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CO Discretionary Funding Fiscal Year 2022

Center: FG

Grantee: BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS IN COLORADO, INC.
Program: Community Funded Project – FY 2022 CDS Project
City: DENVER
State: CO
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000806-01
Congressional District: 1
FY 2022 Funding: $2,000,000
Project Period: 2022/09/30 - 2023/09/29

Boys & Girls Clubs in Colorado (BGCC) will lead 12 Clubs in a statewide Mental Health Initiative, which will invest in the improved mental health and behavioral well-being of Colorado’s youth. Young people are facing a crisis of declining mental health exacerbated by ongoing impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic and youth-serving professionals are overwhelmed, lacking the resources needed to help youth cope with pervasive trauma endured from extreme isolation, death of loved ones, and other social impacts. This project will build strong supports for youth mental health at 12 Boys & Girls Club (BGC) organizations and their 69 Club sites across Colorado. The initiative has the potential to reach more than 45,000 youth and teens, directly impact at least 5,000 Club members, and implement a comprehensive system for providing young people with early social-emotional support where none currently exists. With more than 134 years of youth development experience in Colorado, BGCs are well situated to respond to the mental and behavioral health crises facing today’s young people. Colorado Clubs offer children and youth a safe place to learn and grow through building relationships with caring youth development professionals, life enhancing programs, evidence-based curriculums, character development experiences, and a hopeful and positive atmosphere. BGC organizations serve as many as 45,000 youth through membership and community outreach every year. Based on 2021 data, 78% of youth were ages five to 12 and 21% ages 13-19; 54% male and 46% female; 64% were eligible for the free or reduced lunch program; 64% represent communities of color; 35% were from single-parent homes; and 56% lived in rural areas. Using evidence-based, trauma-informed approaches, this project will (i) increase youth resiliency resulting in increased academic, health, and leadership outcomes; (ii) equip staff with necessary tools to cope with increasing youth mental and behavioral health issues; and (iii) support Colorado young people in recovering from impacts endured during the COVID-19 pandemic and other traumatic social issues. Funds will specifically be used to further three goals and associated objectives: • Strengthen trauma-informed primary prevention practices at BGCs through statewide staff training in PAX Tools for Human Services and other tools, trainings, and evidence-based/informed curricula identified in response to local Club needs. At least 500 staff members will receive full and complete training and report confidence in using the PAX tools system. • Provide supports for youth social-emotional learning (SEL) through programs, services, and activities that build resiliency and other protective factors while reducing harmful behaviors and risk factors. At least 75% of youth served will achieve moderate to high social-emotional skills based on annual BGC survey efforts. • Improve access to mental health care options and opportunities for youth, families, and BGC staff through the addition of dedicated SEL or behavioral support staff, contracted service providers, provision of on-site services, referrals to mental health providers, and/or expanded technological capacity for telehealth access. As a direct result of these supports, at least 65% of youth will evidence a reduction in mental and behavioral health concerns as reported from pre- and post-test staff surveys. Program activities in the one-year grant period, September 30, 2022 -September 29, 2023, will track outcomes through a robust data collection and evaluation program, including pre- and post-training surveys, Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s National Youth Outcomes Initiative, and other monthly reporting tools. Through this project, BGCC and the 12 statewide Clubs will gain necessary experience and data to identify effective ways for BGCs to support resiliency, improve long-term mental health outcomes, and prevent substance abuse and other harmful behaviors among Colorado’s youth.


Grantee: COUNTY OF SUMMIT
Program: Community Funded Project – FY 2022 CDS Project
City: BRECKENRIDGE
State: CO
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000914-01
Congressional District: 2
FY 2022 Funding: $423,000
Project Period: 2022/09/30 - 2023/09/29

This grant request will help provide on-scene, crisis response services to support Summit County Law Enforcement and First Responders when dealing with persons experiencing mental health crisis by helping fund the efforts of the Summit County System-wide Mental Assessment Response Team (SMART). Unincorporated Summit County has a permanent year-round population of about 31,400 people. Summit County is a tourist destination that often has between 80,000 and 100,000 people within its borders. SMART partners a full-time Sheriff's Deputy with a full-time, masters level Mental Health Clinician, and they are supported by a full-time Clinical Case Manager. The team works with clients through crisis and mental health issues, then connecting them to ongoing services, programs, and in turn mitigate barriers to continued treatment within the community. The team works together responding to calls with a public safety and mental health nexus throughout unincorporated Summit County, as well as the municipalities of Breckenridge, Frisco, Silverthorne, Dillon, and Blue River. The SMART section currently has four full teams but do not currently have any field supervision. This grant request will allow us to staff two Sergeants acting as field supervisors to the SMART Teams working in the field along with the equipment needed to staff these positions. Currently these teams are supervised by a Lieutenant who is not in the field. Adding two Sergeants to cover field supervision 7 days per week will bring support to staff and accountability within the program.


