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SAMHSA Tribal Consultation

FY 2008 Grants to Tribal Programs

SAMHSA’s Tribal Initiative policy expands Tribal eligibility to more grant programs.  These multi-year grants (starting in FY 2008) are provided to Tribal organizations that serve American Indians and Alaska Natives.  The grants support a wide range of culturally relevant programs for promoting better mental health, substance abuse prevention and treatment and recovery support.

The Dena Nena dba Tanana Chiefs Conference of Fairbanks, Alaska – $2.1 million in the first year and $10.2 million over the next five years to expand its Chief Andrew Isaac Health Center’s Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment capacities.  These expanded capabilities are projected to help at least 10,000 patients over the next five years.

Gila River Behavioral Health Authority Youth Suicide Prevention Project, The Gila River Indian Community, Sacaton, Ariz. -- $496,889 for the first year to provide suicide prevention and intervention services through Saving Lives for Tomorrow.

Omaha Nation Community Response Team - Project Hope, Walthill, Neb. --  $500,000 for the first year to build on prior suicide prevention efforts in order to develop and implement a tribal youth suicide prevention initiative grounded in strong partnerships and collaborations. 

Mescalero Apache School Youth Suicide Prevention and Early Intervention Initiative, Mescalero, N.M. -- $432,282 for the first year to implement and evaluate a comprehensive early intervention and suicide prevention model.

Wiconi Wakan Health & Healing Center, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Rosebud, S.D. -- $477,570 for the first year to establish the Wiconi Wakan  Health & Healing Center, a place to implement the Tribal Youth Suicide Prevention and Early Intervention Project Plan. 

Circle of Trust Youth Suicide Prevention Program, The Confederated Salish Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Indian Nation, Pablo, Mont. -- $166,667 for the first year to implement a prevention project that will include both CSKT members and nonmembers.

Preserving Life: Nevada Tribal Youth Suicide Prevention Initiative, Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada, Sparks, Nev. -- $500,000 for the first year to support, expand, and enhance suicide prevention efforts within the communities of the Nevada Tribes by implementing goals in the three areas of interest of the Indian Health Service Suicide Prevention Plan--Awareness, Interventions, and Methodology. 

Youth Suicide Prevention, The Crow Creek Sioux Tribe, Ft. Thompson, S.D. -- $450,390 for the first year to enhance the Tribe’s suicide prevention strategies and meet the objectives of its suicide prevention plan. 

Tribal Youth Suicide Prevention Program, Oglala Sioux Tribe, Pine Ridge, S.D. -- $500,000 for the first year to develop and implement a comprehensive and sustainable program to prevent suicide.

Wiconi Ohitika Project, Cankdeska Cikana Community College, Fort Totten, N.D. -- $485,857 for the first year to provide suicide prevention for the Spirit Lake Nation. 

Sault Tribe Alive Youth (STAY) Project, Sault Ste. Marie Tribe Chippewa Indians,  Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. -- $500,000 for the first year to work with tribal and nontribal stakeholders to develop and implement a broad-based, culturally competent suicide prevention and early intervention program. 

Bering Strait Suicide Prevention Program, Kawerak, Inc., Nome, Alaska -- $500,000 for the first year to assist villages in developing prevention strategies through capacity building, education, training, and strong interdisciplinary collaboration and elder guidance. 

Native Youth Suicide Prevention Project, Native American Rehabilitation Association, Portland, Ore. -- $500,000 for the first year to expand and strengthen youth suicide prevention networks.

Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewas’ Red Cliff Project LAUNCH -- $915,200. This project will build a supportive, family-driven system of child services by blending traditional tribal values and evidenced-based practices.

American Indian Center Circle of Care
American Indian Center of Chicago
-- $257,326 for the first year to enable the Center to develop an infrastructure for a collaborative, community-driven mental health system of care for Chicago's American Indian/Alaska Native youth at-risk for, or suffering from, serious mental illness.

Crow Creek Sioux Tribe Circles of Care
Crow Creek Sioux Tribe, Fort Thompson, S.D.
-- $285,860 for the first year to design a holistic mental health service delivery system in which service will be provided to youth and their families in a coordinated manner.

Pueblo of San Felipe Children's Mental Health Systems of Care Development Project
San Felipe Pueblo, N.M.
-- $292,440 for the first year to build on the progress already made toward improving health care programs by assessing, designing and implementing a system of care for children with serious emotional and mental health problems.

Yav pa anav (The medicine is good)
Karuk Tribe, Happy Camp, Calif.
-- $116,157 for the first year to strengthen communities by increasing the access to and availability of culturally appropriate behavioral health, wellness offerings, and primary care services.

