Disaster-specific Resources

This installment of the SAMHSA Disaster Behavioral Health Information Series (DBHIS) presents information specific to particular kinds of disasters, as well as general preparedness and response information. Topics covered include but are not limited to the following:

  • Information about a range of natural disasters (such as drought, earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, and tornadoes) and human-caused disasters (such as mass violence, terrorism, and technological disasters)
  • General disaster preparedness and response

Use the menu bar on the left to narrow the results by professional and research topic, types of intervention and treatment, and more.

Related Resources

Displaying 19 total results.
National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This document informs parents of common child reactions to earthquakes and provides tips on supporting children after an earthquake. Also available in Japanese at http://www.nctsn.org/sites/default/files/assets/pdfs/healing_the_young_c...

American Red Cross

This fact sheet provides information on earthquake preparedness, safety during an earthquake, and what to do after an earthquake. It is available in French at https://www.redcross.org/content/dam/redcross/atg/PDF_s/Preparedness___Disaster_Recovery/Disaster_Preparedness/Earthquake/Earthquakes_FR_final.pdf. A version in Haitian Creole is also available at https://www.redcross.org/content/dam/redcross/atg/PDF_s/Preparedness___Disaster_Recovery/Disaster_Preparedness/Earthquake/HT_Earthquakes_final.pdf.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

This website explains actions the general public can take to remain safe and healthy in the event of an earthquake.

Smithsonian Institution, Smithsonian Science Education Center

In this app designed for children in sixth, seventh, and eighth grades, participants help cities prepare for four types of natural disasters (earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes, and volcanoes). They are provided with extensive information about the cities and measurements indicating hazard levels, and they are given opportunities to take preparedness actions such as building or repairing shelters or reinforcing roofs. The app is available online as well as on iOS and Android devices.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (DHS, FEMA)

This booklet is designed to help the public plan for and survive a major earthquake.

American Red Cross

This document offers information on how you can prepare for earthquakes and steps to take after an earthquake occurs. The English-language version is available at https://www.redcross.org/content/dam/redcross/atg/PDF_s/Preparedness___Disaster_Recovery/Disaster_Preparedness/Earthquake/Earthquake.pdf.

World Health Organization (WHO)

The World Health Organization (WHO) is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations system. This web page offers information on earthquakes and response.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The CDC earthquake page contains helpful information and resources on earthquake preparedness, surviving during an earthquake, and what happens after an earthquake.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This informational packet discusses how to interact with children or teens who have lost a loved one in an earthquake. It includes common reactions, the grieving process, and signs that suggest a youth is having difficulty coping with traumatic grief.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This guidance helps school personnel provide support to children and teens who are experiencing traumatic grief after losing a loved one in an earthquake.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (DHS, FEMA)

This guide provides information about how to protect yourself and your property during an earthquake.

American Psychological Association (APA)

This tip sheet provides guidance on coping with stress for family and friends of those living in areas affected by an earthquake.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This guidance informs parents of common child reactions to earthquakes and provides tips on supporting children after an earthquake. Also available in Haitian Creole at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/konsey-pou-paran-ka-ede-timoun-yo-apre-yon-tranbleman-te.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This tip sheet identifies common reactions to an earthquake and offers tips for helping children cope. The English-language version is available at https://www.nctsn.org/resources/parent-guidelines-helping-children-after-earthquake.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (HHS, CDC, OPHPR)

The CDC's Ready Wrigley materials focus on the character of Wrigley, a dog who leads children through preparedness activities and demonstrates ways to stay safe after disasters. Ready Wrigley books feature activities and can be printed and used as coloring books. They cover tornadoes, extreme heat, earthquakes, and staying safe after a flood. Also available are emergency planning checklists and a mobile app for iOS devices.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

The National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) is a unique collaboration with a mission to raise the standard of care and increase access to services for traumatized children and their families. Its earthquake recovery page is designed to assist parents and families after an earthquake.

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP)

This two-page handout suggests ways for parents, teachers, and other adults to talk with children about earthquakes and other disasters.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This document informs teachers of common child reactions to earthquakes and provides tips on supporting children after an earthquake. Also available in Haitian Creole at http://www.nctsn.org/sites/default/files/assets/pdfs/Konsey_pur_pwofese.pdf and French Creole at http://www.nctsn.org/sites/default/files/assets/pdfs/Gid_Pou_pwofese.pdf

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This tip sheet provides information for parents on how to limit a child's exposure to disturbing media images after an earthquake.

Last Updated: 09/06/2017