2018-2019 National Survey on Drug Use and
Health National Maps of
Prevalence Estimates, by State

The 122 national maps presented here show the 2018-2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) estimates for 32 substance use and mental health outcomes, by age group, for 50 states and the District of Columbia. The color of each state on the U.S. maps indicates how the state ranks relative to other states for each measure. States could fall into one of five groups according to their ranking by quintiles. Because 51 states were ranked for each measure, the middle quintile was assigned to 11 states, and the remaining quintiles were assigned 10 states each. In some cases, a "quintile" could have more or fewer states than desired because two (or more) states had the same estimate (to two decimal places). When such ties occurred at the "boundary" between two quintiles, all of the states with the same estimate were conservatively assigned to the lower quintile. Those states with the highest rates for a given measure are in orange, with the exception of the perceptions of risk measures, for which the lowest perceptions of great risk are in orange. Those states with the lowest estimates are in dark blue, with the exception of the perceptions of risk measures, for which the highest perceptions of great risk are in dark blue. The upper and lower limits of each quintile shown in the map legend collectively define a continuum and are not necessarily the actual values of a particular state. For example, in Figure 1a, the values on the boundary in the lowest quintile correspond to South Dakota (7.52 percent) and Louisiana and Nebraska (9.41 percent) and are displayed in the legend. In the next to lowest quintile, Arkansas (9.45 percent) and North Carolina (10.63 percent) are the states with the lowest and highest values; however, in the continuum of the legend, the lower limit was assigned a value of 9.42 percent because the upper limit of the quintile below it is 9.41 percent.

Tables containing specific estimates for these state maps are available on the 2018-2019 NSDUH webpage at https://www.samhsa.gov/data/report/2018-2019-nsduh-state-estimates-substance-use-and-mental-disorders. Specifically, see the file for the "2018-2019 NSDUH State Prevalence Estimates (Tables 1 to 33, by Age Group)."

Figure 1a. Illicit Drug Use in the Past Month among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 1a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 1b. Illicit Drug Use in the Past Month among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 1b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 1c. Illicit Drug Use in the Past Month among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 1c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 1d. Illicit Drug Use in the Past Month among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 1d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 2a. Marijuana Use in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 2a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 2b. Marijuana Use in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 2b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 2c. Marijuana Use in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 2c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 2d. Marijuana Use in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 2d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 3a. Marijuana Use in the Past Month among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 3a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 3b. Marijuana Use in the Past Month among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 3b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 3c. Marijuana Use in the Past Month among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 3c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 3d. Marijuana Use in the Past Month among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 3d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 4a. Perceptions of Great Risk from Smoking Marijuana Once a Month among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 4a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 4b. Perceptions of Great Risk from Smoking Marijuana Once a Month among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 4b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 4c. Perceptions of Great Risk from Smoking Marijuana Once a Month among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 4c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 4d. Perceptions of Great Risk from Smoking Marijuana Once a Month among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 4d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 5a. First Use of Marijuana among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Average Annual Initiation Estimates (Expressed as Percentages of the At-Risk Population) Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 5a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 5b. First Use of Marijuana among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Average Annual Initiation Estimates (Expressed as Percentages of the At-Risk Population) Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 5b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 5c. First Use of Marijuana among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Average Annual Initiation Estimates (Expressed as Percentages of the At-Risk Population) Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 5c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 5d. First Use of Marijuana among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Average Annual Initiation Estimates (Expressed as Percentages of the At-Risk Population) Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 5d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 6a. Illicit Drug Use Other Than Marijuana in the Past Month among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 6a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 6b. Illicit Drug Use Other Than Marijuana in the Past Month among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 6b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 6c. Illicit Drug Use Other Than Marijuana in the Past Month among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 6c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 6d. Illicit Drug Use Other Than Marijuana in the Past Month among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 6d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 7a. Cocaine Use in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 7a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 7b. Cocaine Use in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 7b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 7c. Cocaine Use in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 7c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 7d. Cocaine Use in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 7d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 8a. Perceptions of Great Risk from Using Cocaine Once a Month among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 8a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 8b. Perceptions of Great Risk from Using Cocaine Once a Month among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 8b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 8c. Perceptions of Great Risk from Using Cocaine Once a Month among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 8c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 8d. Perceptions of Great Risk from Using Cocaine Once a Month among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 8d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 9a. Heroin Use in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 9a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 9b. Heroin Use in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 9b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 9c. Heroin Use in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 9c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 10a. Perceptions of Great Risk from Trying Heroin Once or Twice among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 10a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 10b. Perceptions of Great Risk from Trying Heroin Once or Twice among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 10b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 10c. Perceptions of Great Risk from Trying Heroin Once or Twice among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 10c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 10d. Perceptions of Great Risk from Trying Heroin Once or Twice among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 10d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 11a. Methamphetamine Use in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 11a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 11b. Methamphetamine Use in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 11b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 11c. Methamphetamine Use in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 11c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 11d. Methamphetamine Use in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 11d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 12a. Pain Reliever Misuse in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 12a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 12b. Pain Reliever Misuse in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 12b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 12c. Pain Reliever Misuse in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 12c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 12d. Pain Reliever Misuse in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 12d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 13a. Alcohol Use in the Past Month among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 13a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 13b. Alcohol Use in the Past Month among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 13b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 13c. Alcohol Use in the Past Month among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 13c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 13d. Alcohol Use in the Past Month among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 13d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 14a. Binge Alcohol Use in the Past Month among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 14a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 14b. Binge Alcohol Use in the Past Month among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 14b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 14c. Binge Alcohol Use in the Past Month among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 14c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 14d. Binge Alcohol Use in the Past Month among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 14d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 15a. Perceptions of Great Risk from Having Five or More Drinks of an Alcoholic Beverage Once or Twice a Week among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 15a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 15b. Perceptions of Great Risk from Having Five or More Drinks of an Alcoholic Beverage Once or Twice a Week among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 15b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 15c. Perceptions of Great Risk from Having Five or More Drinks of an Alcoholic Beverage Once or Twice a Week among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 15c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 15d. Perceptions of Great Risk from Having Five or More Drinks of an Alcoholic Beverage Once or Twice a Week among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 15d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 16a. Alcohol Use in the Past Month among Individuals Aged 12 to 20, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 16a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 16b. Binge Alcohol Use in the Past Month among Individuals Aged 12 to 20, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 16b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 17a. Tobacco Product Use in the Past Month among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 17a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 17b. Tobacco Product Use in the Past Month among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 17b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 17c. Tobacco Product Use in the Past Month among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 17c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 17d. Tobacco Product Use in the Past Month among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 17d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 18a. Cigarette Use in the Past Month among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 18a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 18b. Cigarette Use in the Past Month among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 18b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 18c. Cigarette Use in the Past Month among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 18c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 18d. Cigarette Use in the Past Month among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 18d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 19a. Perceptions of Great Risk from Smoking One or More Packs of Cigarettes per Day among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 19a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 19b. Perceptions of Great Risk from Smoking One or More Packs of Cigarettes per Day among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 19b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 19c. Perceptions of Great Risk from Smoking One or More Packs of Cigarettes per Day among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 19ca. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 19d. Perceptions of Great Risk from Smoking One or More Packs of Cigarettes per Day among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 19d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 20a. Illicit Drug Use Disorder in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 20a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 20b. Illicit Drug Use Disorder in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 20b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 20c. Illicit Drug Use Disorder in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 20c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 20d. Illicit Drug Use Disorder in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 20d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 21a. Pain Reliever Use Disorder in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 21a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 21b. Pain Reliever Use Disorder in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 21b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 21c. Pain Reliever Use Disorder in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 21c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 22a. Alcohol Use Disorder in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 22a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 22b. Alcohol Use Disorder in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 22b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 22c. Alcohol Use Disorder in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 22c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 22d. Alcohol Use Disorder in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 22d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 23a. Substance Use Disorder in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 23a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 23b. Substance Use Disorder in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 23b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 23c. Substance Use Disorder in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 23c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 23d. Substance Use Disorder in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 23d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 24a. Needing But Not Receiving Treatment at a Specialty Facility for Illicit Drug Use in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 24a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 24b. Needing But Not Receiving Treatment at a Specialty Facility for Illicit Drug Use in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 24b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 24c. Needing But Not Receiving Treatment at a Specialty Facility for Illicit Drug Use in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 24c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 24d. Needing But Not Receiving Treatment at a Specialty Facility for Illicit Drug Use in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 24d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 25a. Needing But Not Receiving Treatment at a Specialty Facility for Alcohol Use in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 25a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 25b. Needing But Not Receiving Treatment at a Specialty Facility for Alcohol Use in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 25b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 25c. Needing But Not Receiving Treatment at a Specialty Facility for Alcohol Use in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 25c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 25d. Needing But Not Receiving Treatment at a Specialty Facility for Alcohol Use in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 25d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 26a. Needing But Not Receiving Treatment at a Specialty Facility for Substance Use in the Past Year among Individuals Aged 12 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 26a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 26b. Needing But Not Receiving Treatment at a Specialty Facility for Substance Use in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 26b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 26c. Needing But Not Receiving Treatment at a Specialty Facility for Substance Use in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 26c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 26d. Needing But Not Receiving Treatment at a Specialty Facility for Substance Use in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 26d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 27a. Any Mental Illness in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 27a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 27b. Any Mental Illness in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 27b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 27c. Any Mental Illness in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 27c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 28a. Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 28a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 28b. Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 28b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 28c. Serious Mental Illness in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 28c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 29a. Received Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 29a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 29b. Received Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 29b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 29c. Received Mental Health Services in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 29c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 30a. Major Depressive Episode in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 30a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 30b. Major Depressive Episode in the Past Year among Youths Aged 12 to 17, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 30b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 30c. Major Depressive Episode in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 30c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 30d. Major Depressive Episode in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 30d. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 31a. Had Serious Thoughts of Suicide in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 31a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 31b. Had Serious Thoughts of Suicide in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 31b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 31c. Had Serious Thoughts of Suicide in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 31c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 32a. Made Suicide Plans in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 32a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 32b. Made Suicide Plans in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 32b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 32c. Made Suicide Plans in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 32c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 33a. Attempted Suicide in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 33a. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 33b. Attempted Suicide in the Past Year among Adults Aged 18 to 25, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 33b. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Figure 33c. Attempted Suicide in the Past Year among Adults Aged 26 or Older, by State: Percentages, Annual Averages Based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs

Figure 33c. Follow 'D' link at right for long description.     D

Source: SAMHSA, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, NSDUH, 2018 and 2019.

Long Descriptions—Maps

Long description, Figure 1a. Figure 1a is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use in the past month among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (16.33 to 21.13 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (12.46 to 16.32 percent) were Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, and New Mexico. States in the midgroup (10.64 to 12.45 percent) were Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Kentucky, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (9.42 to 10.63 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. States in the lowest group (7.52 to 9.41 percent) were Iowa, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Virginia, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 1a.

Long description, Figure 1b. Figure 1b is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use in the past month among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (10.42 to 14.14 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (8.32 to 10.41 percent) were Alaska, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Michigan, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (7.76 to 8.31 percent) were Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (7.00 to 7.75 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Missouri, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and Texas. States in the lowest group (6.03 to 6.99 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 1b.

Long description, Figure 1c. Figure 1c is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use in the past month among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (31.87 to 39.70 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (24.31 to 31.86 percent) were Alaska, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Montana, New Mexico, and New York. States in the midgroup (21.64 to 24.30 percent) were Arizona, Florida, Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, Ohio, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (19.62 to 21.63 percent) were Alabama, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina. States in the lowest group (15.90 to 19.61 percent) were Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Mississippi, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 1c.

Long description, Figure 1d. Figure 1d is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use in the past month among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (14.52 to 18.69 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (10.99 to 14.51 percent) were Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. States in the midgroup (9.30 to 10.98 percent) were Alabama, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (7.97 to 9.29 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (6.23 to 7.96 percent) were Iowa, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Virginia, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 1d.

Long description, Figure 2a. Figure 2a is a U.S. map showing marijuana use in the past year among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (21.44 to 27.42 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (16.39 to 21.43 percent) were California, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and New York. States in the midgroup (14.81 to 16.38 percent) were Arizona, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania. States in the next lowest group (13.54 to 14.80 percent) were Alabama, Florida, Idaho, Kansas, Nebraska, New Jersey, South Carolina, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (11.13 to 13.53 percent) were Arkansas, Iowa, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Virginia, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 2a.

Long description, Figure 2b. Figure 2b is a U.S. map showing marijuana use in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (16.18 to 21.13 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (12.79 to 16.17 percent) were California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, and New York. States in the midgroup (11.93 to 12.78 percent) were Arizona, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Maryland, Minnesota, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (11.18 to 11.92 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, New Jersey, Ohio, and South Carolina. States in the lowest group (8.56 to 11.17 percent) were Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 2b.

Long description, Figure 2c. Figure 2c is a U.S. map showing marijuana use in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (43.92 to 52.18 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (35.39 to 43.91 percent) were Alaska, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New York, and Ohio. States in the midgroup (31.96 to 35.38 percent) were Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (29.00 to 31.95 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (24.62 to 28.99 percent) were Arkansas, Idaho, Iowa, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Dakota, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 2c.

Long description, Figure 2d. Figure 2d is a U.S. map showing marijuana use in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (18.35 to 24.93 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (13.98 to 18.34 percent) were Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and New York. States in the midgroup (12.89 to 13.97 percent) were Alabama, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania. States in the next lowest group (10.88 to 12.88 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Idaho, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, South Carolina, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (8.67 to 10.87 percent) were Iowa, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Virginia, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 2d.

Long description, Figure 3a. Figure 3a is a U.S. map showing marijuana use in the past month among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (14.92 to 19.74 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (11.00 to 14.91 percent) were Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and New York. States in the midgroup (9.18 to 10.99 percent) were Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, Minnesota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (7.90 to 9.17 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Idaho, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (6.35 to 7.89 percent) were Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Virginia, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 3a.

Long description, Figure 3b. Figure 3b is a U.S. map showing marijuana use in the past month among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (8.86 to 12.84 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (7.06 to 8.85 percent) were Alaska, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, New Hampshire, New York, and Rhode Island. States in the midgroup (6.19 to 7.05 percent) were Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (5.81 to 6.18 percent) were Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Kentucky, Missouri, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (4.58 to 5.80 percent) were Alabama, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 3b.

Long description, Figure 3c. Figure 3c is a U.S. map showing marijuana use in the past month among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (30.17 to 38.99 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (22.51 to 30.16 percent) were California, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and New York. States in the midgroup (19.81 to 22.50 percent) were Arizona, Florida, Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, Ohio, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (18.22 to 19.80 percent) were Alabama, Georgia, Hawaii, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Tennessee. States in the lowest group (14.50 to 18.21 percent) were Arkansas, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Mississippi, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 3c.

Long description, Figure 3d. Figure 3d is a U.S. map showing marijuana use in the past month among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (12.74 to 17.49 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (9.36 to 12.73 percent) were Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Indiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, and New Mexico. States in the midgroup (7.92 to 9.35 percent) were Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (6.44 to 7.91 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (4.96 to 6.43 percent) were Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Virginia, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 3d.

Long description, Figure 4a. Figure 4a is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from smoking marijuana once a month among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (15.00 to 17.72 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (17.73 to 21.88 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (21.89 to 23.13 percent) were Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania. States in the next highest group (23.14 to 25.79 percent) were California, Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the highest group (25.80 to 31.91 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, South Carolina, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 4a.

Long description, Figure 4b. Figure 4b is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from smoking marijuana once a month among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (14.14 to 18.31 percent) were Alaska, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (18.32 to 20.28 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (20.29 to 22.38 percent) were California, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (22.39 to 24.20 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Idaho, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. States in the highest group (24.21 to 28.08 percent) were Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 4b.

Long description, Figure 4c. Figure 4c is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from smoking marijuana once a month among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (5.80 to 8.48 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (8.49 to 9.85 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Ohio, Rhode Island, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (9.86 to 11.00 percent) were Hawaii, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (11.01 to 12.72 percent) were Arizona, Arkansas, California, Idaho, Kansas, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Tennessee. States in the highest group (12.73 to 17.12 percent) were Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, Texas, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 4c.

Long description, Figure 4d. Figure 4d is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from smoking marijuana once a month among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (16.19 to 19.14 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (19.15 to 23.86 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (23.87 to 25.22 percent) were Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania. States in the next highest group (25.23 to 28.36 percent) were Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the highest group (28.37 to 35.23 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 4d.

