people aged 12 or older who needed treatment for illicit drug use received specialty treatment for their illicit drug use problem (Figure 18). Stated another way, about 1 in 5 people aged 12 or older who needed treatment for their use of illicit drugs received specialty treatment in the past year for their illicit drug use problem.

Figure 18. Received Illicit Drug Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Illicit Drug Use Treatment, by Age Group: Percentages, 2002-2014

Figure 18     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 18 Table. Received Illicit Drug Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Illicit Drug Use Treatment, by Age Group: Percentages, 2002-2014
Age Group 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
12 or Older 18.2   15.0+ 17.7 17.0 20.3 18.0   16.0+ 18.9 19.1 18.8 19.1 19.5 20.3
12 to 17 10.1   8.5   9.6 11.3 11.2   9.9   9.3 10.7   8.4 10.5 11.6 10.0   8.3
18 to 25 10.7 13.0 12.3 12.3 12.5 11.1 11.3 13.7 12.6 14.5 12.8 12.8 13.3
26 or Older 26.9   19.2+ 24.8 22.9 28.9 25.7 21.6 24.7 27.0 25.5 25.2 26.1 26.5

By Age Group

Among people in specific age groups in 2014 who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem, 8.3 percent of adolescents aged 12 to 17, 13.3 percent of young adults aged 18 to 25, and 26.5 percent of adults aged 26 or older received treatment at a specialty facility in the past 12 months (Figure 18). These 2014 percentages were similar to the percentages in each year from 2002 to 2013 for adolescents and young adults who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem and also were similar to the percentages in most years from 2002 to 2013 among the corresponding group of adults aged 26 or older.

Receipt of Specialty Treatment for Alcohol Use among People Who Needed Alcohol Use Treatment

In 2014, 1.6 million people aged 12 or older received treatment at a specialty facility for an alcohol use problem in the past year, which represents 8.9 percent of the 17.6 million people who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem (Figure 19).25 Thus, an estimated 16.1 million people aged 12 or older who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem did not receive specialty treatment. Between 2002 and 2014, 7.1 to 8.9 percent of people aged 12 or older who needed treatment for alcohol use actually received specialty treatment for their alcohol use problem (Figure 20).

Figure 19. Receipt of Specialty Treatment in the Past Year for an Alcohol Use Problem among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Alcohol Use Treatment: 2014

Figure 19     D

Note: The numbers do not add to 17.6 million due to rounding.

Figure 20. Received Alcohol Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Alcohol Use Treatment, by Age Group: Percentages, 2002-2014

Figure 20     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 20 Table. Received Alcohol Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Alcohol Use Treatment, by Age Group: Percentages, 2002-2014
Age Group 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
12 or Older   8.3   7.1+ 7.9   8.4 7.9 8.1 8.2 8.8   8.5 8.5   8.2   7.9   8.9
12 to 17   8.1 6.3 8.0   8.1 7.2 5.9 6.2 8.2   6.1 6.4   8.5 10.0   7.9
18 to 25   4.8 5.5 5.6   5.1 5.4 5.2 5.9 6.4   5.7 6.2     3.6+   5.0   5.6
26 or Older 10.0 8.1 9.0 10.0 9.3 9.7 9.5 9.9 10.0 9.6 10.0   8.8 10.1

By Age Group

Among people in specific age groups in 2014 who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem, 7.9 percent of adolescents aged 12 to 17, 5.6 percent of young adults aged 18 to 25, and 10.1 percent of adults aged 26 or older received treatment at a specialty facility in the past 12 months (Figure 20). These 2014 percentages were similar to percentages from 2002 to 2013 among adolescents and among adults aged 26 or older who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem. Among young adults who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem, the percentage who received treatment at a specialty facility in 2014 was similar to the percentages in most years from 2002 to 2013.


Perceived Need for Substance Use Treatment


NSDUH respondents who used alcohol or illicit drugs in their lifetime and did not receive substance use treatment in the past 12 months are asked whether they felt they needed treatment for their use of alcohol or illicit drugs. Respondents who reported that they felt they needed treatment in the past 12 months also are asked whether they made an effort to get treatment.26

In 2014, among the estimated 19.9 million people aged 12 or older who needed substance use treatment but did not receive specialty treatment in the past year (Figure 15), about 798,000 reported that they perceived a need for treatment for their use of illicit drugs or alcohol (Figure 21). The estimated 798,000 people who perceived a need for treatment corresponds to about 4.0 percent of the people who needed specialty substance use treatment. Thus, the large majority of the roughly 20 million people aged 12 or older who needed substance use treatment but did not receive specialty treatment did not think that they needed treatment in the past 12 months for their substance use.

Figure 21. Perceived Need for Substance Use Treatment among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Substance Use Treatment But Did Not Receive Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year: 2014

Figure 21     D

Note: The percentages do not add to 100 percent due to rounding.

Similarly, most people aged 12 or older in 2014 who needed substance use treatment but did not receive specialty treatment specifically for an illicit drug use problem or specifically for an alcohol use problem did not perceive a need for treatment. Of the 6.3 million people aged 12 or older in 2014 who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem but did not receive specialty treatment, 399,000 (6.4 percent) perceived a need for treatment for their use of illicit drugs, and 5.9 million did not perceive a need for treatment (Figure 22). Among the 16.1 million people aged 12 or older in 2014 who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem but did not receive specialty treatment, 459,000 people (2.9 percent) felt they needed treatment for their alcohol use (Figure 23).

Figure 22. Perceived Need for Illicit Drug Use Treatment among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Treatment for an Illicit Drug Use Problem But Did Not Receive Illicit Drug Use Treatment in the Past Year: 2014

Figure 22     D

Note: The percentages do not add to 100 percent due to rounding.

Figure 23. Perceived Need for Alcohol Use Treatment among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Treatment for an Alcohol Use Problem But Did Not Receive Alcohol Use Treatment in the Past Year: 2014

Figure 23     D

In 2014, the 798,000 people aged 12 or older who felt they needed treatment for their use of illicit drugs or alcohol but did not receive specialty treatment included 231,000 people who reported that they made an effort to get treatment (1.2 percent of people who needed treatment but did not receive treatment) and 567,000 people who did not report making an effort to get treatment (2.9 percent of people who needed treatment but did not receive it) (Figure 21). Of the 399,000 people who felt a need for treatment for their use of illicit drugs but did not receive specialty treatment, 145,000 reported that they made an effort to get treatment, and 254,000 did not report making an effort to get treatment (Figure 22). Of the 459,000 people who perceived a need for treatment for their use of alcohol but did not receive specialty treatment, 125,000 made an effort to get treatment, and 334,000 did not make an effort to get treatment (Figure 23).

By Age Group

Aged 12 to 17

In 2014, among the estimated 1.2 million adolescents aged 12 to 17 who needed substance use treatment but did not receive treatment at a specialty facility in the past year (Table A.11A in Appendix A), about 32,000 reported that they perceived a need for treatment for their illicit drug or alcohol use (Table A.15A in Appendix A). This number of adolescents who perceived a need for substance use treatment represents 2.7 percent of adolescents who needed and did not receive specialty treatment in 2014. The 32,000 adolescents who felt they needed substance use treatment but did not receive specialty treatment included 21,000 who reported that they made an effort to get treatment and 10,000 who did not report making an effort to get treatment.27

Most adolescents in 2014 who needed but did not receive specialty treatment specifically for an illicit drug use problem or specifically for an alcohol use problem also did not perceive a need for treatment. Of the 820,000 adolescents in 2014 who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem but did not receive specialty treatment (Table A.11A in Appendix A), about 29,000 (3.6 percent) perceived a need for treatment for their illicit drug use, and 791,000 did not perceive a need for treatment (Table A.16A in Appendix A). Of the 644,000 adolescents who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem but did not receive specialty treatment, about 8,000 (1.2 percent) perceived a need for treatment for their alcohol use and 636,000 did not (Table A.17A in Appendix A).

Aged 18 to 25

Among the estimated 5.4 million young adults aged 18 to 25 in 2014 who needed substance use treatment but did not receive treatment at a specialty facility in the past year (Table A.12A in Appendix A), about 168,000 reported that they perceived a need for treatment for their illicit drug or alcohol use (Table A.15A in Appendix A). This number of young adults who perceived a need for substance use treatment represents 3.1 percent of young adults who needed but did not receive specialty treatment in 2014. The estimated 168,000 young adults who felt they needed substance use treatment but did not receive specialty treatment includes about 58,000 who reported that they made an effort to get treatment and 110,000 who did not report making an effort to get treatment.

As was the case for adolescents, most young adults in 2014 who needed but did not receive treatment specifically for an illicit drug use problem or specifically for an alcohol use problem did not perceive a need for treatment. Of the estimated 2.1 million young adults aged 18 to 25 in 2014 who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem but did not receive specialty treatment (Table A.12A in Appendix A), about 85,000 (4.0 percent) reported that they perceived a need for treatment for their use of illicit drugs, and 2.0 million did not perceive a need for treatment (Table A.16A in Appendix A). Among the estimated 4.1 million young adults in 2014 who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem but did not receive specialty treatment, about 72,000 (1.8 percent) perceived a need for treatment for their alcohol use, and 4.0 million did not (Table A.17A in Appendix A).

Aged 26 or Older

In 2014, the estimated 13.3 million adults aged 26 or older who needed substance use treatment but did not receive treatment at a specialty facility in the past year (Table A.13A in Appendix A) included approximately 599,000 adults who reported that they perceived a need for treatment for their illicit drug or alcohol use (Table A.15A in Appendix A). This number of adults aged 26 or older in 2014 who perceived a need for substance use treatment represents 4.5 percent of adults in this age group who needed but did not receive specialty treatment. The 599,000 adults aged 26 or older in 2014 who needed substance use treatment and felt they needed treatment but who did not receive specialty treatment includes 152,000 who reported that they made an effort to get treatment and 447,000 who did not report making an effort to get treatment.

Of the estimated 3.3 million adults aged 26 or older in 2014 who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem but did not receive specialty treatment (Table A.13A in Appendix A), about 284,000 (8.5 percent) reported that they perceived a need for treatment for their illicit drug use, and 3.0 million did not perceive a need for treatment (Table A.16A in Appendix A). Of the estimated 11.3 million adults in this age group who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem but did not receive specialty treatment in 2014, about 380,000 (3.4 percent) felt that they needed treatment for their alcohol use, and 10.9 million did not (Table A.17A in Appendix A).


Reasons for Not Receiving Specialty Substance Use Treatment


As noted in the previous section, most people aged 12 or older who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem or an alcohol use problem in 2014 did not think that they needed treatment. For people with substance use problems who feel the need for treatment, potential barriers to receiving treatment could affect whether they make an effort to obtain treatment. Different barriers to receiving treatment also could be important depending on whether people need treatment for problems related to their use of illicit drugs or their use of alcohol.

If NSDUH respondents reported that they did not receive treatment for their illicit drug use or alcohol use in the past 12 months but they felt that they needed treatment, they were asked to report the reasons why they did not receive treatment. Information on commonly reported reasons why people did not receive treatment for a substance use problem despite perceiving a need for treatment is important for identifying and addressing barriers that prevent people from getting treatment.

Reasons for Not Receiving Specialty Treatment among People Who Perceived a Need for Substance Use Treatment

Based on 2011-2014 combined data, the two most commonly reported reasons for not receiving illicit drug use or alcohol use treatment among people aged 12 or older who needed but did not receive treatment at a specialty facility, despite perceiving a need for treatment, were that they were not ready to stop using (41.2 percent) or that they had no health coverage and could not afford the cost of treatment (30.8 percent) (Figure 24). About 1 in 10 people who needed specialty substance use treatment but did not receive it, despite feeling a need for treatment, were concerned about the possible negative effects on their jobs, thought that receiving treatment might cause their neighbors or their community to have a negative opinion of them, or did not know where to go for treatment.

Figure 24. Reasons for Not Receiving Substance Use Treatment among People Aged 12 or Older Who Felt They Needed Treatment: Percentages, 2011-2014 Combined

Figure 24     D

Among people in 2011 to 2014 who needed but did not receive illicit drug use treatment, despite feeling that they needed specialty treatment for their illicit drug use, about two fifths (39.0 percent) reported that they had no health insurance coverage and could not afford the cost of treatment (Figure 25). An estimated 29.1 percent reported that they did not receive illicit drug use treatment because they were not ready to stop using substances.

Figure 25. Reasons for Not Receiving Illicit Drug Use Treatment or Alcohol Use Treatment among People Aged 12 or Older Who Felt They Needed Treatment: Percentages, 2011-2014 Combined

Figure 25     D

Over half of people aged 12 or older in 2011 to 2014 (51.9 percent) who needed but did not receive alcohol use treatment, despite feeling a need for specialty treatment for their alcohol use, reported that they were not ready to stop using (Figure 25). About 1 in 4 people who needed but did not receive specialty alcohol use treatment, despite feeling a need for treatment for their alcohol use, reported that they had no health insurance coverage and could not afford the cost of treatment.

The finding that substantial percentages of people aged 12 or older in 2011 to 2014 who needed and perceived the need for substance use treatment did not receive treatment because they were not ready to stop using is not necessarily contradictory with people feeling the need for treatment because of problems associated with their substance use, especially among alcohol users. For example, some alcohol users may be reluctant to seek or enter specialty treatment for alcohol use problems if they believe that the expected outcome of treatment is total abstinence from alcohol and they are not ready to take this step.28,29

Reasons for Not Receiving Specialty Treatment among People Who Perceived a Need for Substance Use Treatment and Made an Effort to Get Treatment

Among people aged 12 or older in 2011 to 2014 who needed but did not receive specialty substance use treatment, felt a need for treatment, and made an effort to receive treatment, 35.3 percent reported that they had no health insurance coverage and could not afford the cost of treatment, and 24.2 percent were not ready to stop using (Figure 26).30 Other commonly reported reasons for not receiving treatment among this group included having inadequate health insurance coverage (i.e., did not cover treatment or did not cover the costs of treatment) (11.0 percent), not knowing where to go for treatment (10.6 percent), no program having the type of treatment that people wanted (10.3 percent), and not having transportation or treatment programs having inconvenient hours (10.0 percent).

Figure 26. Reasons for Not Receiving Substance Use Treatment among People Aged 12 or Older Who Made an Effort to Get Treatment: Percentages, 2011-2014 Combined

Figure 26     D

Note: Percentages are for people who (a) needed substance use treatment; (b) felt they needed treatment; and (c) made an effort to get treatment but did not receive treatment.


Mental Health Service Utilization among Adults


This section presents data on the receipt of mental health services among adults aged 18 or older, including the receipt of services among adults in the following age groups: young adults aged 18 to 25, adults aged 26 to 49, and those aged 50 or older. Adults in NSDUH are asked whether they received treatment or counseling for any problem with emotions, "nerves," or mental health in the past year. Adults are asked about the receipt of services in any inpatient or outpatient setting or use of prescription medication in the past year for a mental or emotional condition.31 These questions do not include treatment for the use of alcohol or illicit drugs. Also, these NSDUH questions do not ask specifically about treatment for a particular mental health issue. Consequently, references to treatment or counseling for any problem with emotions, nerves, or mental health are described broadly as "mental health service use" or receipt of "mental health care."

Also, questions in NSDUH on mental health service utilization are asked of all adults and are not limited to those with past year mental illness. Estimates of the receipt of mental health services are presented for all adults as well as among adults who had any mental illness (AMI) or serious mental illness (SMI) in the past year. Adults are defined as having AMI if they had any mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder in the past year that met DSM-IV criteria (excluding developmental and substance use disorders).32 Adults with AMI were defined as having SMI if they had any mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder that substantially interfered with or limited one or more major life activities.33

Mental Health Service Utilization among All Adults in 2014

In 2014, an estimated 35.5 million adults aged 18 or older (14.8 percent of the population aged 18 or older) received mental health care during the past 12 months (Figure 27). The type of mental health service that was most commonly used by adults in the past year was prescription medication (12.6 percent of adults), followed by outpatient services (6.7 percent), then by inpatient services (1.0 percent).34 These percentages correspond to 30.1 million adults who used prescription medication, 16.1 million adults who used outpatient services, and 2.4 million adults who used inpatient services.

Figure 27. Type of Mental Health Services Received in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older: Percentages, 2002-2014

Figure 27     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 27 Table. Type of Mental Health Services Received in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older: Percentages, 2002-2014
  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
Any Mental Health Services 13.0+  13.2+  12.8+  13.0+  12.9+  13.3+  13.5+  13.4+  13.8+  13.6+ 14.5 14.6 14.8
Inpatient   0.7+ 0.8 0.9 1.0   0.7+ 1.0 0.9 0.8    0.8+    0.8+     0.8+   0.9   1.0
Outpatient   7.4+ 7.1 7.1 6.8 6.7 7.0 6.8 6.4  6.6  6.7   6.6   6.6   6.7
Prescription Medication 10.5+  10.9+  10.5+  10.7+  10.9+  11.2+  11.4+  11.3+  11.7+  11.5+ 12.4 12.5 12.6

By Age Group

The percentage of adults who used mental health services in the past year in 2014 was lower among adults aged 18 to 25 (11.9 percent) than among adults aged 26 to 49 (15.3 percent) and those aged 50 or older (15.4 percent) (Figure 28). These percentages correspond to 4.1 million young adults aged 18 to 25, 14.9 million adults aged 26 to 49, and 16.4 million adults aged 50 or older who received mental health services in the past year.

Figure 28. Past Year Mental Health Service Use among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Age Group: Percentages, 2014

Figure 28     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the estimate for adults aged 18 to 25 is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Among all three adult age groups in 2014, use of prescription medication was the most common type of mental health service in the past year (Table A.22B in Appendix A). The following percentages and numbers of adults in different age groups in 2014 used prescription medication in the past year for a mental health issue:

The second most common type of mental health service in the past year among all three age groups was receipt of outpatient services. Outpatient mental health services were received by the following percentages and numbers of adults in different age groups:

An estimated 1.2 percent of young adults (418,000 people), 1.0 percent of adults aged 26 to 49 (1.0 million people), and 1.0 percent of adults aged 50 or older (1.0 million people) used inpatient mental health services in the past year.

Trends in Mental Health Service Utilization among All Adults

The estimate of 14.8 percent of adults aged 18 or older in 2014 who received mental health care in the past 12 months was greater than the estimates from 2002 to 2011, but it was similar to the estimates in 2012 and 2013 (Figure 27). In 2004, for example, 12.8 percent of adults received mental health care in the past 12 months. The estimate of 12.6 percent of adults in 2014 who received prescription medication also was greater than the estimates in 2002 to 2011. The estimate of 6.7 percent of adults in 2014 who used outpatient services in the past year was lower than the estimate of 7.4 percent in 2002, but it was similar to the estimates in 2003 to 2013. The estimate of 1.0 percent of adults in 2014 who received inpatient mental health services was similar to the estimates in most years from 2002 to 2009, but it was greater than the estimates in 2010 to 2012 (0.8 percent in each year).

By Age Group

In each adult age group, the percentage of adults in 2014 who used prescription medication was greater than the percentages in 2002 and several prior years (Table A.22B in Appendix A). Among young adults aged 18 to 25, the estimate of 8.8 percent in 2014 who used prescription medication was greater than the estimates in most years from 2002 to 2007. In 2002, for example, 7.5 percent of young adults used prescription medication for a mental health issue. Among adults aged 26 to 49, the estimate of 12.8 percent who used prescription medication was greater than the estimates in 2002 to 2008, which ranged from 11.4 to 11.9 percent. Among adults aged 50 or older, the estimate of 13.5 percent in 2014 who used prescription medication was greater than the estimates in most years from 2002 to 2011. In 2002, for example, 10.5 percent of adults aged 50 or older used prescription medication for mental health care.

The estimate of 7.5 percent of adults aged 26 to 49 in 2014 who received outpatient services was lower than the percentages in 2002 to 2004, which ranged from 8.6 to 8.9 percent (Table A.22B in Appendix A). Percentages of adults who received outpatient services were relatively stable for young adults aged 18 to 25 and adults aged 50 or older.

The percentage of adults aged 18 to 25 in 2014 who received inpatient services was similar to the percentages in 2002 to 2013 (Table A.22B in Appendix A). Among adults aged 26 to 49, the percentage in 2014 who received inpatient services also was similar to the percentages in most years from 2002 to 2013. Among adults aged 50 or older, however, the estimates for the receipt of inpatient services in 2002, 2006, 2009, and 2011 (ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 percent) were lower than the estimate of 1.0 percent in 2014.

Mental Health Service Utilization among Adults Who Received Mental Health Care in 2014

Among adults aged 18 or older who received mental health services in 2014, 66.1 percent reported using used one type of care (inpatient, outpatient, or prescription medication), 30.9 percent used two types of care, and 3.0 percent used all three types of care (Table A.21B in Appendix A).35 Among adults aged 18 or older in 2014 who used outpatient mental health services in the past year, 57.5 percent received services at an office of a private therapist, psychologist, psychiatrist, social worker, or counselor that was not part of a clinic; 25.8 percent received services at an outpatient mental health clinic or center; 15.3 percent received services at a doctor's office that was not part of a clinic; and 7.2 percent received services at an outpatient medical clinic (Figure 29).

Figure 29. Locations of Outpatient Mental Health Care among Adults Aged 18 or Older Who Received Outpatient Mental Health Care in the Past Year: Percentages, 2014

Figure 29     D

In 2014, the most commonly reported sources of payment for outpatient mental health services among adults aged 18 or older who used these services in the past year were private health insurance (38.1 percent) and self-payment or payment by a family member living in the household (37.1 percent) (Table A.36B in Appendix A). Other sources of payment included Medicare (16.3 percent), Medicaid (12.1 percent), or payment by an employer (6.2 percent).36


Mental Health Service Utilization among Adults with AMI or SMI in 2014


Data from NSDUH on whether adults with AMI or SMI have received mental health care are important to policymakers and service providers for gauging whether adults with mental illness are receiving the services that they need. In order to provide context for the estimates of mental health service use among adults with mental illness, it is necessary first to present the percentages and numbers of adults with mental illness in the United States. In 2014, 43.6 million adults aged 18 or older (18.1 percent of adults) had AMI in the past year, and 9.8 million had SMI (4.1 percent of adults).37

Among the 43.6 million adults with AMI in 2014, 19.4 million (44.7 percent) received mental health services in the past year (Figure 30). Also, 6.7 million of the 9.8 million adults with SMI (68.5 percent) received mental health services in the past year.

Figure 30. Mental Health Service Use in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Any Mental Illness or Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year, by Age Group: Percentages, 2014

Figure 30     D

AMI = any mental illness; SMI = serious mental illness.
+ Difference between this estimate and the AMI estimate for adults aged 18 to 25 is statistically significant at the .05 level.
# Difference between this estimate and the SMI estimate for adults aged 18 to 25 is statistically significant at the .05 level.

In 2014, among adults aged 18 or older with past year AMI who received mental health care in the past year, 38.7 percent used prescription medication, 24.3 percent used outpatient services, and 3.8 percent used inpatient services for mental health issues in the past year (Figure 31). Among adults with SMI who received mental health care in the past year, 61.4 percent used prescription medication, 44.2 percent used outpatient services, and 8.8 percent used inpatient services.

Figure 31. Specific Types of Mental Health Care Received by Adults Aged 18 or Older with Any Mental Illness or Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year: Percentages, 2014

Figure 31     D

AMI = any mental illness; SMI = serious mental illness.

Among the estimated 19.4 million adults aged 18 or older in 2014 with past year AMI who reported receiving mental health services in the past year, about 55.0 percent received one type of care (inpatient, outpatient, or prescription medication), 40.1 percent received two types of care, and 4.8 percent received all three types of care (Figure 32). Among the 6.7 million adults aged 18 or older in 2014 with past year SMI who received mental health services in the past year, about 42.0 percent received one type of care, 48.8 percent received two types of care, and 9.1 percent received all three types of care.

Figure 32. Number of Types of Mental Health Care Received by Adults Aged 18 or Older with Any Mental Illness or Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year: Percentages, 2014

Figure 32     D

Note: The three types of mental health care are receiving inpatient care, outpatient care, or prescription medication.
Note: The percentages do not add to 100 percent due to rounding.

By Age Group

Among adults with AMI in 2014, the percentage of adults who used mental health services was lower among adults aged 18 to 25 (33.6 percent) than among corresponding adults aged 26 to 49 (44.2 percent) and those aged 50 or older (49.9 percent) (Figure 30). Stated another way, among adults with AMI in 2014, about two thirds of young adults, more than half of adults aged 26 to 49, and about half of adults aged 50 or older did not receive mental health services in the past year.

Among adults with SMI in 2014, the percentage of adults who used mental health services also was lower among adults aged 18 to 25 (53.9 percent) than among adults aged 26 to 49 (66.2 percent) and those aged 50 or older (79.2 percent) (Figure 30). Thus, only about half of young adults in 2014 who had SMI received mental health services. Among adults aged 26 to 49 in 2014 who had SMI, about one third did not receive services, and among adults aged 50 or older with SMI, about 1 in 5 did not receive services.

In 2014, among young adults aged 18 to 25 with AMI in the past year, about 1 in 4 (25.5 percent) used prescription medication in the past year, about 1 in 5 (21.3 percent) used outpatient services, and 3.7 percent used inpatient services for mental health issues (Table A.25B in Appendix A). Among young adults with past year SMI, 42.4 percent used prescription medication, 39.2 percent used outpatient services, and 8.2 percent used inpatient services in the past year for mental health issues.

Among adults aged 26 to 49 in 2014 with past year AMI, more than one third (38.0 percent) used prescription medication in the past year, about one fourth (25.8 percent) used outpatient services, and 3.7 percent used inpatient services for mental health issues (Table A.25B in Appendix A). Among adults aged 26 to 49 with past year SMI, 60.1 percent used prescription medication, 43.8 percent used outpatient services, and 8.0 percent used inpatient services.

In 2014, among adults aged 50 or older with past year AMI, 45.3 percent used prescription medication in the past year, 23.9 percent used outpatient services, and 3.9 percent used inpatient services for mental health issues (Table A.25B in Appendix A). Among adults aged 50 or older with past year SMI, 72.9 percent used prescription medication, 47.3 percent used outpatient services, and 10.2 percent used inpatient services.

