Children and Youth

This installment of the SAMHSA Disaster Behavioral Health Information Series (DBHIS) focuses on disaster behavioral health resources for children and youth, their families, and child-serving professionals. Children and youth are a population with unique needs and vulnerabilities during all stages of a disaster. Many children may not have the skills or knowledge of how to prepare for or stay safe during disasters. During the aftermath of a disaster, the reactions of children and youth will be vastly different from those of adults, and they will differ from one age group to another.

The following resources can be used by parents and other caregivers and school staff to teach children about disasters and how to prepare before they occur. Some can be used by children and youth for individual and family preparedness and to understand and cope with their disaster reactions. Resources are also included that school personnel can use to evaluate and improve their organization’s capacity for dealing with crisis events.

Use the menu bar at left to narrow the results by disaster type, behavioral health issue or condition, treatment topic, and more.

Related Resources

Displaying 95 total results.
University of Southern California, Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work

The National Center for School Crisis and Bereavement at the USC Suzanna Dworak-Peck School of Social Work is dedicated to helping schools support their students through crisis and loss. They offer crisis response resources, educational materials, and consultation and training, and they conduct childhood bereavement and disaster preparedness research. Many of the resources they offer are free; however, the books may require purchase.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

Educators and school personnel can use this guide to determine how well their school is prepared to respond to the immediate and long-term psychological effects of a crisis or disaster on students, their families, and staff. It offers many practical suggestions for developing procedures and plans for mitigation, prevention, preparation, response, and recovery.

National Center for Crisis Management

This guide provides information to help schools respond effectively to a range of school crises and disasters that affect school communities. The links provided offer strategies to potentially prevent violent school-based tragedies, identify students who may be at greatest risk of violent behavior, and address the emergent needs of students during times of crisis.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This handout describes how young children may respond to disasters and other crises and suggests ways for parents or other caregivers to interpret their behavior and support them in coping. The handout uses the acronym SAFETY to help readers remember the tips provided.

New York Life Foundation

This 26-page booklet is for parents and other adults to help children who have suffered the loss of a parent or loved one to get through their grief. Topics covered include explaining death to children, common child responses to death, helping children cope over time, and finding additional support for children. [Authors: Schonfeld, D. J., and Quackenbush, M.]

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This handout uses the acronym SAFETY to outline practical ways in which parents can help young children cope with the emotional impact of a hurricane.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This informational handout provides an overview of how children and adolescents may react to natural and human-caused disasters that they experience as traumatic. It describes the reactions that are typical among specific age ranges and offers tips for parents and other caregivers, school staff, health care practitioners, and community members to help children and adolescents cope.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This is a guide for communities to help them improve their capacity to respond effectively to disasters and terrorism. It includes information, suggestions, and resources for nine sectors, including business, cultural and faith-based groups and organizations, and first responders. [Authors: Gurwitch, R. H., Pfefferbaum, B., Montgomery, J. M., Klomp, R. W., and Reissman, D. B.]

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (HHS, CDC)

This part of CDC's website describes how children differ from adults in how they experience disasters; suggests ways to prepare for disasters; and provides links to webpages with information specifically for health professionals and responders, parents, children, and schools and child care centers. Also provided is information about specific threats and for children with special health care needs in emergencies.

New York University, School of Medicine, Child Study Center

This guide examines children's reactions to disasters and trauma at different stages of development, as well as providing practical advice to parents and school staff for supporting children and adolescents in coping. Also included is information about when and how to get help for mental health problems in children. [Authors: Faculty and staff of the New York University Child Study Center, Koplewicz, H.S., and Cloitre, M.]

National Child Traumatic Stress Network, National Center for Child Traumatic Stress (NCTSN, NCCTS)

According to the NCTSN website, this toolkit "provides school administrators, teachers, staff, and concerned parents with basic information about working with traumatized children in the school system." The toolkit is available in Spanish at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/caja-de-herramientas-para-educadores-par....

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD (VA, PTSD)

Designed for research and mental health professionals, this article identifies causes of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children and adolescents, discusses how many children develop PTSD, and lists PTSD symptoms in children. It also covers treatments for children and adolescents with PTSD.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This tip sheet notes that many college students may be experiencing stress after a hurricane; identifies common reactions to hurricanes; and lists ways that college students can care for themselves, increase their resilience, and cope with the recovery period after the hurricane.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

Designed for youth, this resource provides information on community violence, how it can affect the daily lives of people in communities with high levels of violence, and what to do for support. It also helps youth to understand their reactions and offers tips for safety.