Grantee: MENTAL HEALTH CENTER OF BOULDER COUNTY, INC.
Program: Community Funded Project – FY 2022 CDS Project
City: Lafayette
State: CO
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000904-01
Congressional District: 2
FY 2022 Funding: $275,000
Project Period: 2022/09/30 - 2023/09/29

The Boulder Strong Resource Center (BSRC) project aims to facilitate an open connection to supportive services in the aftermath of community trauma, supported by a Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusivity lens. The project will build on a strong foundation created in the 15 months since the mass shooting incident at the local Table Mesa King Soopers grocery store. The project targets individuals and families of all ages and backgrounds who are impacted by any community-wide traumatic event, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, record-breaking wildfires, the Table Mesa King Soopers shooting in March 2021, and any other instance of community violence. Target subpopulations include those from systematically marginalized populations, such as low-income, housing insecure, LGBTQ+, Hispanic/Latino, BIPOC, and limited English or monolingual Spanish speakers, as well as our community's first responders. The BSRC aims to address our communities' undeniable need for more accessible, innovative behavioral healthcare in one cohesive response, targeting victims of trauma and their families, law enforcement and other first responders, and community members, to provide an innovative and welcoming place to access individual and group supports in the aftermath of traumatic events. Project goals include: (1) Provide trauma-informed healing services to anyone struggling in the aftermath of community traumatic events, such as the Table Mesa King Soopers mass shooting of 2021, wildfires/wildland-urban fires, or violence; and (2) Build community resilience by facilitating strong partnerships across systems, such as law enforcement, district attorney's office, victim advocates, local businesses, and other community service providers. Services will include individual and group counseling, activity and wellness groups, referral and navigation supports, holistic services (e.g., AcuDetox, trauma-informed yoga, massage), trauma-informed support dogs, and community events and trainings. The project aims to serve a total of 525 unduplicated individuals with direct clinical services, as well as 1,000 individuals at community events and trainings. We are confident that the Boulder Strong Resource Center will provide an agile, trauma-informed response to our community's needs as we work together to heal and build resilience.


Grantee: MILE HIGH UNITED WAY, INC.
Program: Community Funded Project – FY 2022 CDS Project
City: DENVER
State: CO
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000909-01
Congressional District: 1
FY 2022 Funding: $100,000
Project Period: 2022/09/30 - 2023/09/29

Grantee: REACHING HOPE
Program: Community Funded Project – FY 2022 CDS Project
City: COMMERCE CITY
State: CO
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000803-01
Congressional District: 7
FY 2022 Funding: $321,000
Project Period: 2022/09/30 - 2023/09/29

The Spanish-speaking Family Trauma Program Expansion will serve Latinx and Spanish-speaking individuals and families who have survived trauma in Colorado. Of important note, 98% of families that come to Reaching HOPE (RH) have involvement in the child welfare system. Funding from the legislative subcommittee of Labor, Health and Human Services and Education and Related Agencies will enable RH to expand its services by providing trauma-informed programming that centers linguistic needs and culturally competent services to better serve the Latinx/Hispanic community. While 31% of children in Colorado are Latinx/Hispanic, 38% of all child abuse victims are Latinx/Hispanic (Child Welfare Outcomes Report, 2018). RH primarily serves families in Adams County, and 40.8% of the population in Adams county identifies as Latinx/Hispanic (US Census, 2019). While some agencies in the community offer Spanish-speaking counseling services upon request, there are no agencies in Colorado that offer trauma-focused, Spanish-speaking family counseling services that specifically address the needs of the Latinx/Hispanic community. RH aims to fill this gap in services. This project expands mental health treatment available to the Latinx/Hispanic community by providing Spanish-speaking and culturally competent clinical services. The Spanish-speaking population has been historically underserved within the mental health field. Thus, this project seeks to reduce barriers to accessing mental health services for the Latinx/Hispanic community. The timeline for this project is one year (7/1/2022 - 7/1/2023). During which, RH will hire and resource 3 Spanish-speaking trauma therapists, allowing the organization to provide more than 2,400 therapeutic services to over 100 trauma survivors living in Colorado, with particular focus on Spanish-speaking and Latinx/Hispanic families. RH anticipates that 80% of all clients will report a reduction of trauma symptoms and an increase in knowledge of healing and safety. Additionally, all RH staff is required to participate in 2 cultural competency trainings and develop a total of 15 new community connections during the program expansion period. By the end of this project period, RH will make all clinical and organization-related materials available in both English and Spanish, and ensure that Care Kits are accessible to Spanish-speaking families. RH’s last goal during this project period is to distribute 500 culturally competent Care Kits to families interfacing with RH community partnership programs like Ralston House Child Advocacy Center and the Adams County Diversion Program.


