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Alt Tags – Results from the 2013
National Survey on Drug Use and Health:
Mental Health Findings

Figures

Chapter 2

Figure 2.1. Figure 2.1 is titled "Any Mental Illness in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Age and Gender: 2013." It is a bar graph, where age in years and gender are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with any mental illness (AMI) in the past year is shown on the vertical axis.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with past year AMI was 18.5 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 to 25 with past year AMI was 19.4 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 26 to 49 with past year AMI was 21.5 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 50 or older with past year AMI was 15.3 percent.

The percentage of males aged 18 or older with past year AMI was 14.4 percent.

The percentage of females aged 18 or older with past year AMI was 22.3 percent.

Return to Figure 2.1.

Figure 2.2. Figure 2.2 is titled "Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Age and Gender: 2013." It is a bar graph, where age in years and gender are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with serious mental illness (SMI) in the past year is shown on the vertical axis.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with past year SMI was 4.2 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 to 25 with past year SMI was 4.2 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 26 to 49 with past year SMI was 5.3 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 50 or older with past year SMI was 3.2 percent.

The percentage of males aged 18 or older with past year SMI was 3.5 percent.

The percentage of females aged 18 or older with past year SMI was 4.9 percent.

Return to Figure 2.2.

Figure 2.3. Figure 2.3 is titled "Major Depressive Episode in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Age and Gender: 2013." It is a bar graph, where age in years and gender are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with major depressive episode (MDE) in the past year is shown on the vertical axis.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with past year MDE was 6.7 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 to 25 with past year MDE was 8.7 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 26 to 49 with past year MDE was 7.6 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 50 or older with past year MDE was 5.1 percent.

The percentage of males aged 18 or older with past year MDE was 5.1 percent.

The percentage of females aged 18 or older with past year MDE was 8.1 percent.

Return to Figure 2.3.

Figure 2.4. Figure 2.4 is titled "Receipt of Treatment for Major Depressive Episode in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older Who Had a Major Depressive Episode in the Past Year, by Age and Gender: 2013." It is a bar graph, where age in years and gender are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage receiving treatment for major depressive episode (MDE) in the past year is shown on the vertical axis.

Among adults aged 18 or older who had an MDE in the past year, the percentages who received treatment are as follows:

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with past year receipt of treatment for MDE was 68.6 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 to 25 with past year receipt of treatment for MDE was 50.8 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 26 to 49 with past year receipt of treatment for MDE was 66.7 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 50 or older with past year receipt of treatment for MDE was 81.3 percent.

The percentage of males aged 18 or older with past year receipt of treatment for MDE was 60.1 percent.

The percentage of females aged 18 or older with past year receipt of treatment for MDE was 73.6 percent.

Return to Figure 2.4.

Figure 2.5. Figure 2.5 is titled "Type of Professional Seen among Adults Aged 18 or Older with a Major Depressive Episode Who Received Treatment in the Past Year: 2013." It is a bar graph, where the percentage among adults with major depressive episode (MDE) who received treatment in the past year is shown on the horizontal axis and the types of professionals seen are shown on the vertical axis. Ten types of professionals are shown: (1) general practitioner or family doctor; (2) psychiatrist or psychotherapist; (3) psychologist; (4) counselor; (5) religious or spiritual advisor (includes ministers, priests, or rabbis); (6) social worker; (7) other medical doctor (includes cardiologists, gynecologists, urologists, and other medical doctors who are not general practitioners or family doctors); (8) nurse, occupational therapist, or other health professional; (9) other mental health professional (includes mental health nurses and other therapists where type is not specified); and (10) herbalist, chiropractor, acupuncturist, or massage therapist.

Among adults aged 18 or older with an MDE who received treatment in the past year, the following percentages of adults received mental health services from the following types of professionals: 57.2 percent saw a general practitioner or family doctor; 35.0 percent saw a psychiatrist or psychotherapist; 31.8 percent saw a psychologist; 24.4 percent saw a counselor; 14.5 percent saw a religious or spiritual advisor; 12.5 percent saw a social worker; 11.4 percent saw some other medical doctor; 7.4 percent saw a nurse, occupational therapist, or other health professional; 7.1 percent saw some other mental health professional; and 6.4 percent saw an herbalist, chiropractor, acupuncturist, or massage therapist.

Return to Figure 2.5.

Figure 2.6. Figure 2.6 is titled "Past Year Mental Health Service Use among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Type of Care: 2002-2013." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage using mental health services in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each of the mental health service use categories (any type of care, prescription medication, outpatient, and inpatient), there is a line showing service use over the years 2002 through 2013. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2013 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older using any type of mental health service in the past year was 13.0 percent in 2002, 13.2 percent in 2003, 12.8 percent in 2004, 13.0 percent in 2005, 12.9 percent in 2006, 13.3 percent in 2007, 13.5 percent in 2008, 13.4 percent in 2009, 13.8 percent in 2010, 13.6 percent in 2011, 14.5 percent in 2012, and 14.6 percent in 2013. The differences between the 2013 estimate and the 2002 through 2011 estimates were statistically significant.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older taking prescription medication for mental health issues in the past year was 10.5 percent in 2002, 10.9 percent in 2003, 10.5 percent in 2004, 10.7 percent in 2005, 10.9 percent in 2006, 11.2 percent in 2007, 11.4 percent in 2008, 11.3 percent in 2009, 11.7 percent in 2010, 11.5 percent in 2011, 12.4 percent in 2012, and 12.5 percent in 2013. The differences between the 2013 estimate and the 2002 through 2011 estimates were statistically significant.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older receiving outpatient services for mental health issues in the past year was 7.4 percent in 2002, 7.1 percent in both 2003 and 2004, 6.8 percent in 2005, 6.7 percent in 2006, 7.0 percent in 2007, 6.8 percent in 2008, 6.4 percent in 2009, 6.6 percent in 2010, 6.7 percent in 2011, and 6.6 percent in both 2012 and 2013. The difference between the 2013 estimate and the 2002 estimate was statistically significant.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older receiving inpatient services for mental health issues in the past year was 0.7 percent in 2002; 0.8 percent in 2003; 0.9 percent in 2004; 1.0 percent in 2005; 0.7 percent in 2006; 1.0 percent in 2007; 0.9 percent in 2008; 0.8 percent in 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012; and 0.9 percent in 2013. The differences between the 2013 estimate and the 2002 and 2006 estimates were statistically significant.

Return to Figure 2.6.