Southeast Missouri State University

This online article outlines common reactions to violent events such as campus shootings. It lists tips for coping and seeking help after a traumatic event, as well as resources for additional information and support.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (HHS, SAMHSA)

The goal of this 60-minute podcast is to assist disaster behavioral health responders in providing culturally aware and appropriate disaster behavioral health services for children, youth, and families affected by natural and human-caused disasters. The PDF version of the podcast presentation is available at https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/podcasts-cultural-awareness-p....

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This webinar provides an overview of the challenges journalists face covering disasters and how mental health professionals can collaborate with the news media. It covers how professionals can help journalists cover children and disasters, and how to assess whether disaster plans are media-friendly.

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP)

At this part of its website, AACAP provides an overview of the topic of disasters and how they affect children, and how parents can offer support, and then presents links to fact sheets, answers to parents' frequently asked questions, and policies and articles for clinicians. The webpage also features information and links for finding help for a child or adolescent struggling with his or her disaster reactions.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This part of the NCTSN's website links to sections with information about specific types of natural disasters and about pandemics, how to prepare for them, and how they may affect children and families. Also provided are ideas for preparedness, response, and recovery, as well as links to related resources.

American Psychological Association (APA)

The APA Help Center contains many articles on natural and human-caused disasters, including terrorist attacks; how disasters affect survivors; and tips for coping. Articles cover the effects of and strategies for coping with residential fires and wildfires, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, and disease outbreaks, as well as ideas for enhancing resilience.

Sesame Street

This toolkit shares the story of how the Sesame Street characters Grover and Rosita prepare for emergencies. Resources include videos; guides for families, educators, and communities; a family emergency plan template; and an emergency kit checklist. The toolkit is also available in Spanish at https://www.sesamestreet.org/node/1212?language=es.

Consortium for Infant and Child Health

This guide can help families of children with special needs plan and prepare for a disaster or other emergency. The guide covers different types of emergencies and online resources families can use to help with preparing for an emergency. It also identifies items to include in an emergency supply kit and tips for staying as safe as possible if a disaster strikes.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network, National Center for Child Traumatic Stress (NCTSN, NCCTS)

This document helps families prepare for a disaster or other emergency. It reviews information families should know before an emergency, such as the location of evacuation routes. It also helps families create an emergency plan and a family communication plan. It is also available in Armenian at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/family-preparedness-thinking-ahead-armenian, Korean at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/family-preparedness-thinking-ahead-korean, Russian at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/family-preparedness-thinking-ahead-russian, Spanish at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/preparacion-familiar-como-tomar-previsiones, and Vietnamese at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/family-preparedness-thinking-ahead-vietn....

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This section of the website of the NCTSN describes floods and provides information for parents, other caregivers, and families about what to do before, during, and after a flood. Descriptions and links to related resources are also provided.

American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

This fact sheet discusses what parents should tell their children about disasters, the importance of staying calm in an emergency, common child behaviors after a disaster, special needs of children after a disaster, and how to help children cope. Also covered are steps to take in developing a family emergency plan and items to include in an emergency kit for children.

U.S. Department of Education, Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools Technical Assistance Center (ED, REMS Technical Assistance Center)

This guide was developed to assist institutions of higher education in creating and updating emergency plans that are responsive to active shooter situations, as well as natural disasters. This resource was jointly developed by the U.S. Departments of Homeland Security, Justice, Education, and Health and Human Services so that campus communities can align their emergency planning practices with those at the national, state, and local levels.