Grantee: REGION 9 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT OF SOUTHWEST COLORADO, INC.
Program: Community Funded Project – FY 2022 CDS Project
City: DURANGO
State: CO
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000853-01
Congressional District: 3
FY 2022 Funding: $149,331
Project Period: 2022/09/30 - 2023/09/29

This crucial Southwest Colorado Substance Treatment Feasibility Study and Implementation Plan will determine what type, size, location, and programming would provide viable high acuity substance treatment in rural Southwest Colorado. Like many rural areas of the country, the impacts of opioid and substance use are felt in our jails, court system, workforce, and families, all of which were exacerbated because of the pandemic. While substance misuse is not unique to our region, it is a growing concern, and our region has no residential treatment options. All 17 of our communities are united around the desire to identify the potential treatment options that our region can support to expand needed services on the treatment continuum. Region 9 Economic Development District (Region 9 EDD) facilitates the SouthWEST Colorado Opioid Response District (SWORD) that formed to oversee the region’s opioid settlement dollars. Region 9 EDD successfully applied for congressionally designated funding to support a regional Substance Treatment Feasibility Study and Implementation Plan. This study and plan will enable the region to take the necessary steps to solve at least one opioid and substance use treatment (SUD) (inpatient or residential) gaps in the region. The region includes five counties (Archuleta, Dolores, Montezuma, La Plata, San Juan), ten cities and towns, and the Southern Ute and Ute Mountain Ute Indian Tribes. This rural region has a population of 99,000, with the largest county, La Plata, with 56,000. The goal of this study is to identify what gaps our region can fill and dedicate opioid settlement dollars and other financial resources to increase and sustain treatment resources in our region. As a result of the study, we will have a clear path forward to addressing substance treatment options. Objectives of the project include: • When available funding is confirmed (estimated by Sept. 30) a contractor will be hired to complete the feasibility study and implementation plan. • By October 1 the feasibility study and implementation plan will begin. • By March 1 the feasibility study and implementation plan will be finalized and presented to SWORD. • Region 9 Economic Development District will continue to host (coordinate/facilitate) monthly SWORD meetings • By June 30, based on the results of this Feasibility study and Implementation Plan, the SWORD will allocate opioid settlement dollars and leverage other resources and community partnerships to move forward recommendations.


Grantee: SERVICIOS DE LA RAZA INC.
Program: Community Funded Project – FY 2022 CDS Project
City: DENVER
State: CO
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000866-01
Congressional District: 1
FY 2022 Funding: $160,000
Project Period: 2022/09/30 - 2023/09/29

Servicios de La Raza (Servicios) will implement the HOME program which stands for Holistic Our (Relations) Mental (Health) Engagement. Through this project, Servicios will deploy evidence-based, culturally, and linguistically appropriate mental health and substance misuse treatment services to divert Colorado youth and adults away from justice systems, as well as provide treatment to incarcerated and returning community members to quantifiably reduce recidivism rates. The HOME program focuses on providing mental health and substance misuse services to individuals who have had contact with the criminal justice system. Behavioral health staff facilitate services to justice involved individuals who are currently incarcerated at the Denver Downtown Detention Center and Denver County Jail. Geographically, the project will be focused on Denver, Colorado and has the capacity to scale across the state and into other underserved areas as additional sources of funding are identified and awarded.


Grantee: UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO HEALTH
Program: Community Funded Project – FY 2022 CDS Project
City: AURORA
State: CO
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000818-01
Congressional District: 6
FY 2022 Funding: $450,000
Project Period: 2022/09/30 - 2023/09/29