Figure 2.7. Figure 2.7 is titled "Receipt of Mental Health Services among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Level of Mental Illness: 2013." It is a bar graph, where the levels of mental illness are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage receiving mental health services in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. The levels of mental illness are any mental illness (AMI), serious mental illness (SMI), moderate mental illness, low (mild) mental illness, and no mental illness.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with past year AMI who received mental health services in the past year was 44.7 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with past year SMI who received mental health services in the past year was 68.5 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with past year moderate mental illness who received mental health services in the past year was 48.9 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with past year low (mild) mental illness who received mental health services in the past year was 31.9 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with no past year mental illness who received mental health services in the past year was 7.8 percent.

Return to Figure 2.7.

Figure 2.8. Figure 2.8 is titled "Number of Types of Mental Health Services Received among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Past Year Any Mental Illness Who Received Mental Health Services in the Past Year: 2013." It is a pie chart, with the following label below the chart: "19.6 Million Adults with Any Mental Illness (AMI) Who Received Mental Health Services." The pie chart shows the percentages of the number of the three types of mental health care received in the past year for AMI. Two notes are below the chart. The first note says, "The three types of mental health care are receiving inpatient care, outpatient care, or prescription medication." The second note says, "The percentages do not add to 100 percent due to rounding."

Of the 19.6 million adults with AMI who received mental health services in the past year, 55.9 percent received one type of mental health care, 39.2 percent received two types of mental health care, and 5.0 percent received all three types of mental health care.

Return to Figure 2.8.

Figure 2.9. Figure 2.9 is titled "Number of Types of Mental Health Services Received among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Past Year Serious Mental Illness Who Received Mental Health Services in the Past Year: 2013." It is a pie chart, with the following label below the chart: "6.9 Million Adults with Serious Mental Illness (SMI) Who Received Mental Health Services." The pie chart shows the percentages of the number of the three types of mental health care received in the past year for SMI. A note below the chart says, "The three types of mental health care are receiving inpatient care, outpatient care, or prescription medication."

Of the 6.9 million adults with SMI who received mental health services in the past year, 37.9 percent received one type of mental health care, 52.9 percent received two types of mental health care, and 9.2 percent received all three types of mental health care.

Return to Figure 2.9.

Figure 2.10. Figure 2.10 is titled "Reasons for Not Receiving Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with a Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Care Who Did Not Receive Mental Health Services: 2013." It is a bar graph, where the percentage reporting a reason is shown on the horizontal axis and the reasons for not receiving mental health services are shown on the vertical axis. Fourteen reasons are shown: (1) could not afford cost, (2) thought could handle the problem without treatment, (3) did not know where to go for services, (4) did not have time, (5) might cause neighbors or community to have a negative opinion, (6) did not feel need for treatment at the time, (7) treatment would not help, (8) fear of being committed or having to take medicine, (9) health insurance did not cover enough treatment, (10) concerned about confidentiality, (11) might have a negative effect on their job, (12) did not want others to find out, (13) health insurance did not cover any treatment, and (14) no transportation or it was inconvenient.

Among adults aged 18 or older with a perceived unmet need for mental health care who did not receive mental health services in the past year, the following percentages of adults did not receive mental health services for the following reasons: 48.3 percent because they could not afford the cost, 26.5 percent because they thought they could handle the problem without treatment, 24.6 percent because they did not know where to go for services, 15.8 percent because they did not have the time, 10.3 percent because they thought it might cause their neighbors or community to have a negative opinion, 10.1 percent because they did not feel need for treatment at the time, 9.2 percent because they thought treatment would not help, 9.1 percent because they had a fear of being committed or having to take medicine, 8.9 percent because their health insurance did not cover enough treatment, 8.3 percent because they were concerned about confidentiality, 7.8 percent because they thought it might have a negative effect on their job, 6.3 percent because they did not want others to find out, 6.2 percent because health insurance did not cover any treatment, and 2.8 percent because they had no transportation or it was inconvenient.

Return to Figure 2.10.

Figure 2.11. Figure 2.11 is titled "Reasons for Not Receiving Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Past Year Any Mental Illness and a Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Care Who Did Not Receive Mental Health Services: 2013." It is a bar graph, where the percentage reporting a reason is shown on the horizontal axis and the reasons for not receiving mental health services are shown on the vertical axis. Fourteen reasons are shown: (1) could not afford cost, (2) did not know where to go for services, (3) thought could handle the problem without treatment, (4) did not have time, (5) treatment would not help, (6) might cause neighbors or community to have a negative opinion, (7) fear of being committed or having to take medicine, (8) concerned about confidentiality, (9) health insurance did not cover enough treatment, (10) might have a negative effect on their job, (11) did not feel need for treatment at the time, (12) did not want others to find out, (13) health insurance did not cover any treatment, and (14) no transportation or it was inconvenient.

Among adults aged 18 or older with past year any mental illness and a perceived unmet need for mental health care who did not receive mental health services in the past year, the following percentages of adults did not receive mental health services for the following reasons: 55.3 percent because they could not afford the cost, 25.5 percent because they did not know where to go for services, 24.6 percent because they thought they could handle the problem without treatment, 14.8 percent because they did not have the time, 11.1 percent because they thought treatment would not help, 11.0 percent because they thought it might cause their neighbors or community to have a negative opinion, 11.0 percent because they had a fear of being committed or having to take medicine, 10.7 percent because they were concerned about confidentiality, 9.6 percent because their health insurance did not cover enough treatment, 8.7 percent because they thought it might have a negative effect on their job, 8.1 percent because they did not feel need for treatment at the time, 6.8 percent because they did not want others to find out, 6.7 percent because health insurance did not cover any treatment, and 3.6 percent because they had no transportation or it was inconvenient.

Return to Figure 2.11.

Figure 2.12. Figure 2.12 is titled "Reasons for Not Receiving Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older with Past Year Serious Mental Illness and a Perceived Unmet Need for Mental Health Care Who Did Not Receive Mental Health Services: 2013." It is a bar graph, where the percentage reporting a reason is shown on the horizontal axis and the reasons for not receiving mental health services are shown on the vertical axis. Fourteen reasons are shown: (1) could not afford cost, (2) did not know where to go for services, (3) thought could handle the problem without treatment, (4) fear of being committed or having to take medicine, (5) concerned about confidentiality, (6) treatment would not help, (7) did not have time, (8) might cause neighbors or community to have a negative opinion, (9) might have a negative effect on their job, (10) health insurance did not cover enough treatment, (11) did not want others to find out, (12) no transportation or it was inconvenient, (13) health insurance did not cover any treatment, and (14) did not feel need for treatment at the time.