U.S. Department of Education, Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools Technical Assistance Center (ED, REMS Technical Assistance Center)

Developed in collaboration with the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, and Justice, this guide is designed to help individual schools and school districts develop and maintain emergency operations plans that can be used in a disaster. The guide describes the building blocks of a plan, an intervention to help school communities recover after disasters; and ways to respond to an active shooter situation.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

The Help Kids Cope app can help families talk about disasters before they happen and learn what to do before, during, and after 10 different disaster types. The app also helps parents learn how to best support their children through sheltering in place, evacuations, and healing after the disaster is over. The app can also be useful for teachers and counselors, as well as for emergency preparedness professionals.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health (HHS, NIH, NIMH)

This publication defines trauma due to natural and human-caused disasters as well as other experiences and describes how children commonly react to trauma. It also provides steps that parents can take to help children cope with trauma after violence and disasters.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (DHS, FEMA)

Developed in collaboration with the American Red Cross, this booklet offers information about how children typically react to disasters and suggests ways for parents and other caregivers and other adults to help children in coping. Also provided is information to help families prepare for disasters, including steps to take in creating a family disaster plan. This publication is available in Spanish at https://www.fema.gov/pdf/library/spa_children478.pdf.

National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)

This online article suggests ways for families and school staff to behave around children, and talk with children, to help them cope with the emotional effects of acts of terrorism. Adults are also advised to monitor their own emotions and levels of stress and engage in self-care activities.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Agency for Toxic Substance and Diseases Registry (HHS, CDC, ATSDR)

This handout provides information the stresses relocation after a disaster may cause for a family. It also includes the signs of stress that are common in children and adolescents of different ages, as well as in older adults, and ways that parents, caregivers, and families can support children and older adults in coping with stress.

American School Counselor Association (ASCA)

On this webpage, ASCA provides tips for adults in helping children deal with the aftermath of hurricanes and floods. Also provided are links to articles, webinars, online information, and other resources, including SAMHSA's Disaster Distress Helpline and recommended reading for parents and children.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This tip sheet provides information about the traumatic grief that Children and Youth DBHIS may experience after a disaster or other traumatic event. It explains that school-age children my experience traumatic grief differently from adults and suggests tips for parents and caregivers to support them in moving through and coping with grief.

University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Terrorism and Disaster Center

This 10-page fact sheet describes the effects that media coverage may have on Children and Youth DBHISboth those directly affected by the disaster and also those who live far from the disaster site but see coverage in the news of the disaster. It identifies ways in which school personnel can support students in coping with media coverage and their emotions about the disaster. [Authors: Houston, J. B., Rosenholtz, C. E., and Weisbrod, J. L.]

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This tip sheet explains how teens may experience traumatic grief following a disaster or other traumatic event. It describes 10 ways teens may feel, behave, and express themselves as they go through a period of grief. It also suggests ways parents or caregivers can support them and identifies signs that a teen might benefit from seeing a mental health professional.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This tip sheet explains how young children may experience traumatic grief, which can arise after a disaster or other traumatic event in which the child lost a loved one. The tip sheet lists ways in which young children may go through and express traumatic grief and offers suggestions for parents and other caregivers to support children in coping.

University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Terrorism and Disaster Center

This 9-page fact sheet describes the effects that media coverage of a disaster may have on children and adolescents and presents strategies for parents to manage their children's media exposure and support their children in coping with their emotions. Tips are also provided for parents to help children develop strong coping skills. [Authors: Houston, J. B., Rosenholtz, C. E., and Weisbrod, J. L.]

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This tip sheet identifies 10 ways in which youth may react to community traumas such as natural or human-caused disasters and suggests ways for educators to respond to these reactions and support youth in coping. The tip sheet also advises educators to find professional mental health support for youthand for themselvesas needed.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This part of the NCTSN's website describes hurricanes and how they often affect children and families. Information and resources are also provided to help children and teens through response and recovery after hurricanes.

American Psychological Association (APA)

In this online article, the APA provides recommendations for parents for talking with their children after a shooting. The APA provides tips and strategies for helping children manage their distress, and it suggests that parents also engage in self-care activities so they can effectively support their children in coping.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This video provides information regarding traumatic grief in children, addresses the three main types of trauma reminders, and illustrates how families can experience the pain of loss and then heal. It features physicians and experts in the field and is appropriate for parents and others who care for children.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Ready.gov

This document was created for parents and other caregivers to help them understand what their child may go through after a disaster, and it offers ways to help children following disasters. Basics are taught, and space is provided to write down a child's answers to questions and behavior, as well as to come up with ways to support a child in feeling better and coping. [Authors: Schreiber, M., and Gurwitch, R.]

