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Date: October 23, 2003
Media Contact: SAMHSA Press
Phone: 301-443-8956


 

 

HHS Announces $8.8 Million for Youth Violence Prevention

 

Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson today announced 27 grants totaling $8.8 million over two years to prevent youth violence. These grants are designed to implement evidence-based prevention, intervention and treatment services to reduce youth violence. 

Violence today affects too many of our young people, but we know we can take steps to reduce its impact," Secretary Thompson said.  "These new grants support programs that work to prevent youth violence by promoting the positive development of our children, before problems arise that can lead to violent behavior."

These awards are being administered by HHS’ Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).  There are three funding categories for this program for fiscal year 2003 – general violence prevention, violence prevention for females, and service for justice-involved youth.  Grants are awarded for a two-year duration pending ongoing availability of funding in the next fiscal year.

“All too often we hear about children engaging in violent behaviors,” SAMHSA Administrator Charles G. Curie said.  “Through these grants, SAMHSA is working to make schools safer, to foster children's healthy development, and to prevent aggressive and violent behavior among the nation's youth." 

 
 

General violence prevention grantees include:

Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif. - $150,000- The goals of this project are to mobilize homeless youth, community leaders, law enforcement and other stakeholders to address victimization and violence among the runaway and homeless youth population.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Youth Alive, Oakland, Calif. - $ 150,000- The goal of this project is to reduce the number of violently injured youth who are re-injured or retaliate, and who are at higher risk for violence as adults.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Latino Center for Prevention & Action in Health and Welfare, Santa Ana, Calif. - $124,978- This project is designed to build the capacity of community residents to actively participate in addressing violence prevention and positive youth development, to have a voice in decisions about the allocation of resources related to positive youth development and to broker services for their own neighborhoods.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Clifford W. Beers Guidance Center, New Haven, Conn. - $150,000-  This project will incorporated three best practice programs, The Olweus Bullying Project; Strengthening Multi Ethnic Families and Communities Model; and Life Skills Training, into the development of a School and Community Violence Prevention Project.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Switchboard of Miami, Miami, Fla. - $150,000- This grant will provide intervention services that address youth problems in the community or that enhance personal and interpersonal strengths, pro-social development, and positive mental health in youth.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Illinois Center for Violence Prevention, Chicago, Ill. - $150,000- This project will focus on building a statewide movement of youth leaders that includes empowerment of youth as change agents and engaging youth in activism around issues of violence prevention.   The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Women on Maintaining Education and Nutrition, Nashville, Tenn. - $150,000- This grant will implement the StreetTalk-peer-led interactive seminars designed to show youth the harmful repercussions of violent behavior and the LifeSkills-nine-week youth empowerment curriculum designed to transform youth behaviors by teaching social negotiation skills.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Big Brothers, Big Sisters of El Paso, El Paso, Texas - $149,000- This project will provide, promote and support mentoring services to at-risk youth through the Big Brothers/Big Sisters mentoring model. The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Skagit County, Mt. Vernon, Wash. - $150,000- This grantee will provide comprehensive intervention services to youth residing in Kulshan Creek, a 95% Latino population, and increase the availability of culturally-based activities that encourage positive physical, emotional, psychological and social development.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Safefutures Youth Center, Seattle, Wash. - $150,000- The goal of this project is to increase positive opportunities and protective factors for youth in the High Point Garden Community; enhance systems for early and ongoing identification of youth; and develop a community support safety net.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

 
 

Violence Prevention for Females grantees include:

Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction, Hartford, Conn. - $150,000- This grant will develop, adapt and implement an evidence-based violence prevention intervention model for use with court-involved and at-risk girls, ages 14-17.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Community Connections, Washington, D.C. - $149,710- This project will serve adolescent girls, ages 12-18, with histories of violent victimization, including physical, sexual or emotional abuse, and/or witnessing violence.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Latin American Youth Center, Washington, D.C. - $148,925- This project is designed to educate girls within the community about the risks and costs of violence and to empower each individual to protect herself and others against violent acts.  The project will teach critical life skills, build self-esteem and peer support, and encourage girls to care for themselves and others who are victimized by violence.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Literature for All of Us, Chicago, Ill. - $150,000- This grant focuses on reducing the psychological distress due to violence among youth attending an alternative high school for pregnant and parenting teens.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

National Council on Alcohol and Drug Abuse, St. Louis, Mo. - $150,000- This grantee will implement “Girl Talk” and implement the Expect Respect educational support violence prevention curriculum with girls in grades 5-8 so they will better understand and be prepared to deal with violence in relationships.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Bronx AIDS Services, Bronx, N.Y. - $150,000- This grant will serve girls ages 12-17 and expand the Adolescent Girls’ Mentoring Coalition to provide more extensive violence prevention services and develop resiliency skills.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Clemson University, Chesterfield, S.C. - $149,881 .  This grant will implement, Stop the Violence, a comprehensive, community-wide prevention and intervention program to reduce the prevalence and incidence of intimate partner and family violence against girls and young women ages 12-18.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

The Women’s Rape Crisis Center, Burlington, Vt. - $150,000- This project will further develop the Paradigm Project, an existing educational collaboration that focuses on development of new models of safe and healthy relationships and positive self – awareness.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Asian Counseling and Referral, Seattle, Wash. - $150,000- This grant will use Teen Peer Advocate Program strategies that address access barriers and help Asian/Pacific Islander young women in a culturally relevant manner.  The program will expand dating violence prevention and intervention services for young Asian/Pacific Islander women.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

 
 

Service for Justice-Involved Youth grantees include:

Pima Prevention Partnership, Tuscon, Ariz. - $199,967- This goal of this project is to reduce future acts of violence by serving youth in the juvenile system, employing the Strengthening Families Program: For Parents and Youth program and the Functional Family Therapy program.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Children’s Institute International, Los Angeles, Calif. - $200,000- This project will develop and implement Project New Directions, a collaboration of public and private agencies designed to help youth and parenting youth remain in, and successfully transition back into, their communities.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Mental Health Center to Boulder County, Boulder, Colo. - $200,000- This project will implement wraparound services using the BluePrints model “Functional Family Therapy” as a treatment intervention for youth in the juvenile justices system and their families.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Central Baptist Children’s Services, Centralia, Ill. - $200,000- This project will implement Services for Justice-Involved Youth, a program to reduce violent behaviors by at-risk youth and provide intervention services such as Aggression Replacement Training and Multi-Systemic Therapy.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Detroit Hispanic Development Center, Detroit, Mich. - $200,000- This project will provide a continuum of services including early intervention and detection, referral, counseling and aftercare services for youth ages 13-18.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Ramsay County Juvenile Justice and Family, St. Paul, Minn. - $200,000- This project will teach strategies to reduce the risk of anti-social behavior and increase resilience and pro-social behavior in juvenile offenders.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Toledo Hospital, Toledo, Ohio - $200,000- This program will provide screening, diagnostic, and assessment services for youth with trauma issues and improve access to appropriate trauma-focused treatment, intensive case management and supportive services.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

Yakima Valley Farm Workers Clinic, Yakima, Wash. - $200,000- This Youth with Co-occurring Disorders Violence Prevention Project will implement an integrated mental health and substance abuse treatment program for Latino youth involved in the juvenile justice system with a goal of improving pro-social behaviors and preventing violence and substance abuse.  The program is expected to receive the same amount in the second year.

 
 

SAMHSA is a public health agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  The agency is responsible for accountability, capacity and effectiveness of the nation’s substance abuse prevention, addictions treatment and mental health service delivery systems.

 
 


 

 

This page was last updated on 23 October, 2003
SAMHSA is An Agency of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services