Among adults aged 18 or older with past year serious mental illness and a perceived unmet need for mental health care who did not receive mental health services in the past year, the following percentages of adults did not receive mental health services for the following reasons: 61.1 percent because they could not afford the cost, 27.1 percent because they did not know where to go for services, 19.8 percent because they thought they could handle the problem without treatment, 19.8 percent because they had a fear of being committed or having to take medicine, 13.7 percent because they were concerned about confidentiality, 13.2 percent because they thought treatment would not help, 12.3 percent because they did not have the time, 11.2 percent because they thought it might cause their neighbors or community to have a negative opinion, 10.4 percent because they thought it might have a negative effect on their job, 8.5 percent because their health insurance did not cover enough treatment, 7.9 percent because they did not want others to find out, 7.0 percent because they had no transportation or it was inconvenient, 6.9 percent because health insurance did not cover any treatment, and 3.8 percent because they did not feel need for treatment at the time.

Return to Figure 2.12.

Chapter 3

Figure 3.1. Figure 3.1 is titled "Suicidal Thoughts in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Age and Gender: 2013." It is a bar graph, where age in years and gender are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with suicidal thoughts in the past year is shown on the vertical axis.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with suicidal thoughts in the past year was 3.9 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 to 25 with suicidal thoughts in the past year was 7.4 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 26 to 49 with suicidal thoughts in the past year was 4.0 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 50 or older with suicidal thoughts in the past year was 2.7 percent.

The percentage of males aged 18 or older with suicidal thoughts in the past year was 3.8 percent.

The percentage of females aged 18 or older with suicidal thoughts in the past year was 4.0 percent.

Return to Figure 3.1.

Figure 3.2. Figure 3.2 is titled "Suicidal Thoughts and Behavior in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older: 2013." It is a Venn diagram, where the outer circle represents the number in millions of adults who had serious thoughts of committing suicide and the overlapping inner circles represent the following categories of suicidal thoughts and behavior: (1) made suicide plans, (2) attempted suicide, (3) made plans and attempted suicide, and (4) made no plans and attempted suicide.

Of the 9.3 million adults aged 18 or older who had serious thoughts of committing suicide in the past year, 2.7 million made suicide plans, 1.3 million attempted suicide, 1.1 million made plans and attempted suicide, and 0.2 million made no plans and attempted suicide.

Return to Figure 3.2.

Figure 3.3. Figure 3.3 is titled "Suicidal Thoughts in the Past Year among Full-Time College Students Aged 18 to 22 and Other Adults Aged 18 to 22, by Gender: 2013." It is a bar graph, where the total adults aged 18 to 22, males, and females are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with suicidal thoughts in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each gender category, there is a bar for full-time college students and a bar for other adults aged 18 to 22. A footnote on the label for the "Other Adults Aged 18 to 22" bar says, "Other adults include respondents aged 18 to 22 not enrolled in school, enrolled in college part time, enrolled in other grades either full or part time, or enrolled with no other information available."

The percentage of total full-time college students aged 18 to 22 with suicidal thoughts in the past year was 8.0 percent. The percentage of total other adults aged 18 to 22 with suicidal thoughts in the past year was 8.7 percent.

The percentage of male full-time college students aged 18 to 22 with suicidal thoughts in the past year was 7.1 percent. The percentage of male other adults aged 18 to 22 with suicidal thoughts in the past year was 7.6 percent.

The percentage of female full-time college students aged 18 to 22 with suicidal thoughts in the past year was 8.7 percent. The percentage of female other adults aged 18 to 22 with suicidal thoughts in the past year was 10.1 percent.

Return to Figure 3.3.

Figure 3.4. Figure 3.4 is titled "Suicidal Thoughts in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Past Year Use of Selected Illicit Drugs: 2013." It is a bar graph, where the percentage of adults aged 18 or older with suicidal thoughts in the past year is shown on the horizontal axis while all adults and those with past year use of selected illicit drugs are shown on the vertical axis. Ten categories of illicit drug users are shown: (1) users of any illicit drug, (2) users of marijuana, (3) users of hallucinogens, (4) users of cocaine, (5) users of inhalants, (6) users of heroin, (7) nonmedical users of pain relievers, (8) nonmedical users of sedatives, (9) nonmedical users of tranquilizers, and (10) nonmedical users of stimulants. A note below the graph says, "Illicit Drugs include marijuana/hashish, cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or prescription-type psychotherapeutics used nonmedically." Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between users of selected categories of illicit drugs and all adults; significant results are indicated where appropriate.

The percentages of adults in 2013 who had suicidal thoughts in the past year were 3.9 percent among all adults, 9.4 percent among past year users of illicit drugs, 9.3 percent among past year users of marijuana, 13.0 percent among past year users of hallucinogens, 13.5 percent among past year users of cocaine, 19.4 percent among past year users of inhalants, 20.7 percent among past year users of heroin, 13.1 percent among past year nonmedical users of pain relievers, 14.8 percent among past year nonmedical users of sedatives, 15.7 percent among past year nonmedical users of tranquilizers, and 16.0 percent among past year nonmedical users of stimulants. The difference between the estimate for all adults and each estimate for the 10 categories of users of selected illicit drugs was statistically significant.

Return to Figure 3.4.

Figure 3.5. Figure 3.5 is titled "Suicidal Thoughts and Behavior in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Substance Dependence or Abuse: 2013." It is a bar graph, where three behaviors (had serious thoughts of suicide, made any suicide plans, and attempted suicide) are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with suicidal thoughts and behavior in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each behavior, there is a bar representing those who had drug or alcohol dependence or abuse and a bar representing those who did not have drug or alcohol dependence or abuse.

Among adults aged 18 or older who had drug or alcohol dependence or abuse in the past year, 11.4 percent had serious thoughts of suicide, 4.2 percent made any suicide plans, and 2.3 percent attempted suicide in the past year.

Among adults aged 18 or older with no past year drug or alcohol dependence or abuse, 3.2 percent had serious thoughts of suicide, 0.9 percent made any suicide plans, and 0.4 percent attempted suicide in the past year.

Return to Figure 3.5.