American Red Cross of Utah

Developed in collaboration with Be Ready Utah of the Division of Emergency Management, this curriculum includes a series of lesson plans teachers can use educate youth about the importance of disaster safety and preparedness. Lessons cover specific types of natural disasters, public health emergencies, and general preparedness.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

The NCTSN's mission is to raise the standard of care and improve access to services for traumatized children, their families and communities throughout the United States. NCTSN develops and disseminates resource materials, and they offer education and training materials on disaster-related topics, as well as general childhood trauma topics.

American School Counselor Association (ASCA)

On this webpage, the ASCA offers tips for adults for helping children in dealing with their reactions to natural disasters. Also provided are links to information and resources on helping kids cope with natural disasters from the American Psychological Association, National Child Traumatic Stress Network, Federal Emergency Management Agency, and SAMHSA.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This tip sheet explains how hurricanes may affect families, and children in particular, and identifies ways that parents and other caregivers can help their children to cope after a hurricane. Also provided are tips for self-care for parents and other caregivers. The tip sheet is also available in Spanish at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/guia-para-los-padres-para-ayudar-los-nin....

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This tip sheet offers parents guidance on helping their children after a tornado. It describes how tornadoes often affect families and children, common reactions children may have, and how parents can help their children. The tip sheet also provides self-care tips for parents after a tornado.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This tip sheet identifies the challenges often experienced during and after wildfires, lists common reactions in children, and suggests ways parents and other caregivers can help their children with these reactions. The tip sheet is also available in Spanish at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/guia-para-padres-con-hijos-que-han-sido-....

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This tip sheet offers tips for parents to use to help teens feel safe following high-profile acts of violence. It suggests ways to establish a sense of normalcy and security, urges parents to talk with children about their fears, and lists other ways to support children in coping. The tip sheet is also available in Spanish at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/guia-para-los-padres-para-ayudar-los-jov....

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

Part of the Psychological First Aid (PFA) Field Operations Guide, this handout provides parents with tips for how to respond to an adolescent child after a disaster. The document includes adolescents' possible reactions, how parents can respond, and examples of what parents can do and say. PFA is an evidence-informed, modular approach anyone can use to assist disaster survivors. The table is also available in Chinese at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/pfa-parent-tips-helping-adolescents-chinese, in Japanese at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/pfa-parent-tips-helping-adolescents-japa..., and in Spanish at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/pfa-consejos-para-padres-como-ayudar-ado....

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

Part of the Psychological First Aid (PFA) Field Operations Guide, this handout helps parents understand how infants and toddlers may be feeling after disaster. It also lists ways for parents to help their young children cope with disaster. PFA is an evidence-informed, modular approach anyone can use to assist disaster survivors. The handout is also available in Chinese at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/pfa-parent-tips-helping-infants-and-todd..., in Japanese at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/pfa-parent-tips-helping-infants-and-todd..., and in Spanish at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/pfa-consejos-para-padres-como-ayudar-beb....

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This handout provides information for parents including reactions and/or behavior they may notice in preschool-age children after a disaster and suggestions for what to say and do once the disaster is over. This resource is part of the Psychological First Aid (PFA) Field Operations Guide, which helps people provide PFA, an evidence-informed, modular approach for assisting disaster survivors. The table is also available in Chinese at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/pfa-parent-tips-helping-preschool-age-ch..., in Japanese at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/pfa-parent-tips-helping-preschool-age-ch..., and in Spanish at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/pfa-consejos-para-padres-como-ayudar-nin....

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This document offers information on how school-age children commonly react to disasters and how parents can respond. It is part of the Psychological First Aid (PFA) Field Operations Guide, which prepares people to deliver PFA, an evidence-informed, modular approach anyone can use to assist disaster survivors. The table is also available in Chinese at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/pfa-parent-tips-helping-school-age-child..., in Japanese at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/pfa-parent-tips-helping-school-age-child..., and in Spanish at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/pfa-consejos-para-padres-como-ayudar-nin....