Trends in Mental Health Service Utilization among Adults with AMI or SMI

The percentage of adults with AMI remained stable from 2008 to 2014 (18.1 percent of adults in 2014), and the percentage of adults with SMI in 2014 (4.1 percent) was similar to the percentages in 2010 to 2013.37 Among adults aged 18 or older with AMI, higher percentages received mental health services in the past year in 2013 and 2014 (44.7 percent in both years) compared with corresponding percentages of adults in 2008 to 2012, which ranged from 40.2 to 42.4 percent (Figure 33). The percentage of adults with SMI who received mental health services in the past year in 2014 was similar to the percentages in most years from 2008 to 2013 and constituted about two thirds of adults with SMI in most years (Figure 34).

Figure 33. Type of Mental Health Care Received in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Any Mental Illness in the Past Year, by Age Group: Percentages, 2008-2014

Figure 33     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 33 Table. Type of Mental Health Care Received in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Any Mental Illness in the Past Year, by Age Group: Percentages, 2008-2014
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
Any Mental Health Services   40.9+   40.2+   42.4+   40.8+ 41.0+ 44.7 44.7
Inpatient   3.7   3.2     2.7+   3.3 3.0   3.3   3.8
Outpatient 24.1 22.5 23.4 24.0 22.4+ 24.4 24.3
Prescription Medication   35.5+   34.8+ 36.9   35.6+ 35.3+ 38.9 38.7

Figure 34. Type of Mental Health Care Received in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year, by Age Group: Percentages, 2008-2014

Figure 34     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 34 Table. Type of Mental Health Care Received in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year, by Age Group: Percentages, 2008-2014
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
Any Mental Health Services 65.7 66.5 67.5 64.9   62.9+ 68.5 68.5
Inpatient   8.6   8.6   6.7   8.8     6.2+   8.3   8.8
Outpatient 46.2 44.6 42.5 44.1   39.0+ 46.9 44.2
Prescription Medication 59.7 61.1 61.0 58.2 57.8 62.1 61.4

The estimate of 38.7 percent of adults with AMI in 2014 who received prescription medication for mental health issues was greater than the estimates in most years from 2008 to 2012, which ranged from 34.8 to 35.6 percent (Figure 33). In contrast, the percentages of adults with AMI who received outpatient care or who received inpatient care in 2014 were similar to the corresponding percentages in most years from 2008 to 2013.

Among adults with SMI, the percentages who received different specific types of mental health care in 2014 were similar to the percentages in most or all years between 2008 and 2013 (Figure 34). For example, the percentage of adults with SMI who received prescription medication was stable between 2008 and 2014. Also, the percentage of adults with SMI in 2014 who received inpatient services was similar in most years to the percentages in 2008 to 2013. With the exception of 2012, the percentages of adults with SMI who received any mental health services or who received outpatient care were stable between 2008 and 2014.

By Age Group

Among adults aged 18 to 25 with past year AMI, the percentage in 2014 who reported using prescription medication (25.5 percent) was similar to the percentages in 2008 to 2013, which ranged from 23.3 to 27.2 percent (Table A.25B in Appendix A). The percentage of adults aged 26 to 49 with AMI who used prescription medication also was stable from 2008 to 2014, ranging from 35.3 to 38.0 percent. In contrast, the percentage of adults aged 50 or older with AMI in 2014 who used prescription medication (45.3 percent) was higher than the percentages in most years from 2009 to 2012. In 2012, for example, 36.7 percent of adults aged 50 or older with AMI used prescription medication.

Among young adults aged 18 to 25 with SMI, the percentage in 2014 who used prescription medication (42.4 percent) was greater than the percentage in 2008 (35.9 percent), but it was similar to the percentages in 2009 to 2013 (Table A.25B in Appendix A). For adults aged 26 to 49 with SMI, the percentage who used prescription medication in 2014 was similar to the percentages in 2008 to 2013. Among adults aged 26 to 49 who had SMI in 2008 to 2014, 57.2 to 61.2 percent used prescription medication. Among adults aged 50 or older with SMI, the percentage in 2014 who used prescription medication also was similar to the percentages in most years from 2008 to 2013.

Percentages of adults with AMI or SMI in each age group in 2014 who received outpatient or inpatient care were similar to the percentages in most or all years from 2008 to 2013. For example, percentages of adults with SMI who received outpatient care in 2008 to 2014 ranged from 33.0 to 39.2 percent for young adults aged 18 to 25, from 40.3 to 48.2 percent for adults aged 26 to 49, and from 38.2 to 50.7 percent of adults aged 50 or older.


Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services among Adults


This section discusses estimates of the perceived unmet need for mental health services among adults aged 18 or older. This section also discusses reasons for not receiving mental health services among adults with a perceived unmet need. Perceived unmet need is described among the overall adult population and among adults with AMI or SMI.

Unmet need is estimated from a question that asks adults whether there was any time in the past 12 months when they thought they needed treatment or counseling for mental health issues but they did not receive it. This measure also includes adults who received some type of mental health service in the past 12 months but reported a perceived need for additional services they did not receive.

Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services among All Adults in 2014

In 2014, there were an estimated 11.8 million adults aged 18 or older who perceived an unmet need for mental health care at any time in the past year, including 5.3 million adults who did not receive any mental health services in the past year (Figure 35). The 11.8 million adults who perceived an unmet need for mental health care represent 4.9 percent of all adults.

Figure 35. Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Age Group (in millions): 2014

Figure 35     D

Note: The bottom number in each bar is the estimated number of people with a perceived unmet need for mental health services who did not receive any mental health services in the past year. The top number in each bar is the total estimated number of people with any perceived unmet need for mental health services, including those who did not receive any mental health services and those who had an unmet need for additional services.

By Age Group

Among the approximately 11.8 million adults in 2014 who perceived an unmet need for mental health care in the past year, about 2.8 million were young adults aged 18 to 25, 5.8 million were aged 26 to 49, and 3.2 million were aged 50 or older (Figure 35). These numbers of adults who perceived an unmet need for mental health care at any time in the past year represent 8.0 percent of young adults, 5.9 percent of adults aged 26 to 49, and 3.0 percent of adults aged 50 or older. In addition, there were 1.6 million young adults, 2.8 million adults aged 26 to 49, and 1.0 million adults aged 50 or older who perceived an unmet need for mental health care and did not receive any mental health services in the past year.

Trends in Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services among All Adults

In 2014, 4.9 percent of adults in 2014 perceived an unmet need for mental health care in the past year (Figure 36). This percentage was similar to the estimated percentages in 2003 to 2013; however, the 2014 estimate was lower than the percentage in 2002. Each year from 2002 to 2014, about 1 in 20 adults in the general population perceived an unmet need for mental health care.

Figure 36. Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older: Percentages, 2002-2014

Figure 36     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 36 Table. Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older: Percentages, 2002-2014
  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
18 or Older   5.4+ 5.1 5.1 5.1 4.8 4.9 4.7 5.3 4.9 4.6 4.9 4.6 4.9

Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services among Adults with AMI or SMI in 2014

In 2014, there were an estimated 9.0 million adults aged 18 or older with AMI who perceived an unmet need for mental health care in the past year, including 3.6 million adults with AMI who did not receive any mental health services in the past year (Figure 37). The 9.0 million adults with AMI who perceived an unmet need for mental health care in the past year represent 20.8 percent of adults with AMI.

Figure 37. Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Any Mental Illness in the Past Year, by Age Group (in millions): 2014

Figure 37     D

Note: The bottom number in each bar is the estimated number of people with a perceived unmet need for mental health services who did not receive any mental health services in the past year. The top number in each bar is the total estimated number of people with any perceived unmet need for mental health services, including those who did not receive any mental health services and those who had an unmet need for additional services.

About 4.2 million adults with SMI in 2014 perceived an unmet need for mental health care in the past year, including 1.3 million adults with SMI who did not receive any mental health services in the past year (Figure 38). The 4.2 million adults with SMI who perceived an unmet need for mental health care in the past year represent 42.9 percent of adults with SMI.

Figure 38. Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year, by Age Group (in millions): 2014

Figure 38     D

Note: The bottom number in each bar is the estimated number of people with a perceived unmet need for mental health services who did not receive any mental health services in the past year. The top number in each bar is the total estimated number of people with any perceived unmet need for mental health services, including those who did not receive any mental health services and those who had an unmet need for additional services.

By Age Group

In 2014, among the 9.0 million adults with AMI who perceived an unmet need for mental health care in the past year, about 2.0 million were young adults aged 18 to 25, 4.7 million were aged 26 to 49, and 2.4 million were aged 50 or older (Figure 37). These numbers of adults with AMI who perceived an unmet need for mental health care correspond to 28.9 percent of young adults with AMI, 23.3 percent of adults aged 26 to 49 with AMI, and 14.3 percent of those aged 50 or older with AMI.

About half of the 2.0 million young adults with AMI who perceived an unmet need for mental health care did not receive any mental health services in the past year (1.0 million young adults with AMI, or 50.1 percent).38 Among adults aged 26 to 49 with AMI who had a perceived unmet need for mental health care, 43.7 percent (2.0 million adults) did not receive any mental health services in the past year. Among adults aged 50 or older with AMI who had a perceived unmet need for mental health care, 25.4 percent (601,000 adults) did not receive any mental health services in the past year.

Among adults with SMI in 2014, an estimated 900,000 adults aged 18 to 25, 2.2 million adults aged 26 to 49, and 1.1 million adults aged 50 or older perceived an unmet need for mental health care in the past year (Figure 38). These numbers included 365,000 adults aged 18 to 25, 742,000 adults aged 26 to 49, and 217,000 adults aged 50 or older with SMI who perceived an unmet need for mental health care in the past year and did not receive any mental health services.

Trends in Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services among Adults with AMI or SMI

The estimate of 20.8 percent of adults in 2014 with AMI in the past year who perceived an unmet need for mental health care in that period was similar to the percentages in 2008 to 2013, which ranged from 19.3 to 22.1 percent (Figure 39). Each year, therefore, about 1 in 5 adults with AMI perceived an unmet need for mental health care. Each year since 2008, 38.6 to 46.3 percent of adults with SMI in the past year perceived an unmet need for mental health care in that period (Figure 39).

Figure 39. Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Any Mental Illness or Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year: Percentages, 2008-2014

Figure 39     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 39 Table. Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Any Mental Illness or Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year: Percentages, 2008-2014
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
Any Mental Illness 20.6 22.1 21.0 20.7 20.8 19.3 20.8
Serious Mental Illness 43.7 46.3 42.0 43.1 41.6 38.6 42.9

Reasons for Not Receiving Mental Health Services in 2014 among Adults with a Perceived Unmet Need

In 2014, among the 5.3 million adults aged 18 or older who had a perceived unmet need for mental health care and did not receive mental health services in the past year, 45.4 percent reported that they did not receive mental health services because they could not afford the cost of care (Figure 40). In addition, 28.3 percent believed at the time that the problem could be handled without treatment, 22.7 percent did not know where to go for services, and 16.4 percent did not think that they had the time to go for care.

Figure 40. Reasons for Not Receiving Mental Health Services in the Past Year among All Adults Aged 18 or Older with a Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Care Who Did Not Receive Mental Health Services: Percentages, 2014

Figure 40     D

Among adults with AMI and among adults with SMI in 2014 who had a perceived unmet need for mental health care and did not receive mental health services in the past year, the most commonly reported reason for not receiving mental health care was that they could not afford the cost of care (Figure 41). Specifically, 51.3 percent of adults with AMI who had a perceived unmet need for mental health care and did not receive care, and 56.1 percent of corresponding adults with SMI reported that they could not afford the cost of care.

Figure 41. Reasons for Not Receiving Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with a Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Care Who Did Not Receive Mental Health Services, by Mental Illness Status: Percentages, 2014

Figure 41     D

AMI = any mental illness; SMI = serious mental illness.

Other reasons for not receiving mental health care that were reported by at least 1 out of 5 adults with AMI or SMI who had a perceived unmet need for mental health care and did not receive mental health services in the past year included not knowing where to go for services and believing at the time that the problem could be handed without treatment (Figure 41). Among adults with AMI who had a perceived unmet need for mental health care and did not receive services in the past year, 25.6 percent did not know where to go for services, and 25.7 percent believed at the time that the problem could be handled without treatment. Among corresponding adults with SMI, 27.4 percent reported that they did not know where to go for services, and 20.4 percent believed at the time that the problem could be handled without treatment.

In addition, 16.5 percent of adults with AMI who had a perceived unmet need for mental health care and did not receive mental health services in the past year reported that they did not have the time to go for care. Among adults with SMI who had a perceived unmet need for mental health care and did not receive services in the past year, 19.2 percent were concerned about being committed or having to take medication.


Receipt of Services among Adults with Co-Occurring Mental Illness and a Substance Use Disorder


The coexistence of both a mental health issue and a substance use disorder (SUD) is referred to as co-occurring mental disorders and SUDs. Because NSDUH collects information on both mental health issues and SUDs, it is possible to estimate the percentages of adults with co-occurring disorders and the percentage of adults with co-occurring disorders who received services. Therefore, this section presents data from NSDUH on the receipt of mental health care or specialty substance use treatment among adults with co-occurring disorders.

Receipt of Services among Adults with Co-Occurring Disorders in 2014

An estimated 7.9 million adults aged 18 or older in 2014 had co-occurring AMI and an SUD in the past year, which corresponds to 3.3 percent of all adults. In addition, about 2.3 million adults had SMI and an SUD in the past year, which corresponds to 1.0 percent of all adults.37

Among the estimated 7.9 million adults with co-occurring AMI and an SUD in the past year, 46.4 percent received either mental health care or substance use treatment at a specialty facility in the past year. In contrast, therefore, more than half of adults with co-occurring AMI and an SUD in the past year did not receive either type of service (Figure 42).39 An estimated 8.9 percent of adults with co-occurring disorders received both mental health care and specialty substance use treatment, 33.9 percent received mental health care but not specialty substance use treatment, and 3.5 percent received only specialty substance use treatment.

Figure 42. Receipt of Mental Health Care and Specialty Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older Who Had Past Year Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders: Percentages, 2014

Figure 42     D

Note: Mental health care is defined as having received inpatient care or outpatient care or having used prescription medication for problems with emotions, nerves, or mental health. Specialty substance use treatment refers to treatment at a hospital (inpatient only), rehabilitation facility (inpatient or outpatient), or mental health center in order to reduce or stop drug or alcohol use, or for medical problems associated with drug or alcohol use.

Among the 2.3 million adults who had co-occurring SMI and an SUD in the past year, 65.7 percent received either substance use treatment at a specialty facility or mental health care in the past year. Thus, 34.3 percent of adults with co-occurring SMI and an SUD did not receive either type of care in the past year (Figure 43). Among adults with co-occurring SMI and an SUD, 17.0 percent received both mental health care and specialty substance use treatment, 46.1 percent received only mental health care, and 2.6 percent received only specialty substance use treatment.

Figure 43. Receipt of Mental Health Care and Specialty Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older Who Had Past Year Serious Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders: Percentages, 2014

Figure 43     D

Note: Mental health care is defined as having received inpatient care or outpatient care or having used prescription medication for problems with emotions, nerves, or mental health. Specialty substance use treatment refers to treatment at a hospital (inpatient only), rehabilitation facility (inpatient or outpatient), or mental health center in order to reduce or stop drug or alcohol use, or for medical problems associated with drug or alcohol use.
SMI = serious mental illness.

By Age Group

Among adults in 2014 who had co-occurring AMI and an SUD in the past year, 38.1 percent of young adults aged 18 to 25, 46.4 percent of those aged 26 to 49, and 56.3 percent of those aged 50 or older received mental health care or substance use treatment at a specialty facility in the past year (Table A.30B in Appendix A). Among adults in all three age groups in 2014 who had co-occurring AMI and an SUD in the past year, the most common type of service was receipt of only mental health care. Specifically, 29.8 percent of young adults, 33.0 percent of those aged 26 to 49, and 41.0 percent of those aged 50 or older who had co-occurring AMI and an SUD received only mental health care. In addition, 5.1 percent of young adults, 9.2 percent of adults aged 26 to 49, and 12.9 percent of adults aged 50 or older who had co-occurring AMI and an SUD received both mental health care and specialty substance use treatment. Receipt of only specialty substance use treatment in the past year among adults with co-occurring AMI and an SUD in that period was reported by 3.2 percent of young adults, 4.2 percent of adults aged 26 to 49, and 2.2 percent of those aged 50 or older.

Among adults with co-occurring SMI and an SUD in 2014, 57.1 percent of young adults aged 18 to 25 and 65.5 percent of those aged 26 to 49 received either mental health care or specialty substance treatment in the past year (Table A.30B in Appendix A). In addition, 10.5 percent of young adults and 18.5 percent of adults aged 26 to 49 who had co-occurring SMI and an SUD received both mental health care and specialty substance use treatment. An estimated 44.0 percent of adults aged 18 to 25 with co-occurring SMI and an SUD and 43.2 percent of those aged 26 to 49 received only mental health care. (Estimates for the receipt of services among adults aged 50 or older with co-occurring SMI and an SUD were not reported because of low precision.11)

Trends in Receipt of Services among All Adults with Co-Occurring Disorders

In 2008 to 2014, 45.7 to 48.6 percent of adults aged 18 or older with co-occurring AMI and an SUD received mental health care or substance use treatment at a specialty facility in the past year (Figure 44). Stated another way, these percentages consistently indicate that more than half of adults with co-occurring AMI and an SUD in any given year did not receive either type of care. Percentages among adults with co-occurring AMI and an SUD also were stable between 2008 and 2014 for receiving both types of care, receiving only mental health care, and receiving only specialty substance use treatment (Table A.31B in Appendix A). As was the case in 2014, the most commonly reported form of care in each year among adults with co-occurring AMI and an SUD was the receipt of only mental health care.

Figure 44. Receipt of Mental Health Care or Specialty Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Past Year Substance Use Disorder and Co-Occurring Mental Illness or Serious Mental Illness: Percentages, 2008-2014

Figure 44     D

AMI = any mental illness; SMI = serious mental illness; SUD = substance use disorder.
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 44 Table. Receipt of Mental Health Care or Specialty Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Past Year Substance Use Disorder and Co-Occurring Mental Illness or Serious Mental Illness: Percentages, 2008-2014
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
AMI = any mental illness; SMI = serious mental illness; SUD = substance use disorder.
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
Co-Occuring AMI and SUD 45.7 48.1 48.6 46.5 46.3 47.8 46.4
Co-Occuring SMI and SUD 66.3 69.0   73.5+ 69.3 64.7 69.2 65.7

About two thirds to three fourths of adults with co-occurring SMI and an SUD in 2008 to 2014 (64.7 to 73.5 percent) received mental health care or substance use treatment at a specialty facility in the past year (Figure 44). Percentages of adults with co-occurring SMI and an SUD in 2014 who received both types of care, only mental health care, or only specialty substance use treatment were similar to the corresponding percentages in most or all years from 2008 to 2014 (Table A.31B in Appendix A).


Mental Health Service Utilization among Adolescents


Although NSDUH includes questions for adolescents aged 12 to 17 and adults aged 18 or older that ask about the receipt of services for emotional and behavioral problems that were not caused by substance use, these questions differ for adolescents and adults. The youth mental health service utilization module asks respondents aged 12 to 17 whether they received any treatment or counseling within the 12 months prior to the interview for problems with emotions or behavior in several settings: (a) the specialty mental health setting (inpatient or outpatient care); (b) the education setting (talked with a school social worker, psychologist, or counselor about an emotional or behavioral problem; participated in a program for students with emotional or behavioral problems while in a regular school; or attended a school for students with emotional or behavioral problems); (c) the general medical setting (care from a pediatrician or family physician for emotional or behavioral problems); (d) the juvenile justice setting (services for an emotional or behavioral problem in a detention center, prison, or jail); or (e) the child welfare setting (foster care or therapeutic foster care). Youths aged 12 to 17 also are asked about the number of nights that they spent in overnight facilities, the number of visits they had to outpatient mental health or general medical providers for mental health services, and the reason(s) for their most recent stay or visit.

Youth mental health service questions were revised in 2009 to include updates to the questions about services in the education setting (i.e., school system). A new question on mental health service utilization in the juvenile justice setting also was added in 2009. In addition, the definition of mental health service use among youths was revised for the 2014 survey. The child welfare setting was redefined as a separate service category instead of being included as part of inpatient services under specialty mental health services. Therefore, some estimates of mental health service use among youths in this report may differ from estimates in reports prior to the 2014 NSDUH. Unlike the estimation of AMI and SMI among adults, NSDUH does not produce an overall estimate of any mental disorders among adolescents. Therefore, this section focuses on mental health care among all adolescents.

Mental Health Service Utilization among All Adolescents in 2014

In 2014, an estimated 3.4 million adolescents aged 12 to 17 in the past 12 months received mental health services in a specialty mental health setting (inpatient or outpatient care) for problems with emotions or behaviors, 3.2 million received mental health services in an education setting, 700,000 received mental health services in a general medical setting, 92,000 received mental health services in a child welfare setting, and 63,000 received mental health services in a juvenile justice setting (Figure 45). In addition, 1.5 million youths aged 12 to 17 received mental health services in both specialty and nonspecialty settings (i.e., an education, general medical, or child welfare setting). These numbers correspond to 13.7 percent of youths who received mental health services in a specialty mental health setting, 13.2 percent who received services in an education setting, 2.9 percent who received services in a general medical setting, 0.4 percent who received services in a child welfare setting, 0.3 percent who received services in a juvenile justice setting, and 5.9 percent who received services in both specialty and nonspecialty settings.

Figure 45. Sources of Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17: Percentages and Numbers (in thousands), 2014

Figure 45     D

Note: Nonspecialty settings do not include youths who received mental health care in the past year from a juvenile justice setting.

Of the 3.4 million adolescents aged 12 to 17 in 2014 who received specialty mental health services, about half (56.5 percent) reported receiving services because they felt depressed (Figure 46).40 Other commonly reported reasons for receiving services included thinking about or attempting suicide (29.1 percent), feeling very afraid or tense (29.0 percent), having problems with home or family situations (26.6 percent), breaking rules and "acting out" (20.8 percent), and having problems at school (18.1 percent). An estimated 16.7 percent of youths who received specialty mental health services reported receiving services because they had trouble controlling their anger.

Figure 46. Reasons for Receiving Specialty Mental Health Services among Youths Aged 12 to 17 Who Received Mental Health Services in the Past Year: Percentages, 2014

Figure 46     D

Of an estimated 606,000 youths aged 12 to 17 in 2014 who received inpatient or residential specialty mental health services in the past 12 months, 29.7 percent reported staying overnight for 1 night. An estimated 16.2 percent reported staying overnight for 2 nights, 20.0 percent reported staying overnight for 3 to 6 nights, 25.3 percent reported staying overnight for 7 to 24 nights, and 8.9 percent reported staying overnight for 25 or more nights (Figure 47).

Figure 47. Number of Nights Spent as an Inpatient in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17 Who Received Inpatient Specialty Mental Health Care: Percentages, 2014

Figure 47     D

Note: The percentages do not add to 100 percent due to rounding.

Among the estimated 3.1 million youths who received outpatient specialty mental health services in the past year, 16.1 percent had 25 or more visits (Figure 48). More than half received 3 to 24 outpatient visits, including 25.0 percent who received 3 to 6 visits and 28.9 percent who received 7 to 24 visits.

Figure 48. Number of Outpatient Visits in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17 Who Received Outpatient Specialty Mental Health Services: Percentages, 2014

Figure 48     D

Note: The percentages do not add to 100 percent due to rounding.

Trends in Mental Health Service Utilization among All Adolescents

In 2014, 13.7 percent of adolescents received mental health services in a specialty mental health setting in the past 12 months. This percentage was higher than the percentages in 2007 to 2012, which ranged from 12.0 to 12.7 percent (Table A.32B in Appendix A). However, this estimate in 2014 was similar to the estimates in 2004 to 2006 and in 2013. In addition, the percentage of adolescents who received outpatient services in a specialty mental health setting in 2014 (12.7 percent) was greater than the percentages in 2006 to 2012, which ranged from 10.9 to 11.7 percent. In each year from 2003 to 2014, 2.1 to 2.5 percent of youths received inpatient specialty mental health services.

The percentage of youths aged 12 to 17 in 2014 who received mental health services in an education setting (13.2 percent) was greater than the percentages in 2009 to 2011 (ranging from 11.9 to 12.4 percent), but it was similar to the percentages in 2012 and 2013 (Table A.32B in Appendix A). The percentage of youths in 2014 who received mental health services in a general medical setting was similar to the percentages in most years from 2002 to 2013.

Treatment for Depression among Adolescents

As noted previously, the NSDUH interview currently does not include questions or methods for estimating the occurrence of mental disorders among adolescents, other than whether adolescents had a major depressive episode (MDE). Therefore, a NSDUH measure of any mental disorder does not exist for adolescents. However, NSDUH does provide estimates for whether adolescents had an MDE in the past year.

MDE among adolescents is defined using the diagnostic criteria from the DSM-IV.15 Questions in NSDUH for measuring MDE among adolescents were written to be developmentally appropriate for youths. Adolescents were defined as having an MDE if they had a period of 2 weeks or longer in the past 12 months when they experienced a depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure in daily activities and they had at least four of seven additional symptoms, such as problems with sleep, eating, energy, concentration, and self-worth.41 Adolescents were defined as having an MDE with severe impairment if their depression caused severe problems with their ability to do chores at home, do well at work or school, get along with their family, or have a social life.42

Adolescents who had met the criteria for having a past year MDE were asked whether they had received treatment for their MDE in the past year. If so, they were asked to report the types of providers from whom they received treatment for their MDE. Adolescents with a past year MDE also were asked whether they took prescription medication in the past 12 months for their problems with depression. Adolescents were defined as having received treatment for an MDE in the past year if they reported seeing or talking to a health professional or taking prescribed medication for their depression.43 Thus, estimates for treatment for depression in this section are based on a different set of questions than the estimates in the previous section for the receipt of mental health care among all adolescents.