Chapter 4

Figure 4.1. Figure 4.1 is titled "Major Depressive Episode in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by Severe Impairment, Age, and Gender: 2013." It is a bar graph, where the age in years and gender are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with major depressive episode (MDE) in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. Each bar is divided into two sections: (1) MDE with severe impairment and (2) MDE without severe impairment. The section of each bar for MDE without severe impairment indicates the difference between the percentage who had past year MDE and the percentage who had MDE with severe impairment. A note below the figure says, "Respondents with an unknown level of impairment were included in the estimates for Major Depressive Episode without Severe Impairment."

The percentage of youths aged 12 to 17 with MDE in the past year was 10.7 percent, including 7.7 percent who had MDE with severe impairment.

The percentage of youths aged 12 with MDE in the past year was 4.4 percent, including 2.7 percent who had MDE with severe impairment.

The percentage of youths aged 13 with MDE in the past year was 7.6 percent, including 5.3 percent who had MDE with severe impairment.

The percentage of youths aged 14 with MDE in the past year was 11.0 percent, including 8.4 percent who had MDE with severe impairment.

The percentage of youths aged 15 with MDE in the past year was 13.8 percent, including 9.8 percent who had MDE with severe impairment.

The percentage of youths aged 16 with MDE in the past year was 13.1 percent, including 9.7 percent who had MDE with severe impairment.

The percentage of youths aged 17 with MDE in the past year was 13.2 percent, including 9.6 percent who had MDE with severe impairment.

The percentage of male youths aged 12 to 17 with MDE in the past year was 5.3 percent, including 3.5 percent who had MDE with severe impairment.

The percentage of female youths aged 12 to 17 with MDE in the past year was 16.2 percent, including 12.0 percent who had MDE with severe impairment.

Return to Figure 4.1.

Figure 4.2. Figure 4.2 is titled "Major Depressive Episode in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by Gender: 2004-2013." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with major depressive episode (MDE) in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. Lines for youths aged 12 to 17, males, and females showing past year MDE appear over the years 2004 through 2013. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2013 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate.

The percentage of youths aged 12 to 17 with MDE in the past year was 9.0 percent in 2004, 8.8 percent in 2005, 7.9 percent in 2006, 8.2 percent in 2007, 8.3 percent in 2008, 8.1 percent in 2009, 8.0 percent in 2010, 8.2 percent in 2011, 9.1 percent in 2012, and 10.7 percent in 2013. The differences between the 2013 estimate and the 2004 through 2012 estimates were statistically significant.

The percentage of female youths aged 12 to 17 with MDE in the past year was 13.1 percent in 2004, 13.3 percent in 2005, 11.8 percent in 2006, 11.9 percent in 2007, 12.5 percent in 2008, 11.7 percent in 2009, 11.9 percent in 2010, 12.1 percent in 2011, 13.7 percent in 2012, and 16.2 percent in 2013. The differences between the 2013 estimate and the 2004 through 2012 estimates were statistically significant.

The percentage of male youths aged 12 to 17 with MDE in the past year was 5.0 percent in 2004, 4.5 percent in 2005, 4.2 percent in 2006, 4.6 percent in 2007, 4.3 percent in 2008, 4.7 percent in 2009, 4.4 percent in 2010, 4.5 percent in 2011, 4.7 percent in 2012, and 5.3 percent in 2013. The differences between the 2013 estimate and the 2005, 2006, 2008, and 2010 estimates were statistically significant.

Return to Figure 4.2.

Figure 4.3. Figure 4.3 is titled "Major Depressive Episode with Severe Impairment in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by Gender: 2006-2013." It is a line graph, where the survey years are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage who had major depressive episode (MDE) with severe impairment in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. Lines for youths aged 12 to 17, males, and females showing past year MDE with severe impairment appear over the years 2006 through 2013. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2013 and each of the previous years listed; significant results are indicated where appropriate.

The percentage of youths aged 12 to 17 who had MDE with severe impairment in the past year was 5.5 percent in both 2006 and 2007, 6.0 percent in 2008, 5.8 percent in 2009, 5.7 percent in both 2010 and 2011, 6.3 percent in 2012, and 7.7 percent in 2013. The differences between the 2013 estimate and the 2006 through 2012 estimates were statistically significant.

The percentage of female youths aged 12 to 17 who had MDE with severe impairment in the past year was 8.4 percent in 2006, 8.2 percent in 2007, 9.3 percent in 2008, 8.6 percent in 2009, 8.2 percent in 2010, 8.3 percent in 2011, 9.8 percent in 2012, and 12.0 percent in 2013. The differences between the 2013 estimate and the 2006 through 2012 estimates were statistically significant.

The percentage of male youths aged 12 to 17 who had MDE with severe impairment in the past year was 2.6 percent in 2006, 3.0 percent in 2007, 2.9 percent in 2008, 3.2 percent in 2009 through 2011, 3.0 percent in 2012, and 3.5 percent in 2013. The difference between the 2013 estimate and the 2006 estimate was statistically significant.

Return to Figure 4.3.

Figure 4.4. Figure 4.4 is titled "Type of Treatment Received for Major Depressive Episode in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by Gender: 2013." It is a bar graph, where three types of treatment received for major depressive episode (MDE) are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage receiving treatment in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each treatment category (saw or talked to a health professional only, used prescription medication only, and saw or talked to a health professional and used prescription medication), there is a bar for all youths aged 12 to 17, a bar for males, and a bar for females. A note below the graph says, "Health Professionals include general practitioner or family doctor; other medical doctor (e.g., cardiologist, gynecologist, urologist); psychologist; psychiatrist or psychotherapist; social worker; counselor; other mental health professional (e.g., mental health nurse or other therapist where type is not specified); and nurse, occupational therapist, or other health professional."

The percentage who saw or talked to a health professional only in the past year was 20.4 percent among all youths aged 12 to 17, 12.5 percent among male youths aged 12 to 17, and 23.1 percent among female youths aged 12 to 17.

The percentage who used prescription medication only in the past year was 3.7 percent among all youths aged 12 to 17, 4.0 percent among male youths aged 12 to 17, and 3.5 percent among female youths aged 12 to 17.

The percentage who saw or talked to a health professional and used prescription medication in the past year was 12.3 percent among all youths aged 12 to 17, 10.4 percent among male youths aged 12 to 17, and 13.0 percent among female youths aged 12 to 17.

Return to Figure 4.4.