Long description, Figure 5a. Figure 5a is a U.S. map showing first use of marijuana among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: average annual initiation estimates (expressed as percentages of the at-risk population) based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (3.34 to 4.19 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (2.44 to 3.33 percent) were California, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, and Ohio. States in the midgroup (2.19 to 2.43 percent) were Arizona, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (1.91 to 2.18 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, South Dakota, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (1.67 to 1.90 percent) were Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 5a.

Long description, Figure 5b. Figure 5b is a U.S. map showing first use of marijuana among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: average annual initiation estimates (expressed as percentages of the at-risk population) based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (7.17 to 9.50 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (6.01 to 7.16 percent) were California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Michigan, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Washington. States in the midgroup (5.29 to 6.00 percent) were Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Maryland, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (4.94 to 5.28 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, South Carolina, and Tennessee. States in the lowest group (3.68 to 4.93 percent) were Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 5b.

Long description, Figure 5c. Figure 5c is a U.S. map showing first use of marijuana among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: average annual initiation estimates (expressed as percentages of the at-risk population) based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (11.46 to 15.54 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (8.94 to 11.45 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, District of Columbia, Indiana, Minnesota, Nevada, New Mexico, Ohio, and Washington. States in the midgroup (7.85 to 8.93 percent) were California, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (6.91 to 7.84 percent) were Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, South Dakota, Tennessee, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (5.48 to 6.90 percent) were Alabama, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 5c.

Long description, Figure 5d. Figure 5d is a U.S. map showing first use of marijuana among adults aged 26 or older, by state: average annual initiation estimates (expressed as percentages of the at-risk population) based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (1.02 to 1.50 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (0.74 to 1.01 percent) were Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, and New Mexico. States in the midgroup (0.61 to 0.73 percent) were Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (0.52 to 0.60 percent) were Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, North Dakota, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (0.37 to 0.51 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 5d.

Long description, Figure 6a. Figure 6a is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use other than marijuana in the past month among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (3.72 to 5.29 percent) were California, Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Kansas, Massachusetts, Montana, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (3.36 to 3.71 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Connecticut, Hawaii, Iowa, Michigan, Nevada, Oklahoma, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (3.12 to 3.35 percent) were Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, and South Carolina. States in the next lowest group (2.90 to 3.11 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, and Utah. States in the lowest group (2.34 to 2.89 percent) were Georgia, Idaho, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 6a.

Long description, Figure 6b. Figure 6b is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use other than marijuana in the past month among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (2.56 to 3.02 percent) were Colorado, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Montana, New Mexico, Oregon, South Carolina, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (2.42 to 2.55 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, California, Delaware, Louisiana, Missouri, Nevada, North Carolina, Utah, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (2.26 to 2.41 percent) were Alabama, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Texas, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (2.13 to 2.25 percent) were Arkansas, Connecticut, Idaho, Illinois, Mississippi, New York, Ohio, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (1.77 to 2.12 percent) were the District of Columbia, Georgia, Hawaii, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island.

Long description end. Return to Figure 6b.

Long description, Figure 6c. Figure 6c is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use other than marijuana in the past month among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (7.02 to 8.56 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (6.20 to 7.01 percent) were California, Delaware, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, North Carolina, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (5.62 to 6.19 percent) were Louisiana, Maryland, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Utah, Virginia, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (5.21 to 5.61 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Florida, Illinois, Missouri, New Jersey, North Dakota, Ohio, Texas, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (4.34 to 5.20 percent) were Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Kentucky, Mississippi, New Mexico, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 6c.

Long description, Figure 6d. Figure 6d is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use other than marijuana in the past month among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (3.33 to 5.08 percent) were California, Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Kansas, Nevada, Oregon, Rhode Island, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (3.09 to 3.32 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Connecticut, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, and Vermont. States in the midgroup (2.80 to 3.08 percent) were Hawaii, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Tennessee. States in the next lowest group (2.53 to 2.79 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, and Texas. States in the lowest group (1.90 to 2.52 percent) were Idaho, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 6d.

Long description, Figure 7a. Figure 7a is a U.S. map showing cocaine use in the past year among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (2.25 to 4.12 percent) were California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Nevada, New Hampshire, New York, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (2.00 to 2.24 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, Illinois, Kansas, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (1.74 to 1.99 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (1.48 to 1.73 percent) were Florida, Indiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (1.10 to 1.47 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Missouri, North Dakota, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 7a.

Long description, Figure 7b. Figure 7b is a U.S. map showing cocaine use in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (0.55 to 0.68 percent) were Colorado, Idaho, Maine, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (0.48 to 0.54 percent) were Arizona, California, Indiana, Kansas, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (0.41 to 0.47 percent) were Alaska, Hawaii, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, and Texas. States in the next lowest group (0.33 to 0.40 percent) were Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, and Tennessee. States in the lowest group (0.21 to 0.32 percent) were Alabama, Delaware, District of Columbia, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, South Carolina, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 7b.

Long description, Figure 7c. Figure 7c is a U.S. map showing cocaine use in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (6.64 to 10.98 percent) were California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (5.84 to 6.63 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, Pennsylvania, and Washington. States in the midgroup (4.78 to 5.83 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Florida, Kansas, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (4.13 to 4.77 percent) were Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, New Jersey, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (3.05 to 4.12 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Mississippi, Missouri, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 7c.

Long description, Figure 7d. Figure 7d is a U.S. map showing cocaine use in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (1.87 to 3.75 percent) were California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Nevada, New York, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (1.63 to 1.86 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (1.42 to 1.62 percent) were Alabama, Connecticut, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Montana, New Mexico, North Carolina, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (1.17 to 1.41 percent) were Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Michigan, Mississippi, New Jersey, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (0.77 to 1.16 percent) were Arkansas, Idaho, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 7d.

Long description, Figure 8a. Figure 8a is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from using cocaine once a month among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (59.89 to 66.16 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (66.17 to 68.40 percent) were Arizona, California, Hawaii, Maine, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (68.41 to 70.72 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Nebraska, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, and South Dakota. States in the next highest group (70.73 to 74.97 percent) were Florida, Indiana, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Utah, and Virginia. States in the highest group (74.98 to 79.21 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 8a.

Long description, Figure 8b. Figure 8b is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from using cocaine once a month among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (50.11 to 51.57 percent) were Alaska, Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (51.58 to 52.45 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, North Dakota, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (52.46 to 54.43 percent) were California, Hawaii, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and South Dakota. States in the next highest group (54.44 to 55.80 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, New York, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Virginia. States in the highest group (55.81 to 58.10 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, Tennessee, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 8b.

Long description, Figure 8c. Figure 8c is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from using cocaine once a month among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (51.12 to 56.87 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Vermont, Washington, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (56.88 to 60.42 percent) were Alaska, Connecticut, Iowa, Maine, Nebraska, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (60.43 to 62.40 percent) were Arizona, California, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Nevada, and South Dakota. States in the next highest group (62.41 to 66.23 percent) were Florida, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Utah, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the highest group (66.24 to 72.75 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 8c.

Long description, Figure 8d. Figure 8d is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from using cocaine once a month among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (61.13 to 69.37 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (69.38 to 71.51 percent) were California, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (71.52 to 74.17 percent) were Arizona, Connecticut, Delaware, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Nebraska, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Virginia. States in the next highest group (74.18 to 78.06 percent) were Florida, Indiana, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Utah. States in the highest group (78.07 to 83.20 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 8d.

Long description, Figure 9a. Figure 9a is a U.S. map showing heroin use in the past year among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (0.39 to 0.65 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, District of Columbia, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (0.33 to 0.38 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Montana, Ohio, Rhode Island, Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (0.29 to 0.32 percent) were Idaho, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, and Tennessee. States in the next lowest group (0.25 to 0.28 percent) were Alabama, Hawaii, Iowa, Louisiana, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (0.15 to 0.24 percent) were Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 9a.

Long description, Figure 9b. Figure 9b is a U.S. map showing heroin use in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (0.50 to 0.81 percent) were Colorado, Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Vermont, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (0.42 to 0.49 percent) were Arizona, Kansas, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Ohio, Oregon, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (0.37 to 0.41 percent) were Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (0.32 to 0.36 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, District of Columbia, Idaho, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island, South Dakota, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (0.18 to 0.31 percent) were California, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Nevada, South Carolina, Texas, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 9b.