In 2014, 11.4 percent of adolescents aged 12 to 17 (2.8 million adolescents) had an MDE during the past year. An estimated 8.2 percent of adolescents in 2014 (2.0 million adolescents) had a past year MDE with severe impairment in one or more role domains.37

In 2014, an estimated 41.2 percent of youths aged 12 to 17 in 2014 who had a past year MDE received treatment for depression (Figure 49). Among youths who had a past year MDE with severe impairment, 44.7 percent received treatment for depression. Among youths in 2014 with a past year MDE, 16.4 percent saw or talked to a health professional and also took prescription medication, 20.0 percent reported seeing or talking to a health professional but did not report taking prescription medication, and 2.8 percent reported using only prescription medication (Figure 50).

Figure 49. Received Treatment in the Past Year for Depression among Youths Aged 12 to 17 with a Past Year Major Depressive Episode (MDE) or MDE with Severe Impairment: Percentages, 2004-2014

Figure 49     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 49 Table. Received Treatment in the Past Year for Depression among Youths Aged 12 to 17 with a Past Year Major Depressive Episode (MDE) or MDE with Severe Impairment: Percentages, 2004-2014
  2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
N/A = not available.
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
MDE 40.3 37.8 38.8 39.0 37.7 34.6+ 37.8 38.4   37.0+ 38.1 41.2
MDE with Severe
   Impairment
N/A N/A 46.5 43.9 42.6 38.8+ 41.1 43.5 41.0 45.0 44.7

Figure 50. Type of Treatment Received in the Past Year for Depression among Youths Aged 12 to 17 with a Past Year Major Depressive Episode: Percentages, 2004-2014

Figure 50     D

+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.

Figure 50 Table. Type of Treatment Received in the Past Year for Depression among Youths Aged 12 to 17 with a Past Year Major Depressive Episode: Percentages, 2004-2014
  2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
+ Difference between this estimate and the 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the .05 level.
NOTE: Health Professionals include general practitioner or family doctor; other medical doctor (e.g., cardiologist, gynecologist, urologist); psychologist; psychiatrist or psychotherapist; social worker; counselor; other mental health professional (e.g., mental health nurse or other therapist where type is not specified); and nurse, occupational therapist, or other health professional.
Saw or Talked to a Health
   Professional Only
19.3 18.6 20.9 18.6 20.2 18.5 19.4 19.9 19.6 20.4 20.0
Used Prescription
   Medication and Did Not
   See or Talk to a Health
   Professional
  3.4   2.7   2.4   2.7   3.0   2.4   3.0   2.6   2.4   3.7   2.8
Saw or Talked to a Health
   Professional and Used
   Prescription Medication
15.5 14.1   12.3+ 15.3   12.8+   11.9+   13.2+ 13.6 13.7   12.3+ 16.4

Trends in Treatment for Depression among Adolescents

The percentage of adolescents aged 12 to 17 in 2014 who had an MDE during the past year (11.4 percent) was higher than the percentages in 2004 to 2012 (ranging from 7.9 to 9.1 percent), but it was similar to the percentage in 2013. Also, the percentage of adolescents in 2014 who had a past year MDE with severe impairment in one or more role domains (8.2 percent of all adolescents) was higher than the percentages in 2006 to 2012, which ranged from 5.5 to 6.3 percent.37

In 2014, 41.2 percent of adolescents with a past year MDE received treatment for depression in the past year. This 2014 percentage was similar to the estimates in most years from 2004 to 2013 (Figure 49). In 2014, 44.7 percent of adolescents with MDE with severe impairment in the past year received treatment for depression. The percentage of adolescents with MDE with severe impairment in 2014 who received treatment for depression was similar to the percentages in most years from 2006 to 2013.


Author Affiliations


Beth Han, Sarra L. Hedden, and Rachel Lipari are with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD. Elizabeth A. P. Copello and Larry A. Kroutil are with RTI International (a registered trademark and a trade name of Research Triangle Institute), Research Triangle Park, NC.


Acknowledgments of Reviewers


The authors would like to thank Neil Russell of the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and Kathryn R. Batts, Teresa R. Davis, Kristen Gulledge, Dexter McNutt, Jeremy D. Porter, Paxton Syrek, and Jean Wang at RTI International for reviewing previous drafts of this Data Review.


Endnotes


1 Glasheen, C., Hedden, S. L., Kroutil, L. A., Pemberton, M. R., & Goldstrom, I. (2012, November). CBHSQ Data Review: Past year arrest among adults in the United States: Characteristics of and association with mental illness and substance use. Retrieved from http://www.samhsa.gov/data/

2 Feucht, T. E., & Gfroerer, J. (2011, Summer). SAMHSA Data Review: Mental and substance use disorders among adult men on probation or parole: Some success against a persistent challenge (NCJ 235637). Retrieved from http://www.samhsa.gov/data/

3 Clarke, D. M., & Currie, K. (2009). Depression, anxiety and their relationship with chronic diseases: A review of the epidemiology, risk and treatment evidence. Medical Journal of Australia, 190(7 Suppl.), S54-S60.

4 McCusker, J., Cole, M., Ciampi, A., Latimer, E., Windholz, S., & Belzile, E. (2007). Major depression in older medical inpatients predicts poor physical and mental health status over 12 months. General Hospital Psychiatry, 29, 340-348. doi:10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2007.03.007

5 This report occasionally presents estimated numbers of people with a specific characteristic (e.g., estimated numbers of substance users). Some of these estimated numbers are not included in figures or tables in the report but may be found in the detailed tables or mental health detailed tables for the 2014 NSDUH available at http://www.samhsa.gov/data/.

6 In this report, terms such as "Americans," "people in this country," "general population," or similar terms are used broadly to refer to the civilian, noninstitutionalized population that is covered by NSDUH. Although some people in the general population of the United States are outside of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population, information from the 2010 census suggests that the civilian, noninstitutionalized population includes at least 97 percent of the total U.S. population. See the following reference: Lofquist, D., Lugaila, T., O'Connell, M., & Feliz, S. (2012, April). Households and families: 2010 (C2010BR-14, 2010 Census Briefs). Retrieved from https://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-14.pdf

7 Details about the sample design, weighting, and interviewing results for the 2014 NSDUH are provided in Sections A.1, A.3.3, and B.3.1 of CBHSQ (2015). In particular, Tables A.1 and A.2 in CBHSQ (2015) provide sample design information on the targeted numbers of completed interviews by state and by age group, respectively. See the following reference: Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (2015). 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Methodological summary and definitions. Retrieved from http://www.samhsa.gov/data/

8 The screening procedure involves listing all household members in order to determine whether zero, one, or two individuals aged 12 or older should be selected for the interview.

9 An overall response rate is not calculated for adolescents or adults because the screening response rate is not specific to age groups.

10 See the CBHSQ (2015) reference in endnote 7.

11 For a discussion of the criteria for suppressing (i.e., not publishing) unreliable estimates, see Section B.2.2 in CBHSQ (2015). See endnote 7 for the reference.

12 The term "most years" is used when the 2014 estimate is either similar to or significantly different from the estimates in the majority of prior years. However, estimates may not follow the overall pattern in up to 3 nonsequential years for estimates that are available in 2002 to 2014 and in up to 1 or 2 nonsequential years for mental health estimates that are available in 2008 (or 2009) to 2014.

13 Anomalous differences between 2 years of data usually "correct" themselves with 1 or 2 additional years of data.

14 NSDUH obtains information on nine categories of illicit drugs: marijuana (including hashish), cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, and inhalants, as well as the nonmedical use of prescription-type pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants, and sedatives. Nonmedical use refers to use of prescription drugs without a prescription of the individual's own or simply for the experience or feeling the drugs caused.

15 American Psychiatric Association. (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-IV; 4th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

16 Estimated numbers of people who received treatment for alcohol or who received treatment for illicit drugs do not sum to the total number of people who received treatment either for alcohol or illicit drugs because the total includes people who reported receiving treatment but did not report for which substance(s) they received treatment.

17 The most recent treatment includes people who reported that they were currently receiving treatment.

18 Data on the substances for which people received their most recent treatment are not mutually exclusive because respondents could indicate that they received treatment for their use of more than one substance during their most recent substance use treatment.

19 The number of adolescents aged 12 to 17 in 2013 who last received treatment for heroin use was not reported because of low precision. For a discussion of the criteria for suppressing (i.e., not publishing) unreliable estimates, see Section B.2.2 in CBHSQ (2015). See endnote 7 for the reference.

20 Data on locations where people received substance use treatment are not mutually exclusive because respondents could report that they received treatment in more than one location in the past year.

21 People increasingly may seek treatment from private doctors for problems related to their use of alcohol or illicit drugs, especially with implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Pub. L. No. 111-148 (March 23, 2010). However, the number of people who received treatment in the past year in a private doctor's office in 2014 was similar to the numbers in 2006 to 2013 (Table A.9A in Appendix A). Also, the definition for specialty substance use treatment facilities for 2014 continues to exclude private doctors' offices for consistency in the measurement of trends.

22 The NSDUH definition of the need for treatment does not explicitly indicate the need for treatment in a specialty facility. People who had an SUD in the past year can be considered to need some form of assistance for their problems with substance use. However, individuals who met DSM-IV criteria for abuse but not dependence may not necessarily need treatment in a specialty facility. For more information about the DSM-IV criteria for having an SUD, see Section B.4.2 and the definitions for abuse and dependence in Section C of CBHSQ (2015). See endnote 7 for the reference.

23 Numbers of people who needed treatment specifically for illicit drug use or for alcohol use are not mutually exclusive and therefore do not sum to the total number of people who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem or an alcohol use problem.

24 Individuals who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem were defined as receiving treatment for their illicit drug use problem only if they reported receiving specialty treatment for illicit drug use in the past year. Thus, individuals who needed treatment for illicit drug use but received specialty treatment only for alcohol use in the past year or who received treatment for illicit drug use only at a facility not classified as a specialty facility were not counted as receiving treatment for illicit drug use. However, these individuals still were counted among those who needed treatment for illicit drug use or alcohol use and who received treatment at a specialty facility for their illicit drug use problem or alcohol use problem.

25 Individuals who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem were defined as receiving treatment for their alcohol use problem only if they reported receiving specialty treatment for alcohol use in the past year. Thus, individuals who needed treatment for alcohol use but received specialty treatment only for illicit drug use in the past year or who received treatment for alcohol use only at a facility not classified as a specialty facility were not counted as receiving treatment for alcohol use. However, these individuals still were counted among those who needed treatment for illicit drug use or alcohol use and who received treatment at a specialty facility for their illicit drug use problem or alcohol use problem.

26 Estimates for the perceived need for substance use treatment are discussed only for people who were classified as needing treatment but who did not receive treatment at a specialty facility. Similarly, estimates for whether a person made an effort to get substance use treatment are discussed only for people who felt the need for treatment and did not receive it.

27 Due to rounding, the numbers of people who made an effort or did not report making an effort to get treatment may not sum to the total number of people who needed substance use treatment and felt the need for treatment.

28 Granfield, R., & Cloud, W. (1996). The elephant that no one sees: Natural recovery among middle-class addicts. Journal of Drug Issues, 26, 45-61.

29 Tucker, J. A., & Simpson, C. A. (2011). The recovery spectrum: From self-change to seeking treatment. Alcohol Research & Health, 33, 371-379.

30 Estimates are not presented for reasons for not receiving treatment specifically for illicit drug use or for alcohol use if people reported making an effort to get treatment because many of the resulting estimates did not have sufficient precision to be reported, despite multiple years of data being combined to increase the precision of estimates. See endnote 11 for more information about suppressing (i.e., not publishing) unreliable estimates.

31 For services in an inpatient setting, adult respondents were asked whether they stayed overnight or longer in a hospital or other facility in the past 12 months to receive treatment or counseling for any problems they were having with their emotions, nerves, or mental health. For services in an outpatient setting, adult respondents were presented with the following examples of locations for outpatient mental health care: (a) an outpatient mental health clinic or center; (b) the office of a private therapist, psychologist, psychiatrist, social worker, or counselor that was not part of a clinic; (c) a doctor's office that was not part of a clinic; (d) an outpatient medical clinic; (e) a partial day hospital or day treatment program; or (f) some other place. Based on these examples, adults were asked whether they received any outpatient treatment or counseling in the past 12 months for any problems they were having with their emotions, nerves, or mental health.

32 For details, see the reference in endnote 15.

33 In order to generate estimates of AMI and SMI in the United States, SAMHSA designed and implemented the Mental Health Surveillance Study (MHSS). Over the 5-year period from 2008 to 2012, a subsample of adults was selected from the main study to participate in a follow-up telephone interview that obtained a detailed mental health assessment administered by trained mental health clinicians. The MHSS interview used the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders, Research Version, Non-patient Edition (SCID-I/NP). A prediction model created from clinical interview data that were collected in 2008 to 2012 was applied to data from the 2008 to 2013 NSDUHs to produce estimates of AMI for the entire NSDUH adult sample in these years. For details about the SCID-I/NP, see the following reference: First, M. B., Spitzer, R. L., Gibbon, M., & Williams, J. B. W. (2002). Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders, Research Version, Non-patient Edition (SCID-I/NP). New York, NY: New York State Psychiatric Institute, Biometrics Research.

34 Estimates for the types of mental health care that adults received are not mutually exclusive because adults could have received more than one type of care.

35 Estimates for the types of mental health care that adults received sum to less than 100 percent because some adult respondents reported that they received at least one type of care but they did not have complete information for whether or not they received each type of care (i.e., inpatient care, outpatient care, or prescription medication).

36 Estimates for sources of payment for outpatient mental health services among adults who received outpatient care are not mutually exclusive because adults could report more than one source of payment.

37 Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (2015). Behavioral health trends in the United States: Results from the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (HHS Publication No. SMA 15-4927, NSDUH Series H-50). Retrieved from http://www.samhsa.gov/data/

38 Percentages that readers calculate from estimated numbers of adults with a perceived unmet need for mental health services may not agree with reported percentages because the estimated numbers are rounded to the nearest 0.1 million adults.

39 Percentages for the receipt of specific types of services do not sum to the total percentage who received any type of service due to rounding.

40 Reasons that adolescents received mental health services were based on respondent self-reports and therefore do not necessarily indicate clinical diagnoses for specific mental disorders.

41 Adolescents were first asked about having an MDE in their lifetime, including whether they had at least five of nine symptoms in the same 2-week period in their lifetime; at least one of the symptoms needed to be having a depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure in daily activities. Adolescents who had lifetime MDE were asked if they had a period of time in the past 12 months when they felt depressed or lost interest or pleasure in daily activities for 2 weeks or longer, and they reported that they had some of their other lifetime MDE symptoms in the past 12 months. These adolescents were defined as having past year MDE.

42 Questions for measuring adolescents' impairment in carrying out life activities because of MDE were added to the NSDUH questionnaire for the 2006 survey.

43 Health professionals include general practitioners or family doctors; other medical doctors (e.g., cardiologist, gynecologist, urologist); psychologists; psychiatrists or psychotherapists; social workers; counselors; other mental health professionals (e.g., mental health nurse or other therapist where type is not specified); and nurses, occupational therapists, or other health professionals.


Appendix A: Supplemental Tables of Estimates for Receipt of Services for Behavioral Health Problems


