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Date: October 22, 2003
Media Contact: SAMHSA Press
Phone: 301-443-8956


 

 

Substance Abuse Prevention Services: HHS Announces $156.5 Million Awards to Expand Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment for People with HIV 

 

Targeted Capacity Expansion Initiatives for Substance Abuse Prevention (SAP) and HIV Prevention in Minority Communities: Services Grants (SP03-005)

   
  Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Tommy G. Thompson today announced $156.5 million in 115 awards over five years to fund substance abuse prevention and treatment services for people with or at risk of HIV.  The awards are targeted to African American, Hispanic/Latino and other racial and ethnic minority communities that have been highly affected by the twin epidemics of substance abuse and HIV/AIDS. 

The prevention and treatment grants will be administered by HHS’ Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).  These grants are designed to enhance and expand substance abuse treatment and outreach services, pretreatment, and prevention services in conjunction with HIV/AIDS services in the community. The total for prevention and treatment grants is $152 million, $37.4 million for prevention and $114.6 million for treatment.  First year awards include $7,289,891 for prevention grants and $22,743,927 for treatment grants.  Along with these five-year awards, SAMHSA also issued 44 one-year HIV prevention planning grants totaling an additional $4.5 million.

 “These grants will help a wide range of providers become familiar with the various issues surrounding substance abuse and HIV/AIDS, and should foster a comprehensive, community-based response to the challenge,” Secretary Thompson said.

SAMHSA Administrator Charles G. Curie said:  The current trend in HIV/AIDS shows that a disproportionate number of minorities who live in inner cities are affected by or at risk for contracting HIV.  Often this population is poor, hard to reach through traditional public health methods, and in need of a wide range of health and human services.  These grants will help community-based organizations build substance abuse prevention and treatment services and establish networks among substance abuse treatment centers, medical personnel, mental health personnel, and public health professionals to prevent further spread of the disease and to provide high-quality care to infected individuals.”

The treatment grants are aimed at localities within states that have an annual AIDS rate of 10 per 100,000 or higher, or communities in metropolitan statistical areas that have an annual AIDS rate of 20 per 100,000 or higher among minority communities.  The total for these grants over five years is expected to be $114,620,017.

The 5-year prevention grants are designed to fund efforts by community-based organizations, faith communities, minority-serving colleges and universities, health care delivery organizations and others to provide effective, integrated substance abuse prevention and HIV services in high risk minority communities.  The one-year planning grants are designed to help communities begin strategic planning efforts for HIV prevention in areas suffering from addiction problems.

 
 

Prevention grantees include:

ARIZONA

Concilio Latino de Salud, Inc., Phoenix - $350,000 expected for each year for five years. This organization will provide integrated substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention services to three at-risk groups of youth and young adults who are homeless, runaways, dealing with sexual identity issues and returning to the community from the justice system.

Arizona Board of Regents, University of Arizona, Tucson - $349,613, first year; $349,979, expected second year; $349,780, expected third year; $349,997, expected fourth year; and $349,951 expected for the fifth year. This project is a collaboration between the University of Arizona, College of Public Health and the Pascua Yacqui Tribe that is designed to integrate and expand the Tribe’s current substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention services.

COPE Behavioral Services, Inc., Tucson – $344,477, first year; $345,455, expected second year; $346,460 expected third year; $347,691, expected fourth year; and $347,846 expected for the fifth year. This organization will target women of color who exchange sex for drugs or money through street and prison outreach plus follow-up, a community-based drop-in center, an integrated substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention education curriculum, and referral and linkages to other services.

CALIFORNIA

Walden House, Inc., San Francisco - $331,651, first year; $331,651, expected second year; $346,873, expected third year; $349,126, expected fourth year; and $349,818 expected for the fifth year. In partnership with two local faith-based organizations, the organization will provide a 3-tiered asset-based substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention service in Los Angeles to youth ages 12-15,and children ages 8-11 who have a parent in the criminal justice system.

Iris Center: Women’s Counseling and Recovery Services, San Francisco - $329,186, first year; $349,090 expected for years 2-3; and $344,709 expected for the fifth year.  Project HOPE (Helping Other Peers Excel) will provide substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention services to low-income African American female adolescents and young women; includes street and agency-based outreach, individual risk reduction counseling, single and multiple-session workshops, and case management.

Health Initiatives for Youth, San Francisco - $349,995 expected each year for five years. This project will develop a new generation of youth health advocates through an arts-based youth leadership program by providing multicultural substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention workshops for youth in San Francisco and Alameda Counties.

Asian Pacific Family Center, Rosemead - $350,000 expected each year for five years. This substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention project includes Life Skills Development and After School Group Activities for high school age Chinese and Korean immigrant youths in the East San Gabriel Valley area of Los Angeles County and Bicultural Parenting Group sessions for their parents.

