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All reports on violence, suicide, & risky behaviors

 

  • new The New DAWN Report:  Emergency Department Visits Involving ADHD Stimulant Medications According to SAMHSA's Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) for 2004, an estimated 7,873 drug-related emergency department visits involved methylphenidate or amphetamine-dextroamphetamine, two medications used to treat attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The most frequent reason for these ADHD stimulant medication related visits was nonmedical use (48%), followed by adverse reactions associated with medical use (34%), accidental ingestion (10%), and suicide attempts (8%).  
  • The OAS Report:  Suicidal Thoughts, Suicide Attempts, Major Depressive Episode & Substance Use among Adults   Data on suicide attempts and related behaviors are available from SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health and SAMHSA's Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN).   Among adults who experienced a major depressive episode in the past year, 56.3% thought during their worst or most recent episode that it would be better if they were dead, 40.3% thought about committing suicide, 14.5% made a suicide plan, and 10.4% made a suicide attempt.  Adults with a past year major depressive episode who reported past month binge alcohol or illicit drug use were more likely to report suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts than their counterparts with past year depression who had not did not binge drink or use an illicit drug in the past month.   In 2004, an estimated 106,079 emergency department visits were the result of drug-related suicide attempts by persons aged 18 or older.   A psychiatric condition was diagnosed in 41% (43,176) of the drug-related suicide attempts treated in the emergency departments.   The most frequent psychiatric diagnosis was depression.  
  • According to SAMHSA's Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN),  in 2004 there were over 15,000 emergency department visits by adolescents aged 12 to 17 whose suicide attempts involved drugs.    Pain medications were involved in about half of the suicide attempts.  Almost three quarters of the drug related suicide attempts were serious enough to merit the patient's admission to the same hospital or transfer to another health care facility.  Antidepressants or other psychotherapeutic medications were involved in over 40% of the suicide attempts by adolescents who were admitted to the hospital.  See  The New DAWN Report:  Disposition of Emergency Department Visits for Drug-Related Suicide Attempts by Adolescents, 2004
  • Based on SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use & Health, youths aged 12 to 17 who used an illicit drug in the past year were almost twice as likely to have engaged in a violent behavior as those who did not use an illicit drug (49.8% vs. 26.6%). Rates of past year violent behavior were higher among youths aged 13, 14, and 15 than those either younger or older. The likelihood of having engaged in violent behavior increased with the number of drugs used in the past year: 45.6% of youths who used one illicit drug engaged in violent behavior compared to 61.9% of youths who used three or more illicit drugs.  See The NSDUH Report:  Youth Violence and Illicit Drug Use 
  • As reported in SAMHSA's 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an estimated 14% of youths aged 12 to 17, approximately 3.5 million youths, had experienced at least one major depressive episode in their lifetime. Over 7%, an estimated 1.8 million youths, had lifetime major depressive episode and thought about killing themselves at the time of their worst or most recent episode. An estimated 712,000 youths had tried to kill themselves during their worst or most recent major depressive episode; this represents 2.9% of those aged 12 to 17. See The NSDUH Report:  Suicidal Thoughts among Youths Aged 12 to 17 with Major Depressive Episode
  • Youths who reported heavy alcohol use in the past month were the most likely to have participated in any of the six delinquent behaviors assessed in SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Heavy drinking was defined as drinking five or more alcoholic beverages on the same occasion on each of 5 or more days in the past 30 days. All heavy alcohol users are also binge alcohol users, i.e., drank five or more drinks on the same occasion on at least one day in the past 30 days. In 2003, an estimated 9 million (36.1%) youths aged 12 to 17 had engaged in at least one delinquent behavior in the past year. Almost 6 million (23.8%) took part in a serious fight at school or work; 4.5 million (18.1%) took part in a group-against-group fight; 2.1 million (8.3%) attacked someone with the intent to seriously hurt them; 1.1 million (4.5%) stole or tried to steal something worth more than $50; over 900,000 (3.6%) sold illegal drugs; and over 900,000 (3.6%) carried a handgun during the past year. See The NSDUH Report:  Alcohol Use and Delinquent Behaviors among Youths