Table A.1A – Received Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older
Location/Substance for Which
Treatment Was Received in
Past Year
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are numbers in thousands with standard errors included in parentheses.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
ANY TREATMENT LOCATION                          
Illicit Drugs or Alcohol 3,483*
(178)
3,327*
(169)
3,791
(198)
3,930
(191)
4,031
(214)
3,927
(193)
4,061
(211)
4,276
(213)
4,152
(196)
3,764
(194)
4,004
(198)
4,051
(211)
4,149
(186)
Both Illicit Drugs and
   Alcohol
1,319
(111)
1,255
(100)
1,467
(111)
1,522
(120)
1,571
(128)
1,416
(125)
1,324
(96)
1,535
(128)
1,313
(109)
1,211
(107)
1,213
(108)
1,320
(123)
1,427
(113)
Illicit Drugs but Not
   Alcohol
693*
(76)
545*
(60)
724*
(76)
649*
(69)
885
(93)
766*
(76)
768*
(82)
767*
(80)
887
(78)
794
(76)
1,012
(89)
857
(81)
1,008
(84)
Alcohol but Not Illicit
   Drugs
1,086
(98)
1,103
(100)
1,191
(127)
1,318
(120)
1,192
(111)
1,326
(112)
1,583
(152)
1,545
(124)
1,553
(138)
1,432
(140)
1,377
(134)
1,404
(128)
1,256
(104)
SPECIALTY FACILITY                          
Illicit Drugs or Alcohol 2,346
(151)
1,874*
(118)
2,327
(165)
2,308
(157)
2,533
(162)
2,430
(166)
2,293
(159)
2,627
(168)
2,594
(155)
2,325
(150)
2,496
(155)
2,466
(160)
2,606
(148)
Both Illicit Drugs and
   Alcohol
709
(88)
595
(71)
718
(73)
748
(89)
734
(82)
624
(76)
580
(63)
750
(87)
629
(79)
574
(77)
633
(83)
547
(75)
684
(73)
Illicit Drugs but Not
   Alcohol
645*
(77)
442*
(51)
609*
(75)
481*
(56)
809
(94)
678
(74)
585*
(67)
653
(76)
787
(73)
701
(72)
824
(79)
786
(78)
861
(77)
Alcohol but Not Illicit
   Drugs
783
(87)
646
(69)
727
(102)
818
(100)
725
(88)
898
(102)
890
(116)
843
(89)
891
(94)
828
(97)
801
(97)
840
(101)
764
(82)
Table A.2A – Received Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17
Location/Substance for Which
Treatment Was Received in
Past Year
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are numbers in thousands with standard errors included in parentheses.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
ANY TREATMENT LOCATION                          
Illicit Drugs or Alcohol 369*
(26)
362*
(24)
406*
(26)
348*
(24)
353*
(27)
341*
(24)
331*
(27)
286
(23)
290
(24)
301*
(26)
285
(24)
232
(20)
227
(23)
Both Illicit Drugs and
   Alcohol
172*
(20)
161*
(16)
180*
(18)
167*
(17)
152*
(18)
153*
(17)
145*
(16)
141*
(16)
112
(15)
113
(16)
135
(19)
113
(14)
91
(15)
Illicit Drugs but Not
   Alcohol
83
(11)
81
(11)
95
(12)
83
(12)
106
(16)
77
(12)
75
(12)
67
(11)
91
(13)
113
(16)
88
(13)
60
(9)
75
(13)
Alcohol but Not Illicit
   Drugs
55*
(9)
55*
(10)
55*
(9)
47*
(8)
45*
(8)
37*
(7)
40*
(9)
37*
(7)
35*
(8)
30
(7)
29
(7)
24
(6)
16
(5)
SPECIALTY FACILITY                          
Illicit Drugs or Alcohol 186*
(19)
168*
(17)
185*
(18)
181*
(17)
181*
(20)
151
(15)
145
(16)
152
(16)
139
(16)
146
(18)
157*
(16)
122
(15)
109
(16)
Both Illicit Drugs and
   Alcohol
81*
(16)
55*
(9)
81*
(12)
84*
(12)
63*
(12)
53*
(9)
54*
(9)
68*
(11)
39
(8)
43
(9)
52*
(10)
49*
(10)
25
(6)
Illicit Drugs but Not
   Alcohol
56
(8)
52
(9)
47
(8)
54
(9)
72
(14)
46
(9)
52
(9)
42
(8)
52
(9)
75
(13)
67
(11)
38
(7)
47
(11)
Alcohol but Not Illicit
   Drugs
36
(7)
30
(6)
37
(8)
27
(6)
28
(6)
22
(5)
17
(5)
20
(5)
19
(5)
16
(5)
19
(5)
13
(4)
18
(7)
Table A.3A – Received Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among Young Adults Aged 18 to 25
Location/Substance for Which
Treatment Was Received in
Past Year
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are numbers in thousands with standard errors included in parentheses.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
ANY TREATMENT LOCATION                          
Illicit Drugs or Alcohol 686
(38)
891
(45)
874
(48)
962*
(47)
875
(49)
864
(45)
864
(46)
984*
(49)
969*
(52)
872
(50)
841
(52)
764
(46)
764
(52)
Both Illicit Drugs and
   Alcohol
256
(23)
352*
(27)
317
(29)
317
(26)
375*
(34)
301
(26)
325*
(28)
383*
(32)
317
(31)
326
(34)
221
(23)
304
(31)
244
(28)
Illicit Drugs but Not
   Alcohol
161*
(19)
190
(25)
226
(23)
247
(25)
178*
(19)
177*
(23)
188
(23)
215
(24)
253
(26)
249
(25)
331
(35)
205
(21)
252
(30)
Alcohol but Not Illicit
   Drugs
197
(20)
247*
(24)
258*
(26)
273*
(26)
251*
(24)
325*
(29)
285*
(25)
288*
(27)
299*
(30)
219
(22)
189
(23)
162
(19)
181
(21)
SPECIALTY FACILITY                          
Illicit Drugs or Alcohol 435
(30)
486
(33)
548
(36)
522
(34)
505
(38)
489
(33)
502
(33)
586*
(39)
537
(37)
567
(40)
467
(37)
458
(35)
470
(41)
Both Illicit Drugs and
   Alcohol
148
(18)
178
(22)
154
(19)
138
(17)
185
(27)
139
(19)
157
(19)
169
(19)
146
(19)
169
(26)
92
(13)
137
(22)
122
(20)
Illicit Drugs but Not
   Alcohol
133*
(16)
147
(20)
182
(20)
194
(22)
148
(17)
156
(20)
137*
(18)
180
(22)
202
(22)
221
(24)
259
(31)
179
(19)
205
(26)
Alcohol but Not Illicit
   Drugs
118
(16)
114
(15)
156
(20)
151
(18)
118
(16)
145
(16)
169*
(19)
154
(18)
147
(21)
140
(18)
80
(13)
89
(13)
112
(18)
Table A.4A – Received Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older
Location/Substance for Which
Treatment Was Received in
Past Year
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are numbers in thousands with standard errors included in parentheses.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
ANY TREATMENT LOCATION                          
Illicit Drugs or Alcohol 2,428*
(169)
2,074*
(160)
2,511*
(189)
2,620*
(180)
2,803
(208)
2,721
(186)
2,867
(201)
3,006
(205)
2,893
(187)
2,591*
(184)
2,878
(191)
3,055
(204)
3,158
(172)
Both Illicit Drugs and
   Alcohol
891
(106)
742*
(93)
970
(104)
1,038
(113)
1,044
(123)
962
(122)
854
(89)
1,011
(124)
885
(102)
772*
(100)
857
(104)
903
(118)
1,092
(108)
Illicit Drugs but Not
   Alcohol
450*
(76)
275*
(52)
404*
(73)
319*
(63)
602
(92)
513
(71)
505
(77)
484
(76)
542
(72)
432*
(69)
593
(81)
592
(75)
681
(74)
Alcohol but Not Illicit
   Drugs
834
(96)
802
(96)
877
(124)
999
(116)
896
(108)
964
(107)
1,257
(151)
1,220
(121)
1,219
(135)
1,183
(137)
1,159
(131)
1,218
(126)
1,059
(101)
SPECIALTY FACILITY                          
Illicit Drugs or Alcohol 1,724
(145)
1,221*
(110)
1,594*
(157)
1,605*
(150)
1,846
(158)
1,790
(160)
1,646
(151)
1,888
(163)
1,919
(148)
1,613*
(141)
1,872
(153)
1,886
(153)
2,028
(139)
Both Illicit Drugs and
   Alcohol
480
(84)
363
(67)
483
(69)
527
(86)
486
(78)
432
(73)
368
(59)
512
(85)
445
(77)
361
(71)
489
(83)
361
(70)
536
(69)
Illicit Drugs but Not
   Alcohol
456
(77)
243*
(45)
380*
(72)
233*
(48)
589
(92)
476
(68)
395*
(63)
431
(72)
533
(69)
405*
(66)
497
(72)
569
(74)
609
(68)
Alcohol but Not Illicit
   Drugs
629
(86)
502
(67)
534
(99)
640
(98)
579
(86)
731
(99)
704
(114)
669
(88)
725
(91)
672
(95)
702
(97)
738
(100)
634
(79)
Table A.5A – Substances for Which Last or Current Treatment Was Received among Individuals Aged 12 or Older Who Received Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year
Substance for Which Last
or Current Treatment
Was Received1
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are numbers in thousands with standard errors included in parentheses.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Respondents could indicate multiple substances for which they received their last or current treatment; thus, these response categories are not mutually exclusive.
2 Estimates for stimulants do not include data from new methamphetamine items added in 2005 and 2006.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
TOTAL POPULATION 3,483*
(179)
3,327*
(169)
3,791
(202)
3,930
(192)
4,031
(216)
3,927
(192)
4,061
(210)
4,276
(211)
4,152
(199)
3,764
(196)
4,004
(200)
4,051
(210)
4,149
(188)
Marijuana 974
(91)
975
(71)
1,017
(78)
1,062
(80)
1,233
(105)
942
(91)
955
(74)
1,234
(102)
1,028
(89)
872
(76)
957
(84)
845
(72)
1,034
(87)
Cocaine 796
(95)
557
(72)
884
(89)
797
(89)
930
(112)
818
(103)
664
(67)
777
(91)
706
(84)
511*
(70)
658
(81)
584
(77)
781
(90)
Heroin 277*
(55)
281*
(50)
283*
(57)
326*
(63)
467
(78)
343*
(73)
343*
(55)
486
(78)
422
(73)
430
(72)
450
(63)
526
(69)
618
(75)
Hallucinogens 275
(42)
278
(38)
348
(48)
358
(57)
443
(73)
306
(46)
291
(42)
445
(65)
335
(57)
293
(50)
366
(59)
303
(48)
339
(53)
Inhalants 139
(29)
135
(26)
213
(39)
167
(33)
254
(54)
187
(39)
186
(34)
248
(51)
222
(53)
152
(39)
153
(34)
187
(39)
189
(39)
Pain Relievers 360*
(59)
415*
(51)
424*
(46)
466*
(55)
547*
(64)
565*
(70)
604
(61)
736
(84)
761
(83)
726
(78)
973
(99)
746
(85)
772
(72)
Tranquilizers 197*
(36)
252*
(43)
276*
(45)
278*
(43)
387
(74)
269*
(43)
327
(50)
413
(66)
353
(61)
318*
(47)
458
(68)
376
(57)
480
(65)
Stimulants2 268*
(39)
344
(51)
393
(56)
351
(55)
537
(85)
314
(43)
339
(51)
517
(78)
345
(59)
309
(52)
357
(56)
461
(73)
425
(60)
Sedatives 163
(60)
107
(27)
117
(28)
98
(24)
190
(58)
62*
(17)
130
(32)
185
(50)
188
(51)
120
(32)
140
(37)
154
(41)
152
(38)
Alcohol 2,222
(143)
2,163
(137)
2,413
(172)
2,463
(157)
2,545
(176)
2,471
(156)
2,678
(179)
2,881*
(176)
2,607
(173)
2,364
(166)
2,395
(171)
2,513
(168)
2,406
(150)
Table A.6A – Substances for Which Last or Current Treatment Was Received among Youths Aged 12 to 17 Who Received Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year
Substance for Which Last
or Current Treatment
Was Received1
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
**Low precision; no estimate reported.
NOTE: Estimates shown are numbers in thousands with standard errors included in parentheses.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Respondents could indicate multiple substances for which they received their last or current treatment; thus, these response categories are not mutually exclusive.
2 Estimates for stimulants do not include data from new methamphetamine items added in 2005 and 2006.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
TOTAL POPULATION 369*
(26)
362*
(24)
406*
(27)
348*
(24)
353*
(27)
341*
(25)
331*
(27)
286
(23)
290
(24)
301*
(27)
285
(24)
232
(20)
227
(23)
Marijuana 203*
(20)
189*
(17)
219*
(21)
185*
(17)
189*
(20)
172*
(18)
162
(17)
159
(17)
155
(17)
165
(19)
187*
(21)
127
(14)
117
(16)
Cocaine 45*
(11)
33*
(7)
41*
(9)
32*
(7)
48*
(11)
34*
(7)
23*
(6)
28*
(7)
27*
(8)
18
(5)
24
(8)
20
(7)
8
(3)
Heroin 6
(3)
8
(3)
10
(4)
10
(4)
5
(2)
8
(3)
9
(4)
7
(3)
3
(2)
14
(6)
9
(5)
**
(**)
12
(5)
Hallucinogens 45*
(12)
39*
(8)
35*
(7)
39*
(8)
47*
(10)
30*
(7)
34*
(8)
35*
(8)
29
(7)
38*
(9)
32
(9)
25
(7)
13
(4)
Inhalants 26
(9)
27*
(7)
29*
(6)
25*
(6)
20
(6)
12
(4)
17
(5)
26
(7)
35*
(9)
12
(4)
19
(6)
12
(4)
11
(4)
Pain Relievers 37
(10)
40
(9)
60*
(11)
47*
(9)
57*
(12)
41
(8)
44*
(8)
44*
(9)
50*
(10)
51*
(10)
44*
(9)
29
(7)
22
(6)
Tranquilizers 27
(10)
16
(4)
29
(6)
23
(6)
35
(10)
24
(7)
21
(5)
22
(6)
24
(7)
32
(8)
44
(12)
19
(5)
23
(7)
Stimulants2 34
(10)
23
(6)
36
(8)
23
(6)
44*
(10)
22
(6)
14
(5)
19
(5)
27
(7)
25
(7)
17
(5)
21
(6)
19
(7)
Sedatives 10
(4)
9
(5)
13
(4)
6
(3)
10
(4)
5
(3)
3
(1)
5
(2)
**
(**)
8
(4)
8
(4)
**
(**)
11
(6)
Alcohol 187*
(19)
171*
(17)
197*
(19)
171*
(17)
149*
(17)
162*
(17)
145*
(16)
135*
(16)
122*
(16)
103
(13)
122*
(17)
105
(14)
79
(13)
Table A.7A – Substances for Which Last or Current Treatment Was Received among Young Adults Aged 18 to 25 Who Received Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year
Substance for Which Last
or Current Treatment
Was Received1
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are numbers in thousands with standard errors included in parentheses.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Respondents could indicate multiple substances for which they received their last or current treatment; thus, these response categories are not mutually exclusive.
2 Estimates for stimulants do not include data from new methamphetamine items added in 2005 and 2006.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
TOTAL POPULATION 686
(38)
891
(46)
874
(49)
962*
(48)
875
(50)
864
(46)
864
(47)
984*
(50)
969*
(52)
872
(51)
841
(54)
764
(47)
764
(52)
Marijuana 264
(24)
356*
(28)
346*
(29)
332*
(27)
379*
(36)
281
(28)
310
(29)
362*
(31)
335*
(29)
298
(29)
279
(31)
268
(26)
238
(29)
Cocaine 114
(15)
138
(17)
161*
(19)
140*
(17)
167*
(21)
134
(18)
144*
(19)
142*
(18)
143*
(18)
121
(19)
106
(20)
116
(21)
88
(19)
Heroin 39*
(8)
50*
(11)
60*
(10)
87
(15)
67*
(13)
74*
(14)
67*
(13)
95
(15)
86
(13)
112
(18)
104
(17)
128
(19)
133
(22)
Hallucinogens 77
(13)
106
(15)
116
(19)
90
(14)
114
(23)
99
(18)
97
(15)
125*
(20)
83
(13)
90
(16)
83
(16)
90
(18)
72
(17)
Inhalants 30
(7)
39
(9)
62
(12)
48
(11)
61
(15)
60
(14)
61
(14)
65
(16)
30
(8)
42
(11)
38
(10)
46
(14)
35
(13)
Pain Relievers 75*
(11)
136
(17)
140
(19)
137
(17)
159
(21)
131
(18)
171
(21)
207
(25)
182
(21)
228
(25)
247
(31)
190
(22)
183
(26)
Tranquilizers 59
(11)
78
(13)
77
(14)
79
(13)
107
(23)
77
(15)
79
(14)
99
(16)
78
(13)
110
(19)
109
(16)
104
(17)
98
(21)
Stimulants2 60
(11)
130
(20)
116
(19)
98
(15)
122
(25)
103
(17)
78
(15)
104
(18)
76
(13)
85
(17)
113
(25)
94
(17)
97
(20)
Sedatives 18
(6)
22
(6)
19
(6)
22
(7)
28
(8)
21
(7)
29
(8)
29
(11)
18
(6)
14
(4)
13
(4)
25
(10)
21
(9)
Alcohol 387
(28)
524*
(34)
493*
(35)
531*
(35)
556*
(40)
570*
(39)
553*
(37)
610*
(40)
537*
(39)
472
(38)
358
(29)
398
(33)
377
(34)
Table A.8A – Substances for Which Last or Current Treatment Was Received among Adults Aged 26 or Older Who Received Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year
Substance for Which Last
or Current Treatment
Was Received1
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are numbers in thousands with standard errors included in parentheses.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Respondents could indicate multiple substances for which they received their last or current treatment; thus, these response categories are not mutually exclusive.
2 Estimates for stimulants do not include data from new methamphetamine items added in 2005 and 2006.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
TOTAL POPULATION 2,428*
(170)
2,074*
(159)
2,511*
(191)
2,620*
(181)
2,803
(210)
2,721
(184)
2,867
(199)
3,006
(203)
2,893
(190)
2,591*
(186)
2,878
(192)
3,055
(203)
3,158
(173)
Marijuana 507
(84)
431*
(62)
451*
(68)
546
(72)
665
(98)
490
(84)
483
(65)
714
(97)
539
(83)
409*
(66)
491
(76)
450*
(63)
679
(79)
Cocaine 637
(92)
386*
(70)
683
(87)
624
(87)
715
(110)
650
(101)
497
(63)
607
(89)
535
(81)
372*
(66)
528
(78)
448*
(73)
685
(87)
Heroin 232*
(54)
224*
(49)
213*
(54)
228*
(61)
396
(77)
261*
(71)
267*
(53)
385
(76)
333
(72)
303
(69)
338
(60)
392
(66)
473
(70)
Hallucinogens 152
(37)
134*
(33)
197
(43)
229
(54)
282
(68)
176
(42)
160
(37)
285
(61)
223
(56)
165
(45)
252
(55)
189
(42)
254
(51)
Inhalants 83
(26)
69
(24)
122
(38)
94
(31)
173
(51)
115
(37)
108
(32)
157
(48)
156
(52)
98
(36)
95
(32)
129
(35)
143
(38)
Pain Relievers 247*
(57)
239*
(47)
224*
(40)
282*
(51)
330*
(60)
393
(68)
388*
(57)
485
(80)
529
(80)
447
(69)
682
(93)
527
(82)
567
(64)
Tranquilizers 111*
(32)
158*
(41)
170*
(40)
176*
(40)
245
(70)
168*
(40)
228
(48)
292
(64)
251
(59)
176*
(41)
305
(65)
253
(53)
359
(61)
Stimulants2 174*
(35)
190
(46)
241
(52)
230
(53)
370
(81)
189
(40)
247
(49)
394
(76)
242
(58)
199
(47)
227
(48)
346
(70)
308
(56)
Sedatives 136
(60)
76
(26)
85
(27)
70
(23)
152
(57)
35*
(16)
99
(31)
151
(49)
164
(51)
98
(32)
118
(37)
123
(39)
121
(36)
Alcohol 1,647
(138)
1,469*
(131)
1,723
(166)
1,761
(150)
1,840
(170)
1,739
(149)
1,980
(174)
2,136
(170)
1,948
(167)
1,789
(162)
1,915
(167)
2,010
(164)
1,950
(144)
Table A.9A – Locations Received Illicit Drug Use Treatment or Alcohol Use Treatment in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older Who Received Illicit Drug Use Treatment or Alcohol Use Treatment in the Past Year
Location of Treatment1 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are totals with standard errors included in parentheses.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Respondents could indicate multiple locations of treatment; thus, these response categories are not mutually exclusive.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
TOTAL POPULATION 3,483*
(179)
3,327*
(169)
3,791
(202)
3,930
(192)
4,031
(216)
3,927
(192)
4,061
(210)
4,276
(211)
4,152
(199)
3,764
(196)
4,004
(200)
4,051
(210)
4,149
(188)
Hospital - Inpatient 859
(103)
587*
(66)
775
(88)
773
(80)
815
(97)
784
(100)
681*
(81)
855
(88)
737
(85)
871
(90)
861
(101)
879
(93)
921
(85)
Rehabilitation Facility -
   Inpatient
1,094
(112)
752*
(80)
947
(88)
1,109
(111)
934
(95)
1,055
(109)
744*
(75)
1,194
(115)
992
(96)
1,001
(102)
1,010
(101)
1,042
(107)
1,076
(85)
Rehabilitation Facility -
   Outpatient
1,536
(124)
1,243*
(94)
1,666
(137)
1,546
(132)
1,616
(124)
1,723
(139)
1,460
(115)
1,993
(149)
1,702
(127)
1,531
(125)
1,505
(116)
1,753
(134)
1,731
(118)
Mental Health Center -
   Outpatient
1,016
(108)
729*
(68)
982
(111)
1,046
(116)
1,107
(104)
890*
(93)
1,055
(108)
1,092
(109)
1,003
(93)
1,031
(94)
1,000
(95)
1,176
(109)
1,157
(94)
Emergency Room 469
(68)
251*
(35)
453
(63)
399
(55)
395
(56)
525
(79)
374
(55)
492
(62)
472
(72)
574
(76)
597
(88)
603
(74)
521
(60)
Private Doctor's Office 523*
(81)
377*
(45)
490*
(61)
460*
(58)
614
(74)
599
(68)
688
(81)
721
(82)
655
(76)
700
(83)
735
(93)
770
(86)
780
(78)
Self-Help Group 2,021
(137)
1,911
(131)
2,098
(157)
2,102
(144)
2,183
(167)
2,188
(148)
2,199
(161)
2,434
(164)
2,343
(166)
2,139
(154)
2,119
(148)
2,292
(172)
2,210
(136)
Prison/Jail 259
(39)
206*
(37)
310
(50)
344
(54)
421
(67)
302
(53)
344
(56)
373
(60)
344
(46)
435
(60)
388
(65)
263
(42)
366
(51)
Table A.10A – Need for and Receipt of Treatment at a Specialty Facility for a Substance Use Problem in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older
Substance/Substance Treatment Status 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are numbers in thousands with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents were classified as needing treatment for a substance use problem if they met at least one of three criteria during the past year: (1) dependent on the substance; (2) abuse of the substance; or (3) received treatment for substance use at a specialty facility (i.e., drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility [inpatient or outpatient], hospital [inpatient only], or mental health center).
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Estimates include individuals who received treatment specifically for illicit drugs or alcohol, as well as individuals who received treatment but did not specify for what substance(s).
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
NEEDED TREATMENT FOR ILLICIT
DRUG USE
7,748
(231)
7,333
(215)
8,053
(228)
7,550
(222)
7,762
(240)
7,558
(249)
7,580
(219)
7,863
(244)
7,936
(264)
7,186*
(223)
8,040
(264)
7,608
(261)
7,881
(237)
Received Treatment at a Specialty
   Facility
1,412
(121)
1,103*
(91)
1,427
(114)
1,280*
(108)
1,578
(125)
1,362
(114)
1,211*
(94)
1,484
(124)
1,518
(116)
1,354
(109)
1,532
(117)
1,483
(123)
1,604
(108)
Did Not Receive Treatment at a
   Specialty Facility
6,335
(205)
6,230
(192)
6,626
(203)
6,269
(198)
6,184
(203)
6,196
(217)
6,369
(196)
6,379
(213)
6,418
(231)
5,832
(191)
6,508
(243)
6,126
(226)
6,278
(214)
NEEDED TREATMENT FOR
ALCOHOL USE
18,638
(411)
18,215
(389)
19,360*
(431)
19,378*
(413)
19,568*
(419)
19,350*
(421)
19,102*
(407)
19,420*
(427)
18,633
(416)
17,389
(390)
18,291
(424)
18,049
(429)
17,645
(375)
Received Treatment at a Specialty
   Facility
1,549
(124)
1,298
(102)
1,535
(135)
1,626
(139)
1,553
(125)
1,575
(131)
1,564
(138)
1,709
(127)
1,591
(126)
1,472
(124)
1,492
(127)
1,421
(125)
1,572
(121)
Did Not Receive Treatment at a
   Specialty Facility
17,089
(403)
16,917
(370)
17,824*
(409)
17,752*
(386)
18,015*
(407)
17,775*
(398)
17,537*
(387)
17,711*
(410)
17,042
(400)
15,917
(372)
16,800
(406)
16,628
(406)
16,073
(351)
NEEDED TREATMENT FOR ILLICIT
DRUG USE OR ALCOHOL USE
22,811
(436)
22,165
(415)
23,476
(461)
23,172
(443)
23,635
(463)
23,265
(470)
23,208
(439)
23,632
(474)
23,209
(476)
21,579
(423)
23,061
(477)
22,687
(477)
22,478
(404)
Did Not Receive Treatment at a
   Specialty Facility1
2,346
(151)
1,874*
(118)
2,327
(165)
2,308
(157)
2,533
(162)
2,430
(166)
2,293
(159)
2,627
(168)
2,594
(155)
2,325
(150)
2,496
(155)
2,466
(160)
2,606
(148)
Did Not Receive Treatment at a
   Specialty Facility
20,465
(429)
20,290
(390)
21,149*
(426)
20,864
(412)
21,102*
(441)
20,835
(434)
20,914
(411)
21,005
(441)
20,615
(453)
19,254
(397)
20,565
(453)
20,221
(444)
19,872
(373)
Table A.11A – Need for and Receipt of Treatment at a Specialty Facility for a Substance Use Problem in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17
Substance/Substance Treatment Status 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are numbers in thousands with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents were classified as needing treatment for a substance use problem if they met at least one of three criteria during the past year: (1) dependent on the substance; (2) abuse of the substance; or (3) received treatment for substance use at a specialty facility (i.e., drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility [inpatient or outpatient], hospital [inpatient only], or mental health center).
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Estimates include individuals who received treatment specifically for illicit drugs or alcohol, as well as individuals who received treatment but did not specify for what substance(s).
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
NEEDED TREATMENT FOR ILLICIT
DRUG USE
1,414*
(51)
1,327*
(46)
1,397*
(48)
1,254*
(48)
1,218*
(48)
1,124*
(42)
1,197*
(47)
1,100*
(45)
1,179*
(47)
1,184*
(48)
1,041*
(45)
908
(41)
894
(46)
Received Treatment at a Specialty
   Facility
142*
(18)
113*
(14)
134*
(16)
142*
(15)
137*
(18)
111*
(13)
112*
(14)
117*
(13)
99
(13)
125*
(17)
121*
(14)
90
(12)
74
(12)
Did Not Receive Treatment at a
   Specialty Facility
1,272*
(46)
1,214*
(45)
1,262*
(45)
1,112*
(45)
1,081*
(45)
1,013*
(40)
1,085*
(45)
983*
(43)
1,080*
(45)
1,060*
(44)
920
(43)
817
(39)
820
(45)
NEEDED TREATMENT FOR
ALCOHOL USE
1,495*
(51)
1,501*
(50)
1,570*
(52)
1,460*
(52)
1,409*
(49)
1,400*
(48)
1,255*
(49)
1,182*
(50)
1,144*
(50)
978*
(46)
889*
(40)
735
(37)
699
(42)
Received Treatment at a Specialty
   Facility
121*
(17)
95*
(12)
126*
(15)
119*
(14)
101*
(14)
83
(12)
78
(11)
97*
(13)
70
(11)
63
(11)
76
(12)
73
(13)
55
(12)
Did Not Receive Treatment at a
   Specialty Facility
1,374*
(49)
1,406*
(49)
1,444*
(49)
1,341*
(50)
1,308*
(48)
1,318*
(47)
1,177*
(48)
1,086*
(47)
1,074*
(48)
915*
(44)
814*
(39)
662
(35)
644
(40)
NEEDED TREATMENT FOR ILLICIT
DRUG USE OR ALCOHOL USE
2,256*
(61)
2,253*
(61)
2,288*
(63)
2,096*
(61)
2,090*
(60)
1,984*
(57)
1,949*
(59)
1,784*
(59)
1,833*
(61)
1,744*
(58)
1,563*
(55)
1,340
(51)
1,284
(55)
Did Not Receive Treatment at a
   Specialty Facility1
186*
(19)
168*
(17)
185*
(18)
181*
(17)
181*
(20)
151
(15)
145
(16)
152
(16)
139
(16)
146
(18)
157*
(16)
122
(15)
109
(16)
Did Not Receive Treatment at a
   Specialty Facility
2,071*
(57)
2,085*
(61)
2,103*
(60)
1,915*
(58)
1,908*
(58)
1,833*
(56)
1,804*
(58)
1,632*
(56)
1,694*
(58)
1,598*
(55)
1,407*
(53)
1,218
(49)
1,175
(54)
Table A.12A – Need for and Receipt of Treatment at a Specialty Facility for a Substance Use Problem in the Past Year among Young Adults Aged 18 to 25
Substance/Substance Treatment Status 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are numbers in thousands with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents were classified as needing treatment for a substance use problem if they met at least one of three criteria during the past year: (1) dependent on the substance; (2) abuse of the substance; or (3) received treatment for substance use at a specialty facility (i.e., drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility [inpatient or outpatient], hospital [inpatient only], or mental health center).
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Estimates include individuals who received treatment specifically for illicit drugs or alcohol, as well as individuals who received treatment but did not specify for what substance(s).
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
NEEDED TREATMENT FOR ILLICIT
DRUG USE
2,680
(78)
2,624
(75)
2,856*
(84)
2,854*
(84)
2,734*
(84)
2,754*
(82)
2,697
(84)
2,747*
(85)
2,815*
(87)
2,761*
(86)
2,849*
(95)
2,671
(90)
2,460
(93)
Received Treatment at a Specialty
   Facility
287
(25)
340
(29)
352
(28)
350
(29)
342
(33)
307
(29)
305
(26)
377
(32)
355
(29)
401
(36)
365
(34)
341
(31)
328
(34)
Did Not Receive Treatment at a
   Specialty Facility
2,393*
(72)
2,284
(70)
2,505*
(82)
2,504*
(81)
2,392*
(77)
2,447*
(77)
2,392*
(81)
2,370*
(80)
2,460*
(82)
2,360
(79)
2,483*
(90)
2,330
(83)
2,132
(88)
NEEDED TREATMENT FOR
ALCOHOL USE
5,584*
(113)
5,589*
(110)
5,744*
(121)
5,816*
(121)
5,909*
(122)
5,641*
(117)
5,847*
(116)
5,538*
(117)
5,455*
(127)
5,062*
(118)
5,038*
(115)
4,633
(123)
4,361
(120)
Received Treatment at a Specialty
   Facility
270
(24)
305
(26)
323*
(28)
295
(25)
317
(31)
293
(25)
345*
(28)
353*
(29)
312
(29)
315
(32)
180
(19)
233
(26)
244
(27)
Did Not Receive Treatment at a
   Specialty Facility
5,313*
(111)
5,284*
(107)
5,421*
(118)
5,522*
(118)
5,592*
(122)
5,348*
(114)
5,502*
(113)
5,184*
(114)
5,143*
(123)
4,747*
(115)
4,858*
(114)
4,400
(120)
4,117
(117)
NEEDED TREATMENT FOR ILLICIT
DRUG USE OR ALCOHOL USE
6,874*
(122)
6,824*
(117)
7,047*
(130)
7,220*
(133)
7,155*
(133)
6,939*
(128)
7,054*
(125)
6,929*
(129)
6,956*
(140)
6,560*
(130)
6,681*
(134)
6,146
(138)
5,845
(135)
Did Not Receive Treatment at a
   Specialty Facility1
435
(30)
486
(33)
548
(36)
522
(34)
505
(38)
489
(33)
502
(33)
586*
(39)
537
(37)
567
(40)
467
(37)
458
(35)
470
(41)
Did Not Receive Treatment at a
   Specialty Facility
6,439*
(120)
6,338*
(115)
6,499*
(127)
6,699*
(130)
6,650*
(131)
6,450*
(124)
6,552*
(121)
6,343*
(125)
6,419*
(137)
5,994*
(127)
6,215*
(131)
5,689
(133)
5,375
(130)
Table A.13A – Need for and Receipt of Treatment at a Specialty Facility for a Substance Use Problem in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older
Substance/Substance Treatment Status 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are numbers in thousands with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents were classified as needing treatment for a substance use problem if they met at least one of three criteria during the past year: (1) dependent on the substance; (2) abuse of the substance; or (3) received treatment for substance use at a specialty facility (i.e., drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility [inpatient or outpatient], hospital [inpatient only], or mental health center).
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Estimates include individuals who received treatment specifically for illicit drugs or alcohol, as well as individuals who received treatment but did not specify for what substance(s).
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
NEEDED TREATMENT FOR ILLICIT
DRUG USE
3,654*
(213)
3,382*
(187)
3,801*
(209)
3,442*
(196)
3,810*
(217)
3,680*
(224)
3,686*
(186)
4,016
(220)
3,943
(232)
3,240*
(197)
4,150
(242)
4,030
(238)
4,527
(207)
Received Treatment at a Specialty
   Facility
983
(116)
649*
(84)
941
(107)
789*
(101)
1,099
(120)
944
(107)
794*
(88)
990
(120)
1,064
(111)
828*
(100)
1,046
(113)
1,051
(115)
1,201
(100)
Did Not Receive Treatment at a
   Specialty Facility
2,670*
(178)
2,732*
(168)
2,860
(181)
2,653*
(170)
2,711*
(182)
2,735*
(193)
2,892
(164)
3,026
(190)
2,878
(201)
2,412*
(163)
3,104
(221)
2,978
(209)
3,326
(180)
NEEDED TREATMENT FOR
ALCOHOL USE
11,559*
(389)
11,125*
(358)
12,045
(389)
12,102
(369)
12,251
(390)
12,309
(395)
12,000
(377)
12,701
(405)
12,034
(393)
11,349*
(369)
12,364
(392)
12,681
(405)
12,584
(337)
Received Treatment at a Specialty
   Facility
1,157
(121)
898*
(96)
1,086
(131)
1,213
(135)
1,135
(121)
1,199
(127)
1,142
(132)
1,260
(124)
1,209
(121)
1,093
(120)
1,236
(127)
1,115
(121)
1,272
(115)
Did Not Receive Treatment at a
   Specialty Facility
10,402
(380)
10,228*
(341)
10,960
(367)
10,889
(345)
11,116
(376)
11,110
(374)
10,858
(355)
11,441
(385)
10,825
(375)
10,255*
(349)
11,128
(372)
11,567
(385)
11,312
(318)
NEEDED TREATMENT FOR ILLICIT
DRUG USE OR ALCOHOL USE
13,680*
(406)
13,088*
(378)
14,142*
(424)
13,856*
(395)
14,390
(423)
14,342
(437)
14,204*
(399)
14,918
(448)
14,420
(439)
13,274*
(397)
14,817
(434)
15,200
(443)
15,349
(363)
Did Not Receive Treatment at a
   Specialty Facility1
1,724
(145)
1,221*
(110)
1,594*
(157)
1,605*
(150)
1,846
(158)
1,790
(160)
1,646
(151)
1,888
(163)
1,919
(148)
1,613*
(141)
1,872
(153)
1,886
(153)
2,028
(139)
Did Not Receive Treatment at a
   Specialty Facility
11,956*
(397)
11,867*
(357)
12,547
(385)
12,251*
(366)
12,543
(400)
12,552
(402)
12,558
(370)
13,030
(414)
12,502
(416)
11,661*
(370)
12,944
(409)
13,314
(418)
13,321
(335)
Table A.14B – Received Substance Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Substance Use Treatment, by Age Group
Substance Treatment/Age Group 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents were classified as needing treatment for a substance use problem if they met at least one of three criteria during the past year: (1) dependent on the substance; (2) abuse of the substance; or (3) received treatment for the substance at a specialty facility (i.e., drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility [inpatient or outpatient], hospital [inpatient only], or mental health center).
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
RECEIVED ILLICIT DRUG USE
TREATMENT AMONG
INDIVIDUALS WHO NEEDED
ILLICIT DRUG USE TREATMENT
18.2   (1.39) 15.0* (1.12) 17.7   (1.26) 17.0   (1.28) 20.3   (1.38) 18.0   (1.32) 16.0* (1.12) 18.9   (1.39) 19.1   (1.28) 18.8   (1.31) 19.1   (1.34) 19.5   (1.41) 20.3   (1.23)
12-17 10.1   (1.17) 8.5   (1.02) 9.6   (1.06) 11.3   (1.12) 11.2   (1.40) 9.9   (1.15) 9.3   (1.11) 10.7   (1.17) 8.4   (1.09) 10.5   (1.32) 11.6   (1.34) 10.0   (1.27) 8.3   (1.34)
18-25 10.7   (0.86) 13.0   (1.03) 12.3   (0.96) 12.3   (0.97) 12.5   (1.13) 11.1   (0.98) 11.3   (0.95) 13.7   (1.09) 12.6   (0.96) 14.5   (1.19) 12.8   (1.14) 12.8   (1.08) 13.3   (1.31)
26 or Older 26.9   (2.66) 19.2* (2.24) 24.8   (2.44) 22.9   (2.57) 28.9   (2.64) 25.7   (2.51) 21.6   (2.10) 24.7   (2.57) 27.0   (2.45) 25.5   (2.57) 25.2   (2.51) 26.1   (2.52) 26.5   (1.93)
RECEIVED ALCOHOL USE
TREATMENT AMONG
INDIVIDUALS WHO NEEDED
ALCOHOL USE TREATMENT
8.3   (0.65) 7.1* (0.54) 7.9   (0.66) 8.4   (0.68) 7.9   (0.62) 8.1   (0.64) 8.2   (0.69) 8.8   (0.63) 8.5   (0.65) 8.5   (0.68) 8.2   (0.67) 7.9   (0.65) 8.9   (0.64)
12-17 8.1   (1.11) 6.3   (0.78) 8.0   (0.91) 8.1   (0.91) 7.2   (0.99) 5.9   (0.80) 6.2   (0.88) 8.2   (1.06) 6.1   (0.97) 6.4   (1.06) 8.5   (1.26) 10.0   (1.61) 7.9   (1.57)
18-25 4.8   (0.42) 5.5   (0.45) 5.6   (0.48) 5.1   (0.43) 5.4   (0.52) 5.2   (0.44) 5.9   (0.46) 6.4   (0.51) 5.7   (0.52) 6.2   (0.62) 3.6* (0.37) 5.0   (0.55) 5.6   (0.61)
26 or Older 10.0   (1.02) 8.1   (0.82) 9.0   (1.03) 10.0   (1.05) 9.3   (0.96) 9.7   (0.98) 9.5   (1.04) 9.9   (0.93) 10.0   (0.96) 9.6   (1.00) 10.0   (0.97) 8.8   (0.91) 10.1   (0.86)
RECEIVED ILLICIT DRUG USE
OR ALCOHOL USE TREATMENT
AMONG INDIVIDUALS WHO
NEEDED ILLICIT DRUG USE OR
ALCOHOL USE TREATMENT
10.3   (0.65) 8.5* (0.50) 9.9   (0.65) 10.0   (0.63) 10.7   (0.65) 10.4   (0.66) 9.9   (0.64) 11.1   (0.66) 11.2   (0.63) 10.8   (0.65) 10.8   (0.64) 10.9   (0.66) 11.6   (0.61)
12-17 8.2   (0.81) 7.4   (0.74) 8.1   (0.74) 8.6   (0.77) 8.7   (0.93) 7.6   (0.77) 7.4   (0.79) 8.5   (0.85) 7.6   (0.83) 8.4   (0.94) 10.0   (1.01) 9.1   (1.06) 8.5   (1.21)
18-25 6.3* (0.43) 7.1   (0.47) 7.8   (0.50) 7.2   (0.46) 7.1   (0.52) 7.0   (0.47) 7.1   (0.45) 8.5   (0.54) 7.7   (0.52) 8.6   (0.60) 7.0   (0.54) 7.4   (0.55) 8.0   (0.67)
26 or Older 12.6   (1.03) 9.3* (0.79) 11.3   (1.01) 11.6   (1.00) 12.8   (1.04) 12.5   (1.03) 11.6   (0.99) 12.7   (1.01) 13.3   (0.97) 12.1   (0.99) 12.6   (0.97) 12.4   (0.95) 13.2   (0.84)
Table A.15A – Perceived Need for Illicit Drug Use Treatment or Alcohol Use Treatment and Whether Made an Effort to Get Treatment in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older Classified as Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for an Illicit Drug Use Problem or Alcohol Use Problem, by Age Group
Age Group Felt Need
for Treatment
(2014)
Felt Need and Made Effort
to Get Treatment
(2014)
Felt Need and Made No
Effort
to Get Treatment
(2014)
Did Not
Feel Need for Treatment
(2014)
NOTE: Estimates shown are numbers in thousands with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents were classified as needing treatment for an illicit drug use problem or alcohol use problem if they met at least one of three criteria during the past year: (1) dependent on illicit drugs or alcohol; (2) abuse of illicit drugs or alcohol; or (3) received treatment for illicit drug use or alcohol use at a specialty facility (i.e., drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility [inpatient or outpatient], hospital [inpatient only], or mental health center).
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2014.
TOTAL 798  (73) 231  (36) 567  (61) 19,073  (388)
AGE        
12-17   32    (9)   21    (8)   10    (4)   1,143    (54)
18-25 168  (25)   58  (14) 110  (19)   5,207  (149)
26 or Older 599  (68) 152  (32) 447  (58) 12,723  (347)
Table A.16A – Perceived Need for Illicit Drug Use Treatment and Whether Made an Effort to Get Treatment in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older Classified as Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for an Illicit Drug Use Problem, by Age Group
Age Group Felt Need
for Treatment
(2014)
Felt Need and Made Effort
to Get Treatment
(2014)
Felt Need and Made No
Effort
to Get Treatment
(2014)
Did Not
Feel Need for Treatment
(2014)
NOTE: Estimates shown are numbers in thousands with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents were classified as needing treatment for an illicit drug use problem if they met at least one of three criteria during the past year: (1) dependent on illicit drugs; (2) abuse of illicit drugs; or (3) received treatment for illicit drug use at a specialty facility (i.e., drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility [inpatient or outpatient], hospital [inpatient only], or mental health center).
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2014.
TOTAL 399  (48) 145  (31) 254  (36) 5,879  (215)
AGE        
12-17   29    (9)   20    (8)     9    (4)    791    (44)
18-25   85  (16)   28  (10)   58  (13) 2,046    (90)
26 or Older 284  (44)   97  (29) 187  (33) 3,042  (182)
Table A.17A – Perceived Need for Alcohol Use Treatment and Whether Made an Effort to Get Treatment in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older Classified as Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for an Alcohol Use Problem, by Age Group
Age Group Felt Need
for Treatment
(2014)
Felt Need and Made Effort
to Get Treatment
(2014)
Felt Need and Made No
Effort
to Get Treatment
(2014)
Did Not
Feel Need for Treatment
(2014)
**Low precision; no estimate reported.
NOTE: Estimates shown are numbers in thousands with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents were classified as needing treatment for an alcohol use problem if they met at least one of three criteria during the past year: (1) dependent on alcohol; (2) abuse of alcohol; or (3) received treatment for alcohol use at a specialty facility (i.e., drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility [inpatient or outpatient], hospital [inpatient only], or mental health center).
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2014.
TOTAL 459  (62) 125  (28) 334  (54) 15,614  (362)
AGE        
12-17     8    (5)   **  (**)     1    (1)      636    (40)
18-25   72  (15)   30  (11)   42  (11)   4,045  (133)
26 or Older 380  (60)   88  (25) 291  (53) 10,933  (325)
Table A.18B – Detailed Reasons for Not Receiving Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by Whether Made an Effort to Get Treatment in the Past Year
Reason Did Not Receive Substance Use
Treatment1
Needed but Did Not Receive Illicit
Drug or Alcohol Use Treatment
and Felt a Need for Illicit Drug
Use or Alcohol Use Treatment
(2011-2014)
Needed but Did Not Receive
Illicit Drug Use or Alcohol Use
Treatment, Felt a Need, and
Made Effort for Illicit Drug Use
or Alcohol Use Treatment
(2011-2014)
Needed but Did Not Receive Illicit
Drug Use Treatment and Felt a
Need for Illicit Drug Use
Treatment
(2011-2014)
Needed but Did Not Receive
Alcohol Use Treatment and Felt
a Need for Alcohol
Use Treatment
(2011-2014)