Figure 4.5. Figure 4.5 is titled "Reasons for Receiving Specialty Mental Health Services among Youths Aged 12 to 17 Who Received Mental Health Services in the Past Year: 2013." It is a bar graph, where the percentage among youths who received specialty mental health services in the past year is shown on the horizontal axis and the reasons for receiving specialty mental health services are shown on the vertical axis. Twelve reasons are shown: (1) felt depressed, (2) had problems with home or family, (3) thought about killing self or tried to kill self, (4) felt very afraid and tense, (5) broke rules and "acted out," (6) had problems at school, (7) had trouble controlling anger, (8) had problems with friends, (9) had eating problems, (10) had problems with people other than family or friends, (11) got into physical fights, and (12) had other diagnosed mental or neurological disorder.

Among youths aged 12 to 17 who received specialty mental health services in the past year, the following percentages of youths received mental health services for the following reasons: 50.2 percent felt depressed, 28.2 percent had problems with home or family, 25.2 percent thought about killing self or tried to kill self, 22.4 percent felt very afraid and tense, 20.3 percent broke rules and "acted out," 18.2 percent had problems at school, 15.9 percent had trouble controlling anger, 11.5 percent had problems with friends, 10.6 percent had eating problems, 8.7 percent had problems with people other than family or friends, 3.2 percent got into physical fights, and 2.7 percent had other diagnosed mental or neurological disorder.

Return to Figure 4.5.

Figure 4.6. Figure 4.6 is titled "Past Year Mental Health Service Use among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by Gender: 2012 and 2013." It is a bar graph, where four mental health service use categories are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage using mental health services in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each mental health service use category (outpatient specialty mental health, inpatient specialty mental health, education, and general medicine), there is a bar for males and females for both years 2012 and 2013. Tests of statistical significance at the .05 level were performed between 2013 and 2012; significant results are indicated where appropriate.

Among male youths aged 12 to 17, the percentage using outpatient specialty mental health services in the past year was 8.7 percent in 2012 and 9.2 percent in 2013. Among female youths aged 12 to 17, the percentage using outpatient specialty mental health services in the past year was 14.5 percent in 2012 and 15.9 percent in 2013. The difference between the 2013 estimate and the 2012 estimate for females aged 12 to 17 was statistically significant.

Among male youths aged 12 to 17, the percentage using inpatient specialty mental health services in the past year was 2.2 percent in 2012 and 2.3 percent in 2013. Among female youths aged 12 to 17, the percentage using inpatient specialty mental health services in the past year was 2.3 percent in 2012 and 2.4 percent in 2013.

Among male youths aged 12 to 17, the percentage using mental health services in an education setting in the past year was 10.7 percent in 2012 and 11.4 percent in 2013. Among female youths aged 12 to 17, the percentage using mental health services in an education setting in the past year was 15.2 percent in 2012 and 14.6 percent in 2013.

Among male youths aged 12 to 17, the percentage using mental health services in a general medical-based setting in the past year was 1.7 percent in 2012 and 2.4 percent in 2013. The difference between the 2013 estimate and the 2012 estimate for males aged 12 to 17 was statistically significant. Among female youths aged 12 to 17, the percentage using mental health services in a general medical-based setting in the past year was 3.4 percent in 2012 and 3.2 percent in 2013.

Return to Figure 4.6.

Figure 4.7. Figure 4.7 is titled "Number of Outpatient Visits in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17 Who Received Outpatient Specialty Mental Health Services: 2013." It is a pie chart, with the following label below the chart: "3.1 Million Youths Who Received Outpatient Specialty Mental Health Services." The pie chart shows the percentages of the number of outpatient visits among youths aged 12 to 17 who received outpatient specialty mental health services in the past year.

Among youths aged 12 to 17 who received outpatient specialty mental health services in the past year, 16.1 percent had 1 visit, 14.0 percent had 2 visits, 27.7 percent had 3 to 6 visits, 28.4 percent had 7 to 24 visits, and 13.8 percent had 25 or more visits.

Return to Figure 4.7.

Chapter 5

Figure 5.1. Figure 5.1 is titled "Past Year Substance Use among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Any Mental Illness: 2013." It is a bar graph, where seven substance use types (illicit drugs, marijuana, psychotherapeutics, cocaine, hallucinogens, inhalants, and heroin) are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage using the substance is shown on the vertical axis. For each substance use type, there is a bar representing those who had mental illness in the past year and a bar representing those who did not have mental illness in the past year. A footnote on the label for the "Illicit Drugs" bars states, "Illicit Drugs include marijuana/hashish, cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or prescription-type psychotherapeutics used nonmedically."

Among adults aged 18 or older, 27.6 percent of those who had mental illness in the past year and 13.0 percent of those who did not have mental illness in the past year used illicit drugs in the past year.

Among adults aged 18 or older, 20.9 percent of those who had mental illness in the past year and 10.6 percent of those who did not have mental illness in the past year used marijuana in the past year.

Among adults aged 18 or older, 13.0 percent of those who had mental illness in the past year and 4.2 percent of those who did not have mental illness in the past year used psychotherapeutics nonmedically in the past year.

Among adults aged 18 or older, 3.9 percent of those who had mental illness in the past year and 1.2 percent of those who did not have mental illness in the past year used cocaine in the past year.

Among adults aged 18 or older, 3.4 percent of those who had mental illness in the past year and 1.3 percent of those who did not have mental illness in the past year used hallucinogens in the past year.

Among adults aged 18 or older, 1.0 percent of those who had mental illness in the past year and 0.3 percent of those who did not have mental illness in the past year used inhalants in the past year.

Among adults aged 18 or older, 0.9 percent of those who had mental illness in the past year and 0.1 percent of those who did not have mental illness in the past year used heroin in the past year.

Return to Figure 5.1.

Figure 5.2. Figure 5.2 is titled "Past Year Substance Use Disorders and Mental Illness among Adults Aged 18 or Older: 2013." It is a Venn diagram, where the smaller circle on the left represents the number in millions of adults who had substance use disorder (SUD), the larger circle on the right represents the number in millions of adults who had mental illness, and the overlap of these two circles represents the number in millions of adults who had both SUD and mental illness. A footnote for the label "43.8 Million Adults Had Mental Illness" on the larger circle on the right says, "Statistics on mental illness are provided in Chapter 2 of this report."

Of the 20.3 million adults aged 18 or older who had SUD in the past year, 12.6 million did not have mental illness, while 7.7 million did have mental illness. Of the 43.8 million adults aged 18 or older who had mental illness in the past year, 36.2 million did not have SUD, while 7.7 million did have SUD.

Return to Figure 5.2.