Long description, Figure 9c. Figure 9c is a U.S. map showing heroin use in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (0.41 to 0.75 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, District of Columbia, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (0.36 to 0.40 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Montana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (0.30 to 0.35 percent) were Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (0.26 to 0.29 percent) were Alabama, Illinois, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (0.15 to 0.25 percent) were Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Maryland, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 9c.

Long description, Figure 10a. Figure 10a is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from trying heroin once or twice among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (80.42 to 82.65 percent) were Alaska, District of Columbia, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Montana, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (82.66 to 84.95 percent) were California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (84.96 to 85.74 percent) were Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (85.75 to 87.83 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Texas. States in the highest group (87.84 to 89.02 percent) were Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, New Hampshire, Ohio, South Carolina, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 10a.

Long description, Figure 10b. Figure 10b is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from trying heroin once or twice among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (57.83 to 60.86 percent) were Alaska, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (60.87 to 62.67 percent) were California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Michigan, Nevada, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Utah. States in the midgroup (62.68 to 63.98 percent) were Arizona, District of Columbia, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Mexico, Vermont, and Virginia. States in the next highest group (63.99 to 65.41 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Tennessee. States in the highest group (65.42 to 67.64 percent) were Connecticut, Georgia, Kentucky, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, South Carolina, Texas, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 10b.

Long description, Figure 10c. Figure 10c is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from trying heroin once or twice among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (74.78 to 78.81 percent) were the District of Columbia, Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (78.82 to 81.11 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Massachusetts, Missouri, Nebraska, and New York. States in the midgroup (81.12 to 82.46 percent) were California, Maine, Michigan, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (82.47 to 84.68 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Texas. States in the highest group (84.69 to 86.64 percent) were Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Kentucky, Louisiana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, South Carolina, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 10c.

Long description, Figure 10d. Figure 10d is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from trying heroin once or twice among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (81.88 to 86.08 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Kansas, Minnesota, Montana, Oregon, South Dakota, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (86.09 to 88.03 percent) were California, Idaho, Iowa, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Utah, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (88.04 to 88.87 percent) were Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (88.88 to 90.99 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Indiana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Texas. States in the highest group (91.00 to 92.03 percent) were Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Ohio, South Carolina, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 10d.

Long description, Figure 11a. Figure 11a is a U.S. map showing methamphetamine use in the past year among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (1.16 to 1.74 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Montana, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (0.88 to 1.15 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Indiana, Iowa, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, and Tennessee. States in the midgroup (0.64 to 0.87 percent) were Idaho, Louisiana, Minnesota, New Mexico, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (0.42 to 0.63 percent) were Delaware, Georgia, Maine, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (0.24 to 0.41 percent) were Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 11a.

Long description, Figure 11b. Figure 11b is a U.S. map showing methamphetamine use in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (0.27 to 0.38 percent) were Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (0.23 to 0.26 percent) were Arkansas, Idaho, Kansas, New Hampshire, Ohio, Oregon, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (0.18 to 0.22 percent) were Alabama, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania. States in the next lowest group (0.15 to 0.17 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and Washington. States in the lowest group (0.07 to 0.14 percent) were California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Texas, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 11b.

Long description, Figure 11c. Figure 11c is a U.S. map showing methamphetamine use in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (1.33 to 2.03 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Indiana, Kentucky, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (1.08 to 1.32 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, Idaho, Kansas, Missouri, New Mexico, South Dakota, Utah, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (0.84 to 1.07 percent) were Alabama, Hawaii, Iowa, Maine, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (0.58 to 0.83 percent) were California, Delaware, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (0.28 to 0.57 percent) were Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, and New York.

Long description end. Return to Figure 11c.

Long description, Figure 11d. Figure 11d is a U.S. map showing methamphetamine use in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (1.27 to 1.98 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Kansas, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (0.90 to 1.26 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. States in the midgroup (0.64 to 0.89 percent) were Delaware, Idaho, Louisiana, Minnesota, New Mexico, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Utah, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (0.43 to 0.63 percent) were Georgia, Illinois, Maine, Nebraska, North Carolina, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (0.24 to 0.42 percent) were Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 11d.

Long description, Figure 12a. Figure 12a is a U.S. map showing pain reliever misuse in the past year among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (3.95 to 4.56 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, District of Columbia, Idaho, Iowa, Kentucky, Montana, Ohio, Oregon, and Washington. States in the next highest group (3.72 to 3.94 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Nevada, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (3.55 to 3.71 percent) were Arkansas, California, Florida, Minnesota, Missouri, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, South Carolina, Texas, and Utah. States in the next lowest group (3.33 to 3.54 percent) were Delaware, Georgia, Hawaii, Maryland, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (2.84 to 3.32 percent) were Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 12a.

Long description, Figure 12b. Figure 12b is a U.S. map showing pain reliever misuse in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (2.93 to 4.08 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Iowa, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oregon, South Carolina, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (2.61 to 2.92 percent) were California, Idaho, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Texas. States in the midgroup (2.41 to 2.60 percent) were Arizona, District of Columbia, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Ohio, Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (2.07 to 2.40 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, North Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (1.85 to 2.06 percent) were Alaska, Hawaii, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 12b.

Long description, Figure 12c. Figure 12c is a U.S. map showing pain reliever misuse in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (5.95 to 6.87 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (5.54 to 5.94 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Carolina, and Virginia. States in the midgroup (5.21 to 5.53 percent) were California, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Maine, North Carolina, Ohio, South Dakota, Texas, Vermont, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (4.96 to 5.20 percent) were Alaska, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (4.27 to 4.95 percent) were Connecticut, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island.

Long description end. Return to Figure 12c.

Long description, Figure 12d. Figure 12d is a U.S. map showing pain reliever misuse in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (3.87 to 4.44 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, District of Columbia, Idaho, Iowa, Kentucky, Montana, Ohio, Oregon, and Washington. States in the next highest group (3.53 to 3.86 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, North Dakota, Utah, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (3.39 to 3.52 percent) were California, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas. States in the next lowest group (3.12 to 3.38 percent) were Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the lowest group (2.66 to 3.11 percent) were Illinois, Maine, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 12d.

Long description, Figure 13a. Figure 13a is a U.S. map showing alcohol use in the past month among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (57.65 to 65.97 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Iowa, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (53.58 to 57.64 percent) were Delaware, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, and Washington. States in the midgroup (49.77 to 53.57 percent) were Alaska, Florida, Kansas, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (46.14 to 49.76 percent) were Arizona, California, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Louisiana, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas. States in the lowest group (29.16 to 46.13 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Hawaii, Kentucky, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 13a.

Long description, Figure 13b. Figure 13b is a U.S. map showing alcohol use in the past month among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (10.43 to 13.58 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, Iowa, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (9.62 to 10.42 percent) were Delaware, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Nebraska, Ohio, Rhode Island, Washington, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (9.13 to 9.61 percent) were the District of Columbia, Indiana, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (8.42 to 9.12 percent) were Alaska, California, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (5.67 to 8.41 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 13b.

Long description, Figure 13c. Figure 13c is a U.S. map showing alcohol use in the past month among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (62.95 to 70.56 percent) were Connecticut, District of Columbia, Iowa, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (58.34 to 62.94 percent) were Colorado, Delaware, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, Oregon, and South Dakota. States in the midgroup (53.72 to 58.33 percent) were California, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (49.49 to 53.71 percent) were Alaska, Florida, Hawaii, Louisiana, Nevada, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Washington. States in the lowest group (32.49 to 49.48 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Kentucky, Mississippi, New Mexico, Utah, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 13c.

Long description, Figure 13d. Figure 13d is a U.S. map showing alcohol use in the past month among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (62.14 to 68.93 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Iowa, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (57.40 to 62.13 percent) were Delaware, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, and Washington. States in the midgroup (53.87 to 57.39 percent) were Alaska, Florida, Kansas, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (49.70 to 53.86 percent) were Arizona, California, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Louisiana, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas. States in the lowest group (32.49 to 49.69 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Hawaii, Kentucky, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 13d.

Long description, Figure 14a. Figure 14a is a U.S. map showing binge alcohol use in the past month among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (27.27 to 34.80 percent) were Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Iowa, Massachusetts, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (25.55 to 27.26 percent) were Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Vermont. States in the midgroup (23.86 to 25.54 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, Indiana, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (21.59 to 23.85 percent) were Alabama, California, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Kentucky, Maine, New York, North Carolina, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (16.23 to 21.58 percent) were Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 14a.