U.S. Department of Education, Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools Technical Assistance Center (ED, REMS Technical Assistance Center)

This publication reports on the Listen, Protect, ConnectModel and Teach strategy, an adaptation of PFA for schools by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. PFA is an evidence-informed, modular approach anyone can use to assist disaster survivors in meeting their needs and accessing resilience. The publication also reviews the type of training school staff members need to use PFA effectively.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This guide provides the details of Psychological First Aid (PFA), which it explains is "an evidence-informed modular approach to help children, adolescents, adults, and families in the immediate aftermath of disaster and terrorism." PFA can be used by a range of people responding to disaster, including those who are not mental health professionals. The guide is available in Spanish, Chinese, simplified Chinese, Japanese, and Norwegian. [Authors: Brymer, M., Jacobs, A., Layne, C., Pynoos, R., Ruzek, J., Steinberg, A., Vernberg, E., and Watson, P.]

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This 79-page guide provides information on PFS-S, an adaptation of the PFA evidence-based intervention for school personnel. It provides information on how to use PFA-S to support child and adolescent students, adults, and families in the aftermath of a school crisis, disaster, or terrorism event. [Authors: Brymer, M., Taylor, M., Escudero, P., Jacobs, A., Kronenberg, M., Macy, R., Mock, L., Payne, L., Pynoos, R., and Vogel, J.]

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This resource from the NCTSN lists common reactions to a shooting in children, families, and communities, as well as consequences of reactions, such as poor performance in school, disrupted sleep, and risk-taking behavior in adolescents. Ideas for helping survivors with coping are also provided.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (HHS, SAMHSA)

This guide includes resources for people working with children after a disaster. It covers child development theories in relation to how youth respond emotionally to disasters. It also features suggestions, case studies, and a resource guide. [Author: Speier, A. H.]

U.S. Department of Education, Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools Technical Assistance Center (ED, REMS Technical Assistance Center)

At its website, the REMS Technical Assistance Center provides information and resources about emergency management to help individual schools, school districts, and institutions of higher education learn more about developing, implementing, and evaluating crisis plans. Resources include guides and other publications, checklists, and templates and sample materials.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This children's book tells the story of a boy named Jeremy who is experiencing childhood traumatic grief (CTG) after his father's death. The story highlights signs and symptoms of CTG that Jeremy experiences and traces his acceptance of his loss and beginning of recovery. The book features a caregiver guide, which describes CTG and suggests ways for parents to help children and teens who are going through CTG. [Book authors: Goodman, R. F., Miller, D., and Cohen, J. A.; book illustrator: Major, C. H.; caregiver guide authors: Goodman, R. F., Cohen, J. A., and Wilson, S.]

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (HHS, CDC, OPHPR)

The CDC's Ready Wrigley materials focus on the character of Wrigley, a dog who leads children through preparedness activities and demonstrates ways to stay safe after disasters. Ready Wrigley books feature activities and can be printed and used as coloring books. They cover tornadoes, extreme heat, earthquakes, and staying safe after a flood. Also available are emergency planning checklists and a mobile app for iOS devices.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (DHS, FEMA)

Launched in 2003, Ready is a national campaign designed to educate Americans and help them prepare for and respond to emergencies, including natural and human-caused disasters. This section of the Ready website features information and games for children, family preparedness tools for parents and other caregivers, and tools and a curriculum for teachers to make schools safer and educate children and teens about emergency preparedness.

American Psychological Association (APA)

This resource is for parents and other caregivers to help children (preschool through high school) to build resilience. It includes practical steps for managing stress and uncertainty. It is also available in Spanish at http://www.apa.org/centrodeapoyo/guia.aspx.

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress (USUHS, CSTS)

Written after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, this tip sheet provides information for parents and professionals on how to communicate with children after a mass shooting or other traumatic event. It includes reactions to a traumatic event that children commonly experience and suggestions for talking with children and answering their questions about an incident of mass violence.

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress (USUHS, CSTS)

This tip sheet discusses how parents and caregivers can communicate well and increase a child's sense of safety immediately after and in the days and weeks after a traumatic event, with a focus on violent incidents. Also included are tips for emergency planning with children and online resources for additional assistance for adults concerned about how a child is reacting to an incident of violence.

National Education Association Healthy Futures

Developed with support from the Sprint Foundation, this guide provides information and advice for schools and districts to help them develop emergency and crisis response plans, put plans into action, and support their communities over the long term after a crisis. It also covers how the National Education Association and state and local education associations can support schools during crises.

