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DC Discretionary Funding Fiscal Year 2017

Center: SM

Grantee: AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION
Program: NITT-MFP-Y
City: WASHINGTON
State: DC
Grant Award Number: 5 T06 SM061728-04
Congressional District: 98
FY 2017 Funding: $191,115
Project Period: 2014/09/30 - 2018/09/29

The Primary goal of the American Psychological Association MFP-Y Program is to increase the availability, quality, and effectiveness of mental health and substance abuse treatment and prevention services provided to underserved racial/ethnic minority populations across the nation in an effort to reduce health disparities, and assist in creating better health outcomes for all Americans. The APA-MFP Transition Aged Youth Fellowship intends to achieve this through culturally competent training of racial/ethnic minority mental health clinicians at the master's level who advance the evidence/recovery- based practice of mental health treatment and prevention geared toward transition age youth (aged 16-25) and their families.


Grantee: AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION
Program: MFP
City: WASHINGTON
State: DC
Grant Award Number: 5 T06 SM060563-07
Congressional District: 98
FY 2017 Funding: $793,978
Project Period: 2011/08/01 - 2018/07/31

The primary goal of the American Psychological Association's Minority Fellowship Program (APA-MFP) is to increase the availability, quality, and effectiveness of mental health and substance abuse treatment and prevention services provided to underserved minority populations across the nation in an effort to reduce health dipartites, and assist in creating better outcomes for all Americans. The APA-MFP's mental health substance abuse fellowship intends to achieve this through culturally competent doctoral training of ethnic minority behavioral health clinicians and leaders who advance the evidence/recovery based practice of behavioral health treatment and prevention.


Grantee: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS, INC
Program: NCTSI III
City: WASHINGTON
State: DC
Grant Award Number: 5 U79 SM063135-02
Congressional District: 98
FY 2017 Funding: $399,994
Project Period: 2016/09/30 - 2021/09/29

Community Connections (CC) proposes developing the Healing, Empowering, and Recovering
Together (HEART) Project to serve children and families living with mental illness, addiction, and inter-generational trauma in the District of Columbia. HEART will reach and serve children 650 (plus an additional 300 in their mothers/primary caretakers) living in the poorest Wards of Washington, DC, including Ward 8. Services are for the whole family within one program utilizing Community Based Intervention (CBI) and Family Team Meetings at the core, with trauma-specific EBP offerings family members can choose amongst (TF-CBT for 1:1 child-specific recovery work, SFCR for multi-family group recovery work, and TREM for adult women's recovery work).

HEART's goals are: 1) outreach to improve access of children and families with multiple
ACEs to integrated behavioral health and trauma recovery treatment; 2) screen, assess, and provide behavioral health services and EBPs to improve outcomes of children, caregivers, and the family unit; 3) collaborate with NCTSI and local partners for system alignment and transformation; and 4) develop data driven approach to evaluate and sustain system change.

Primary outcomes in children are: decreases in mental health symptoms, substance use, and days absent from school; improved health, social connectedness, and stability in housing; and in parents/families are: effective problem-solving, adaptive coping to threats and/or crisis, communication skills, clear family roles and routines, affective involvement and responsiveness with families.

CC will team with an experienced group of child health services researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine led by Laurel Kiser, Ph.D., to conduct process and outcome evaluations of the project.


Grantee: D. C. DEPARTMENT OF BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Program: Healthy Transitions
City: WASHINGTON
State: DC
Grant Award Number: 5 H79 SM061903-04
Congressional District: 98
FY 2017 Funding: $999,999
Project Period: 2014/09/30 - 2019/09/29

The Washington DC Department of Behavioral Health will design and implement a transition age youth-focused system of care (SOC) in partnership with key city agencies, core service agencies, community-based organizations, health care providers, and family and youth networks. This SOC for 16 to 25 year olds, called the DC Transition Age Youth Initiative, will be delivered by Department of Behavioral Health's Core Service Agencies (CSAs). The CSAs will provide transition age youth-specific care planning, wraparound, evidence-based practices and recovery supports, and will employ Transition Specialists specifically trained to address the needs of transition age youth and provide customized, individual plans of care to successfully transition them to adulthood. This Initiative is designed to overcome the current fragmented and siloed system of care that complicates access to appropriate services for this age group, currently straddling the child and adult mental health systems, and replace it with a system where all services are transition age youth-focused. Youth and young adults will receive continuous, developmentally appropriate mental health treatment, guidance in moving towards self-sufficiency, and a full menu of recovery supports in the realms of education, employment and housing-the key domains represented in the transition to adulthood.