Figure 5.3. Figure 5.3 is titled "Past Year Substance Use Disorders and Serious Mental Illness among Adults Aged 18 or Older: 2013." It is a Venn diagram, where the larger circle on the left represents the number in millions of adults who had substance use disorder (SUD), the smaller circle on the right represents the number in millions of adults who had serious mental illness (SMI), and the overlap of these two circles represents the number in millions of adults who had both SUD and SMI. A footnote for the label "10.0 Million Adults Had SMI" on the smaller circle on the right says, "Statistics on mental illness are provided in Chapter 2 of this report."

Of the 20.3 million adults aged 18 or older who had SUD in the past year, 17.9 million did not have SMI, while 2.3 million did have SMI. Of the 10.0 million adults aged 18 or older who had SMI in the past year, 7.7 million did not have SUD, while 2.3 million did have SUD.

Return to Figure 5.3.

Figure 5.4. Figure 5.4 is titled "Past Year Substance Use Disorders among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Level of Mental Illness: 2013." It is a bar graph, where the levels of mental illness (serious mental illness [SMI], moderate mental illness, low [mild] mental illness, no mental illness) are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with substance dependence or abuse in the past year is shown on the vertical axis.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with SMI who had past year substance dependence or abuse was 23.1 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with moderate mental illness who had past year substance dependence or abuse was 19.6 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with low (mild) mental illness who had past year substance dependence or abuse was 13.9 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with no mental illness who had past year substance dependence or abuse was 6.5 percent.

Return to Figure 5.4.

Figure 5.5. Figure 5.5 is titled "Past Year Illicit Drug Use Disorders among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Level of Mental Illness: 2013." It is a bar graph, where the levels of mental illness (serious mental illness [SMI], moderate mental illness, low [mild] mental illness, no mental illness) are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with illicit drug dependence or abuse in the past year is shown on the vertical axis.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with SMI who had past year illicit drug dependence or abuse was 10.5 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with moderate mental illness who had past year illicit drug dependence or abuse was 8.6 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with low (mild) mental illness who had past year illicit drug dependence or abuse was 4.8 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with no mental illness who had past year illicit drug dependence or abuse was 1.5 percent.

Return to Figure 5.5.

Figure 5.6. Figure 5.6 is titled "Past Year Alcohol Use Disorders among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Level of Mental Illness: 2013." It is a bar graph, where the levels of mental illness (serious mental illness [SMI], moderate mental illness, low [mild] mental illness, no mental illness) are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with alcohol dependence or abuse in the past year is shown on the vertical axis.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with SMI who had past year alcohol dependence or abuse was 17.4 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with moderate mental illness who had past year alcohol dependence or abuse was 15.0 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with low (mild) mental illness who had past year alcohol dependence or abuse was 10.8 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with no mental illness who had past year alcohol dependence or abuse was 5.5 percent.

Return to Figure 5.6.

Figure 5.7. Figure 5.7 is titled "Co-Occurring Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Age and Gender: 2013." It is a bar graph, where age in years and gender are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with co occurring mental illness and substance use disorders in the past year is shown on the vertical axis.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders in the past year was 3.2 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 to 25 with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders in the past year was 6.0 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 26 to 49 with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders in the past year was 4.5 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 50 or older with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders in the past year was 1.1 percent.

The percentage of males aged 18 or older with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders in the past year was 3.6 percent.

The percentage of females aged 18 or older with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders in the past year was 2.8 percent.

Return to Figure 5.7.

Figure 5.8. Figure 5.8 is titled "Co-Occurring Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Employment Status: 2013." It is a bar graph, where employment status is shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. The four employment statuses are full time, part time, unemployed, and other. A footnote on the "Other" label states, "The Other Employment category includes students, persons keeping house or caring for children full time, retired or disabled persons, or other persons not in the labor force."

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders in the past year who were employed full time was 3.0 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders in the past year who were employed part time was 4.0 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders in the past year who were unemployed was 6.8 percent.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders in the past year who were in the other employment category was 2.6 percent.

Return to Figure 5.8.

Figure 5.9. Figure 5.9 is titled "Past Year Substance Use among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Major Depressive Episode in the Past Year: 2013." It is a bar graph, where seven substance use types (illicit drugs, marijuana, psychotherapeutics, cocaine, hallucinogens, inhalants, and heroin) are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage using the substance is shown on the vertical axis. For each substance use type, there is a bar representing those who had major depressive episode in the past year and a bar representing those who did not have major depressive episode in the past year. A footnote on the label for the "Illicit Drugs" bars states, "Illicit Drugs include marijuana/hashish, cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or prescription-type psychotherapeutics used nonmedically."

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older who used illicit drugs in the past year was 28.8 percent among adults who had major depressive episode in the past year and 14.8 percent among adults who did not have major depressive episode in the past year.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older who used marijuana in the past year was 21.7 percent among adults who had major depressive episode in the past year and 11.8 percent among adults who did not have major depressive episode in the past year.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older who used psychotherapeutics nonmedically in the past year was 14.1 percent among adults who had major depressive episode in the past year and 5.2 percent among adults who did not have major depressive episode in the past year.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older who used cocaine in the past year was 4.2 percent among adults who had major depressive episode in the past year and 1.5 percent among adults who did not have major depressive episode in the past year.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older who used hallucinogens in the past year was 4.1 percent among adults who had major depressive episode in the past year and 1.5 percent among adults who did not have major depressive episode in the past year.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older who used inhalants in the past year was 1.3 percent among adults who had major depressive episode in the past year and 0.4 percent among adults who did not have major depressive episode in the past year.

The percentage of adults aged 18 or older who used heroin in the past year was 1.1 percent among adults who had major depressive episode in the past year and 0.2 percent among adults who did not have major depressive episode in the past year.

Return to Figure 5.9.

Figure 5.10. Figure 5.10 is titled "Past Year Substance Dependence or Abuse among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by Major Depressive Episode in the Past Year: 2013." It is a bar graph, where three dependence or abuse categories are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with substance dependence or abuse in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each dependence or abuse category (drug or alcohol dependence or abuse, drug dependence or abuse, and alcohol dependence or abuse), there is a bar representing those who had major depressive episode in the past year and a bar representing those who did not have major depressive episode in the past year.

Among adults aged 18 or older who had major depressive episode in the past year, 21.0 percent had drug or alcohol dependence or abuse in the past year, 8.4 percent had drug dependence or abuse, and 16.9 percent had alcohol dependence or abuse.