National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)

At this part of its website, NASP provides information and resources about natural disasters, terrorism, suicide, trauma, and violence prevention. Materials on these topics are also offered in languages other than English, including Amharic, Arabic, Chinese, French, Korean, Kurdish, Somali, Spanish, and Vietnamese.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This fact sheet provides an overview of secondary traumatic stress and its potential impact on professionals involved in the care of traumatized children and their families. It discusses how to identify secondary traumatic stress and presents strategies for preventing and addressing the issue.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This handout suggests activities for children and adolescents that require some suppliesa ball, a deck of cards, etc.and daylight. They may be useful to families after a disaster that has led them to evacuate or that has left the area where they live without power.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This handout suggests activities for children and adolescents that require some suppliespaper, a flashlight, etc.and that can be done at night. They may be useful to families after a disaster that has led them to evacuate or that has left the area where they live without power.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This 2-page handout lists a range of activities for children and adolescents that require no supplies. The activities are ideal for families that have evacuated due to a disaster, or who have remained at home but are living in an area without power.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This resource offers tips for parents and other caregivers to help them talk with their children about a shooting, recognize certain reactions as common in children who have witnessed a shooting, model coping strategies, and know when to seek professional mental health assistance for their child.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (HHS, SAMHSA)

This fact sheet provides parents, caregivers, and teachers with strategies for helping children manage stress during an infectious disease outbreak. It discusses the possible reactions children may be having depending on their age range and gives tips for how adults can provide support to children during an outbreak. It is available in Spanish at https://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content/SMA14-4886SPANISH/SMA14-4886SPANIS....

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This fact sheet describes how hurricanes can affect children, adolescents, and families; identifies common reactions to hurricanes in children; and suggests ways for teachers to support their students. The fact sheet emphasizes the importance of teachers' taking care of themselves in order to be able to help their students.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network, National Center for Child Traumatic Stress (NCTSN, NCCTS)

This video prepares practitioners to provide trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) to help children with traumatic grief. It features role playing of each component of TF-CBT.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This tip sheet provides guidance for parents and youth about how to talk to journalists about civil unrest in their community. It covers parents and childrens rights and lists signs of a good reporter, to help readers know what they should expect.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This 1-page tip sheet from the NCTSN describes how talking with journalists may affect youth who have survived an incident of mass violence. It lists the rights that youth and families have (for example, they have the right to ask what the interview questions will be in advance of agreeing to an interview). It also identifies signs that reporters are doing their job well, so that readers know what to expect.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (HHS, SAMHSA)

This fact sheet provides information for college students on coping after disasters or other traumatic events. It reviews common reactions survivors may be experiencing and provides helpful resources for survivors who may need additional information and support. It is available in Spanish at https://store.samhsa.gov/product/Tips-for-College-Students-After-a-Disas....

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This tip sheet provides information for parents and other caregivers about how media coverage of a violent incident may affect children, teenagers, and families, as well as how they can help their children and teens manage media exposure and cope with their feelings about what they see in the media. The tip sheet also offers suggestions for families directly involved in a violent incident in working with reporters and setting limits if needed.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This fact sheet offers guidance to mental health professionals working with children in schools after a disaster. It highlights the importance of understanding that schools and school systems are all different from one another and of being flexible when working in a school in a disaster-affected community.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

The NCTSN describes tornadoes and the effects they commonly have on children and families. This part of the NCTSN's website includes information and links to resources about how parents can help their children to cope with the effects of a tornado, as well as tips for teachers interested in helping their students with coping after a tornado.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This story and activity booklet tells the story of Trinka and Sam, two young mice who are friends and neighbors who survive a tornado. The story covers experiences children may have during and after a tornado, as well as emotions they may have and changes in behavior they may experience. At the end is a guide for parents and caregivers to help them use the booklet as a tool for supporting their children in coping with their reactions to the experience of a tornado. It is also available in Spanish at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/trinka-y-juan-el-viento-que-giraba-y-giraba.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This booklet tells the story of Trinka and Sam, two young mice who are friends and neighbors who survive a wildfire. The booklet covers effects a wildfire can have on a community, as well as the emotions and behaviors children may display after a wildfire. Guidance is provided at the end of the book for parents and other caregivers to help them use the book with their children to understand and talk about their experiences with wildfires. It is also available in Spanish at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/trinka-y-juan-el-gran-fuego.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This story was developed to help young children and their families talk about feelings and worries they may have after they have experienced an earthquake. The story describes children's reactions and talks about how their parents help them to express their emotions and feel safer. In the back of the booklet, there is a parent guide that suggests ways that parents can use the story with their children. This document is also available in Japanese at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/trinka-and-sam-day-earth-shook-japanese, Nepalese at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/gita-and-shyam, and Spanish at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/trinka-y-juan-el-dia-que-la-tierra-se-movio.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This children's book was developed to help young children and their families talk about feelings and worries they have after experiencing a hurricane. The story describes children's reactions and talks about how their parents help them to express their emotions and feel safer. In the back of the booklet, there is a parents' guide that suggests ways that parents can use the story with their children. This publication is also available in Cebuano at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/si-trinka-ug-si-sam-sa-adlaw-nga-dunay-u..., Haitian Creole at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/trinka-ak-sam-nan-yon-jounen-anpil-van-a..., Spanish at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/trinka-y-juan-en-un-dia-de-mucho-viento-..., Vietnamese at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/trinka-va-sam-ngay-mua-gio, and Waray at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/hi-trinka-ngam-hi-sam-mauran-ngan-mahang....