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents were classified as needing treatment for a substance use problem if they met at least one of three criteria during the past year: (1) dependent on the substance; (2) abuse of the substance; or (3) received treatment for the substance at a specialty facility (i.e., drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility [inpatient or outpatient], hospital [inpatient only], or mental health center).
1 Respondents could indicate multiple reasons for not receiving treatment; thus, these response categories are not mutually exclusive.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2011-2014.
TOTAL POPULATION 100.0  (0.00) 100.0  (0.00) 100.0  (0.00) 100.0  (0.00)
No Health Coverage and Could Not Afford
   Cost
  30.8  (2.34)   35.3  (4.18)   39.0  (3.36)   26.2  (2.92)
Had Health Coverage but Did Not Cover
   Treatment or Did Not Cover Cost
    8.2  (1.31)   11.0  (2.68)   10.4  (2.17)     7.8  (1.59)
No Transportation/Inconvenient     7.5  (1.24)   10.0  (2.54)     7.9  (1.63)     6.5  (1.75)
No Program Having Type of Treatment     7.6  (1.53)   10.3  (2.87)     7.1  (1.73)     9.3  (2.36)
Not Ready to Stop Using   41.2  (2.48)   24.2  (3.32)   29.1  (2.90)   51.9  (3.46)
No Openings in a Program     3.7  (1.00)     8.7  (2.89)     6.5  (1.91)     1.8  (0.87)
Did Not Know Where to Go for Treatment   10.4  (1.40)   10.6  (2.47)   13.8  (2.25)     7.5  (1.68)
Might Cause Neighbors/Community to
   Have Negative Opinion
  11.1  (1.59)     5.7  (1.88)   18.0  (2.75)     5.7  (1.50)
Might Have Negative Effect on Job   11.6  (1.55)     7.6  (1.96)   17.3  (2.53)     7.7  (1.74)
Did Not Feel Need for Treatment at
   the Time
    3.7  (0.74)     4.6  (1.58)     2.6  (0.69)     3.7  (1.10)
Could Handle the Problem without
   Treatment
    7.2  (1.24)     6.3  (2.02)     7.9  (1.88)     6.7  (1.59)
Treatment Would Not Help     2.3  (0.78)     0.5  (0.22)     3.3  (1.31)     1.2  (0.71)
Did Not Have Time     5.3  (1.13)     3.9  (1.53)     7.0  (1.82)     3.3  (1.20)
Did Not Want Others to Find Out     4.1  (0.94)     1.6  (0.96)     5.3  (1.59)     2.4  (0.82)
Some Other Reason     2.7  (0.62)     3.8  (1.46)     2.6  (0.77)     3.4  (1.22)
Table A.19B – Received Mental Health Treatment/Counseling in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Age Group and Health Insurance Type
Age Group/Health Insurance Type 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
-- Not available.
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents with unknown treatment/counseling information were excluded.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Respondents could indicate multiple types of health insurance; thus, these response categories are not mutually exclusive.
2 CHIP is the Children's Health Insurance Program. Individuals aged 19 or younger are eligible for this plan.
3 Other Health Insurance is defined as having Medicare, CHAMPUS, TRICARE, CHAMPVA, the VA, military health care, or any other type of health insurance.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
TOTAL 13.0* (0.27) 13.2* (0.26) 12.8* (0.26) 13.0* (0.26) 12.9* (0.26) 13.3* (0.27) 13.5* (0.29) 13.4* (0.27) 13.8* (0.27) 13.6* (0.26) 14.5  (0.28) 14.6  (0.28) 14.8  (0.23)
AGE                          
18-25 10.5* (0.25) 11.1   (0.28) 10.8* (0.26) 11.2   (0.27) 10.8* (0.28) 10.4* (0.28) 11.0* (0.28) 11.2   (0.27) 11.0* (0.27) 11.4   (0.30) 12.0   (0.29) 12.2   (0.32) 11.9   (0.34)
26-49 14.5   (0.36) 14.5   (0.35) 14.4* (0.34) 13.9* (0.34) 14.0* (0.37) 14.3* (0.35) 14.1* (0.34) 14.6   (0.36) 14.9   (0.37) 14.9   (0.36) 15.2   (0.38) 15.5   (0.40) 15.3   (0.28)
50 or Older 12.0* (0.54) 12.3* (0.53) 11.7* (0.51) 12.5* (0.53) 12.4* (0.48) 13.2* (0.53) 13.7* (0.57) 12.9* (0.52) 13.6* (0.52) 13.2* (0.47) 14.8   (0.51) 14.6   (0.52) 15.4   (0.42)
HEALTH INSURANCE1                          
Private 12.8* (0.30) 12.9* (0.33) 12.5* (0.30) 12.0* (0.30) 12.7* (0.31) 12.6* (0.32) 13.2   (0.36) 12.8* (0.32) 13.5   (0.33) 13.1   (0.32) 14.2   (0.34) 14.3   (0.35) 13.9   (0.28)
Medicaid/CHIP2 19.2* (1.08) 22.8   (1.18) 23.2   (1.18) 25.2   (1.20) 21.7   (1.11) 24.0   (1.20) 22.0   (1.16) 23.6   (1.07) 21.7   (1.05) 22.2   (0.93) 21.4   (1.05) 23.1   (0.99) 22.8   (0.75)
Other3 --       (--) 13.0* (0.68) 12.6* (0.66) 13.7* (0.67) 13.2* (0.63) 14.9* (0.70) 15.2* (0.74) 14.0* (0.67) 14.9* (0.66) 14.6* (0.60) 16.4* (0.66) 15.7* (0.69) 18.1   (0.56)
No Coverage 9.7   (0.63) 9.1   (0.51) 8.7   (0.45) 9.5   (0.48) 8.7   (0.48) 8.8   (0.50) 9.2   (0.50) 9.2   (0.49) 9.2   (0.53) 8.8   (0.50) 10.4   (0.55) 10.1   (0.57) 9.6   (0.47)
Table A.20B – Received Mental Health Treatment/Counseling in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Past Year Level of Mental Illness and Age Group
Level of Mental Illness/Age Group 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents with unknown treatment/counseling information were excluded.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2008-2014.
ANY MENTAL ILLNESS 40.9* (0.93) 40.2* (0.86) 42.4* (0.89) 40.8* (0.82) 41.0* (0.82) 44.7   (0.91) 44.7   (0.72)
18-25 30.3* (0.94) 32.0   (0.97) 32.6   (0.93) 32.9   (0.98) 34.5   (0.96) 34.7   (0.98) 33.6   (1.05)
26-49 41.4* (1.09) 40.8* (1.10) 43.3   (1.07) 41.1* (1.09) 42.0   (1.10) 43.5   (1.15) 44.2   (0.83)
50 or Older 45.2   (2.26) 42.8* (1.92) 45.1* (1.93) 43.6* (1.75) 42.4* (1.67) 50.5   (1.95) 49.9   (1.48)
SERIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS 65.7   (1.76) 66.5   (1.68) 67.5   (1.67) 64.9   (1.70) 62.9* (1.65) 68.5   (1.78) 68.5   (1.33)
18-25 45.9* (2.28) 55.0   (2.20) 53.7   (2.32) 52.1   (2.27) 53.1   (2.14) 54.0   (2.30) 53.9   (2.13)
26-49 67.2   (2.08) 64.5   (2.06) 67.4   (2.05) 63.6   (2.20) 63.5   (2.27) 68.4   (2.29) 66.2   (1.72)
50 or Older 73.2   (4.33) 76.1   (3.74) 74.0   (3.74) 73.2   (3.60) 66.3* (3.62) 74.9   (3.51) 79.2   (2.59)
ANY MENTAL ILLNESS EXCLUDING
SERIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS
34.4* (1.06) 33.4* (0.94) 35.1* (0.95) 34.1* (0.93) 34.9* (0.92) 37.7   (1.03) 37.7   (0.79)
18-25 26.4   (1.00) 26.8   (1.01) 26.7   (0.98) 28.0   (1.02) 29.5   (1.00) 29.4   (1.07) 27.2   (1.12)
26-49 33.7* (1.16) 33.8* (1.18) 35.3   (1.18) 33.7* (1.24) 35.0   (1.22) 35.3   (1.25) 37.3   (0.96)
50 or Older 39.1   (2.53) 35.8* (2.08) 38.1   (2.09) 37.0* (1.87) 36.8* (1.84) 44.1   (2.20) 42.5   (1.60)
Table A.21B – Number of Mental Health Treatment/Counseling Services Received in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older Who Received Mental Health Treatment/Counseling in the Past Year, by Age Group
Number of Mental Health
Treatment/Counseling1
Services/Age Group
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Respondents with unknown treatment/counseling information or combinations of types of treatment information were excluded.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
RECEIVED ONLY ONE
TREATMENT TYPE
59.3* (1.11) 59.6* (1.01) 58.4* (1.03) 60.7* (0.99) 61.4* (1.00) 59.8* (1.07) 61.6* (1.13) 64.4   (0.99) 64.1   (1.03) 63.7   (0.97) 66.7   (0.93) 66.4   (1.05) 66.1   (0.74)
18-25 60.2* (1.25) 60.4* (1.21) 62.0* (1.27) 63.5   (1.21) 66.7   (1.25) 62.9   (1.30) 66.0   (1.22) 64.0   (1.21) 65.4   (1.24) 63.9   (1.25) 64.5   (1.21) 64.8   (1.17) 66.4   (1.32)
26-49 57.4* (1.22) 55.9* (1.27) 55.7* (1.20) 58.7* (1.27) 60.1* (1.26) 58.5* (1.36) 58.4* (1.34) 61.9   (1.26) 61.0   (1.32) 62.5   (1.19) 62.6   (1.28) 64.4   (1.28) 63.7   (0.95)
50 or Older 62.0* (2.53) 64.8   (2.14) 61.1* (2.26) 62.3* (2.07) 61.2* (1.98) 60.6* (2.10) 64.0   (2.16) 67.4   (1.86) 67.0   (1.90) 65.0   (1.85) 71.3   (1.71) 68.8   (1.96) 68.2   (1.38)
RECEIVED TWO
TREATMENT TYPES
38.0* (1.12) 37.0* (1.01) 38.4* (1.05) 35.4* (0.96) 35.3* (0.98) 36.6* (1.06) 34.5* (1.08) 32.7   (0.95) 33.4* (0.99) 33.2   (0.95) 30.7   (0.91) 30.4   (1.05) 30.9   (0.73)
18-25 35.6* (1.23) 35.4* (1.16) 32.5   (1.24) 31.9   (1.19) 28.5   (1.19) 32.3   (1.24) 29.9   (1.18) 31.5   (1.20) 31.1   (1.20) 31.1   (1.19) 31.3   (1.14) 30.8   (1.16) 29.2   (1.24)
26-49 39.5* (1.22) 40.1* (1.28) 41.3* (1.20) 37.6* (1.26) 36.6* (1.23) 37.0* (1.34) 38.0* (1.30) 34.2   (1.18) 36.1* (1.28) 34.5   (1.16) 34.7   (1.27) 32.1   (1.26) 32.6   (0.92)
50 or Older 36.6* (2.55) 33.0   (2.10) 36.1* (2.25) 33.8   (2.04) 35.9* (1.96) 37.2* (2.06) 31.9   (2.08) 31.3   (1.84) 31.0   (1.86) 32.4   (1.81) 26.6   (1.65) 28.7   (1.97) 29.8   (1.37)
RECEIVED ALL THREE
TREATMENT TYPES
2.7   (0.28) 3.4   (0.36) 3.3   (0.35) 3.9   (0.43) 3.3   (0.36) 3.6   (0.38) 3.9   (0.48) 2.9   (0.32) 2.6   (0.28) 3.1   (0.33) 2.6   (0.29) 3.2   (0.33) 3.0   (0.24)
18-25 4.3   (0.55) 4.1   (0.48) 5.5   (0.61) 4.6   (0.56) 4.8   (0.56) 4.7   (0.57) 4.1   (0.55) 4.5   (0.62) 3.6   (0.47) 5.0   (0.59) 4.2   (0.50) 4.4   (0.51) 4.4   (0.58)
26-49 3.2   (0.46) 4.0   (0.53) 3.0   (0.43) 3.7   (0.49) 3.3   (0.52) 4.5   (0.57) 3.6   (0.52) 3.9   (0.57) 2.8   (0.42) 3.0   (0.43) 2.7   (0.38) 3.5   (0.45) 3.7   (0.37)
50 or Older 1.3   (0.39) 2.2   (0.65) 2.8   (0.71) 3.9   (0.92) 2.9   (0.70) 2.2   (0.66) 4.1   (1.04) 1.2   (0.34) 2.0   (0.43) 2.6   (0.56) 2.1   (0.54) 2.5   (0.59) 2.0   (0.40)
Table A.22B – Type of Mental Health Treatment/Counseling Received in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Age Group
Mental Health
Treatment/Counseling
Received1/Age Group
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents with unknown treatment/counseling information were excluded.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Respondents could indicate multiple service sources; thus, these response categories are not mutually exclusive.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
INPATIENT 0.7* (0.06) 0.8   (0.07) 0.9   (0.07) 1.0   (0.08) 0.7* (0.06) 1.0   (0.08) 0.9   (0.10) 0.8   (0.07) 0.8* (0.07) 0.8* (0.06) 0.8* (0.06) 0.9   (0.07) 1.0   (0.06)
18-25 0.9   (0.08) 1.0   (0.09) 1.2   (0.10) 1.1   (0.09) 1.1   (0.08) 1.1   (0.09) 1.1   (0.10) 1.1   (0.10) 1.0   (0.09) 1.1   (0.09) 1.1   (0.10) 1.3   (0.11) 1.2   (0.11)
26-49 0.8   (0.09) 0.9   (0.10) 0.8   (0.09) 0.9   (0.10) 0.8   (0.09) 1.1   (0.11) 0.8   (0.09) 1.0   (0.11) 0.8   (0.09) 0.8   (0.09) 0.7* (0.08) 1.0   (0.10) 1.0   (0.08)
50 or Older 0.5* (0.10) 0.7   (0.14) 0.9   (0.14) 1.0   (0.17) 0.5* (0.10) 0.7   (0.15) 0.9   (0.22) 0.6* (0.11) 0.7   (0.13) 0.7* (0.11) 0.8   (0.12) 0.7   (0.11) 1.0   (0.12)
OUTPATIENT 7.4* (0.21) 7.1   (0.19) 7.1   (0.19) 6.8   (0.20) 6.7   (0.20) 7.0   (0.19) 6.8   (0.20) 6.4   (0.19) 6.6   (0.20) 6.7   (0.19) 6.6   (0.19) 6.6   (0.21) 6.7   (0.16)
18-25 6.7   (0.21) 6.6   (0.21) 6.2   (0.21) 6.4   (0.22) 5.9   (0.23) 5.6* (0.21) 5.9   (0.21) 6.1   (0.20) 5.7   (0.21) 6.2   (0.22) 6.5   (0.22) 6.3   (0.22) 6.4   (0.25)
26-49 8.9* (0.29) 8.7* (0.28) 8.6* (0.27) 7.8   (0.27) 7.6   (0.27) 8.0   (0.28) 7.9   (0.26) 7.5   (0.27) 7.8   (0.28) 7.8   (0.28) 7.6   (0.26) 7.4   (0.29) 7.5   (0.20)
50 or Older 5.7   (0.39) 5.3   (0.35) 5.6   (0.36) 5.9   (0.39) 6.0   (0.37) 6.3   (0.37) 6.0   (0.39) 5.3   (0.34) 5.7   (0.35) 5.7   (0.34) 5.7   (0.33) 6.0   (0.37) 6.1   (0.29)
PRESCRIPTION
MEDICATION
10.5* (0.25) 10.9* (0.25) 10.5* (0.23) 10.7* (0.24) 10.9* (0.24) 11.2* (0.25) 11.4* (0.27) 11.3* (0.25) 11.7* (0.24) 11.5* (0.25) 12.4   (0.26) 12.5   (0.27) 12.6   (0.21)
18-25 7.5* (0.22) 8.3   (0.25) 8.1* (0.23) 8.3   (0.23) 8.0* (0.24) 8.0* (0.24) 8.1   (0.24) 8.5   (0.23) 8.4   (0.24) 8.8   (0.25) 9.0   (0.25) 9.4   (0.27) 8.8   (0.30)
26-49 11.4* (0.32) 11.9* (0.32) 11.7* (0.31) 11.4* (0.31) 11.7* (0.34) 11.8* (0.32) 11.7* (0.32) 12.3   (0.33) 12.5   (0.33) 12.3   (0.33) 13.0   (0.36) 13.1   (0.37) 12.8   (0.26)
50 or Older 10.5* (0.51) 10.9* (0.51) 10.1* (0.48) 10.8* (0.49) 11.0* (0.45) 11.7* (0.50) 12.2   (0.53) 11.3* (0.49) 12.0* (0.49) 11.8* (0.45) 12.9   (0.49) 12.9   (0.49) 13.5   (0.39)
Table A.23B – Locations of Outpatient Mental Health Treatment/Counseling among Adults Aged 18 or Older Who Received Outpatient Mental Health Treatment/Counseling in the Past Year
Location of Treatment/Counseling1 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents with unknown treatment/counseling information were excluded.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Respondents could indicate multiple locations for receiving outpatient mental health treatment/counseling; thus, these response categories are not mutually exclusive.
2 Respondents were permitted to specify other locations for receiving outpatient mental health treatment/counseling. This location was the most commonly reported other location for receiving outpatient treatment/counseling.
3 Respondents with unknown or invalid responses to the other-specify question on Some Other Place Received Outpatient Mental Health Treatment/Counseling were excluded.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
Outpatient Mental Health Clinic or
   Center
20.4* (1.06) 20.0* (1.09) 21.6* (1.10) 24.5   (1.34) 22.8   (1.25) 20.4* (1.16) 22.1* (1.21) 21.6* (1.15) 22.0* (1.18) 23.7   (1.26) 23.5   (1.20) 25.7   (1.36) 25.8   (1.02)
Office of a Private Therapist,
   Psychologist, Psychiatrist, Social
   Worker, or Counselor – Not Part
   of a Clinic
55.0   (1.52) 55.0   (1.51) 51.7* (1.39) 54.4   (1.41) 53.2* (1.49) 54.9   (1.49) 57.7   (1.48) 53.8   (1.55) 56.3   (1.46) 55.7   (1.39) 55.1   (1.42) 57.9   (1.57) 57.5   (1.21)
Doctor's Office - Not Part of a Clinic 24.7* (1.30) 24.6* (1.18) 24.8* (1.27) 21.4* (1.13) 22.5* (1.21) 21.4* (1.27) 19.8* (1.31) 23.4* (1.41) 21.0* (1.21) 19.6* (1.08) 20.1* (1.17) 15.4   (1.23) 15.3   (0.88)
Outpatient Medical Clinic 6.2   (0.72) 6.7   (0.83) 7.9   (0.77) 7.6   (0.81) 7.9   (0.85) 9.0   (0.86) 8.9   (0.95) 8.6   (0.93) 6.7   (0.71) 7.6   (0.79) 6.6   (0.67) 6.9   (0.90) 7.2   (0.62)
Partial Day Hospital or Day Treatment
   Program
1.9   (0.36) 2.1   (0.39) 1.9   (0.40) 2.1   (0.46) 1.3   (0.35) 2.3   (0.57) 1.6   (0.28) 2.5   (0.45) 1.9   (0.35) 1.9   (0.37) 2.2   (0.40) 1.2   (0.26) 1.9   (0.31)
School or University Setting/Clinic/
   Center2
0.7   (0.19) 0.5   (0.14) 0.6   (0.12) 0.6   (0.12) 0.6   (0.12) 0.4   (0.10) 0.7   (0.14) 0.6   (0.12) 0.5   (0.10) 0.6   (0.10) 0.7   (0.12) 0.5   (0.12) 0.7   (0.13)
Some Other Place3 1.9   (0.38) 1.8   (0.34) 2.1   (0.39) 1.0* (0.24) 1.8   (0.38) 2.2   (0.47) 1.6   (0.32) 1.9   (0.34) 2.2   (0.44) 2.4   (0.41) 1.7   (0.32) 2.8   (0.45) 2.5   (0.36)
Table A.24B – Number of Mental Health Treatment/Counseling Services Received in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older Who Received Mental Health Treatment/Counseling in the Past Year, by Past Year Level of Mental Illness and Age Group
Level of Mental Illness/Number of Mental
Health Treatment/Counseling1
Services/Age Group
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
**Low precision; no estimate reported.
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Respondents with unknown treatment/counseling or combinations of types of treatment information were excluded.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2008-2014.
ANY MENTAL ILLNESS              
Received Only One Treatment Type 50.8* (1.54) 54.2   (1.39) 54.9   (1.43) 50.5* (1.39) 56.2   (1.28) 55.9   (1.43) 55.0   (1.06)
18-25 55.6   (1.83) 52.1   (1.69) 55.4   (1.73) 54.5   (1.75) 54.1   (1.66) 55.9   (1.65) 56.6   (1.83)
26-49 48.4* (1.71) 52.4   (1.67) 52.8   (1.72) 49.5   (1.69) 54.2   (1.67) 55.0   (1.72) 52.8   (1.39)
50 or Older 52.8   (3.38) 57.5   (2.92) 57.6   (2.77) 50.4   (2.78) 59.6   (2.60) 56.8   (2.84) 57.0   (2.04)
Received Two Treatment Types 43.2   (1.49) 40.8   (1.34) 41.2   (1.38) 44.7* (1.36) 39.3   (1.26) 39.2   (1.43) 40.1   (1.06)
18-25 37.6   (1.78) 40.3   (1.74) 39.5   (1.70) 38.3   (1.69) 39.3   (1.60) 37.3   (1.61) 36.5   (1.81)
26-49 46.5* (1.68) 41.5   (1.60) 43.0   (1.67) 46.0* (1.69) 41.6   (1.66) 39.8   (1.72) 41.5   (1.34)
50 or Older 40.1   (3.26) 40.0   (2.85) 39.4   (2.76) 45.0   (2.72) 36.3   (2.54) 39.0   (2.87) 39.7   (2.08)
Received All Three Treatment Types   6.0   (0.79)   5.0   (0.53)   3.9   (0.45)   4.9   (0.56)   4.5   (0.51)   5.0   (0.56)   4.8   (0.42)
18-25   6.8   (0.95)   7.7   (1.11)   5.1   (0.77)   7.2   (0.90)   6.6   (0.82)   6.9   (0.87)   6.9   (0.93)
26-49   5.1   (0.79)   6.2   (0.83)   4.3   (0.65)   4.5   (0.70)   4.2   (0.63)   5.1   (0.70)   5.6   (0.60)
50 or Older   7.1   (1.88)   2.5   (0.69)   3.1   (0.74)   4.6   (1.07)   4.1   (1.09)   4.2   (1.07)   3.4   (0.72)
SERIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS              
Received Only One Treatment Type 36.5   (2.22) 38.5   (2.39) 43.6   (2.34) 38.3   (2.17) 43.5   (2.13) 37.9   (2.22) 42.0   (1.74)
18-25 43.9   (3.23) 44.0   (3.02) 44.1   (3.04) 45.2   (3.20) 41.9   (2.84) 39.2   (2.84) 44.7   (2.85)
26-49 37.3   (2.72) 37.1   (2.76) 42.2   (2.68) 39.4   (2.61) 42.7   (2.85) 39.4   (2.68) 41.3   (2.28)
50 or Older 32.7   (5.03) 39.1   (5.31) 45.8   (5.27) 34.3   (4.51) 45.4   (4.59) 35.2   (4.48) 42.0   (3.45)
Received Two Treatment Types 52.3   (2.37) 51.2   (2.35) 49.3   (2.29) 51.8   (2.22) 49.3   (2.16) 52.9   (2.42) 48.8   (1.80)
18-25 45.0   (3.20) 41.9   (3.01) 46.9   (3.10) 43.7   (3.04) 46.6   (2.88) 47.8   (2.95) 43.7   (2.88)
26-49 53.8   (2.79) 50.6   (2.74) 50.4   (2.58) 51.2   (2.71) 51.5   (2.88) 51.3   (2.82) 48.1   (2.30)
50 or Older 52.1   (5.50) 55.4   (5.33) 48.4   (5.27) 55.6   (4.67) 46.9   (4.59) 56.8   (5.06) 51.4   (3.59)
Received All Three Treatment Types 11.1   (1.88) 10.2   (1.30)   7.1   (0.98)   9.8   (1.34)   7.2   (1.04)   9.2   (1.20)   9.1   (0.99)
18-25 11.1   (2.05) 14.1   (2.60)   9.0   (1.56) 11.1   (1.91) 11.4   (1.91) 13.0   (2.02) 11.5   (1.68)
26-49   9.0   (1.68) 12.3   (1.92)   7.4   (1.32)   9.4   (1.56)   5.8* (1.19)   9.3   (1.55) 10.6   (1.34)
50 or Older   **      (**)   5.4   (1.82)   5.8   (1.82) 10.1   (2.87)   7.7   (2.41)   8.0   (2.34)   6.5   (1.85)
Table A.25B – Type of Mental Health Treatment/Counseling Received in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Past Year Level of Mental Illness and Age Group
Level of Mental Illness/Mental Health
Treatment/Counseling Received1/Age
Group
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents with unknown treatment/counseling information were excluded.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Respondents could indicate multiple service sources; thus, these response categories are not mutually exclusive.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2008-2014.
ANY MENTAL ILLNESS              
Inpatient   3.7   (0.51)   3.2   (0.29)   2.7* (0.25)   3.3   (0.31)   3.0   (0.28)   3.3   (0.29)   3.8   (0.26)
18-25   3.5   (0.39)   4.1   (0.45)   3.3   (0.35)   3.9   (0.40)   3.8   (0.39)   4.2   (0.40)   3.7   (0.37)
26-49   2.9   (0.38)   3.7   (0.43)   2.8   (0.38)   2.9   (0.38)   2.3* (0.30)   3.3   (0.37)   3.7   (0.34)
50 or Older   5.2   (1.42)   2.1* (0.50)   2.1* (0.44)   3.5   (0.63)   3.6   (0.65)   2.9   (0.60)   3.9   (0.56)
Outpatient 24.1   (0.78) 22.5   (0.74) 23.4   (0.78) 24.0   (0.74) 22.4* (0.68) 24.4   (0.84) 24.3   (0.61)
18-25 18.9   (0.80) 20.3   (0.80) 19.9   (0.82) 20.9   (0.84) 21.9   (0.84) 21.0   (0.82) 21.3   (0.92)
26-49 26.0   (0.89) 23.6* (0.90) 24.9   (0.92) 25.1   (0.98) 23.6* (0.89) 24.3   (0.99) 25.8   (0.71)
50 or Older 23.5   (1.85) 21.9   (1.63) 22.8   (1.63) 23.8   (1.60) 21.0   (1.40) 26.1   (1.83) 23.9   (1.26)
Prescription Medication 35.5* (0.91) 34.8* (0.82) 36.9   (0.90) 35.6* (0.82) 35.3* (0.79) 38.9   (0.91) 38.7   (0.71)
18-25 23.3   (0.84) 25.3   (0.88) 25.5   (0.89) 25.3   (0.92) 26.8   (0.88) 27.2   (0.90) 25.5   (1.00)
26-49 35.9   (1.07) 35.3   (1.08) 37.7   (1.07) 35.6   (1.05) 37.1   (1.10) 37.7   (1.11) 38.0   (0.81)
50 or Older 40.8   (2.25) 38.1* (1.84) 40.7   (1.94) 39.8* (1.77) 36.7* (1.65) 45.5   (1.92) 45.3   (1.46)
SERIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS              
Inpatient   8.6   (1.29)   8.6   (0.98)   6.7   (0.77)   8.8   (1.11)   6.2* (0.77)   8.3   (0.93)   8.8   (0.85)
18-25   7.9   (1.18) 11.4   (1.81)   8.1   (1.06)   8.0   (1.19)   8.5   (1.18) 10.3   (1.27)   8.2   (1.05)
26-49   6.9   (1.19)   9.7   (1.44)   7.0   (1.04)   8.0   (1.17)   4.8* (0.82)   8.4   (1.22)   8.0   (0.93)
50 or Older 12.4   (3.65)   4.9* (1.47)   5.5   (1.50) 10.8   (2.61)   7.3   (1.90)   7.3   (1.93) 10.2   (2.07)
Outpatient 46.2   (1.86) 44.6   (1.97) 42.5   (1.89) 44.1   (1.78) 39.0* (1.68) 46.9   (1.97) 44.2   (1.39)
18-25 33.0* (2.05) 38.6   (2.27) 36.2   (2.30) 37.2   (2.20) 35.8   (2.08) 37.3   (2.13) 39.2   (2.12)
26-49 48.2   (2.23) 43.8   (2.21) 42.9   (2.13) 42.8   (2.17) 40.3   (2.23) 47.1   (2.33) 43.8   (1.74)
50 or Older 49.0   (4.66) 49.0   (4.74) 44.6   (4.48) 49.7   (4.14) 38.2   (3.62) 50.7   (4.21) 47.3   (3.15)
Prescription Medication 59.7   (1.81) 61.1   (1.77) 61.0   (1.80) 58.2   (1.80) 57.8   (1.65) 62.1   (1.91) 61.4   (1.42)
18-25 35.9* (2.12) 43.4   (2.22) 44.0   (2.31) 41.0   (2.22) 45.5   (2.09) 46.2   (2.21) 42.4   (2.02)
26-49 60.1   (2.22) 59.5   (2.17) 61.2   (2.15) 57.2   (2.26) 58.7   (2.25) 60.7   (2.42) 60.1   (1.79)
50 or Older 71.5   (4.32) 72.6   (4.00) 68.4   (4.10) 68.1   (3.76) 61.9* (3.66) 71.3   (3.74) 72.9   (2.89)
Table A.26B – Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Treatment/Counseling in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Age Group
Age Group 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents with unknown perception of unmet need information were excluded.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
TOTAL 5.4* (0.16) 5.1   (0.15) 5.1   (0.16) 5.1   (0.17) 4.8   (0.15) 4.9   (0.15) 4.7   (0.14) 5.3   (0.16) 4.9   (0.16) 4.6   (0.15) 4.9   (0.15) 4.6   (0.15) 4.9   (0.12)
AGE                          
18-25 8.5   (0.24) 8.3   (0.24) 8.1   (0.23) 8.3   (0.23) 7.5   (0.23) 7.6   (0.23) 8.0   (0.25) 7.9   (0.24) 7.6   (0.24) 7.6   (0.25) 7.4   (0.23) 7.4   (0.24) 8.0   (0.27)
26-49 6.8* (0.25) 6.4   (0.24) 6.6* (0.25) 6.1   (0.23) 5.8   (0.23) 6.5   (0.24) 6.0   (0.23) 6.7* (0.25) 5.9   (0.24) 6.1   (0.25) 6.2   (0.24) 6.0   (0.25) 5.9   (0.19)
50 or Older 2.4   (0.26) 2.2* (0.23) 2.1* (0.25) 2.9   (0.29) 2.5   (0.25) 2.3* (0.23) 2.2* (0.22) 3.0   (0.28) 2.9   (0.26) 2.2* (0.20) 2.8   (0.24) 2.4* (0.22) 3.0   (0.19)
Table A.27B – Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Treatment/Counseling in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Past Year Level of Mental Illness and Age Group
Level of Mental Illness/Age Group 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents with unknown perception of unmet need information were excluded.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2008-2014.
ANY MENTAL ILLNESS 20.6   (0.66) 22.1   (0.70) 21.0   (0.70) 20.7   (0.66) 20.8   (0.63) 19.3   (0.65) 20.8   (0.52)
18-25 30.2   (0.97) 29.4   (0.94) 29.8   (0.93) 28.8   (0.93) 28.1   (0.91) 27.8   (0.93) 28.9   (0.99)
26-49 23.3   (0.92) 24.8   (0.93) 22.5   (0.90) 24.6   (0.95) 24.4   (0.94) 21.7   (0.93) 23.3   (0.73)
50 or Older 11.8   (1.32) 14.8   (1.40) 15.2   (1.44) 12.0   (1.13) 13.2   (1.15) 12.6   (1.21) 14.3   (0.96)
SERIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS 43.7   (1.84) 46.3   (1.81) 42.0   (1.81) 43.1   (1.72) 41.6   (1.69) 38.6   (1.80) 42.9   (1.45)
18-25 50.0   (2.31) 52.2   (2.32) 53.1   (2.27) 55.0   (2.35) 49.8   (2.13) 51.5   (2.08) 53.6   (2.12)
26-49 44.8   (2.26) 49.2   (2.20) 44.3   (2.20) 45.2   (2.13) 46.2   (2.28) 42.4   (2.35) 45.4   (1.82)
50 or Older 38.2   (4.63) 37.5   (4.42) 32.7   (4.29) 33.9   (3.75) 30.1   (3.41) 27.1   (3.49) 33.9   (2.93)
Table A.28B – Did Not Receive Mental Health Treatment/Counseling in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with a Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Treatment/Counseling in the Past Year, by Past Year Level of Mental Illness and Age Group
Level of Mental Illness/Age Group 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
**Low precision; no estimate reported.
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents with unknown treatment or counseling information and/or unknown perception of unmet need information were excluded.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2008-2014.
ANY MENTAL ILLNESS 42.1   (1.65) 44.9* (1.66) 40.1   (1.82) 42.1   (1.65) 42.1   (1.72) 39.9   (1.77) 40.3   (1.43)
18-25 55.3   (1.92) 56.7* (1.98) 52.4   (1.85) 53.7   (1.86) 52.0   (1.96) 53.0   (1.92) 50.1   (2.01)
26-49 41.4   (2.17) 43.3   (2.05) 37.0* (2.16) 43.2   (2.23) 44.0   (2.28) 38.5   (2.25) 43.7   (1.87)
50 or Older 28.1   (5.05) 38.8* (5.05) 36.4   (4.88) 27.4   (4.49) 28.9   (4.38) 30.8   (4.70) 25.4   (3.19)
SERIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS 30.1   (2.39) 29.7   (2.21) 27.9   (2.32) 31.8   (2.31) 34.2   (2.57) 32.7   (2.49) 31.5   (2.01)
18-25 49.1   (3.21) 47.5   (3.28) 42.3   (3.12) 43.5   (3.01) 41.8   (3.11) 43.6   (3.11) 40.6   (2.95)
26-49 27.4   (2.93) 32.8   (2.88) 26.8   (2.86) 33.8   (3.00) 36.3   (3.44) 29.6   (3.41) 34.1   (2.52)
50 or Older    **      (**)    **      (**)    **      (**)    **      (**)    **      (**)    **      (**) 19.3   (4.32)
Table A.29B – Detailed Reasons for Not Receiving Mental Health Treatment/Counseling in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with a Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Treatment/Counseling Who Did Not Receive Mental Health Treatment/Counseling in the Past Year, by Past Year Level of Mental Illness
Reason Did Not Receive Treatment/Counseling1 Total
(2014)
Any Mental Illness
(2014)
Serious Mental Illness
(2014)
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents with unknown reason for not receiving treatment/counseling and/or unknown perception of unmet information were excluded.
1 Respondents could indicate multiple reasons for not receiving mental health treatment/counseling; thus, these response categories are not mutually exclusive.
2 Respondents with unknown or invalid responses to the other-specify question on Some Other Reason for Not Receiving Mental Health Treatment/Counseling were classified as not having received treatment/counseling for Some Other Reason.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2014.
TOTAL POPULATION 100.0  (0.00) 100.0  (0.00) 100.0  (0.00)
Could Not Afford Cost   45.4  (1.75)   51.3  (2.09)   56.1  (3.24)
Might Cause Neighbors/Community to Have Negative Opinion   10.6  (0.98)   11.8  (1.21)   14.7  (2.36)
Might Have Negative Effect on Job     9.5  (1.03)   11.1  (1.30)   12.8  (2.28)
Health Insurance Does Not Cover Any Mental Health
   Treatment/Counseling
    5.7  (0.73)     5.9  (0.89)     5.8  (1.32)
Health Insurance Does Not Pay Enough for Mental Health
   Treatment/Counseling
    9.1  (1.00)   10.6  (1.27)   11.7  (1.99)
Did Not Know Where to Go for Services   22.7  (1.37)   25.6  (1.71)   27.4  (2.94)
Concerned about Confidentiality     7.8  (0.92)     8.6  (1.23)   12.5  (2.54)
Concerned about Being Committed/Having to Take Medicine   10.2  (0.95)   13.2  (1.29)   19.2  (2.51)
Did Not Feel Need for Treatment at the Time     8.8  (0.99)     6.8  (1.07)     3.1  (0.93)
Thought Could Handle the Problem without Treatment   28.3  (1.50)   25.7  (1.70)   20.4  (2.63)
Treatment Would Not Help   10.9  (1.11)   12.2  (1.35)   11.7  (1.97)
Did Not Have Time   16.4  (1.18)   16.5  (1.50)   14.0  (2.09)
Did Not Want Others to Find Out     7.2  (0.81)     8.0  (1.05)     8.2  (1.57)
No Transportation/Inconvenient     2.7  (0.51)     3.5  (0.69)     4.0  (1.27)
Some Other Reason2     7.0  (0.85)     6.6  (0.89)     7.9  (1.59)
Table A.30B – Received Mental Health Treatment/Counseling and/or Illicit Drug Use Treatment or Alcohol Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Past Year Illicit Drug or Alcohol Dependence or Abuse, by Past Year Level of Mental Illness and Age Group
Level of Mental Illness/Age Group Mental Health
Treatment/
Counseling or Substance
Use Treatment at
a Specialty Facility1
(2014)
Mental Health
Treatment/
Counseling Only1
(2014)
Substance Use
Treatment at
a Specialty Facility Only1
(2014)
Mental Health
Treatment/
Counseling and
Substance Use
Treatment at a Specialty
Facility1
(2014)
**Low precision; no estimate reported.
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
1 Respondents with unknown treatment/counseling information were excluded.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2014.
ANY MENTAL ILLNESS 46.4  (1.50) 33.9  (1.45) 3.5  (0.58)   8.9  (0.89)
18-25 38.1  (1.98) 29.8  (1.85) 3.2  (0.71)   5.1  (0.85)
26-49 46.4  (2.09) 33.0  (1.94) 4.2  (0.87)   9.2  (1.19)
50 or Older 56.3  (4.49) 41.0  (4.47) 2.2  (1.38) 12.9  (2.71)
SERIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS 65.7  (2.70) 46.1  (2.95) 2.6  (0.93) 17.0  (2.27)
18-25 57.1  (3.51) 44.0  (3.57) 2.5  (1.07) 10.5  (2.25)
26-49 65.5  (3.74) 43.2  (3.74) 3.7  (1.69) 18.5  (3.02)
50 or Older    **     (**)    **     (**)    **     (**)    **     (**)
Table A.31B – Received Mental Health Treatment/Counseling and/or Illicit Drug Use Treatment or Alcohol Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Past Year Illicit Drug or Alcohol Dependence or Abuse, by Past Year Level of Mental Illness
Level of Mental Illness/Mental Health
Treatment/Counseling/Substance Use Treatment
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Respondents with unknown treatment/counseling information were excluded.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2008-2014.
ANY MENTAL ILLNESS              
Mental Health Treatment/Counseling or
    Substance Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility1
45.7   (1.79) 48.1   (1.76) 48.6   (1.74) 46.5   (1.80) 46.3   (1.68) 47.8   (1.78) 46.4   (1.50)
Mental Health Treatment/Counseling Only1 34.4   (1.70) 36.1   (1.70) 36.8   (1.68) 34.8   (1.74) 34.0   (1.62) 37.2   (1.67) 33.9   (1.45)
Substance Use Treatment at a Specialty
    Facility Only1
  3.7   (0.83)   3.3   (0.60)   2.9   (0.54)   3.6   (0.60)   4.3   (0.75)   2.8   (0.50)   3.5   (0.58)
Mental Health Treatment/Counseling and
    Substance Use Treatment at a Specialty
    Facility1
  7.5   (1.01)   8.7   (0.99)   8.9   (1.02)   8.1   (1.00)   7.9   (1.05)   7.7   (0.94)   8.9   (0.89)
SERIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS              
Mental Health Treatment/Counseling or
    Substance Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility1
66.3   (2.69) 69.0   (2.94) 73.5* (2.63) 69.3   (3.14) 64.7   (3.10) 69.2   (2.78) 65.7   (2.70)
Mental Health Treatment/Counseling Only1 49.1   (3.19) 51.1   (3.24) 53.4   (3.23) 50.9   (3.38) 44.0   (3.20) 52.8   (3.03) 46.1   (2.95)
Substance Use Treatment at a Specialty
    Facility Only1
  2.9   (1.31)   1.3   (0.67)   3.6   (1.30)   4.1   (1.22)   4.6   (1.49)   3.6   (1.09)   2.6   (0.93)
Mental Health Treatment/Counseling and
    Substance Use Treatment at a Specialty
    Facility1
14.1   (2.49) 16.6   (2.28) 16.4   (2.47) 14.3   (2.28) 15.8   (2.78) 12.8   (1.99) 17.0   (2.27)
Table A.32B – Sources of Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17
Source of Mental Health Service1 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
-- Not available.
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents with unknown receipt of mental health service information were excluded.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
1 Respondents could indicate multiple service sources; thus, these response categories are not mutually exclusive.
2 Respondents who did not report their school enrollment status, who reported not being enrolled in school in the past 12 months, or who reported being home-schooled were not asked about receipt of mental health treatment/counseling from this source; however, respondents who reported not being enrolled in school in the past 12 months were classified as not having received treatment/counseling from this source.
3 These services were often provided by psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, or counselors who work for the court system.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002-2014.
SPECIALTY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICE 11.8* (0.28) 12.4* (0.28) 13.4   (0.31) 13.4   (0.30) 13.0   (0.29) 12.4* (0.31) 12.7* (0.29) 12.0* (0.30) 12.1* (0.30) 12.6* (0.31) 12.7* (0.28) 13.6   (0.32) 13.7   (0.34)
Outpatient 10.8* (0.27) 11.3* (0.27) 12.1   (0.30) 12.1   (0.29) 11.7* (0.29) 11.2* (0.29) 11.5* (0.29) 10.9* (0.29) 10.9* (0.28) 11.5* (0.30) 11.5* (0.27) 12.5   (0.31) 12.7   (0.33)
Inpatient or Residential (Overnight or Longer Stay) 2.1* (0.12) 2.2   (0.13) 2.5   (0.14) 2.5   (0.14) 2.4   (0.14) 2.3   (0.13) 2.2   (0.13) 2.1   (0.13) 2.2   (0.13) 2.1   (0.13) 2.2   (0.13) 2.3   (0.14) 2.5   (0.15)
NONSPECIALTY SERVICE --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) 14.2* (0.33) 14.5   (0.32) 14.2* (0.31) 15.0   (0.30) 15.0   (0.33) 15.4   (0.35)
Education2 --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) 12.1* (0.30) 12.4* (0.29) 11.9* (0.28) 12.9   (0.29) 13.0   (0.32) 13.2   (0.33)
General Medicine                          
Pediatrician or Other Family Doctor 2.7   (0.13) 2.9   (0.15) 3.4* (0.15) 3.2   (0.17) 2.8   (0.14) 2.8   (0.14) 2.9   (0.14) 2.5   (0.14) 2.5   (0.14) 2.5   (0.14) 2.5   (0.13) 2.8   (0.15) 2.9   (0.15)
Juvenile Justice                          
Juvenile Detention Center, Prison, or Jail3 --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) 0.4* (0.06) 0.3   (0.05) 0.4* (0.06) 0.3   (0.05) 0.2   (0.04) 0.3   (0.05)
Child Welfare                          
Foster Care or Therapeutic Foster Care 0.6* (0.06) 0.7* (0.08) 0.6* (0.07) 0.6* (0.07) 0.5   (0.07) 0.5   (0.05) 0.5   (0.06) 0.4   (0.05) 0.4   (0.06) 0.6* (0.07) 0.4   (0.05) 0.4   (0.05) 0.4   (0.06)
SPECIALTY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES AND
EDUCATION, GENERAL MEDICINE, OR CHILD
WELFARE SERVICES2
--        (--) --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) --        (--) 5.0* (0.20) 5.3* (0.20) 5.4   (0.20) 5.7   (0.20) 6.1   (0.21) 5.9   (0.23)
Table A.33B – Reasons for Receiving Most Recent Mental Health Service and Number of Overnight Stays in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17 Who Received Specialty Mental Health Services in the Past Year
Reason for Receipt of Mental Health Service1/Number of Visits Specialty Mental Health Service2
(2014)
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents with unknown receipt of mental health service information were excluded.
1 Respondents were asked the reasons for the last time they received mental health care from each of the reported mental health services and could indicate multiple reasons for the last time they received mental health care; thus, these response categories are not mutually exclusive.
2 Specialty Mental Health Services include mental health treatment/counseling received at either an outpatient or inpatient setting. Outpatient services include treatment/counseling from the following: (1) private therapist, psychologist, psychiatrist, social worker, or counselor; (2) mental health clinic or center; (3) partial day hospital or day treatment program; or (4) in-home therapist, counselor, or family preservation worker. Inpatient services include treatment/counseling from an overnight or longer stay in a (1) hospital or (2) residential treatment center.
3 The Received Mental Health Services row represents all youths who received treatment/counseling regardless of whether a reason is known.
4 Respondent reported in the other-specify question that he or she has been diagnosed with a mental or neurological disorder as a reason for having received mental health treatment/counseling. This reason is one of the most commonly reported other reasons for having received treatment/counseling.
5 Respondents with unknown or invalid responses to the other-specify question on Some Other Reason for Receiving Mental Health Treatment/Counseling were classified as not having received treatment/counseling for Some Other Reason.
6 Respondents with unknown number of visits/stays were excluded.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2014.
RECEIVED MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES3 13.7  (0.34)
Thought about Killing Self or Tried to Kill Self 29.1  (1.26)
Felt Depressed 56.5  (1.32)
Felt Very Afraid and Tense 29.0  (1.29)
Had Eating Problems 12.0  (0.87)
Had Other Diagnosed Mental/Neurological Disorder4   2.7  (0.41)
Broke Rules and "Acted Out" 20.8  (1.07)
Had Trouble Controlling Anger 16.7  (1.04)
Got into Physical Fights   3.5  (0.47)
Had Problems with Home/Family 26.6  (1.20)
Had Problems with Friends 13.0  (0.90)
Had Problems with People Other Than Family/Friends   8.6  (0.76)
Had Problems at School 18.1  (1.04)
Some Other Reason5 11.3  (0.90)
NUMBER OF VISITS OR OVERNIGHT STAYS IN THE PAST YEAR
FOR SPECIALTY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES6
 