Among adults aged 18 or older who did not have major depressive episode in the past year, 7.6 percent had drug or alcohol dependence or abuse in the past year, 2.1 percent had drug dependence or abuse, and 6.3 percent had alcohol dependence or abuse.

Return to Figure 5.10.

Figure 5.11. Figure 5.11 is titled "Receipt of Mental Health Care and Specialty Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older Who Had Past Year Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders: 2013." It is a pie chart, with the following label below the chart: "7.7 Million Adults with Co-Occurring Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders." The pie chart shows the percentage of the types of treatment received in the past year. Two notes appear below the chart. The first note says, "Mental health care is defined as having received inpatient care or outpatient care or having used prescription medication for problems with emotions, nerves, or mental health. Specialty substance use treatment refers to treatment at a hospital (inpatient only), rehabilitation facility (inpatient or outpatient), or mental health center in order to reduce or stop drug or alcohol use, or for medical problems associated with drug or alcohol use." The second note says, "The percentages do not add to 100 percent due to rounding."

Of the 7.7 million adults aged 18 or older with co-occurring mental illness and a substance use disorder, 37.2 percent received only mental health care in the past year, 7.7 percent received both mental health care and specialty substance use treatment in the past year, 2.8 percent received only specialty substance use treatment in the past year, and 52.2 percent received no treatment in the past year.

Return to Figure 5.11.

Figure 5.12. Figure 5.12 is titled "Receipt of Mental Health Care and Specialty Substance Use Treatment in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older Who Had Past Year Serious Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders: 2013." It is a pie chart, with the following label below the chart: "2.3 Million Adults with Co-Occurring Serious Mental Illness (SMI) and Substance Use Disorders." The pie chart shows the percentage of the types of treatment received in the past year. A note below the chart says, "Mental health care is defined as having received inpatient care or outpatient care or having used prescription medication for problems with emotions, nerves, or mental health. Specialty substance use treatment refers to treatment at a hospital (inpatient only), rehabilitation facility (inpatient or outpatient), or mental health center in order to reduce or stop drug or alcohol use, or for medical problems associated with drug or alcohol use."

Of the 2.3 million adults aged 18 or older with co-occurring SMI and substance use disorders, 52.8 percent received only mental health care in the past year, 12.8 percent received both mental health care and specialty substance use treatment in the past year, 3.6 percent received only specialty substance use treatment in the past year, and 30.8 percent received no treatment in the past year.

Return to Figure 5.12.

Figure 5.13. Figure 5.13 is titled "Past Year Substance Use among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by Past Year Major Depressive Episode: 2013." It is a bar graph, where seven substance use types (illicit drugs, marijuana, psychotherapeutics, inhalants, hallucinogens, cocaine, and heroin) are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage using the substance is shown on the vertical axis. For each substance use type, there is a bar representing those who had major depressive episode in the past year and a bar representing those who did not have major depressive episode in the past year. A footnote on the label for the "Illicit Drugs" bars states, "Illicit Drugs include marijuana/hashish, cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or prescription-type psychotherapeutics used nonmedically."

The percentage of youths aged 12 to 17 who used illicit drugs in the past year was 33.2 percent among those who had major depressive episode in the past year and 15.1 percent among those who did not have major depressive episode in the past year.

The percentage of youths aged 12 to 17 who used marijuana in the past year was 25.7 percent among those who had major depressive episode in the past year and 11.8 percent among those who did not have major depressive episode in the past year.

The percentage of youths aged 12 to 17 who used psychotherapeutics nonmedically in the past year was 12.8 percent among those who had major depressive episode in the past year and 4.8 percent among those who did not have major depressive episode in the past year.

The percentage of youths aged 12 to 17 who used inhalants in the past year was 4.8 percent among those who had major depressive episode in the past year and 1.5 percent among those who did not have major depressive episode in the past year.

The percentage of youths aged 12 to 17 who used hallucinogens in the past year was 4.2 percent among those who had major depressive episode in the past year and 1.6 percent among those who did not have major depressive episode in the past year.

The percentage of youths aged 12 to 17 who used cocaine in the past year was 1.1 percent among those who had major depressive episode in the past year and 0.4 percent among those who did not have major depressive episode in the past year.

The percentage of youths aged 12 to 17 who used heroin in the past year was 0.3 percent among those who had major depressive episode in the past year and 0.1 percent among those who did not have major depressive episode in the past year.

Return to Figure 5.13.

Figure 5.14. Figure 5.14 is titled "Past Year Substance Use Disorders and Past Year Major Depressive Episode among Youths Aged 12 to 17: 2013." It is a Venn diagram, where the smaller circle on the left represents the number in millions of youths who had substance use disorder (SUD), the larger circle on the right represents the number in millions of youths who had major depressive episode (MDE), and the overlap of these two circles represents the number in thousands of youths who had both SUD and MDE.

Of the 1.3 million youths aged 12 to 17 who had SUD in the past year, 0.9 million did not have MDE, while 359,000 did have MDE. Of the 2.6 million youths aged 12 to 17 who had MDE in the past year, 2.2 million did not have SUD, while 359,000 did have SUD.

Return to Figure 5.14.

Figure 5.15. Figure 5.15 is titled "Past Year Substance Dependence or Abuse among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by Past Year Major Depressive Episode: 2013." It is a bar graph, where three dependence or abuse categories are shown on the horizontal axis and the percentage with substance dependence or abuse in the past year is shown on the vertical axis. For each dependence or abuse category (drug or alcohol dependence or abuse, drug dependence or abuse, and alcohol dependence or abuse), there is a bar representing those who had major depressive episode in the past year and a bar representing those who did not have major depressive episode in the past year.

Among youths aged 12 to 17 who had major depressive episode in the past year, 13.9 percent had drug or alcohol dependence or abuse in the past year, 9.3 percent had drug dependence or abuse, and 8.4 percent had alcohol dependence or abuse.

Among youths aged 12 to 17 who did not have major depressive episode in the past year, 4.1 percent had drug or alcohol dependence or abuse in the past year, 2.7 percent had drug dependence or abuse, and 2.1 percent had alcohol dependence or abuse.

Return to Figure 5.15.

