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SAMHSA News - Volume X, No. 2, Spring 2002
 

SAMHSA Awards New Grants

SAMHSA announced several new grant awards this spring and will continue to make awards throughout the summer. Grants so far include:

  • $5.85 million for eight new awards to help strengthen and expand community-based systems for drug and alcohol addiction identification, referral, and treatment for young people.

Awards were made to: the Inter-tribal Council of Michigan in Sault Ste. Marie, MI; seven counties in greater Louisville, KY; the State Department of Children and Families in Hartford, CT; the Cuyohoga County Board of Commissioners in Cleveland, OH; Codac Behavioral Health Services of Pima County, Inc., of Tucson, AZ; Adolescent Treatment Centers, Inc., of Oakland, CA; Phoenix Programs of New York, Inc., of New York City; and the University of Iowa, Iowa City.

  • $4.4 million awarded for eight Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (ATTCs). These new awards complete the national network of ATTCs, a program of SAMHSA's Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT).

Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (ATTCs) provide state-of-the-art education and training programs about addiction treatment to health care professionals, state and local government officials, and community-based treatment providers.

ATTCs provide state-of-the-art education and training programs about addiction treatment to health care professionals, state and local government officials, and community-based treatment providers. Drawing on current health services research from such sources as the National Institutes of Health as well as SAMHSA's own program evaluations, ATTCs help upgrade standards of professional practice for treatment providers, prepare practitioners to function in managed care settings, and promote the inclusion of addiction treatment training in academic programs.


ATTCs help upgrade standards of professional practice for treatment providers and promote the inclusion of addiction treatment training in academic programs. The ATTC network will now include 14 regional centers and one national coordinating center.

The ATTC network will now include 14 regional centers and one national coordinating center. Grantees include: University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO; University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; University of California, Los Angeles, CA; Universidad Central del Caribe, Bayamon, PR; Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA; Florida Certification Board, Tallahassee, FL.

Seven regional centers, in Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Maryland, Texas, Nevada, and Oregon, were named
in September 2001.

  • $428,384 for three awards to support development of substance abuse treatment services in rural communities experiencing problems with addiction to heroin or prescription pain relief medications containing oxycodone.

The awards will help treatment providers in rural Oregon, rural Maine, and rural Connecticut implement effective treatment strategies that utilize medications, including opioid agonists such as methadone or ORLAAM, in communities where access is limited or nonexistent.

The three projects include a grant of $128,409 to the Oregon Health & Science University to fund an opiate medication initiative for rural residents in Southwest Oregon; a grant of $150,000 to the Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services to implement a culturally appropriate evaluation for Latinos in northwestern Connecticut, near Danbury; and a grant of $149,975 to the Regional Medical Center at Lubec, ME, to confront the crisis in abuse of narcotics in Washington County, ME, by developing and implementing comprehensive treatment services for addicted persons and their families.

For more information visit www.samhsa.gov/grants.

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