Long description, Figure 14b. Figure 14b is a U.S. map showing binge alcohol use in the past month among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (5.43 to 7.51 percent) were Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (5.08 to 5.42 percent) were Connecticut, Kentucky, Maine, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (4.75 to 5.07 percent) were Idaho, Indiana, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (4.33 to 4.74 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, California, Delaware, Illinois, Michigan, Mississippi, Nevada, Texas, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (3.41 to 4.32 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Maryland, New Mexico, South Carolina, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 14b.

Long description, Figure 14c. Figure 14c is a U.S. map showing binge alcohol use in the past month among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (41.21 to 50.26 percent) were Connecticut, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (36.91 to 41.20 percent) were Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (33.69 to 36.90 percent) were California, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (29.95 to 33.68 percent) were Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana, Nevada, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (23.46 to 29.94 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, New Mexico, Tennessee, Utah, and Washington.

Long description end. Return to Figure 14c.

Long description, Figure 14d. Figure 14d is a U.S. map showing binge alcohol use in the past month among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (27.51 to 34.05 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Carolina, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (26.10 to 27.50 percent) were Connecticut, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Rhode Island, and South Dakota. States in the midgroup (24.57 to 26.09 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Delaware, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (22.15 to 24.56 percent) were California, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, New York, North Carolina, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington. States in the lowest group (16.74 to 22.14 percent) were Arizona, Arkansas, Kentucky, Maine, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 14d.

Long description, Figure 15a. Figure 15a is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from having five or more drinks of an alcoholic beverage once or twice a week among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (35.67 to 39.33 percent) were Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (39.34 to 41.51 percent) were Alaska, Indiana, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Washington. States in the midgroup (41.52 to 43.89 percent) were Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (43.90 to 45.77 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Louisiana, Maryland, Nevada, and Virginia. States in the highest group (45.78 to 49.81 percent) were California, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Texas, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 15a.

Long description, Figure 15b. Figure 15b is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from having five or more drinks of an alcoholic beverage once or twice a week among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (34.93 to 38.56 percent) were Iowa, Maine, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Oregon, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (38.57 to 40.25 percent) were Alaska, Idaho, Indiana, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (40.26 to 42.62 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, Oklahoma, and Rhode Island. States in the next highest group (42.63 to 44.70 percent) were Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Louisiana, Maryland, New Mexico, New York, South Carolina, and Tennessee. States in the highest group (44.71 to 49.18 percent) were Alabama, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, Texas, Utah, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 15b.

Long description, Figure 15c. Figure 15c is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from having five or more drinks of an alcoholic beverage once or twice a week among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (29.49 to 32.81 percent) were Iowa, Maine, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (32.82 to 34.90 percent) were Connecticut, Indiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (34.91 to 37.10 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, New York, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Tennessee, and Washington. States in the next highest group (37.11 to 39.36 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Delaware, Hawaii, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, Utah, and Virginia. States in the highest group (39.37 to 44.44 percent) were Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 15c.

Long description, Figure 15d. Figure 15d is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from having five or more drinks of an alcoholic beverage once or twice a week among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (36.48 to 40.67 percent) were Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (40.68 to 42.78 percent) were Alaska, Indiana, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Washington. States in the midgroup (42.79 to 45.27 percent) were Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (45.28 to 46.88 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Louisiana, Maryland, Nevada, and Virginia. States in the highest group (46.89 to 51.30 percent) were California, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Texas, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 15d.

Long description, Figure 16a. Figure 16a is a U.S. map showing alcohol use in the past month among individuals aged 12 to 20, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (22.62 to 31.66 percent) were Connecticut, Iowa, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (20.47 to 22.61 percent) were Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Nebraska, Ohio, Oregon, and South Dakota. States in the midgroup (17.81 to 20.46 percent) were Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (16.55 to 17.80 percent) were Arkansas, California, Indiana, Nevada, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas. States in the lowest group (9.94 to 16.54 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Maryland, Mississippi, New Mexico, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 16a.

Long description, Figure 16b. Figure 16b is a U.S. map showing binge alcohol use in the past month among individuals aged 12 to 20, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (14.41 to 21.21 percent) were Connecticut, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (12.55 to 14.40 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (10.72 to 12.54 percent) were Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (9.78 to 10.71 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, California, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Washington. States in the lowest group (7.42 to 9.77 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Georgia, Hawaii, Maryland, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 16b.

Long description, Figure 17a. Figure 17a is a U.S. map showing tobacco product use in the past month among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (27.01 to 33.77 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, Oklahoma, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (23.99 to 27.00 percent) were Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Tennessee. States in the midgroup (20.95 to 23.98 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, Georgia, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (19.52 to 20.94 percent) were Colorado, Idaho, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Nevada, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Texas. States in the lowest group (14.10 to 19.51 percent) were Arizona, California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 17a.

Long description, Figure 17b. Figure 17b is a U.S. map showing tobacco product use in the past month among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (5.67 to 8.14 percent) were Alaska, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (4.95 to 5.66 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Maine, Missouri, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. States in the midgroup (3.93 to 4.94 percent) were Colorado, Delaware, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (3.47 to 3.92 percent) were the District of Columbia, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Massachusetts, Nevada, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (2.20 to 3.46 percent) were Arizona, California, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 17b.

Long description, Figure 17c. Figure 17c is a U.S. map showing tobacco product use in the past month among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (31.37 to 40.01 percent) were Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Montana, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (28.76 to 31.36 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Virginia. States in the midgroup (25.56 to 28.75 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Delaware, Iowa, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, and Oregon. States in the next lowest group (22.06 to 25.55 percent) were Connecticut, Idaho, Kansas, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nevada, New York, Rhode Island, Texas, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (17.04 to 22.05 percent) were Arizona, California, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, New Jersey, Utah, and Washington.

Long description end. Return to Figure 17c.

Long description, Figure 17d. Figure 17d is a U.S. map showing tobacco product use in the past month among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (28.41 to 35.47 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, Ohio, Oklahoma, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (25.18 to 28.40 percent) were Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (22.13 to 25.17 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, Georgia, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Texas, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (20.32 to 22.12 percent) were Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (14.97 to 20.31 percent) were Arizona, California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 17d.

Long description, Figure 18a. Figure 18a is a U.S. map showing cigarette use in the past month among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (20.84 to 25.86 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (18.62 to 20.83 percent) were Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (16.52 to 18.61 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, Kansas, Maine, Nebraska, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (15.49 to 16.51 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, District of Columbia, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Minnesota, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (11.43 to 15.48 percent) were California, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 18a.

Long description, Figure 18b. Figure 18b is a U.S. map showing cigarette use in the past month among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (3.95 to 5.58 percent) were Kentucky, Maine, Mississippi, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (3.02 to 3.94 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Missouri, Ohio, South Carolina, and Tennessee. States in the midgroup (2.56 to 3.01 percent) were Colorado, Idaho, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (1.89 to 2.55 percent) were Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Massachusetts, Nevada, Rhode Island, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (1.23 to 1.88 percent) were Arizona, California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 18b.

Long description, Figure 18c. Figure 18c is a U.S. map showing cigarette use in the past month among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (22.47 to 30.72 percent) were Indiana, Kentucky, Montana, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (20.79 to 22.46 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Maine, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Virginia. States in the midgroup (18.23 to 20.78 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oregon, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (16.17 to 18.22 percent) were Arizona, Delaware, District of Columbia, Idaho, Kansas, Massachusetts, Nevada, Rhode Island, Texas, and Washington. States in the lowest group (13.24 to 16.16 percent) were California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 18c.

Long description, Figure 18d. Figure 18d is a U.S. map showing cigarette use in the past month among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (22.69 to 27.31 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (20.31 to 22.68 percent) were Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Tennessee, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (17.98 to 20.30 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, Georgia, Maine, Nebraska, Nevada, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (16.57 to 17.97 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, District of Columbia, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Minnesota, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (12.33 to 16.56 percent) were California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 18d.

Long description, Figure 19a. Figure 19a is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from smoking one or more packs of cigarettes per day among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (62.26 to 66.59 percent) were Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (66.60 to 68.13 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Ohio, South Carolina, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (68.14 to 71.51 percent) were Arizona, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Louisiana, Maine, Montana, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Washington. States in the next highest group (71.52 to 73.09 percent) were Colorado, Delaware, Illinois, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, and Vermont. States in the highest group (73.10 to 77.16 percent) were California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 19a.