  • Based on SAMHSA's 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the percentages of youths engaging in delinquent behaviors rose with increasing frequency of marijuana use. In 2002, more than 5 million youths engaged in serious fighting at school or work and almost 4 million took part in a group-against-group fight in the past year. Over half (57%) of those who used marijuana 300 or more days in the past year reported that they also sold illegal drugs. See  The NSDUH Report:  Marijuana Use and Delinquent Behaviors Among Youths.
  • In 2000, Hispanic females aged 12 to 17 were at higher risk for suicide than other youths.  Only 32 percent of Hispanic female youths at risk for suicide during the past year, however, received mental health treatment during this same time period.  Hispanic female youths born in the United States were at higher risk than Hispanic female youths born outside the United States.  But rates of suicide risk were similar among Hispanic female youths across regions and ethnic subgroups (e.g., Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central or South American and Cuban).  See The NHSDA Report:  Risk of Suicide Among Hispanic Females Aged 12 to 17.
  • According to SAMHSA's 1999 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, an estimated 833,000 youths between the ages of 12 and 17 had carried a handgun in the past year.  See The NHSDA Report: Youth Who Carry Handguns.
  • Among youths aged 12 to 17, those aged 14 or 15 reported higher rates than those younger or older for the following violent behaviors:  serious fighting at school or work, group-against-group fights, and attacking others with the intent of seriously hurting them. See The NHSDA Report:  Youth Violence and Substance Use,  2001 Update.
  • In 2000, almost 7 million persons aged 12 to 20 (under the legal drinking age) was a binge drinker.  The rate of binge drinking among underage persons (19 percent) was almost as high as among adults aged 21 or older (21 percent).  Underage persons who reported binge drinking were 7 times more likely to report illicit drugs during the past month than underage persons who did not binge drink. See The NHSDA Report:  Binge Drinking Among Underage Persons.
Also see:  Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol and/or Drugs
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Suicide

 

  • new The New DAWN Report:  Emergency Department Visits Involving ADHD Stimulant Medications According to SAMHSA's Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) for 2004, an estimated 7,873 drug-related emergency department visits involved methylphenidate or amphetamine-dextroamphetamine, two medications used to treat attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The most frequent reason for these ADHD stimulant medication related visits was nonmedical use (48%), followed by adverse reactions associated with medical use (34%), accidental ingestion (10%), and suicide attempts (8%).
  • The OAS Report:  Suicidal Thoughts, Suicide Attempts, Major Depressive Episode & Substance Use among Adults   Data on suicide attempts and related behaviors are available from SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health and SAMHSA's Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN).   Among adults who experienced a major depressive episode in the past year, 56.3% thought during their worst or most recent episode that it would be better if they were dead, 40.3% thought about committing suicide, 14.5% made a suicide plan, and 10.4% made a suicide attempt.  Adults with a past year major depressive episode who reported past month binge alcohol or illicit drug use were more likely to report suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts than their counterparts with past year depression who had not did not binge drink or use an illicit drug in the past month.   In 2004, an estimated 106,079 emergency department visits were the result of drug-related suicide attempts by persons aged 18 or older.   A psychiatric condition was diagnosed in 41% (43,176) of the drug-related suicide attempts treated in the emergency departments.   The most frequent psychiatric diagnosis was depression.  
  • According to SAMHSA's Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN), in 2004 there were over 15,000 emergency department visits by adolescents aged 12 to 17 whose suicide attempts involved drugs.    Pain medications were involved in about half of the suicide attempts.  Almost three quarters of the drug related suicide attempts were serious enough to merit the patient's admission to the same hospital or transfer to another health care facility.  Antidepressants or other psychotherapeutic medications were involved in over 40% of the suicide attempts by adolescents who were admitted to the hospital.  See  The New DAWN Report:  Disposition of Emergency Department Visits for Drug-Related Suicide Attempts by Adolescents, 2004
  • As reported in SAMHSA's 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an estimated 14% of youths aged 12 to 17, approximately 3.5 million youths, had experienced at least one major depressive episode in their lifetime. Over 7%, an estimated 1.8 million youths, had lifetime major depressive episode and thought about killing themselves at the time of their worst or most recent episode. An estimated 712,000 youths had tried to kill themselves during their worst or most recent major depressive episode; this represents 2.9% of those aged 12 to 17. See The NSDUH Report:  Suicidal Thoughts among Youths Aged 12 to 17 with Major Depressive Episode
  • In 2000, Hispanic females aged 12 to 17 were at higher risk for suicide than other youths.  Only 32 percent of Hispanic female youths at risk for suicide during the past year, however, received mental health treatment during this same time period.  Hispanic female youths born in the United States were at higher risk than Hispanic female youths born outside the United States.  But rates of suicide risk were similar among Hispanic female youths across regions and ethnic subgroups (e.g., Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central or South American and Cuban).  See The NHSDA Report:  Risk of Suicide Among Hispanic Females Aged 12 to 17.