1 17.8  (1.05)
2 13.8  (1.00)
3-6 23.7  (1.13)
7-24 27.8  (1.21)
25 or More 16.8  (1.03)
Table A.34B – Receipt of Treatment for Depression in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17 with Major Depressive Episode (MDE) or MDE with Severe Impairment in the Past Year
MDE 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
-- Not available.
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents with unknown past year treatment data, unknown past year MDE data, and/or past year impairment data were excluded.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2004-2014.
MDE 40.3   (1.38) 37.8   (1.42) 38.8   (1.60) 39.0   (1.52) 37.7   (1.48) 34.6* (1.52) 37.8   (1.51) 38.4   (1.47) 37.0* (1.34) 38.1   (1.35) 41.2   (1.42)
MDE WITH SEVERE
IMPAIRMENT
--       (--) --       (--) 46.5   (1.95) 43.9   (1.90) 42.6   (1.73) 38.8* (1.83) 41.1   (1.80) 43.5   (1.79) 41.0   (1.66) 45.0   (1.61) 44.7   (1.67)
Table A.35B – Type of Treatment Received in the Past Year for Depression among Youths Aged 12 to 17 with a Past Year Major Depressive Episode (MDE)
Type of Treatment 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
NOTE: Respondents with unknown past year treatment data and/or unknown past year MDE data were excluded.
* Difference between estimate and 2014 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2004-2014.
SAW OR TALKED TO A HEALTH
PROFESSIONAL OR USED
PRESCRIPTION MEDICATION
38.7   (1.35) 35.9   (1.40) 35.9   (1.54) 37.0   (1.51) 36.3   (1.45) 33.0* (1.51) 35.8   (1.48) 36.3   (1.45) 36.0   (1.35) 36.9   (1.35) 39.6   (1.42)
Saw or Talked to a Health Professional Only 19.3   (1.21) 18.6   (1.19) 20.9   (1.30) 18.6   (1.17) 20.2   (1.22) 18.5   (1.19) 19.4   (1.22) 19.9   (1.20) 19.6   (1.10) 20.4   (1.10) 20.0   (1.19)
Used Prescription Medication and Did Not See or
  Talk to a Health Professional
3.4   (0.47) 2.7   (0.45) 2.4   (0.47) 2.7   (0.52) 3.0   (0.48) 2.4   (0.47) 3.0   (0.63) 2.6   (0.50) 2.4   (0.40) 3.7   (0.65) 2.8   (0.50)
Saw or Talked to a Health Professional and Used
   Prescription Medication
15.5   (1.03) 14.1   (1.02) 12.3* (0.98) 15.3   (1.10) 12.8* (1.00) 11.9* (0.99) 13.2* (0.95) 13.6   (0.97) 13.7   (0.97) 12.3* (0.86) 16.4   (1.07)
Table A.36B – Sources of Payment for Outpatient Mental Health Treatment/Counseling among Adults Aged 18 or Older Who Received Outpatient Mental Health Treatment/Counseling in the Past Year, by Age Group
Source of Payment1 Total
(2014)
Aged 18-25
(2014)
Aged 26-49
(2014)
Aged 50+
(2014)
NOTE: Estimates shown are percentages with standard errors included in parentheses.
1 Respondents could indicate multiple sources of payment for outpatient mental health treatment/counseling; thus, these response categories are not mutually exclusive.
Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2014.
Self or Family Member Living in Household 37.1  (1.21) 44.4  (2.00) 39.6  (1.46) 31.8  (2.35)
Family Member Not Living in Household   2.2  (0.32)   6.4  (0.92)   1.6  (0.32)   1.6  (0.64)
Private Health Insurance 38.1  (1.16) 34.7  (1.88) 38.3  (1.44) 39.0  (2.24)
Medicare 16.3  (1.01)   6.2  (0.94) 10.8  (0.97) 26.0  (2.03)
Medicaid 12.1  (0.86)   8.3  (1.05) 13.5  (1.02) 11.7  (1.72)
Rehabilitation Program   0.5  (0.15)   0.2  (0.13)   0.8  (0.31)   0.2  (0.15)
Employer   6.2  (0.52)   3.1  (0.61)   8.9  (0.79)   4.1  (0.96)
VA or Other Military Program   6.0  (0.60)   2.4  (0.50)   4.6  (0.58)   8.9  (1.31)
Other Public Source   3.0  (0.43)   2.5  (0.58)   3.7  (0.59)   2.5  (0.79)
Other Private Source   1.2  (0.25)   1.7  (0.44)   1.2  (0.32)   1.1  (0.46)
Free Treatment   5.3  (0.46) 13.3  (1.27)   5.4  (0.66)   2.5  (0.70)