Long description, Figure 19b. Figure 19b is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from smoking one or more packs of cigarettes per day among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (60.61 to 62.48 percent) were Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (62.49 to 63.26 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Hawaii, Louisiana, Missouri, Montana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina. States in the midgroup (63.27 to 64.68 percent) were Delaware, District of Columbia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (64.69 to 66.20 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Nevada, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Washington. States in the highest group (66.21 to 68.98 percent) were California, Connecticut, Florida, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 19b.

Long description, Figure 19c. Figure 19c is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from smoking one or more packs of cigarettes per day among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (57.28 to 61.17 percent) were Alaska, Iowa, Kentucky, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (61.18 to 63.30 percent) were Alabama, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (63.31 to 66.90 percent) were Arkansas, Colorado, Hawaii, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, Tennessee, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (66.91 to 67.92 percent) were Arizona, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, New Mexico, Rhode Island, and Texas. States in the highest group (67.93 to 72.63 percent) were California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Utah, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 19c.

Long description, Figure 19d. Figure 19d is a U.S. map showing perceptions of great risk from smoking one or more packs of cigarettes per day among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the lowest group (63.02 to 67.95 percent) were Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (67.96 to 69.52 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Ohio, South Carolina, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (69.53 to 72.94 percent) were Arizona, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Louisiana, Maine, Montana, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Washington. States in the next highest group (72.95 to 74.57 percent) were Colorado, Delaware, Illinois, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas, Utah, and Vermont. States in the highest group (74.58 to 78.88 percent) were California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 19d.

Long description, Figure 20a. Figure 20a is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use disorder in the past year among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (3.46 to 5.00 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Indiana, Maine, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (3.02 to 3.45 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Ohio, Rhode Island, and Washington. States in the midgroup (2.85 to 3.01 percent) were Iowa, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Utah, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (2.63 to 2.84 percent) were Connecticut, Idaho, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (2.21 to 2.62 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Nebraska, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 20a.

Long description, Figure 20b. Figure 20b is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use disorder in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (3.61 to 4.70 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (3.33 to 3.60 percent) were Arizona, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Ohio, Rhode Island, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (3.07 to 3.32 percent) were Florida, Idaho, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (2.81 to 3.06 percent) were Arkansas, Hawaii, Maryland, Michigan, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (2.45 to 2.80 percent) were Alabama, Connecticut, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Jersey, Texas, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 20b.

Long description, Figure 20c. Figure 20c is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use disorder in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (8.33 to 11.68 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (7.88 to 8.32 percent) were Arizona, Connecticut, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, New Hampshire, Ohio, Rhode Island, Virginia, and Washington. States in the midgroup (7.26 to 7.87 percent) were Alabama, Hawaii, Illinois, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (6.63 to 7.25 percent) were Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Utah, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (5.54 to 6.62 percent) were Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 20c.

Long description, Figure 20d. Figure 20d is a U.S. map showing illicit drug use disorder in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (2.70 to 4.31 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Montana, Nevada, Ohio, Oregon, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (2.26 to 2.69 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Delaware, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New York, and Washington. States in the midgroup (2.10 to 2.25 percent) were Illinois, Iowa, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (1.91 to 2.09 percent) were Arkansas, Idaho, Maryland, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Rhode Island, Utah, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (1.51 to 1.90 percent) were Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Michigan, Nebraska, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 20d.

Long description, Figure 21a. Figure 21a is a U.S. map showing pain reliever use disorder in the past year among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (0.69 to 1.05 percent) were Alabama, District of Columbia, Florida, Kentucky, Maine, North Dakota, Ohio, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (0.60 to 0.68 percent) were Colorado, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Montana, Oregon, Tennessee, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (0.53 to 0.59 percent) were Arizona, California, Delaware, Hawaii, Kansas, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Utah, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (0.49 to 0.52 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, Georgia, Missouri, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (0.36 to 0.48 percent) were Connecticut, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 21a.

Long description, Figure 21b. Figure 21b is a U.S. map showing pain reliever use disorder in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (0.81 to 0.93 percent) were Kansas, Maine, Montana, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (0.73 to 0.80 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Kentucky, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Ohio, Vermont, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (0.69 to 0.72 percent) were Arizona, Indiana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, and Utah. States in the next lowest group (0.61 to 0.68 percent) were Delaware, Georgia, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, South Carolina, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (0.50 to 0.60 percent) were California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 21b.

Long description, Figure 21c. Figure 21c is a U.S. map showing pain reliever use disorder in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (0.70 to 1.17 percent) were Alabama, District of Columbia, Florida, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, North Dakota, Ohio, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (0.60 to 0.69 percent) were California, Colorado, Idaho, Iowa, Massachusetts, Montana, Oregon, Tennessee, Utah, and Washington. States in the midgroup (0.53 to 0.59 percent) were Arizona, Delaware, Hawaii, Kansas, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (0.46 to 0.52 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, Connecticut, Georgia, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (0.33 to 0.45 percent) were Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 21c.

Long description, Figure 22a. Figure 22a is a U.S. map showing alcohol use disorder in the past year among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (6.29 to 9.00 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (5.73 to 6.28 percent) were California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Iowa, Massachusetts, Nevada, South Dakota, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (5.22 to 5.72 percent) were Alabama, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. States in the next lowest group (4.88 to 5.21 percent) were Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (3.94 to 4.87 percent) were Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 22a.

Long description, Figure 22b. Figure 22b is a U.S. map showing alcohol use disorder in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (1.98 to 2.56 percent) were Colorado, Iowa, Maine, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, Vermont, Washington, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (1.78 to 1.97 percent) were Alaska, California, Connecticut, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, Rhode Island, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (1.65 to 1.77 percent) were Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. States in the next lowest group (1.50 to 1.64 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Illinois, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (1.24 to 1.49 percent) were the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 22b.

Long description, Figure 22c. Figure 22c is a U.S. map showing alcohol use disorder in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (12.09 to 14.39 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Hawaii, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (10.52 to 12.08 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (9.48 to 10.51 percent) were California, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (8.70 to 9.47 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Kentucky, Missouri, New York, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (7.12 to 8.69 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, Texas, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 22c.

Long description, Figure 22d. Figure 22d is a U.S. map showing alcohol use disorder in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (5.94 to 9.00 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Montana, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (5.44 to 5.93 percent) were Connecticut, Hawaii, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Dakota, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (4.97 to 5.43 percent) were Alabama, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. States in the next lowest group (4.70 to 4.96 percent) were Arkansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (3.73 to 4.69 percent) were Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 22d.

Long description, Figure 23a. Figure 23a is a U.S. map showing substance use disorder in the past year among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (8.56 to 11.94 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (7.67 to 8.55 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, North Dakota, and Washington. States in the midgroup (7.35 to 7.66 percent) were Alabama, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (6.84 to 7.34 percent) were Arizona, Idaho, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (5.81 to 6.83 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 23a.

Long description, Figure 23b. Figure 23b is a U.S. map showing substance use disorder in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (4.85 to 5.77 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Iowa, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, Vermont, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (4.45 to 4.84 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, California, Idaho, Maine, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, South Dakota, and Washington. States in the midgroup (4.01 to 4.44 percent) were Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (3.72 to 4.00 percent) were Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Michigan, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah. States in the lowest group (3.19 to 3.71 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 23b.

Long description, Figure 23c. Figure 23c is a U.S. map showing substance use disorder in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (17.02 to 21.01 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (15.14 to 17.01 percent) were California, Delaware, Hawaii, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (14.62 to 15.13 percent) were Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Michigan, Nebraska, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (13.11 to 14.61 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Idaho, Kansas, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (11.67 to 13.10 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 23c.

Long description, Figure 23d. Figure 23d is a U.S. map showing substance use disorder in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (7.62 to 11.36 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (7.00 to 7.61 percent) were Alabama, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, and Washington. States in the midgroup (6.46 to 6.99 percent) were Connecticut, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (6.10 to 6.45 percent) were Arkansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (5.14 to 6.09 percent) were Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Maryland, New Jersey, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 23d.

Long description, Figure 24a. Figure 24a is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment at a specialty facility for illicit drug use in the past year among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (3.01 to 4.57 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Indiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (2.69 to 3.00 percent) were Arizona, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Washington. States in the midgroup (2.54 to 2.68 percent) were Alabama, Connecticut, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, North Carolina, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Utah, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (2.35 to 2.53 percent) were Arkansas, Idaho, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (2.04 to 2.34 percent) were Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Mississippi, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 24a.

