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Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (AANHPI)

Behavioral Health Equity

Behavioral Health and AANHPI

From the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2010

Substance Use in AANHPI
  • In 2010, among persons aged 12 or older, rates of substance dependence or abuse were lower among Asians (4.1 percent) and Native Hawaiians or Other Pacific Islanders (5.6 percent) than among other racial/ethnic groups. The rates for the other racial/ethnic groups were 16.0 percent for American Indians or Alaska Natives, 9.7 percent for persons reporting two or more races, 9.7 percent for Hispanics, 8.9 percent for whites, and 8.2 percent for blacks.
  • Among Asian adults, those who were born in the United States generally had higher rates of past month substance use than those who were not born in the United States, regardless of age.
  • Among Asian adults, substance use varied greatly among Asian subgroups; past month binge alcohol use, for example, ranged from a high of 25.9 percent among Korean adults to a low of 8.4 percent among Chinese adults.
  • Rates of past month alcohol use, binge alcohol use, and illicit drug use were lower among Asian adults than the national averages (39.8 vs. 55.2 percent, 13.2 vs. 24.5 percent, and 3.4 vs. 7.9 percent, respectively).
  • The percentage who needed treatment for a substance use problem in the past year was lower among Asian adults than for the national average of adults (4.8 vs. 9.6 percent).
Mental Health in AANHPI
  • In 2010, the percentage of persons aged 18 or older with past year any mental illness (AMI) was 15.8 percent among Asians, 18.3 percent among Hispanics, 18.7 percent among American Indians or Alaska Natives, 19.7 percent among blacks, 20.6 percent among whites, and 25.4 percent among persons reporting two or more races. The estimate of past year AMI among Native Hawaiians or Other Pacific Islanders aged 18 or older could not be reported due to low precision.
  • Among racial/ethnic groups, past year mental health service use among adults aged 18 or older in 2010 was 5.3 percent for Asians, 7.9 percent for Hispanics, 8.8 percent for blacks, 13.5 percent for American Indians or Alaska Natives, 16.2 percent for whites, and 18.1 percent for persons reporting two or more races. The estimate of mental health service use for Native Hawaiians or Other Pacific Islanders was not reported due to low precision.

SAMHSA Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration Program (PBHCI)

With the goal of improving the physical health status of people with mental illnesses and addictions, SAMHSA developed the Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration (PBHCI) Program. Through this program, SAMHSA provides support to communities to coordinate and integrate primary care services into publicly funded, community-based behavioral health settings. Of SAMHSA’s PBHCI Grantees, two organizations specifically serve Asian and Pacific American/Islander populations.

PBHCI Grantees Serving Asian and Pacific American/Islander Populations

  • Asian Counseling and Referral Service exit disclaimer icon (ACRS) is a nationally recognized nonprofit organization offering a broad array of human services and behavioral health programs to Asian Pacific Americans in King County. ACRS is the largest multiservice organization serving all the different Asian Pacific American communities - immigrants, refugees and American born - in the Pacific Northwest.
  • Asian Community Mental Health Services exit disclaimer icon (ACMHS) provides multicultural and multilingual services, empowering the most vulnerable members of our community to lead healthy, productive and contributing lives. The vision of ACHMS is to grow as a responsive and innovative organization, embracing diversity and compassionate care, setting the standard of excellence for integrated services to Asian & Pacific Islander communities.

ASIAN AMERICAN & NATIVE HAWAIIAN

SAMHSA Mental Health and Substance Abuse Data and Educational Resources

  • National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Substance Use in Asian Adults: This report examines 2004 and 2008 data on substance abuse and treatment needs among Asian Americans. Describes trends in illicit drug and alcohol use among subgroups, including young adults, women, men, uninsured people, and people living in poverty.
  • National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Substance Use in Asian Adolescents: This report examines trends in substance abuse among Asian adolescents based on 2004 to 2009 data. Reports on past month use by age and gender; Asian sub group; and those living in poverty, and compares the data with national averages.
  • American Indian/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian Resource Kit: This resource kit gives statistics on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders among Amerian Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian populations. Includes education, prevention, and outreach strategies, tips for collaboration among agencies and organizations, two posters, and a CD.
  • Aging, Medicines, and Alcohol (PDFs - Cambodian - 2.2mb, Chinese 1.4mb, Korean - 1.1mb, Vietnamese - 5.2mb): This brochure contains information for older adults on alcohol use and medication-related problems and steps older adults can take to avoid problems resulting from mixing medications.
  • Drugs, Alcohol and HIV/AIDS: A Consumer Guide (PDFs - Cambodian - 2.2mb, Chinese 8.4mb, Korean 13.6mb, Vietnamese - 2.4mb): This 2-page color brochure explains the increased risk of HIV transmission among people who abuse substances and stresses the importance of seeking treatment for both substance use and HIV/AIDS.
  • Good Mental Health is Ageless (PDFs - Cambodian - 7.9mb, Vietnamese - 7.5mb): This brochure provides information for older adults about the symptoms of depression or dementia, basic facts regarding mental health, and suggestions on how to talk to physicians and how to contact organizations that provide additional information.
  • Helping Yourself Heal: A Recovering Man's Guide to Coping With the Effects of Childhood Abuse (PDF - Chinese): This brochure helps men who are entering treatment understand some of the feelings that can surface about the abuse they experienced as a child. The guide defines childhood abuse, describes the symptoms of abuse, and suggests ways to handle childhood abuse issues while in treatment.
  • Helping Yourself Heal: A Recovering Woman’s Guide to Coping with Childhood Abuse Issues (PDFs - Cambodian, Vietnamese - 8.0mb): This brochure helps women who are entering treatment understand some of the feelings that can surface about the abuse they experienced as a child. The guide defines childhood abuse, describes the symptoms of abuse, and suggests ways to handle childhood abuse issues while in treatment.
  • What is Substance Abuse Treatment? A Booklet for Families (PDFs - Chinese - 701kb, Korean - 854kb, Vietnamese - 654kb): This booklet answers questions often asked by family members and significant others of people entering treatment. It also offers a resources section with additional information and a list of support groups.
  • What a Difference a Friend Makes (Chinese): A website that includes real-life stories and resources to help in the recovery process for people living with mental health problems and their friends and family.

PACIFIC ISLANDER

SAMHSA's Pacific Jurisdictions Workgroup and others across the agency, along with colleagues from the Pacific Behavioral Health Collaborating Council (PBHCC), continually work to ensure that the support and technical assistance SAMHSA provides the Jurisdictions is culturally competent and appropriate. Projects have included the development of performance and outcome measures that reflect the cultural perspectives of people living in the Jurisdictions.

Master Trainer Development Program (MTDP) for the Pacific Jurisdictions

SAMHSA is partnering with the Pacific Behavioral Health Collaborating Council (PBHCC) to support the Master Trainer Development Program for the 6 Pacific Jurisdictions from September 2011 - September 2012. This one year training and skill building effort is designed to develop the expertise of a set of Pacific Islander Master Trainer candidates to provide behavioral health training to their Pacific colleagues. Download MTDP Fact Sheet (Word - 25kb).

SAMHSA’s Collaborative for Application of Prevention Technologies (CAPT)

SAMHSA's CAPT is a national substance abuse prevention training and technical assistance (T/TA) system dedicated to strengthening prevention systems and the nation’s behavioral health workforce. SAMHSA’s CAPT provides services across the ten HHS regions, including the 6 Pacific Jurisdictions.

Federal Initiatives and Resources

Additional Behavioral Health Resources

More Behavioral Health Resources

Health Resources for AANHPI
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