Long Descriptions – Figures

Long description, Figure 1: Figure 1 is titled "Past Year Substance Use Disorder and Receipt of Treatment for Substance Use among People Aged 12 or Older: 2014." It is a Venn diagram with a note below the figure that says, "SUD = substance use disorder." The Venn diagram shows overlapping larger and smaller circles. The larger circle on the left represents people aged 12 or older who had an SUD in the past year. The smaller circle on the right represents people who received substance use treatment in the past year. The intersection of the two circles represents people who had an SUD and received substance use treatment.

The number of people aged 12 or older in 2014 with a past year SUD was 21.5 million, and the number of people who received substance use treatment in the past year was 4.1 million. The number of people who had an SUD and also received substance use treatment in the past year was 2.3 million.

Long description end. Return to Figure 1.

Long description, Figure 2: Figure 2 is titled "Received Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older, by Treatment for Illicit Drugs, Alcohol, or Both (in millions): 2014." It is a bar graph, where the type of treatment (total [illicit drugs or alcohol], both illicit drugs and alcohol, illicit drugs [but not alcohol], or alcohol [but not illicit drugs]) is on the horizontal axis and the number of people aged 12 or older in millions who received substance use treatment in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. A note below the figure says, "The total includes people who received treatment specifically for illicit drugs or alcohol, as well as people who received treatment but did not specify whether they received treatment only for alcohol use, only for illicit drug use, or for both alcohol and illicit drug use."

The total number of people aged 12 or older in 2014 who received treatment in the past year for illicit drugs or alcohol was 4.1 million.

The number of people aged 12 or older who received treatment in the past year for both illicit drugs and alcohol was 1.4 million.

The number of people aged 12 or older who received treatment in the past year for illicit drugs but not alcohol was 1.0 million.

The number of people aged 12 or older who received treatment in the past year for alcohol but not illicit drugs was 1.3 million.

Long description end. Return to Figure 2.

Long description, Figure 3: Figure 3 is titled "Received Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the number of people who received substance use treatment in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each of the four age groups (12 or older, 12 to 17, 18 to 25, and 26 or older), there is a line showing the number in thousands who received substance use treatment in the past year over the years 2002 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 3.

Long description, Figure 4: Figure 4 is titled "Substances for Which Most Recent Treatment Was Received in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older (in thousands): 2014." It is a bar graph, with the number of people in thousands who have received treatment on the horizontal axis and eight types of substances for which their most recent treatment was received in the past year on the vertical axis.

The number of people aged 12 or older in 2014 whose most recent treatment in the past year was for alcohol was 2,406,000.

The number of people aged 12 or older whose most recent treatment in the past year was for marijuana was 1,034,000.

The number of people aged 12 or older whose most recent treatment in the past year was for cocaine was 781,000.

The number of people aged 12 or older whose most recent treatment in the past year was for pain relievers was 772,000.

The number of people aged 12 or older whose most recent treatment in the past year was for heroin was 618,000.

The number of people aged 12 or older whose most recent treatment in the past year was for tranquilizers was 480,000.

The number of people aged 12 or older whose most recent treatment in the past year was for stimulants was 425,000.

The number of people aged 12 or older whose most recent treatment in the past year was for hallucinogens was 339,000.

Long description end. Return to Figure 4.

Long description, Figure 5: Figure 5 is titled "Received Most Recent Treatment in the Past Year for Marijuana among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the number of people who received their most recent treatment in the past year for marijuana is shown on the vertical axis. For each of the four age groups (12 or older, 12 to 17, 18 to 25, and 26 or older), there is a line showing the number in thousands who received their most recent treatment in the past year for marijuana over the years 2002 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 5.

Long description, Figure 6: Figure 6 is titled "Received Most Recent Treatment in the Past Year for Cocaine among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the number of people who received their most recent treatment in the past year for cocaine is shown on the vertical axis. For each of the four age groups (12 or older, 12 to 17, 18 to 25, and 26 or older), there is a line showing the number in thousands who received their most recent treatment in the past year for cocaine over the years 2002 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 6.

Long description, Figure 7: Figure 7 is titled "Received Most Recent Treatment in the Past Year for Pain Relievers among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the number of people who received their most recent treatment in the past year for pain relievers is shown on the vertical axis. For each of the four age groups (12 or older, 12 to 17, 18 to 25, and 26 or older), there is a line showing the number in thousands who received their most recent treatment in the past year for pain relievers over the years 2002 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 7.

Long description, Figure 8: Figure 8 is titled "Received Most Recent Treatment in the Past Year for Heroin among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the number of people who received their most recent treatment in the past year for heroin is shown on the vertical axis. For each of the four age groups (12 or older, 12 to 17, 18 to 25, and 26 or older), there is a line showing the number in thousands who received their most recent treatment in the past year for heroin over the years 2002 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 8.

Long description, Figure 9: Figure 9 is titled "Received Most Recent Treatment in the Past Year for Alcohol among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the number of people who received their most recent treatment in the past year for alcohol is shown on the vertical axis. For each of the four age groups (12 or older, 12 to 17, 18 to 25, and 26 or older), there is a line showing the number in thousands who received their most recent treatment in the past year for alcohol over the years 2002 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 9.

Long description, Figure 10: Figure 10 is titled "Locations Where Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year Was Received among People Aged 12 or Older (in thousands): 2014." It is a bar graph, where the number in thousands of people receiving treatment is shown on the horizontal axis and the types of substance use treatment locations are shown on the vertical axis. A note below the figure says, "Locations where people received substance use treatment are not mutually exclusive because respondents could report that they received treatment in more than one location in the past year." There are eight types of substance use treatment locations: (1) self-help group, (2) outpatient rehabilitation, (3) outpatient mental health center, (4) inpatient rehabilitation, (5) hospital inpatient, (6) private doctor's office, (7) emergency room, and (8) prison or jail.

The number of people aged 12 or older in 2014 who received substance use treatment at a self-help group in the past year was 2,210,000.

The number of people aged 12 or older who received substance use treatment at an outpatient rehabilitation facility in the past year was 1,731,000.

The number of people aged 12 or older who received substance use treatment at an outpatient mental health center in the past year was 1,157,000.

The number of people aged 12 or older who received substance use treatment at an inpatient rehabilitation facility in the past year was 1,076,000.

The number of people aged 12 or older who received substance use treatment at a hospital as an inpatient in the past year was 921,000.

The number of people aged 12 or older who received substance use treatment at a private doctor's office in the past year was 780,000.

The number of people aged 12 or older who received substance use treatment at an emergency room in the past year was 521,000.

The number of people aged 12 or older who received substance use treatment at a prison or jail in the past year was 366,000.

Long description end. Return to Figure 10.

Long description, Figure 11: Figure 11 is titled "Received Substance Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older, by Treatment for Illicit Drugs, Alcohol, or Both (in millions): 2014." It is a bar graph, where the type of treatment (total [illicit drugs or alcohol], both illicit drugs and alcohol, illicit drugs [but not alcohol], or alcohol [but not illicit drugs]) is on the horizontal axis and the number of people aged 12 or older in millions who received substance use treatment at a specialty facility in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. A note below the figure says, "The total includes people who received treatment specifically for illicit drugs or alcohol, as well as people who received treatment but did not specify whether they received treatment only for alcohol use, only for illicit drug use, or for both alcohol and illicit drug use."

The total number of people aged 12 or older in 2014 who received substance use treatment at a specialty facility in the past year for illicit drugs or alcohol was 2.6 million.

The number of people aged 12 or older who received substance use treatment at a specialty facility in the past year for both illicit drugs and alcohol was 0.7 million.

The number of people aged 12 or older who received substance use treatment at a specialty facility in the past year for illicit drugs but not alcohol was 0.9 million.

The number of people aged 12 or older who received substance use treatment at a specialty facility in the past year for alcohol but not illicit drugs was 0.8 million.

Long description end. Return to Figure 11.

Long description, Figure 12: Figure 12 is titled "Received Substance Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the number of people who received substance use treatment at a specialty facility in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each of the four age groups (12 or older, 12 to 17, 18 to 25, and 26 or older), there is a line showing the number in thousands who received substance use treatment at a specialty facility over the years 2002 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 12.

Long description, Figure 13: Figure 13 is titled "Need for Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older, by Type of Need (in millions): 2014." It is a bar graph, where the type of treatment (total [illicit drugs or alcohol], illicit drugs, and alcohol) is on the horizontal axis and the number of people aged 12 or older in millions who needed substance use treatment in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. A note below the figure says, "Numbers of people who needed treatment specifically for illicit drug use or for alcohol use are not mutually exclusive."

The number of people aged 12 or older in 2014 who needed substance use treatment in the past year for illicit drugs or alcohol was 22.5 million.

The number of people aged 12 or older who needed substance use treatment in the past year for illicit drugs was 7.9 million.

The number of people aged 12 or older who needed substance use treatment in the past year for alcohol was 17.6 million.

Long description end. Return to Figure 13.

Long description, Figure 14: Figure 14 is titled "Need for Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older, by Age Group (in thousands): 2002-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the number of people who needed substance use treatment in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each of the four age groups (12 or older, 12 to 17, 18 to 25, and 26 or older), there is a line showing the number in thousands who needed substance use treatment over the years 2002 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 14.

Long description, Figure 15: Figure 15 is titled "Receipt of Specialty Treatment in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Substance Use Treatment: 2014." It is a pie chart, with the following written below the chart: "22.5 Million Needed Substance Use Treatment." For people who needed substance use treatment, the pie chart shows the number in millions and the percentage who received treatment at a specialty facility for a substance use problem, as well as the number in millions and the percentage who did not receive treatment at a specialty facility.

Of the 22.5 million people aged 12 or older who needed substance use treatment in 2014, 2.6 million (11.6 percent) received treatment at a specialty facility for a substance use problem, and 19.9 million (88.4 percent) did not receive treatment at a specialty facility.

Long description end. Return to Figure 15.

Long description, Figure 16: Figure 16 is titled "Received Substance Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Substance Use Treatment, by Age Group: Percentages, 2002-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage of those who needed treatment in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each of the four age groups (12 or older, 12 to 17, 18 to 25, and 26 or older), there is a line showing the percentage of people who received substance use treatment at a specialty facility among those who needed treatment over the years 2002 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 16.

Long description, Figure 17: Figure 17 is titled "Receipt of Specialty Treatment in the Past Year for an Illicit Drug Use Problem among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Illicit Drug Use Treatment: 2014." It is a pie chart, with the following written below the chart: "7.9 Million Needed Illicit Drug Use Treatment." For people who needed treatment for an illicit drug use problem, the pie chart shows the number in millions and the percentage who received treatment at a specialty facility for an illicit drug use problem, as well as the number in millions and the percentage who did not receive treatment at a specialty facility.

Of the 7.9 million people aged 12 or older who needed illicit drug use treatment in 2014, 1.6 million (20.3 percent) received treatment at a specialty facility for an illicit drug use problem, and 6.3 million (79.7 percent) did not receive treatment at a specialty facility.

Long description end. Return to Figure 17.

Long description, Figure 18: Figure 18 is titled "Received Illicit Drug Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Illicit Drug Use Treatment, by Age Group: Percentages, 2002-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the percent of those who needed treatment in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each of the four age groups (12 or older, 12 to 17, 18 to 25, and 26 or older), there is a line showing the percentage of people who received illicit drug use treatment at a specialty facility among those who needed treatment over the years 2002 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 18.

Long description, Figure 19: Figure 19 is titled "Receipt of Specialty Treatment in the Past Year for an Alcohol Use Problem among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Alcohol Use Treatment: 2014." It is a pie chart, with the following written below the chart: "17.6 Million Needed Alcohol Use Treatment." For people who needed treatment for an alcohol use problem, the pie chart shows the number in millions and the percentage who received treatment at a specialty facility for an alcohol use problem, as well as the number in millions and the percentage who did not receive treatment at a specialty facility. A note below the chart says, "The numbers do not add to 17.6 million due to rounding."

Of the 17.6 million people aged 12 or older who needed alcohol use treatment in 2014, 1.6 million (8.9 percent) received treatment at a specialty facility for an alcohol use problem, and 16.1 million (91.1 percent) did not receive treatment at a specialty facility.

Long description end. Return to Figure 19.

Long description, Figure 20: Figure 20 is titled "Received Alcohol Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Alcohol Use Treatment, by Age Group: Percentages, 2002-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage of those who needed treatment in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each of the four age groups (12 or older, 12 to 17, 18 to 25, and 26 or older), there is a line showing the percentage of people who received alcohol use treatment at a specialty facility among those who needed treatment over the years 2002 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 20.

Long description, Figure 21: Figure 21 is titled "Perceived Need for Substance Use Treatment among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Substance Use Treatment But Did Not Receive Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year: 2014." It is a pie chart, with the following written below the chart: "19.9 Million People Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for Substance Use." Among people who needed but did not receive substance use treatment, the pie chart shows the number and percentage who felt they needed treatment and did make an effort to get treatment, the number and percentage who felt they needed treatment and did not make an effort to get treatment, and the number and percentage who did not feel they needed treatment. A note below the chart says, "The percentages do not add to 100 percent due to rounding."

Of the 19.9 million people aged 12 or older needing but not receiving treatment for substance use in 2014, 231,000 (1.2 percent) felt they needed treatment and did make an effort to get treatment, 567,000 (2.9 percent) felt they needed treatment and did not make an effort to get treatment, and 19.1 million (96.0 percent) did not feel they needed treatment.

Long description end. Return to Figure 21.

Long description, Figure 22: Figure 22 is titled "Perceived Need for Illicit Drug Use Treatment among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Treatment for an Illicit Drug Use Problem But Did Not Receive Illicit Drug Use Treatment in the Past Year: 2014." It is a pie chart, with the following written below the chart: "6.3 Million People Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for Illicit Drug Use." Among people who needed but did not receive illicit drug use treatment, the pie chart shows the number and percentage who felt they needed treatment and did make an effort to get treatment, the number and percentage who felt they needed treatment and did not make an effort to get treatment, and the number and percentage who did not feel they needed treatment. A note below the chart says, "The percentages do not add to 100 percent due to rounding."

Of the 6.3 million people aged 12 or older needing but not receiving treatment for illicit drug use in 2014, 145,000 (2.3 percent) felt they needed treatment and did make an effort to get treatment, 254,000 (4.0 percent) felt they needed treatment and did not make an effort to get treatment, and 5.9 million (93.6 percent) did not feel they needed treatment.

Long description end. Return to Figure 22.

Long description, Figure 23: Figure 23 is titled "Perceived Need for Alcohol Use Treatment among People Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Treatment for an Alcohol Use Problem But Did Not Receive Alcohol Use Treatment in the Past Year: 2014." It is a pie chart, with the following written below the chart: "16.1 Million People Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for Alcohol Use." Among people who needed but did not receive alcohol use treatment, the pie chart shows the number and percentage who felt they needed treatment and did make an effort to get treatment, the number and percentage who felt they needed treatment and did not make an effort to get treatment, and the number and percentage who did not feel they needed treatment.

Of the 16.1 million people aged 12 or older needing but not receiving treatment for alcohol use in 2014, 125,000 (0.8 percent) felt they needed treatment and did make an effort to get treatment, 334,000 (2.1 percent) felt they needed treatment and did not make an effort to get treatment, and 15.6 million (97.1 percent) did not feel they needed treatment.

Long description end. Return to Figure 23.

Long description, Figure 24: Figure 24 is titled "Reasons for Not Receiving Substance Use Treatment among People Aged 12 or Older Who Felt They Needed Treatment: Percentages, 2011-2014 Combined." It is a bar graph, with the percentage of people on the horizontal axis and reasons for not receiving substance use treatment on the vertical axis. Six reasons are shown for not receiving substance use treatment: (1) not ready to stop using, (2) no health coverage and could not afford cost, (3) might have negative effect on job, (4) might cause neighbors/community to have negative opinion, (5) did not know where to go for treatment, and (6) no program having type of treatment.

Among people aged 12 or older in 2011 to 2014 combined who felt they needed substance use treatment but did not receive it: 41.2 percent were not ready to stop using, 30.8 percent had no health coverage and could not afford the cost, 11.6 percent thought treatment might have a negative effect on their job, 11.1 percent thought treatment might cause their neighbors or community to have a negative opinion of them, 10.4 percent did not know where to go for treatment, and 7.6 percent found no program having the type of treatment they wanted.

Long description end. Return to Figure 24.

Long description, Figure 25: Figure 25 is titled "Reasons for Not Receiving Illicit Drug Use Treatment or Alcohol Use Treatment among People Aged 12 or Older Who Felt They Needed Treatment: Percentages, 2011-2014 Combined." It is a bar graph, with the percentage of people on the horizontal axis and reasons for not receiving substance use treatment on the vertical axis. Each reason on the vertical axis has two bars—one for people who needed but did not receive illicit drug use treatment, and the other for people who needed but did not receive alcohol use treatment. Six reasons are shown for not receiving substance use treatment: (1) not ready to stop using, (2) no health coverage and could not afford cost, (3) might have a negative effect on job, (4) might cause neighbors/community to have negative opinion, (5) did not know where to go for treatment, and (6) no program having type of treatment.

Among people aged 12 or older in 2011 to 2014 combined who needed but did not receive illicit drug use treatment and felt the need for treatment: 29.1 percent were not ready to stop using, 39.0 percent had no health coverage and could not afford the cost, 17.3 percent thought treatment might have a negative effect on their job, 18.0 percent thought treatment might cause their neighbors or community to have a negative opinion of them, 13.8 percent did not know where to go for treatment, and 7.1 percent found no program having the type of treatment they wanted.

Among people aged 12 or older in 2011 to 2014 combined who needed but did not receive alcohol use treatment and felt the need for treatment: 51.9 percent were not ready to stop using, 26.2 percent had no health coverage and could not afford the cost, 7.7 percent thought treatment might have a negative effect on their job, 5.7 percent thought treatment might cause their neighbors or community to have a negative opinion of them, 7.5 percent did not know where to go for treatment, and 9.3 percent found no program having the type of treatment they wanted.