Long description, Figure 24b. Figure 24b is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment at a specialty facility for illicit drug use in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (3.43 to 4.43 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (3.07 to 3.42 percent) were Delaware, Idaho, Illinois, Maine, Minnesota, Ohio, Rhode Island, Washington, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (2.83 to 3.06 percent) were Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (2.64 to 2.82 percent) were Kentucky, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Utah, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (2.16 to 2.63 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 24b.

Long description, Figure 24c. Figure 24c is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment at a specialty facility for illicit drug use in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (7.65 to 11.39 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Nevada, Vermont, and Virginia. States in the next highest group (7.41 to 7.64 percent) were Arizona, Delaware, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Washington. States in the midgroup (6.60 to 7.40 percent) were Alabama, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania. States in the next lowest group (6.04 to 6.59 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, North Dakota, Utah, and West Virginia. States in the lowest group (5.46 to 6.03 percent) were Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 24c.

Long description, Figure 24d. Figure 24d is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment at a specialty facility for illicit drug use in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (2.23 to 3.52 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (1.98 to 2.22 percent) were Alabama, Delaware, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, New York, Ohio, Oregon, and Rhode Island. States in the midgroup (1.80 to 1.97 percent) were Arizona, Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Utah. States in the next lowest group (1.68 to 1.79 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Maryland, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (1.32 to 1.67 percent) were Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Michigan, New Hampshire, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

Long description end. Return to Figure 24d.

Long description, Figure 25a. Figure 25a is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment at a specialty facility for alcohol use in the past year among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (5.87 to 8.27 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (5.49 to 5.86 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Nevada, South Dakota, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (5.02 to 5.48 percent) were Alabama, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, and Oklahoma. States in the next lowest group (4.59 to 5.01 percent) were Kentucky, Missouri, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (3.81 to 4.58 percent) were Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 25a.

Long description, Figure 25b. Figure 25b is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment at a specialty facility for alcohol use in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (1.88 to 2.43 percent) were Iowa, Maine, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Vermont, Washington, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (1.73 to 1.87 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, Rhode Island, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (1.63 to 1.72 percent) were Arizona, California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Idaho, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania. States in the next lowest group (1.48 to 1.62 percent) were Arkansas, Illinois, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Tennessee, Utah, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (1.21 to 1.47 percent) were Alabama, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 25b.

Long description, Figure 25c. Figure 25c is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment at a specialty facility for alcohol use in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (11.48 to 14.06 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (10.24 to 11.47 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nebraska, South Dakota, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (9.36 to 10.23 percent) were California, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (8.44 to 9.35 percent) were Arizona, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (6.93 to 8.43 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 25c.

Long description, Figure 25d. Figure 25d is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment at a specialty facility for alcohol use in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (5.44 to 8.15 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (5.12 to 5.43 percent) were Connecticut, Hawaii, Louisiana, Michigan, Nevada, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (4.71 to 5.11 percent) were Alabama, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, and Oklahoma. States in the next lowest group (4.43 to 4.70 percent) were Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (3.60 to 4.42 percent) were Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 25d.

Long description, Figure 26a. Figure 26a is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment at a specialty facility for substance use in the past year among individuals aged 12 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (7.90 to 10.56 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Oregon, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (7.02 to 7.89 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Indiana, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (6.71 to 7.01 percent) were Alabama, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, and Ohio. States in the next lowest group (6.25 to 6.70 percent) were Arizona, Kansas, Kentucky, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (5.51 to 6.24 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 26a.

Long description, Figure 26b. Figure 26b is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment at a specialty facility for substance use in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (4.57 to 5.40 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Iowa, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, Vermont, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (4.21 to 4.56 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, California, Maine, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (3.82 to 4.20 percent) were Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (3.48 to 3.81 percent) were Florida, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (3.09 to 3.47 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 26b.

Long description, Figure 26c. Figure 26c is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment at a specialty facility for substance use in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (16.40 to 19.82 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Maine, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the next highest group (14.60 to 16.39 percent) were California, Delaware, Hawaii, Iowa, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (13.68 to 14.59 percent) were Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Virginia, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (12.55 to 13.67 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Idaho, Kansas, Maryland, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (10.99 to 12.54 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Utah.

Long description end. Return to Figure 26c.

Long description, Figure 26d. Figure 26d is a U.S. map showing needing but not receiving treatment at a specialty facility for substance use in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (6.79 to 9.85 percent) were Alaska, California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington. States in the next highest group (6.23 to 6.78 percent) were Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and Rhode Island. States in the midgroup (5.88 to 6.22 percent) were Alabama, Connecticut, Idaho, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (5.55 to 5.87 percent) were Arizona, Arkansas, Iowa, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (4.60 to 5.54 percent) were Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 26d.

Long description, Figure 27a. Figure 27a is a U.S. map showing any mental illness in the past year among adults aged 18 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (22.55 to 26.86 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Missouri, Ohio, Oregon, Utah, Washington, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (21.30 to 22.54 percent) were Alaska, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and Vermont. States in the midgroup (20.20 to 21.29 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, and North Dakota. States in the next lowest group (18.86 to 20.19 percent) were Arizona, California, Illinois, Mississippi, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (16.37 to 18.85 percent) were Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Maryland, New Jersey, South Dakota, Texas, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 27a.

Long description, Figure 27b. Figure 27b is a U.S. map showing any mental illness in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (31.91 to 34.28 percent) were Colorado, Idaho, Maine, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Ohio, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (29.22 to 31.90 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, Indiana, Massachusetts, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Vermont, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (28.23 to 29.21 percent) were Arizona, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Illinois, Michigan, Nevada, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (26.87 to 28.22 percent) were Alabama, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Montana, New Mexico, New York, and Tennessee. States in the lowest group (23.24 to 26.86 percent) were Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 27b.

Long description, Figure 27c. Figure 27c is a U.S. map showing any mental illness in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (21.10 to 25.29 percent) were Colorado, District of Columbia, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (20.23 to 21.09 percent) were Idaho, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Vermont, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (18.76 to 20.22 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Delaware, Kansas, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Montana, North Dakota, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (17.28 to 18.75 percent) were Arizona, California, Illinois, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Tennessee. States in the lowest group (15.11 to 17.27 percent) were Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Maryland, New Jersey, South Dakota, Texas, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 27c.

Long description, Figure 28a. Figure 28a is a U.S. map showing serious mental illness in the past year among adults aged 18 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (5.64 to 6.31 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Ohio, Oregon, Utah, Vermont, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (5.43 to 5.63 percent) were Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Missouri, Nevada, Oklahoma, Washington, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (5.05 to 5.42 percent) were Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Montana, New Mexico, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (4.54 to 5.04 percent) were the District of Columbia, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina. States in the lowest group (4.08 to 4.53 percent) were California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Texas, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 28a.

Long description, Figure 28b. Figure 28b is a U.S. map showing serious mental illness in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (9.50 to 11.35 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, Ohio, Oregon, Vermont, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (8.98 to 9.49 percent) were Arkansas, Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (8.55 to 8.97 percent) were Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (7.42 to 8.54 percent) were Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (6.75 to 7.41 percent) were California, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 28b.

Long description, Figure 28c. Figure 28c is a U.S. map showing serious mental illness in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (5.09 to 5.67 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Delaware, Kentucky, Maine, Nevada, Ohio, Oregon, Utah, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (4.85 to 5.08 percent) were Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Vermont, and Washington. States in the midgroup (4.54 to 4.84 percent) were the District of Columbia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Montana, New Mexico, South Dakota, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (4.12 to 4.53 percent) were California, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and South Carolina. States in the lowest group (3.60 to 4.11 percent) were Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Texas, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 28c.

Long description, Figure 29a. Figure 29a is a U.S. map showing those who had received mental health services in the past year among adults aged 18 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (19.01 to 22.16 percent) were Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Ohio, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (17.51 to 19.00 percent) were Colorado, Idaho, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (16.36 to 17.50 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, North Carolina, North Dakota, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (14.10 to 16.35 percent) were Alabama, Illinois, Louisiana, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (10.49 to 14.09 percent) were Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Maryland, Mississippi, Nevada, New Jersey, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 29a.