Institute for Advanced Study of Black Family Life and Culture, Oakland – $349,262 expected each year for five years. This organization will provide substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention services to adolescents, 11-16 years old in the city of Oakland, through a unique collaborative with youth serving community-based agencies in Oakland.

FLORIDA

The Village South, Inc., Miami - $350,000 expected each year for five years. The Demare’ Project will provide substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention services to vulnerable middle school youth ages 10-13 who are primarily Haitian and Caribbean immigrants.

GEORGIA

Wholistic Stress Control Institute, Atlanta - $350,000 expected each year for five years. The PAATH (Pointing African American Towards Health) will provide SAP/HIVP services to African American youth in the Community Education Partnership program.  These students have been removed from their neighborhood schools for disciplinary problems.

HAWAII

Coalition for a Drug Free Hawaii, Honolulu - $350,000 expected each year for five years. This coalition will provide Street Smart, a science-based substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention program adapted for Pacific Island and Asian girls in Hawaii who are runaway, homeless, chronically truant, and status offenders.

ILLINOIS

Genesis House, Chicago - $350,000 expected each year for five years.  This project will provide integrated substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention services to formally incarcerated women who are involved in prostitution.

LOUISIANA

SW Louisiana Area Health Education Center, Lafayette- $350,000 expected each year for five years. The SHIP substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention project targets 11-18 year old African American youth residing in high-risk environments or out-of-home placements in southwest Louisiana.

MARYLAND

Strategic Community Services, Inc., Glenarden - $350,000 expected for each year for five years. This organization will use a youth popular culture framework for integrated SAP/HIVP services for African-American youth attending Suitland High School.

MASSACHUSETTS

Light of Restoration Ministries, Holyoke - $348,950, first year; $345,369, expected second year; $340,989, expected third year; $346,692, expected fourth year; and $349,805 expected for the fifth year. The project will increase access to substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention services for traditionally underserved women with continuity, consistency, and thoroughness of prevention care that addresses spirit, soul, and body.

Family Service, Inc., Lawrence - $172,897, first year; $172,757, expected second year; $181,540, expected third year; $190,617, expected fourth year; and $200,148 expected for the fifth year.  With community members, this organization will provide the MAPA substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention program for adult Latina women.

NEW YORK

Fund for the City of New York, New York - $349,089, first year; $349,656, expected second year; $348,334, expected third year; $349,220, expected fourth year; and $349,949 expected for the fifth year. The Red Hook Community Justice Center will launch TEACH, a new youth program that provides comprehensive and culturally appropriate training on substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention.

Bronx AIDS Services, Inc., Bronx – First year $289,908 and $350,000 expected years two through five. GO GIRL! is a substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention project that targets economically disenfranchised girls ages 12-17 who reside in the Bronx and are involved or at-risk of involvement with the juvenile justice system.

NORTH CAROLINA

Sickle Cell Disease Association of the Piedmont, Greensboro -  $350,000 expected each year for five years. Targeting African American adults ages 18-49 in Guilford County, the Street Community Outreach Prevention Education II (SCOPE II) substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention project will includes Community Promise, Safety Counts and case management services.

TEXAS

Longview Wellness Center, Inc., Longview - $342,638 expected for the first two years; $338,920, expected third year; $336,420, expected fourth year; and $341,884 expected for the fifth year. This project plans to provide culturally appropriate individual and group SAP/HIVP services to African American women accessing family planning services in an urban clinic.

WASHINGTON D.C.

Identity, Inc., Washington, D.C. - $334,521 first year; $350,000, expected second year; $349,500, expected third year; $349,750, expected fourth year; and $333,250 expected for the fifth year. This organization will provide an after-school integrated substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention curriculum, that contains a lifestyle component responding to and designed with extensive community input, to at-risk middle school Latino youth and their parents in Montgomery County, MD.

VIRGIN ISLANDS

Access to Racial and Cultural Health Institute, Inc., Christiansted, VI - $350,000 expected each year for five years. The CAYA substance abuse prevention and HIV prevention Media Initiative integrates Life Skills Training and Focus on Kids within a historical Crucian culture framework for pre- and early adolescents in their existing friendship groups.

 
  See news release on SAMHSA funding of HIV/AIDS Substance Abuse Treatment programs

See news release on SAMHSA funding of HIV/AIDS Substance Abuse Prevention Program Planning 

 
 


 
 

SAMHSA is a public health agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  The agency is responsible for accountability, capacity and effectiveness of the nation’s substance abuse prevention, addictions treatment and mental health service delivery systems.

 
 


 

 

This page was last updated on 22 October, 2003
SAMHSA is An Agency of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services
 

TI03-008: Targeted Capacity Expansion Program for Substance Abuse Treatment and HIV/AIDS Services