Long description end. Return to Figure 25.

Long description, Figure 26: Figure 26 is titled "Reasons for Not Receiving Substance Use Treatment among People Aged 12 or Older Who Made an Effort to Get Treatment: Percentages, 2011-2014 Combined." It is a bar graph, with the percentage of people on the horizontal axis and reasons for not receiving substance use treatment on the vertical axis. A note below the figure says, "Percentages are for people who (a) needed substance use treatment; (b) felt they needed treatment; and (c) made an effort to get treatment but did not receive treatment." Six reasons are shown for not receiving substance use treatment: (1) no health coverage and could not afford cost, (2) not ready to stop using, (3) had health coverage but did not cover treatment or did not cover cost, (4) did not know where to go for treatment, (5) no program having type of treatment, and (6) no transportation/inconvenient.

Among people aged 12 or older in 2011 through 2014 combined who needed substance use treatment, felt they needed treatment, and made an effort to get treatment but did not receive treatment: 35.3 percent did not have health coverage and could not afford the cost, 24.2 percent were not ready to stop using, 11.0 percent had health coverage but it did not cover treatment or did not cover the cost of treatment, 10.6 percent did not know where to go for treatment, 10.3 percent found no program having the type of treatment they wanted, and 10.0 percent had no transportation or it was inconvenient.

Long description end. Return to Figure 26.

Long description, Figure 27: Figure 27 is titled "Type of Mental Health Services Received in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older: Percentages, 2002-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage receiving mental health services in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each of the four types of mental health services (any mental health services, inpatient, outpatient, and prescription medication), there is a line showing the percentage of adults who received mental health services over the years 2002 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 27.

Long description, Figure 28: Figure 28 is titled "Past Year Mental Health Service Use among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Age Group: Percentages, 2014." It is a bar graph, where the four age groups (18 or older, 18 to 25, 26 to 49, and 50 or older) are on the horizontal axis and the percentage of adults aged 18 or older who used mental health services in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between adults aged 18 to 25 and each of the other adult age groups; significant results are indicated where appropriate.

Among all adults aged 18 or older in 2014, 14.8 percent used mental health services in the past year.

Among adults aged 18 to 25, 11.9 percent used mental health services in the past year.

Among adults aged 26 to 49, 15.3 percent used mental health services in the past year.

Among adults aged 50 or older, 15.4 percent used mental health services in the past year.

The estimates for adults aged 26 to 49 and adults aged 50 or older were significantly different from the estimate for adults aged 18 to 25.

Long description end. Return to Figure 28.

Long description, Figure 29: Figure 29 is titled "Locations of Outpatient Mental Health Care among Adults Aged 18 or Older Who Received Outpatient Mental Health Care in the Past Year: Percentages, 2014." It is a bar graph, where the percentage of adults aged 18 or older who received outpatient mental health care is on the horizontal axis and the particular type of location is shown on the vertical axis. Four locations are shown: (1) office of a private therapist, psychologist, psychiatrist, social worker, or counselor – not part of a clinic; (2) outpatient mental health care at an outpatient mental health clinic or center; (3) doctor's office – not part of a clinic; and (4) outpatient medical clinic.

Among adults aged 18 or older who received outpatient mental health care in the past year, 57.5 percent received care at the office of a private therapist, psychologist, psychiatrist, social worker, or counselor that was not part of a clinic; 25.8 percent received care at an outpatient mental health clinic or center; 15.3 percent received care at a doctor's office that was not part of a clinic; and 7.2 percent received care at an outpatient medical clinic.

Long description end. Return to Figure 29.

Long description, Figure 30: Figure 30 is titled "Mental Health Service Use in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Any Mental Illness or Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year, by Age Group: Percentages, 2014." It is a bar graph, where four age groups (18 or older, 18 to 25, 26 to 49, 50 or older) are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage of adults receiving mental health services in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each age group, the figure shows two bars. The first bar shows the percentage of adults with any mental illness who received mental health services in the past year. The second bar shows the percentage of adults with serious mental illness who received mental health services in the past year. A note below the graph says, "AMI = any mental illness; SMI = serious mental illness." Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between adults aged 18 to 25 and each of the other adult age groups; significant results are indicated where appropriate.

Among all adults aged 18 or older in 2014, 44.7 percent of those who had AMI received mental health services in the past year, and 68.5 percent of those who had SMI received mental health services in the past year.

Among adults aged 18 to 25, 33.6 percent of those who had AMI received mental health services in the past year, and 53.9 percent of those who had SMI received mental health services in the past year.

Among adults aged 26 to 49, 44.2 percent of those who had AMI received mental health services in the past year, and 66.2 percent of those who had SMI received mental health services in the past year.

Among adults aged 50 or older, 49.9 percent of those who had AMI received mental health services in the past year, and 79.2 percent of those who had SMI received mental health services in the past year.

Among adults with AMI, the estimates for adults aged 26 to 49 and adults aged 50 or older were significantly different from the estimate for adults aged 18 to 25. Among adults with SMI, the estimates for adults aged 26 to 49 and adults aged 50 or older also were significantly different from the estimate for adults aged 18 to 25.

Long description end. Return to Figure 30.

Long description, Figure 31: Figure 31 is titled "Specific Types of Mental Health Care Received by Adults Aged 18 or Older with Any Mental Illness or Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year: Percentages, 2014." It is a bar graph, where four types of mental health services (any mental health services, inpatient, outpatient, and prescription medication) are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage of adults receiving mental health care with any mental illness or serious mental illness in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each type of mental health service, the figure shows two bars. The first bar shows the percentage of adults with any mental illness who received that type of mental health care in the past year. The second bar shows the percentage of adults with serious mental illness who received that type of mental health care in the past year. A note below the graph says, "AMI = any mental illness; SMI = serious mental illness."

Among adults aged 18 or older in 2014 who had AMI, 44.7 percent received any mental health services in the past year, 3.8 percent received inpatient services, 24.3 percent received outpatient services, and 38.7 percent received prescription medication.

Among adults aged 18 or older in 2014 who had SMI, 68.5 percent received any mental health services in the past year, 8.8 percent received inpatient services, 44.2 percent received outpatient services, and 61.4 percent received prescription medication.

Long description end. Return to Figure 31.

Long description, Figure 32: Figure 32 is titled "Number of Types of Mental Health Care Received by Adults Aged 18 or Older with Any Mental Illness or Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year: Percentages, 2014." It shows two pie charts. The top pie chart is labeled "Any Mental Illness (AMI)" and has the following note written below it: "19.4 Million Adults with AMI Who Received Mental Health Care." The bottom pie chart is labeled "Serious Mental Illness (SMI)" and has the following note written below it: "6.7 Million Adults with SMI Who Received Mental Health Care" The top pie chart shows the number of types of mental health care received by adults with AMI. The bottom pie chart shows the number of types of mental health care received by adults with SMI. Two notes are below the figure, the first of which says, "The three types of mental health care are receiving inpatient care, outpatient care, or prescription medication." The second note says, "The percentages do not add to 100 percent due to rounding."

The top pie chart shows the following for the 19.4 million adults in 2014 with AMI who received mental health care in the past year: 55.0 percent received one type of mental health care, 40.1 percent received two types of mental health care, and 4.8 percent received all three types of mental health care.

The bottom pie chart shows the following for the 6.7 million adults in 2014 with SMI who received mental health care in the past year: 42.0 percent received one type of mental health care, 48.8 percent received two types of mental health care, and 9.1 percent received all three types of mental health care.

Long description end. Return to Figure 32.

Long description, Figure 33: Figure 33 is titled "Type of Mental Health Care Received in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Any Mental Illness in the Past Year, by Age Group: Percentages, 2008-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage receiving mental health care in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each of the four types of mental health services (any mental health services, inpatient, outpatient, and prescription medication), there is a line showing the percentage of adults with any mental illness who received mental health care over the years 2008 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 33.

Long description, Figure 34: Figure 34 is titled "Type of Mental Health Care Received in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year, by Age Group: Percentages, 2008-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage receiving mental health care in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each of the four types of mental health services (any mental health services, inpatient, outpatient, and prescription medication), there is a line showing the percentage of adults with serious mental illness who received mental health care over the years 2008 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 34.

Long description, Figure 35: Figure 35 is titled "Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Age Group (in millions): 2014." It is a stacked bar graph, where four age groups (18 or older, 18 to 25, 26 to 49, and 50 or older) are shown on the horizontal axis and the numbers in millions of adults who had a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year are shown on the vertical axis. The total number of adults with a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year is shown above the bar for each age group. Each bar also shows the number of adults with a perceived unmet need for mental health services who did not receive any health services. A note below the figure says, "The bottom number in each bar is the estimated number of people with a perceived unmet need for mental health services who did not receive any mental health services in the past year. The top number in each bar is the total estimated number of people with any perceived unmet need for mental health services, including those who did not receive any mental health services and those who had an unmet need for additional services."

In addition, each bar is divided into two sections for adults who did not receive any mental health services and adults who had an unmet need for additional services. The section of each bar for the unmet need for additional services indicates the difference between the total number of adults who perceived an unmet need for mental health services and the number who did not receive any mental health services.

There were 11.8 million adults aged 18 or older in 2014 with a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year, including 5.3 million who did not receive any mental health services.

There were 2.8 million adults aged 18 to 25 with a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year, including 1.6 million who did not receive any mental health services.

There were 5.8 million adults aged 26 to 49 with a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year, including 2.8 million who did not receive any mental health services.

There were 3.2 million adults aged 50 or older with a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year, including 1.0 million who did not receive any mental health services.

Long description end. Return to Figure 35.

Long description, Figure 36: Figure 36 is titled "Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older: Percentages, 2002-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with an unmet need for mental health services in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For all adults aged 18 or older, a line shows the percentage who had a perceived unmet need for mental health services over the years 2002 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 36.

Long description, Figure 37: Figure 37 is titled "Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Any Mental Illness in the Past Year, by Age Group (in millions): 2014." It is a stacked bar graph, where four age groups (18 or older, 18 to 25, 26 to 49, and 50 or older) are shown on the horizontal axis and the numbers in millions of adults who had a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year are shown on the vertical axis. The total number of adults with any mental illness who had a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year is shown above the bar for each age group. Each bar also shows the number of adults with any mental illness who had a perceived unmet need for mental health services and who did not receive any health services. A note below the figure says, "The bottom number in each bar is the estimated number of people with a perceived unmet need for mental health services who did not receive any mental health services in the past year. The top number in each bar is the total estimated number of people with any perceived unmet need for mental health services, including those who did not receive any mental health services and those who had an unmet need for additional services."

In addition, each bar is divided into two sections for adults who did not receive any mental health services and adults who had an unmet need for additional services. The section of each bar for the unmet need for additional services indicates the difference between the total number of adults with any mental illness who perceived an unmet need for mental health services and the number who did not receive any mental health services.

There were 9.0 million adults aged 18 or older in 2014 with any mental illness and a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year, including 3.6 million who did not receive any mental health services.

There were 2.0 million adults aged 18 to 25 with any mental illness and a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year, including 1.0 million who did not receive any mental health services.

There were 4.7 million adults aged 26 to 49 with any mental illness and a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year, including 2.0 million who did not receive any mental health services.

There were 2.4 million adults aged 50 or older with any mental illness and a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year, including 0.6 million who did not receive any mental health services.

Long description end. Return to Figure 37.

Long description, Figure 38: Figure 38 is titled "Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year, by Age Group (in millions): 2014." It is a stacked bar graph, where four age groups (18 or older, 18 to 25, 26 to 49, and 50 or older) are shown on the horizontal axis and the numbers in millions of adults who had a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year are shown on the vertical axis. The total number of adults with serious mental illness who had a perceived unmet need for mental health services is shown above the bar for each age group. Each bar also shows the number of adults with serious mental illness who had a perceived unmet need for mental health services and who did not receive any health services. A note below the figure says, "The bottom number in each bar is the estimated number of people with a perceived unmet need for mental health services who did not receive any mental health services in the past year. The top number in each bar is the total estimated number of people with any perceived unmet need for mental health services, including those who did not receive any mental health services and those who had an unmet need for additional services."

In addition, each bar is divided into two sections for adults who did not receive any mental health services and adults who had an unmet need for additional services. The section of each bar for the unmet need for additional services indicates the difference between the total number of adults with serious mental illness who perceived an unmet need for mental health services and the number who did not receive any mental health services.

There were 4.2 million adults aged 18 or older in 2014 with serious mental illness and a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year, including 1.3 million who did not receive any mental health services.

There were 0.9 million adults aged 18 to 25 with serious mental illness and a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year, including 0.4 million who did not receive any mental health services.

There were 2.2 million adults aged 26 to 49 with serious mental illness and a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year, including 0.7 million who did not receive any mental health services.

There were 1.1 million adults aged 50 or older with serious mental illness and a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year, including 0.2 million who did not receive any mental health services.

Long description end. Return to Figure 38.

Long description, Figure 39: Figure 39 is titled "Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Any Mental Illness or Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year: Percentages, 2008-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with a perceived unmet need for mental health services in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each mental illness status (any mental illness, serious mental illness), a line shows the percentage of adults who had a perceived unmet need for mental health services over the years 2008 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 39.

Long description, Figure 40: Figure 40 is titled "Reasons for Not Receiving Mental Health Services in the Past Year among All Adults Aged 18 or Older with a Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Care Who Did Not Receive Mental Health Services: Percentages, 2014." It is a bar graph, where the percentage reporting a reason is shown on the horizontal axis and the reasons for not receiving mental health services are shown on the vertical axis. Fourteen reasons are shown: (1) could not afford cost, (2) thought could handle the problem without treatment, (3) did not know where to go for services, (4) did not have time, (5) treatment would not help, (6) might cause neighbors/community to have negative opinion, (7) concerned about being committed/having to take medicine, (8) might have negative effect on job, (9) health insurance did not cover enough treatment, (10) did not feel need for treatment at the time, (11) concerned about confidentiality, (12) did not want others to find out, (13) health insurance did not cover any treatment, and (14) no transportation/inconvenient.

Among adults 18 or older in 2014 with a perceived unmet need for mental health care who did not receive mental health services in the past year, the following percentages did not receive mental health services for the following reasons: 45.4 percent because they could not afford the cost of treatment, 28.3 percent because they thought they could handle the problem without treatment, 22.7 percent because they did not know where to go for services, 16.4 percent because they did not have time, 10.9 percent because they thought treatment would not help, 10.6 percent because they thought that treatment might cause their neighbors or community to have a negative opinion of them, 10.2 percent because they were concerned about being committed or having to take medicine, 9.5 percent because they thought treatment might have a negative effect on their job, 9.1 percent because their health insurance did not cover enough treatment, 8.8 percent because they not feel the need for treatment at the time, 7.8 percent because they were concerned about confidentiality, 7.2 percent because they did not want others to find out, 5.7 percent because their health insurance did not cover any treatment, and 2.7 percent because they had no transportation or treatment was inconvenient.

Long description end. Return to Figure 40.

Long description, Figure 41: Figure 41 is titled "Reasons for Not Receiving Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with a Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Care Who Did Not Receive Mental Health Services, by Mental Illness Status: Percentages, 2014." It is a bar graph, where the percentage of adults is shown on the horizontal axis and the reasons for not receiving mental health services is shown on the vertical axis. Fourteen reasons are shown: (1) could not afford cost, (2) thought could handle the problem without treatment, (3) did not know where to go for services, (4) did not have time, (5) treatment would not help, (6) might cause neighbors/community to have negative opinion, (7) concerned about being committed/having to take medicine, (8) might have negative effect on job, (9) health insurance did not cover enough treatment, (10) did not feel need for treatment at the time, (11) concerned about confidentiality, (12) did not want others to find out, (13) health insurance did not cover any treatment, and (14) no transportation/inconvenient. Each reason on the vertical axis has two bars, one is for adults with serious mental illness, and the other is for adults with any mental illness. A note below the figure says, "AMI = any mental illness; SMI = serious mental illness."

Among adults aged 18 or older in 2014 who had AMI in the past year and a perceived unmet need for mental health care but who did not receive mental health services in the past year, the following percentages did not receive mental health services for the following reasons: 51.3 percent because they could not afford the cost, 25.7 percent because they thought they could handle the problem without treatment, 25.6 percent because they did not know where to go for services, 16.5 percent because they did not have the time, 12.2 percent because they thought treatment would not help, 11.8 percent because they thought that treatment might cause their neighbors or community to have a negative opinion, 13.2 percent because they were concerned about being committed or having to take medicine, 11.1 percent because they thought that treatment might have a negative effect on their job, 10.6 percent because their health insurance did not cover enough treatment, 6.8 percent because they did not feel need for treatment at the time, 8.6 percent because they were concerned about confidentiality, 8.0 percent because they did not want others to find out, 5.9 percent because their health insurance did not cover any treatment, and 3.5 percent because they had no transportation or treatment was inconvenient.

Among adults aged 18 or older in 2014 who had SMI in the past year and a perceived unmet need for mental health care but who did not receive mental health services in the past year, the following percentages did not receive mental health services for the following reasons: 56.1 percent because they could not afford the cost, 20.4 percent because they thought they could handle the problem without treatment, 27.4 percent because they did not know where to go for services, 14.0 percent because they did not have the time, 11.7 percent because they thought treatment would not help, 14.7 percent because they thought that treatment might cause their neighbors or community to have a negative opinion, 19.2 percent because they were concerned about being committed or having to take medicine, 12.8 percent because they thought that treatment might have a negative effect on their job, 11.7 percent because their health insurance did not cover enough treatment, 3.1 percent because they did not feel need for treatment at the time, 12.5 percent because they were concerned about confidentiality, 8.2 percent because they did not want others to find out, 5.8 percent because their health insurance did not cover any treatment, and 4.0 percent because they had no transportation or treatment was inconvenient.

Long description end. Return to Figure 41.

Long description, Figure 42: Figure 42 is titled "Receipt of Mental Health Care and Specialty Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older Who Had Past Year Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders: Percentages, 2014." It is a pie chart, with the following written below the chart: "7.9 Million Adults with Co-Occurring Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders." The pie chart shows the percentages of adults with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders who received no treatment, received mental health care only, received specialty substance use treatment only, and received both mental health care and specialty substance use treatment. A note below the figure says, "Mental health care is defined as having received inpatient care or outpatient care or having used prescription medication for problems with emotions, nerves, or mental health. Specialty substance use treatment refers to treatment at a hospital (inpatient only), rehabilitation facility (inpatient or outpatient), or mental health center in order to reduce or stop drug or alcohol use, or for medical problems associated with drug or alcohol use."

Of the 7.9 million adults with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders in 2014, 53.7 percent received no treatment, 33.9 percent received only mental health care, 3.5 percent received only specialty substance use treatment, and 8.9 percent received both mental health care and specialty substance use treatment.

Long description end. Return to Figure 42.

Long description, Figure 43: Figure 43 is titled "Receipt of Mental Health Care and Specialty Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older Who Had Past Year Serious Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders: Percentages, 2014." It is a pie chart, with the following written below the chart: "2.3 Million Adults with Co-Occurring SMI and Substance Use Disorders." The pie chart shows the percentage of adults with co-occurring serious mental illness and substance use disorders who received no treatment, received mental health care only, received specialty substance use treatment only, and received both mental health care and specialty substance use treatment. A note below the figure says, "Mental health care is defined as having received inpatient care or outpatient care or having used prescription medication for problems with emotions, nerves, or mental health. Specialty substance use treatment refers to treatment at a hospital (inpatient only), rehabilitation facility (inpatient or outpatient), or mental health center in order to reduce or stop drug or alcohol use, or for medical problems associated with drug or alcohol use." A second note below the figure says, "SMI = serious mental illness."

Of the 2.3 million adults with co-occurring serious mental illness and substance use disorders in 2014, 34.3 percent received no treatment, 46.1 percent received only mental health care, 2.6 percent received only specialty substance use treatment, and 17.0 percent received both mental health care and specialty substance use treatment.

Long description end. Return to Figure 43.

Long description, Figure 44: Figure 44 is titled "Receipt of Mental Health Care or Specialty Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Past Year Substance Use Disorder and Co-Occurring Mental Illness or Serious Mental Illness: Percentages, 2008-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage receiving mental health care or specialty substance use treatment in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each category (co-occurring AMI and SUD, co-occurring SMI and SUD), a line shows the percentage who received mental health care or specialty substance use treatment over the years 2008 through 2014. A note below the figure says, "AMI = any mental illness; SMI = serious mental illness; SUD = substance use disorder." Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 44.

Long description, Figure 45: Figure 45 is titled "Sources of Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17: Percentages and Numbers (in thousands), 2014." It consists of two bar graphs with two horizontal axes and one shared vertical axis. The horizontal axis on the left shows the number of youths in thousands. The horizontal axis on the right shows the percentages that correspond to the number of youths. The shared vertical axis shows six sources of mental health services: (1) specialty mental health setting, (2) education setting, (3) general medical setting, (4) child welfare setting, (5) juvenile justice setting, and (6) specialty and nonspecialty settings. A note below the figure says, "Nonspecialty settings do not include youths who received mental health care in the past year from a juvenile justice setting."

There were 3,369,000 youths aged 12 to 17 in 2014 who received mental health services in a specialty mental health setting in the past year, or 13.7 percent of youths.

There were 3,229,000 youths who received mental health services in an education setting in the past year, or 13.2 percent of youths.

There were 700,000 youths who received mental health services in a general medical setting in the past year, or 2.9 percent of youths.

There were 92,000 youths who received mental health services in a child welfare setting in the past year, or 0.4 percent of youths.

There were 63,000 youths who received mental health services in a juvenile justice setting in the past year, or 0.3 percent of youths.

There were 1,457,000 youths who received mental health services in specialty and nonspecialty settings in the past year, or 5.9 percent of youths.

Long description end. Return to Figure 45.

Long description, Figure 46: Figure 46 is titled "Reasons for Receiving Specialty Mental Health Services among Youths Aged 12 to 17 Who Received Mental Health Services in the Past Year: Percentages, 2014." It is a bar graph, where the percentage of youths is shown on the horizontal axis and the reasons for receiving specialty mental health services are shown on the vertical axis. Twelve reasons are shown: (1) felt depressed, (2) thought about killing self or tried to kill self, (3) felt very afraid and tense, (4) had problems with home/family, (5) broke rules and acted out, (6) had problems at school, (7) had trouble controlling anger, (8) had problems with friends, (9) had eating problems, (10) had problems with people other than family/friends, (11) got into physical fights, and (12) had other diagnosed mental/neurological disorder.

Among youths aged 12 to 17 in 2014 who received specialty mental health services in the past year, the following percentages received mental health services for the following reasons: 56.5 percent because they felt depressed, 29.1 percent because they thought about killing themselves or tried to kill themselves, 29.0 percent because they felt very afraid and tense, 26.6 percent because they had problems with their home or family, 20.8 percent because they broke rules and acted out, 18.1 percent because they had problems at school, 16.7 percent because they had trouble controlling their anger, 13.0 percent because they had problems with friends, 12.0 percent because they had eating problems, 8.6 percent because they had problems with people other than family or friends, 3.5 percent because they got into physical fights, and 2.7 percent because they had some other diagnosed mental or neurological disorder.

Long description end. Return to Figure 46.

Long description, Figure 47: Figure 47 is titled "Number of Nights Spent as an Inpatient in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17 Who Received Inpatient Specialty Mental Health Care: Percentages, 2014." It is a pie chart, with the following written below the chart: "606,000 Youths Who Received Inpatient Specialty Mental Health Services." The pie chart shows the percentages of youths who stayed a given number of nights (1 night, 2 nights, 3 to 6 nights, 7 to 24 nights, and 25 or more nights) as an inpatient in the past year. A note below the figure says, "The percentages do not add to 100 percent due to rounding."

Of the 606,000 youths in 2014 who received inpatient specialty mental health services, 29.7 percent spent 1 night, 16.2 percent spent 2 nights, 20.0 percent spent 3 to 6 nights, 25.3 percent spent 7 to 24 nights, and 8.9 percent spent 25 or more nights.

Long description end. Return to Figure 47.

Long description, Figure 48: Figure 48 is titled "Number of Outpatient Visits in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17 Who Received Outpatient Specialty Mental Health Services: Percentages, 2014." It is a pie chart, with the following written below the chart: "3.1 Million Youths Who Received Outpatient Specialty Mental Health Services." The pie chart shows the percentages of youths who had a given number of visits (1 visit, 2 visits, 3 to 6 visits, 7 to 24 visits, and 25 or more visits) as an outpatient in the past year. A note below the figure says, "The percentages do not add to 100 percent due to rounding."

Of the 3.1 million youths in 2014 who received outpatient specialty mental health services, 16.0 percent had 1 visit, 13.9 percent had 2 visits, 25.0 percent had 3 to 6 visits, 28.9 percent had 7 to 24 visits, and 16.1 percent had 25 or more visits.

Long description end. Return to Figure 48.

Long description, Figure 49: Figure 49 is titled "Received Treatment in the Past Year for Depression among Youths Aged 12 to 17 with a Past Year Major Depressive Episode (MDE) or MDE with Severe Impairment: Percentages, 2004-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage receiving treatment for depression in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For both youths with an MDE and youths with an MDE with severe impairment, a line shows the percentage who received treatment over the years 2004 through 2014. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 49.

Long description, Figure 50: Figure 50 is titled "Type of Treatment Received in the Past Year for Depression among Youths Aged 12 to 17 with a Past Year Major Depressive Episode: Percentages, 2004-2014." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage receiving treatment for depression in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each type of treatment (saw or talked to a health professional only, used prescription medication and did not see or talk to a health professional, and saw or talked to a health professional and used prescription medication), a line shows the percentage who received treatment for depression over the years 2004 through 2014. A note below the figure says, "Health Professionals include general practitioner or family doctor; other medical doctor (e.g., cardiologist, gynecologist, urologist); psychologist; psychiatrist or psychotherapist; social worker; counselor; other mental health professional (e.g., mental health nurse or other therapist where type is not specified); and nurse, occupational therapist, or other health professional." Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2014 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate. An accessible table of the estimates in the line graph is located below this figure.

Long description end. Return to Figure 50.

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