Appendix B

Figure B.1. Figure B.1 is titled "Required Effective Sample in the 2013 NSDUH as a Function of the Proportion Estimated." It is a graph of a function within a coordinate plane; the horizontal axis shows the proportion estimated, and the vertical axis shows the required effective sample size. A horizontal line through the graph indicates that an effective sample size of 68 is required for the current rule. The graph decreases from an infinitely large required effective sample size when the estimated proportion is close to zero and approaches a local minimum of 50 when the estimated proportion is 0.20. The graph increases for estimated proportions greater than 0.20 until a required effective sample size of 68 is reached for an estimated proportion of 0.50. The graph decreases for estimated proportions greater than 0.50 and approaches a local minimum of 50 for the required effective sample size when the estimated proportion is 0.80. The graph increases for estimated proportions greater than 0.80 and reaches an infinitely large required effective sample size when the estimated proportion is close to 1.

Return to Figure B.1.

Equations

Section A.3

The adjustment factor a sub k as a function of lambda is defined as the ratio of two quantities. The quantity in the numerator is defined as the sum of two terms. The first term is calculated as the product of l sub k and the difference between u sub k and c sub k. The second term is calculated as the product of u sub k, the difference between c sub k and l sub k, and the value of the exponential function evaluated as the following product: capital A sub k multiplied by the transpose of the vector x sub k, multiplied by lambda. The quantity in the denominator is defined as the sum of two terms. The first term is the difference between u sub k and c sub k. The second term is calculated as the product of the difference between c sub k and l sub k and the value of the exponential function evaluated as the following product: capital A sub k multiplied by the transpose of the vector x sub k, multiplied by lambda.

Return to Equation A.3-1.

The quantity of the summation over s of the product of (x sub k, d sub k, and a sub k as a function of lambda), minus the quantity capital T tilde sub x is equal to zero.

Return to Equation A.3-2.

Delta of the parameters w and d equals the summation over all k in s of the ratio of d sub k to capital A sub k multiplied by the sum of the following two quantities. The first quantity is calculated as the product of the difference between a sub k and l sub k and the logarithm of the ratio of the difference between a sub k and l sub k to the difference between c sub k and l sub k. The second quantity is defined as the product of the difference between u sub k and a sub k and the logarithm of the ratio of the difference between u sub k and a sub k to the difference between u sub k and c sub k.

Return to Equation A.3-3.

Section B.2

p hat sub d is equal to capital Y hat sub d divided by capital N hat sub d.

Return to Equation B.2-1.

The standard error of capital Y hat sub d is equal to capital N hat sub d times the standard error of p hat sub d.

Return to Equation B.2-2.

Two suppression rules are shown. The first indicates that suppressions occurred when the relative standard error of the negative of the natural logarithm of p hat was greater than .175 and p hat was less than or equal to .5.

Return to Equation B.2-3.

The second suppression rule indicates that suppressions also occurred when the relative standard error of the negative of the natural logarithm of the difference 1 minus p hat was greater than .175 and p hat was greater than .5.

Return to Equation B.2-4.

Two computational forms of the suppression rule are presented. The first indicates that suppressions occurred when p hat was less than or equal to .5 and the following ratio was greater than .175: The numerator of the ratio is the standard error of p hat divided by p hat; the denominator is the negative of the natural logarithm of p hat.

Return to Equation B.2-5.

The second computational form of the suppression rule indicates that suppressions also occurred whenever p hat was greater than .5 and the following ratio was greater than .175: The numerator is the standard error of p hat divided by the difference 1 minus p hat; the denominator is the negative of the natural logarithm of the difference 1 minus p hat.

Return to Equation B.2-6.

Capital Z is equal to the ratio of two quantities. The numerator is p hat sub 1 minus p hat sub 2. The denominator is the square root of the following quantity: the variance of p hat sub 1, plus the variance of p hat sub 2, minus twice the covariance of p hat sub 1 comma p hat sub 2.

Return to Equation B.2-7.

Section B.3

The weighted screening response rate (capital S R R) is equal to the ratio of two quantities. The numerator is the summation of the product of w sub h h and complete sub h h. The denominator is the summation of the product of w sub h h and eligible sub h h.

Return to Equation B.3-1.

The weighted interview response rate (capital I R R) is equal to the ratio of two quantities. The numerator is the summation of the product of w sub i and complete sub i. The denominator is the summation of the product of w sub i and selected sub i.

Return to Equation B.3-2.

The weighted overall response rate (capital O R R) is equal to the product of the weighted screening response rate (capital S R R) and the weighted interview response rate (capital I R R).

Return to Equation B.3-3.

Section B.4

The logit of pi hat is equivalent to the logarithm of pi hat divided by the quantity 1 minus pi hat, which is equal to the sum of the following six quantities: negative 5.972664, the product of 0.0873416 and capital X sub k, the product of 0.3385193 and capital X sub w, the product of 1.9552664 and capital X sub s, the product of 1.1267330 and capital X sub m, and the product of 0.1059137 and capital X sub a.
or
Pi hat is equal to the ratio of two quantities. The numerator is 1. The denominator is 1 plus e raised to the negative value of the sum of the following six quantities: negative 5.972664, the product of 0.0873416 and capital X sub k, the product of 0.3385193 and capital X sub w, the product of 1.9552664 and capital X sub s, the product of 1.1267330 and capital X sub m, and the product of 0.1059137 and capital X sub a.

Return to Equation (1).

The logit of pi hat is equivalent to the logarithm of pi hat divided by the quantity 1 minus pi hat, which is equal to the sum of the following five quantities: negative 5.7736246, the product of 0.1772067 and capital X sub k, the product of 1.8392433 and capital X sub s, the product of 1.6428623 and capital X sub m, and the product of 0.1231266 and capital X sub a.
or
Pi hat is equal to the ratio of two quantities. The numerator is 1. The denominator is 1 plus e raised to the negative value of the sum of the following five quantities: negative 5.7736246, the product of 0.1772067 and capital X sub k, the product of 1.8392433 and capital X sub s, the product of 1.6428623 and capital X sub m, and the product of 0.1231266 and capital X sub a.

Return to Equation (2).

Diagrams

A linear scale ranging from 0 to 10 is shown, with the integers 1 through 9 displayed in between the endpoints. A zero represents no interference; scores of 1, 2, and 3 represent mild interference; scores of 4, 5, and 6 represent moderate interference; and scores of 7, 8, and 9 represent severe interference. A score of 10 represents very severe interference.

Return to first instance of linear scale diagram.

A linear scale ranging from 0 to 10 is shown, with the integers 1 through 9 displayed in between the endpoints. A zero represents no problems; scores of 1, 2, and 3 represent mild problems; scores of 4, 5, and 6 represent moderate problems; and scores of 7, 8, and 9 represent severe problems. A score of 10 represents very severe problems.

Return to second instance of linear scale diagram.

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