Standing Rock Circles of Care Grant
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Fort Yates, N.D.
-- $305,875 for the first year to develop a project that will assist the tribe, the communities, and the tribal members in the transformation of the mental health systems for children.

Nebraska Urban Indian Centers System of Care Program
Indian Center, Inc., Lincoln, Neb.
-- $305,875 for the first year to provide the urban Indian communities with tools and resources to plan and design a holistic, community-based system of care to support mental health and wellness for youth and their families.

Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation
Mashantucket, Conn.
-- $305,875 for the first year to collaborate with the Clifford Beers Clinic to plan, design, and assess the feasibility of implementing a culturally appropriate mental health service model for youth and their families

American Indian Health and Family Services
Gda'shkitoomi (We are able)
Detroit, Mich.
-- $270,421 for the first year to create an integrative culturally appropriate system of wellness by conducting an in-depth gap analysis of the systems of care impacting the mental health and wellness of American Indian children and their families.

Native American Center, Inc., Oakland, Calif.  -- $450,000 for the first year to implement evidence-based treatment practices such as case management, substance abuse counseling, HIV testing and mental health referrals.

Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, Talihina – This grantee will receive $500,000 for the first year to expand comprehensive culturally sensitive high-quality residential treatment services for low-income Native women in Oklahoma who are impacted by the effects of substance abuse. Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma is a federally recognized tribe.

Chippewa Cree Tribe, Box Elder, Montana  -- $282,233 for the first year to expand treatment services, increase access and availability of services, reduce substance abuse among adult non-violent offenders and increase successful rehabilitation.

To Expand & Enhance Treatment to American Indian Adolescents Experiencing SED, Okmulgee, Okla.  --  $1,000,000 for the first year of funding to provide treatment and support services, employ individualized treatment plans and intensive case management

Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board, Portland, Ore.  -- $1,000,000 for the first year of funding to develop an integrated, holistic and culturally-relevant system of care for urban American Indian/Alaska Native children and youth.

Lummi Nation, Bellingham, Wash. -- $1,000,000 for the first year to fund a Lummi System of Care will utilize the concept of lineage as a culturally based wrap-around services for children with serious mental health needs, creating an infrastructure change that results in a culturally based system of care.

Fairbanks Native Association, Fairbanks, Alaska -- $250,000 for the first year of funding to decrease substance use and/or abuse among Native people, improve the mental and physical health of Native clients, and improve family functioning and quality of life.

Native American Health Center, Inc., Oakland, Calif.  -- $250,000 for the first year of funding to integrate substance abuse, mental health and family services, positive parenting education and traditional cultural practices for adults with co-occurring substance and mental health disorders.

Grand Traverse Bank of Ottawa and Chippewa, Suttons Bay, Mich. -- $244,568 for the first year of funding to implement the Teaching Family Model Home Project aimed to reduce youth substance abuse and related criminal behavior; strengthen family support systems, and facilitate self-sufficiency through the enhancement of self-esteem, skill development and interpersonal relationships.

Montana-Wyoming Tribal Leaders Council, Billings, Mont. -- $187,782 for the first year of funding to implement treatment plans coordinate with the chemical dependency programs at a tribal facility so that clients can experience a consistent set of interventions and philosophy.

Confederated Salish and Kootenai, Pablo, Mont.  -- $249,581 for the first year of funding to provide clinical intervention; expand substance abuse services through the hiring of additional chemical dependency counselors and connecting substance abuse treatment clients with other support services in the community

Omaha Nation Community, Walthill, Neb.  -- $250,000 for the first year of funding to provide intensive outpatient treatment to address the unmet needs of youth ages 12-18 years regarding substance abuse and co-occurring disorders.

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Fort Yates, N.D.. -- $250,000 for the first year of funding to further reveal and correct substance abuse and behavioral health treatment disparities and provide for appropriate services within the context of the Standing Rock Sioux culture.

PRC Inc., Parshall, N.D.  -- $247,264 for the first year of funding to provide services which will include social detoxification, drug toxicity screening, cultural education, outreach and diagnosis of co-occurring mental health disorders.

Muscogee Creek Nation, Okmulgee, Okla. -- $250,000 for the first year of funding to expand the provision of substance abuse treatment services currently offered to American Indian adolescents who reside in rural Oklahoma. 

Osage Nation, Pawhuska, Okla. -- $250,000 for the first year of funding will expand the provision of substance abuse treatment services to American Indian adolescents.

Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma, Tonkawa, Okla. -- $250,000 for the first year of funding to enhance the provision of substance abuse treatment services currently offered to American Indian adolescents who reside in rural Oklahoma.


Last Update: 10/27/2008