SAMHSA logo Report to Congress - Nov 2002

 

 

 

 

REPORT TO CONGRESS ON THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF CO-OCCURRING SUBSTANCE ABUSE DISORDERS AND MENTAL DISORDERS

 

 


Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Chapter 4 - Evidence-Based practices for Co-Occurring Disorders - Summary

 

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Summary

The evidence base on co-occurring substance abuse disorders and mental disorders is growing as to the effectiveness of interventions that respond to an individual's stage of recovery and motivation to change. Enhanced research is needed on interventions geared to the unique needs of these individuals with both disorders, especially in regard to psychopharmacological interventions. Individuals with co-occurring disorders are at risk for related conditions. For example, they are vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. Without needed treatment, they are also at risk for homelessness and criminalization.

Programs for co-occurring disorders cannot be effective in isolation because individuals with complex, overlapping conditions are ill prepared to negotiate fragmented systems of care. Systemic barriers to the integration of substance abuse and mental health treatment are difficult and longstanding but can be overcome. States and communities that have successful programs build consensus around the need for an integrated response, develop aggregated financing mechanisms, cross-train staff, and measure achievement by improvements in client functioning and quality of life.

 

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