References on National Strategies to Prevent Suicide:  

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service. (2001). National strategy for suicide prevention: Goals and objectives for action (DHHS Publication No. SMA 013517). Rockville, MD.  http://www.mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/suicideprevention/strategy.asp

Institute of Medicine (S.K. Goldsmith, T.C. Pellmar, A.M. Kleinman, & W.E. Bunney, Eds.). (2002). Reducing suicide: A national imperative. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. http://books.nap.edu/books/0309083214/html/index.html
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Violence

 

  • new  Based on SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use & Health, youths aged 12 to 17 who used an illicit drug in the past year were almost twice as likely to have engaged in a violent behavior as those who did not use an illicit drug (49.8% vs. 26.6%). Rates of past year violent behavior were higher among youths aged 13, 14, and 15 than those either younger or older. The likelihood of having engaged in violent behavior increased with the number of drugs used in the past year: 45.6% of youths who used one illicit drug engaged in violent behavior compared to 61.9% of youths who used three or more illicit drugs.  See The NSDUH Report:  Youth Violence and Illicit Drug Use  
  • Youths who reported heavy alcohol use in the past month were the most likely to have participated in any of the six delinquent behaviors assessed in SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Heavy drinking was defined as drinking five or more alcoholic beverages on the same occasion on each of 5 or more days in the past 30 days. All heavy alcohol users are also binge alcohol users, i.e., drank five or more drinks on the same occasion on at least one day in the past 30 days. In 2003, an estimated 9 million (36.1%) youths aged 12 to 17 had engaged in at least one delinquent behavior in the past year. Almost 6 million (23.8%) took part in a serious fight at school or work; 4.5 million (18.1%) took part in a group-against-group fight; 2.1 million (8.3%) attacked someone with the intent to seriously hurt them; 1.1 million (4.5%) stole or tried to steal something worth more than $50; over 900,000 (3.6%) sold illegal drugs; and over 900,000 (3.6%) carried a handgun during the past year. See The NSDUH Report:  Alcohol Use and Delinquent Behaviors among Youths
  • Based on SAMHSA's 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the percentages of youths engaging in delinquent behaviors rose with increasing frequency of marijuana use. In 2002, more than 5 million youths engaged in serious fighting at school or work and almost 4 million took part in a group-against-group fight in the past year. Over half (57%) of those who used marijuana 300 or more days in the past year reported that they also sold illegal drugs. See  The NSDUH Report:  Marijuana Use and Delinquent Behaviors Among Youths.
  • According to SAMHSA's 1999 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, an estimated 833,000 youths between the ages of 12 and 17 had carried a handgun in the past year.  See The NHSDA Report: Youth Who Carry Handguns.
  • Among youths aged 12 to 17, those aged 14 or 15 reported higher rates than those younger or older for the following violent behaviors:  serious fighting at school or work, group-against-group fights, and attacking others with the intent of seriously hurting them. See The NHSDA Report:  Youth Violence and Substance Use,  2001 Update.

This page was last updated on December 30, 2008.