Long description, Figure 29b. Figure 29b is a U.S. map showing those who had received mental health services in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (19.92 to 22.87 percent) were Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Utah, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (18.52 to 19.91 percent) were Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the midgroup (16.71 to 18.51 percent) were Alaska, Connecticut, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (14.29 to 16.70 percent) were Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Louisiana, Maryland, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (11.85 to 14.28 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Mississippi, Nevada, New Jersey, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 29b.

Long description, Figure 29c. Figure 29c is a U.S. map showing those who had received mental health services in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (18.85 to 22.14 percent) were Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Ohio, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (17.43 to 18.84 percent) were Colorado, Idaho, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oregon, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the midgroup (16.02 to 17.42 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (14.23 to 16.01 percent) were Alabama, Illinois, Louisiana, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (10.31 to 14.22 percent) were Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Maryland, Mississippi, Nevada, New Jersey, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 29c.

Long description, Figure 30a. Figure 30a is a U.S. map showing major depressive episode in the past year among adults aged 18 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (8.53 to 9.82 percent) were Missouri, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (8.23 to 8.52 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, New Hampshire, North Dakota, and Oklahoma. States in the midgroup (7.82 to 8.22 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (7.13 to 7.81 percent) were Arizona, California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Tennessee. States in the lowest group (5.83 to 7.12 percent) were Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Texas, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 30a.

Long description, Figure 30b. Figure 30b is a U.S. map showing major depressive episode in the past year among youths aged 12 to 17, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (16.70 to 18.62 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (15.86 to 16.69 percent) were Arkansas, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (15.12 to 15.85 percent) were California, Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, South Dakota, and Virginia. States in the next lowest group (14.15 to 15.11 percent) were Alabama, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, Montana, North Dakota, Ohio, Rhode Island, and Texas. States in the lowest group (11.36 to 14.14 percent) were the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

Long description end. Return to Figure 30b.

Long description, Figure 30c. Figure 30c is a U.S. map showing major depressive episode in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (16.32 to 17.27 percent) were Colorado, Idaho, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Ohio, Oregon, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (15.51 to 16.31 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Maine, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Nevada, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Utah, and Vermont. States in the midgroup (14.73 to 15.50 percent) were Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, New Mexico, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Tennessee. States in the next lowest group (13.58 to 14.72 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Montana, and North Carolina. States in the lowest group (11.17 to 13.57 percent) were Alabama, California, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 30c.

Long description, Figure 30d. Figure 30d is a U.S. map showing major depressive episode in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (7.41 to 8.55 percent) were Delaware, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, Washington, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (7.10 to 7.40 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Colorado, District of Columbia, Indiana, Maine, Nevada, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (6.65 to 7.09 percent) were Arkansas, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and North Carolina. States in the next lowest group (5.97 to 6.64 percent) were Arizona, California, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Wyoming. States in the lowest group (4.93 to 5.96 percent) were Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Texas, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 30d.

Long description, Figure 31a. Figure 31a is a U.S. map showing those who had had serious thoughts of suicide in the past year among adults aged 18 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (5.32 to 6.19 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Indiana, Maine, Ohio, Oregon, Utah, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (4.90 to 5.31 percent) were Arizona, Delaware, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, North Dakota, and Washington. States in the midgroup (4.69 to 4.89 percent) were Alabama, Arkansas, Hawaii, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina. States in the next lowest group (4.44 to 4.68 percent) were California, Connecticut, Kentucky, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (3.79 to 4.43 percent) were the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Texas, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 31a.

Long description, Figure 31b. Figure 31b is a U.S. map showing those who had had serious thoughts of suicide in the past year among adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (13.28 to 14.95 percent) were Alaska, Colorado, Idaho, Indiana, Maine, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (12.37 to 13.27 percent) were Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah, and Vermont. States in the midgroup (11.90 to 12.36 percent) were Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Nevada, and Washington. States in the next lowest group (11.22 to 11.89 percent) were Hawaii, Illinois, Michigan, Montana, New Mexico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (9.01 to 11.21 percent) were California, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 31b.

Long description, Figure 31c. Figure 31c is a U.S. map showing those who had had serious thoughts of suicide in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (4.21 to 4.75 percent) were Alaska, Delaware, Indiana, Maine, Ohio, Oregon, Utah, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (3.74 to 4.20 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, South Carolina, and Washington. States in the midgroup (3.57 to 3.73 percent) were Alabama, California, District of Columbia, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Nebraska, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee. States in the next lowest group (3.26 to 3.56 percent) were Arkansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New York, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (2.82 to 3.25 percent) were Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 31c.

Long description, Figure 32a. Figure 32a is a U.S. map showing those who had made any suicide plans in the past year among adults aged 18 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (1.76 to 2.01 percent) were Arizona, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Ohio, Utah, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (1.59 to 1.75 percent) were Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, Oregon, South Carolina, and South Dakota. States in the midgroup (1.45 to 1.58 percent) were Alabama, Delaware, Maine, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (1.23 to 1.44 percent) were Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and North Carolina. States in the lowest group (0.94 to 1.22 percent) were California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Texas, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 32a.

Long description, Figure 32b. Figure 32b is a U.S. map showing those who had made any suicide plans in the past year among young adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (4.83 to 5.65 percent) were Alaska, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Nebraska, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (4.38 to 4.82 percent) were Illinois, Minnesota, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Utah, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the midgroup (3.89 to 4.37 percent) were Alabama, Hawaii, Indiana, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and Rhode Island. States in the next lowest group (3.51 to 3.88 percent) were Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Georgia, Kentucky, Michigan, Montana, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (2.20 to 3.50 percent) were Arkansas, California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 32b.

Long description, Figure 32c. Figure 32c is a U.S. map showing those who had made any suicide plans in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (1.32 to 1.51 percent) were Arizona, Arkansas, Idaho, Indiana, Nebraska, Ohio, South Carolina, Utah, West Virginia, and Wyoming. States in the next highest group (1.15 to 1.31 percent) were Colorado, Delaware, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, and Oregon. States in the midgroup (0.99 to 1.14 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Maine, Montana, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin. States in the next lowest group (0.88 to 0.98 percent) were California, District of Columbia, Georgia, Hawaii, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New York, North Carolina, and Oklahoma. States in the lowest group (0.63 to 0.87 percent) were Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Texas, and Virginia.

Long description end. Return to Figure 32c.

Long description, Figure 33a. Figure 33a is a U.S. map showing those who had attempted suicide in the past year among adults aged 18 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (0.72 to 0.92 percent) were Arkansas, Idaho, Indiana, Missouri, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (0.65 to 0.71 percent) were Arizona, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Nebraska, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. States in the midgroup (0.57 to 0.64 percent) were Colorado, Georgia, Maine, Michigan, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (0.48 to 0.56 percent) were Alabama, California, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Montana, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (0.34 to 0.47 percent) were Alaska, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington.

Long description end. Return to Figure 33a.

Long description, Figure 33b. Figure 33b is a U.S. map showing those who had attempted suicide in the past year among young adults aged 18 to 25, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (2.34 to 2.77 percent) were Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Louisiana, Nevada, Oregon, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia. States in the next highest group (2.11 to 2.33 percent) were Alabama, Colorado, Delaware, Georgia, Maine, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania. States in the midgroup (1.98 to 2.10 percent) were Arkansas, Florida, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Washington, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (1.73 to 1.97 percent) were Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the lowest group (1.28 to 1.72 percent) were California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Idaho, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and Texas.

Long description end. Return to Figure 33b.

Long description, Figure 33c. Figure 33c is a U.S. map showing those who had attempted suicide in the past year among adults aged 26 or older, by state: percentages, annual averages based on 2018 and 2019 NSDUHs. States listed here in alphabetical order within each group were divided into five groups based on the magnitude of their percentages. States in the highest group (0.51 to 0.58 percent) were Arkansas, Idaho, Indiana, Missouri, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Utah, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. States in the next highest group (0.43 to 0.50 percent) were Arizona, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Nebraska, New York, Ohio, South Dakota, and Tennessee. States in the midgroup (0.34 to 0.42 percent) were the District of Columbia, Louisiana, Maine, Mississippi, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, and Wyoming. States in the next lowest group (0.28 to 0.33 percent) were California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Montana, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oregon, and Virginia. States in the lowest group (0.16 to 0.27 percent) were Alabama, Alaska, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington.

Long description end. Return to Figure 33c.

Go to Top of Page