Disaster-specific Resources

This installment of the SAMHSA Disaster Behavioral Health Information Series (DBHIS) presents information specific to particular kinds of disasters, as well as general preparedness and response information. Topics covered include but are not limited to the following:

  • Information about a range of natural disasters (such as drought, earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, and tornadoes) and human-caused disasters (such as mass violence, terrorism, and technological disasters)
  • General disaster preparedness and response

Use the menu bar on the left to narrow the results by professional and research topic, types of intervention and treatment, and more.

Related Resources

Displaying 14 total results.
North Dakota State University

This tip sheet discusses the emotions a survivor may feel after a flood, how they can cope with these emotions, how to help others deal with the same emotions, and how to help family members recover.

American Red Cross

This fact sheet provides information on what to do before, during, and after a flood. It is also available in Spanish at https://www.redcross.org/content/dam/redcross/atg/PDF_s/Preparedness___Disaster_Recovery/Disaster_Preparedness/Flood/Flood_SPN.pdf.

Michigan Coalition for Deaf and Hard of Hearing People

This website provides emergency and disaster preparedness information for people who are deaf or hard of hearing. It features American Sign Language videos, and information on emergency communication systems, emergency supply kits, and personal emergency plans.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)

This section of the website of the NCTSN describes floods and provides information for parents, other caregivers, and families about what to do before, during, and after a flood. Descriptions and links to related resources are also provided.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (DHS, FEMA)

This webpage offers information on how to prepare for a flood and what to do during and after a flood. It also offers information about the National Flood Insurance Program and has an outreach toolkit for community leaders.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (DHS, FEMA)

The Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) National Flood Insurance Program is a federal program enabling property owners in participating communities to purchase insurance as a protection against flood losses in exchange for state and community floodplain management regulations that reduce future flood damages.

North Dakota State University

This tip sheet offers advice to parents on how to help their children deal with the emotions after a flood and when to seek professional help.

American School Counselor Association (ASCA)

On this webpage, ASCA provides tips for adults in helping children deal with the aftermath of hurricanes and floods. Also provided are links to articles, webinars, online information, and other resources, including SAMHSA's Disaster Distress Helpline and recommended reading for parents and children.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (DHS, FEMA)

This guide provides information about floods and offers tips on how to prepare for a flood and stay safe in and after a flood.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

This fact sheet provides tips on how to remain safe and healthy in the event of a flood.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

This fact sheet provides tips on how to remain safe and healthy after a hurricane or a flood. It focuses on prevention of foodborne illness, as well as prevention and treatment of illness from other sources and of injuries that become more likely after a hurricane or flood.

American Psychological Association (APA)

This tip sheet provides simple and effective ways to strengthen resilience and thereby manage flood-related stress.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (HHS, CDC, OPHPR)

The CDC's Ready Wrigley materials focus on the character of Wrigley, a dog who leads children through preparedness activities and demonstrates ways to stay safe after disasters. Ready Wrigley books feature activities and can be printed and used as coloring books. They cover tornadoes, extreme heat, earthquakes, and staying safe after a flood. Also available are emergency planning checklists and a mobile app for iOS devices.

American Psychological Association (APA)

This tip sheet provides simple and effective ways to manage flood-related fears and anxiety.

Last Updated: 09/06/2017