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (HHS, SAMHSA)

Created in collaboration with the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, this fact sheet identifies events that Children and Youth DBHIS may experience as traumatic, lists signs of traumatic stress in Children and Youth DBHIS of various ages, and offers tips for parents and other adults in helping Children and Youth DBHIS to cope with trauma. Links to resources for more information and support are also provided. It is available in Spanish at https://store.samhsa.gov/product/Understanding-Child-Trauma-Spanish-Vers....

University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Terrorism and Disaster Center

The Terrorism and Disaster Center (TDC) works to design, publicize, and disseminate disaster mental health and resilience-focused interventions, resources, and services for children, families, and communities. The TDC is testing two interventions it has developed to enhance resilience, one for communities and the other for children. At its website, the TDC offers intervention materials, links to publications, and research articles by TDC staff.

Childswork/Childsplay and Instant Help Publications

This book contains 13 activities designed to help children build resilience and cope with the stress of being displaced from their homes due to disasters or other events or circumstances. The author begins the book with guidance for adults in using the book in providing support for children. [Author: Shapiro, L. E.]

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This part of NCTSN's website is designed to assist parents and families before, during, and after a wildfire. A definition of wildfires is provided, along with a discussion of their effects, and information and links are presented to help parents and families support children in staying safe and coping. Materials related to wildfires can also be accessed at this part of the website.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This NCTSN tip sheet describes how media coverage of a wildfire may affect children and families, notes some negative effects media coverage may have, and lists ways for parents and other caregivers to manage media exposure in helping children cope with their experience of a wildfire. It is also available in Spanish at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/los-incendios-y-su-cobertura-en-las-noti....

Yale School of Medicine, Yale Child Study Center, Trauma Section

The Yale Childhood Violent Trauma Center operates a clinic, runs a program to help law enforcement respond more effectively to children and families who have been exposed to violence, and provides training in the Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention. The center also provides consultation to agencies and communities affected by disasters.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (DHS, FEMA)

Designed for teachers, this curriculum includes guides with lesson plans and materials for children in early elementary school grades, late elementary school grades, middle school, and high school. The lessons provide children and teens with information about different kinds of emergencies and hazards and steps to prepare for emergencies. In addition to lesson plans, each guide features assessments and handouts available in the guide or at FEMA (https://www.fema.gov) or Ready Kids (https://www.ready.gov/kids) websites.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (HHS, SAMHSA)

The goal of this 50-minute podcast is to help parents, caregivers, teachers, and other school staff to identify common reactions of Children and Youth DBHIS to disaster and trauma. It can also help adults determine when a child or youth exposed to a disaster may need mental health services. The PDF version of the podcast presentation is available at https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/podcasts-children-trauma-pres....

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (HHS, SAMHSA)

This tip sheet for parents and other caregivers and teachers explains how to help children cope with the emotional aftermath of a disaster and includes information on common reactions according to developmental stage. It is available in Punjabi at https://store.samhsa.gov/product/Tips-for-Talking-to-Children-and-Youth-After-Traumatic-Events-A-Guide-for-Parents-and-Educators-Punjabi-Version-/KEN01-0093PUNJABI.

Last Updated: 08/16/2018