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SAMHSA News - July/August 2005, Volume 13, Number 4

Retailers Cut Cigarette Sales to Youth

Retailers continue to reduce sales of tobacco to children under age 18, according to data released recently by SAMHSA. The national retailer violation rate dropped to 12.0 percent in reports submitted by states in 2005, down from 12.8 percent reported in 2004 and 40.1 percent since the annual tobacco retailer inspections began in 1996.

Results of the most recent survey of inspections show that 49 of the 50 states achieved the legislative goal of cutting retailer sales of cigarettes to minors to no more than 20 percent. A total of 43 states achieved a retailer violation of no more than 15 percent. In 21 states, the retailer violation was 10 percent or below. The retailer violation rate is based on unannounced state inspections of cigarette retailers.

The survey's findings are based on reports submitted by states in response to a Federal law established in 1992 restricting access to tobacco by youth under age 18. The measure, known as the Synar Amendment, and its implementing regulations require states and U.S. territories to enact and enforce youth tobacco access laws; conduct annual random, unannounced inspections of tobacco outlets; achieve negotiated annual retailer violation targets; and attain a final goal of 20 percent or below for retailer non-compliance. The Synar law was named for the late Representative Mike Synar of Oklahoma.

Data reported in Fiscal Year 2005 indicate that Kansas failed to meet its negotiated retailer violation target. Kansas is committing additional state funds for tobacco enforcement as an alternative to losing part of its SAMHSA block grant funding, as specified in the law.

For more information, visit prevention.samhsa.gov/tobacco. For questions on program requirements or the data being reported, contact Alejandro Arias, SAMHSA's Synar Program Lead, at alejandro.arias@samhsa.hhs.govEnd of Article

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Synar Retailer Violation Rates ( FFY 2005)

State Name
Target Reported
Alabama
20.0
13.9
Alaska
20.0
12.1
Arizona
20.0
8.3
Arkansas
20.0
4.2
California
20.0
14.0
Colorado
20.0
9.0
Connecticut
20.0
18.0
Delaware
20.0
0.9
District of Columbia
20.0
20.5
Florida
20.0
7.0
Georgia
20.0
16.5
Hawaii
20.0
5.3
Idaho
20.0
12.3
Illinois
20.0
6.4
Indiana
20.0
11.9
Iowa
20.0
11.4
Kansas
20.0
38.0
Kentucky
20.0
5.6
Louisiana
20.0
7.3
Maine
20.0
5.3
Maryland
20.0
8.0
Massachusetts
20.0
15.2
Michigan
20.0
19.4
Minnesota
20.0
13.7
Mississippi
20.0
6.0
Missouri
20.0
11.5
Montana
20.0
14.5
Nebraska
20.0
15.5
Nevada
20.0
15.3
New Hampshire
20.0
13.4
New Jersey
20.0
12.6
New Mexico
20.0
6.4
New York
20.0
9.5
North Carolina
20.0
16.8
North Dakota
20.0
6.9
Ohio
20.0
14.3
Oklahoma
20.0
13.9
Oregon
20.0
14.6
Pennsylvania
20.0
7.0
Rhode Island
20.0
9.5
South Carolina
20.0
11.5
South Dakota
20.0
7.1
Tennessee
20.0
10.9
Texas
20.0
15.5
Utah
20.0
8.0
Vermont
20.0
12.7
Virginia
20.0
13.1
Washington
20.0
11.7
West Virginia
20.0
13.4
Wisconsin
20.0
8.3
Wyoming
20.0
8.7

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SAMHSA News - September/October 2005, Volume 13, Number 5




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