Project Name: Implementation of Mental Health Services in Our Hospital-based Violence Intervention Program Scope: This project continues our Hospital-based Violence Intervention Program (HVIP), called the At-Risk Intervention and Mentoring Program (AIM), but focuses on the gap of assessing for mental health issues, and providing mental health services in a responsible, culturally appropriate way to reduce violence recidivism and assist patients in exiting a cycle of violence. Population: We primarily serve the 6th Congressional District of Colorado. As a level 1 trauma center we serve all patients aged 14 and older who present to our hospital. Our population of focus is violently injured patients, and these patients are 85% male, 90% being non-White. Intervention: Outreach Workers are hired through the Gang Resistance and Support Program (GRASP) and are contracted employees at the University of Colorado Hospital. While they work for GRASP, their primary responsibility is to the hospital-based program. This proposal requests four Outreach Worker due to the engagement rate we have had. The Outreach Workers capitalize on the teachable moment by responding to bedside when a patient is admitted with an intentional traumatic injury (gunshot wound, stabbing, assault). At this moment, patients need trauma-informed advocates to help them navigate their hospital stay and are more open to seeking help in avoiding risky life choices and changing the trajectory of their future. During a bedside visit, Outreach Workers connect with the patient and help them process their traumatic event. Outreach Workers identify any concern for retaliatory violence and work to de-escalate the patient while also providing support. The Outreach Workers partner with the hospital social worker and case manager to help guide patients through mental health care and risk reduction resources offered through the hospital, city and community, and may follow the patient for up to 18 months. Goal 1. Assess the implementation of mental health assessment and services in our HVIP • Objective 1: Identify barriers and facilitators to implementation of assessment measure (START tool) though interviews with Outreach Workers and Social Worker. (qualitative) • Objective 2: Evaluate rate of mental health diagnosis and service connection in the community following discharge, including rate of appointment attendance with the Therapists of Color Collaborative. (quantitative) • Objective 3: Increased health services connection and uptake of insurance coverage for hospital Goal 2. Assess the effects of mental health navigation/service connection on multiple outcomes. • Objective 1: Interim reports with effectiveness and cost-utility analysis at each fiscal year interval • Objective 2: Decreased violent injury recidivism to the hospital • Objective 3: Successful treatment of mental health conditions such as PTSD, depression, suicidality • Objective 4: Decreased recidivism for mental health issues in the emergency room We anticipate enrolling at least 125 clients this year, with increase up to 200/yr over the life of the project given current population growth. There is no anticipated stop date for our program as we anticipate that it will continue to be needed for several years.


Center: SM

Grantee: AURORA MENTAL HEALTH CENTER
Program: FY 2022 Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic
City: AURORA
State: CO
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM087004-01
Congressional District: 6
FY 2022 Funding: $999,951
Project Period: 2022/09/30 - 2026/09/29

Project Name and Summary: Aurora Comprehensive Community Mental Health Center, d/b/a Aurora Mental Health Center (AuMHC) will improve and advance our Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic through enhancing client experience of care, developing clinical capacity in trauma-focused care, increasing care coordination activities, and addressing health disparities and improving outcomes through measurement-based care and targeted interventions. Population to be Served: individuals of all ages who have or are at risk for a mental illness or addictions disorder, including individuals with co-occurring disorders. We will focus on three key underserved subpopulations to reduce disparities in behavioral healthcare access and outcomes: refugees, aslyees and immigrants; individuals experiencing homelessness; and members of the Armed Forces and Veterans. Strategies/Interventions: We will develop, implement and evaluate impact of best practices to advance our clinical expertise, build capacity for population health management, and improve client outcomes. Key strategies include: staff training pathways to improve clinical competency and trauma-focused care, investment in technology solutions to enable measurement-based care, integrating feedback from the Client Advisory Council and Community Needs Assessment to improve client experience of care, and developing targeted interventions to address disparities in outcomes for suicide risk and two additional data-driven areas of health focus. Project Goals and Measurable Objectives: Goal 1 is to improve client experience of care through alignment of service delivery to community needs, measured by completion of a community needs assessment, development of a sustainability plan, implementation of a client portal, and integrating meaningful input from the Client Advisory Council. Goal 2 is to increase AuMHC capacity to treat impact of trauma for clients through provision of training pathways and implementation support to deliver trauma-focused clinical interventions, measured by training 155 staff in a trauma-focused practice and providing training trauma-focused supervision. Goal 3 is to increase AuMHC capacity to conduct population health management through improved data collection and enhanced analysis to identify client-level and population-level health outcomes, measured by identifying and collecting additional client-level indicators, and developing data literacy training and data dashboards for clinical staff. Goal 4 is to increase AuMHC capacity to improve health equity through provision of targeted interventions to identified high-risk clients and clients with disparities in access and outcomes in care, measured by developing targeted interventions to address identified indicators for each selected area of population health management. Goal 5 is to increase client treatment plan adherence by implementing targeted care coordination activities that improve both internal and external resource collaboration and communication, measured by improving coordination with primary care providers, creating a standard care coordination scope of work and training, and improving referral processes.


Grantee: AURORA MENTAL HEALTH CENTER
Program: National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative - Category III, Community Treatment and Service (CTS) Centers
City: AURORA
State: CO
Grant Award Number: 5 H79 SM084997-02
Congressional District: 6
FY 2022 Funding: $396,404
Project Period: 2021/09/30 - 2026/09/29

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