Grantee: D. C. DEPARTMENT OF BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Program: SOC Expansion and Sustainability Coop
City: WASHINGTON
State: DC
Grant Award Number: 5 H79 SM063426-02
Congressional District: 98
FY 2017 Funding: $1,000,000
Project Period: 2016/09/30 - 2020/09/29

The DC Social Emotional and Early Development Project (DC SEED); a 4-year SAMHSA System of Care (SOC) Expansion and Sustainability Cooperative Agreement, will address the highly specific, largely unmet needs of young children (birth-6) residing in the District of Columbia who are at high imminent risk for or diagnosed with serious emotional disturbance (SED). DC SEED will serve children birth to 6 in all 8 wards of the District of Columbia and seek to identify and engage in DC SEED the approximately 29.4% who are at risk for social and behavioral problems and increase the number (currently 21% in DC, 29% nationally) who are receiving appropriate screenings and treatment. While all young children residing in the District are eligible for SOC services, DC SEED will prioritize the highest need Wards as identified by the District of Columbia Early Childhood Risk and Reach Assessment [DCRRA] which found that Wards 1, 4, 5, 7 and 8 were at highest risk and most underserved in terms of high quality early childhood and family support services. The vast majority of young children who will be served through the SOC are low-income African American and Black children, residing in one of these Wards.


Grantee: FAMILY MATTERS OF GREATER WASHNGTON, INC.
Program: PBHCI
City: WASHINGTON
State: DC
Grant Award Number: 5 H79 SM062402-02
Congressional District: 98
FY 2017 Funding: $377,827
Project Period: 2016/09/30 - 2020/09/29

Family Matters of Greater Washington (FMGW) seeks to establish a coordinated and integrated primary care and specialty care in FMGWs' community based Mental Health Clinic and in at least three partnering primary care settings throughout Washington DC. FMGW aims to improve the physical health status of 425 adults with serious mental illnesses (SMI) and co-occurring substance use disorders that are at risk for co-morbid primary care conditions and chronic diseases throughout the lifespan of the project. FMGW is anticipating serving 50 individuals within the first year, 75 during the second year, 140 in the third year, and 160 in the fourth year. FMGW PBHCI program's goals are to establish a system of care that is patient-centered, comprehensive, team-based, coordinated, accessible, and focused on quality and safety. FMGW's PBHCI project will establish a PBHCI Leadership Team, utilize evidence-based practices to achieve positive and successful outcomes; implement a shared electronic health record platform; provide prevention and health promotion services to improve chronic disease management, encourage exercise and create access to healthy food choices; and leverage established program and fund development resources to sustain the proposed PBHCI project. PBHCI leadership team had established 6 major goals for this project: (1) implement co-located primary care and mental health services for the target audience; (2) to establish PBHCI Coordination Teams, with an objective of organizing and implementing the PBHCI Leadership and Coordination Teams' communication strategies and standards within the first 6 months of operations; (3) strengthen electronic medical technology linkages; (4) to utilize evidence-based practices; (5) successfully offer prevention and health promotion services, and (6) bring fund development and sustainability processes to the proposed PBHCI effort.


Grantee: NATIONAL COUNCIL OF URBAN INDIAN HEALTH
Program: NATIVE CONNECTIONS
City: WASHINGTON
State: DC
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM080184-01
Congressional District: 98
FY 2017 Funding: $588,985
Project Period: 2017/09/30 - 2022/09/29

ABSTRACT American Indian and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) that live in urban areas suffer from the highest health disparity rates of mental health issues, however this racial group only composes 1.7% of the total U.S. population. These same disparities affect the youth and young adults in those communities at an astounding rate. Urban AI/AN youth suffer higher rates of depression, which can be attributed to isolation from tribal lands and identity, lack of adequate mental health care, and poverty. They are also often geographically dispersed and disconnected from other urban AI/AN youth. Overcome with a high prevalence of alcoholism, and increased risk for mental health issues and suicide the need for better systems of care and improved community capacity to assist in recovery is high priority. The National Council of Urban Indian Health’s (NCUIH) Supporting Urban Native Youth (SUNY) proposes to build the capacity of urban communities to assist urban youth to live healthy lives through community support. The goal of this project is to develop a community-driven comprehensive urban youth suicide and substance abuse response plan for urban Indian communities to address the needs to provide prevention and recovery supports to AI/AN young people up to 24 years of age. Through the creation of a National Urban Youth and Young Adult Advisory Council for youth living in urban areas, NCUIH hopes to engage youth to become active in their communities as ‘gatekeepers’ to promote mental health among AI/AN young people living in urban areas. NCUIH will select youth champions from their urban community to spearhead this endeavor, and provide training on trauma, mental health best practices, and ways to open communication with friends. Through the assistance of a National Behavioral Health Advisory Council, made up of experts from the urban community, a social media campaign on awareness and prevention will be developed for a national release to the urban community. This ongoing relationship will lead to better equipped youth in urban settings to respond to community crisis. As the youth are helped to develop as leaders, the SUNY Project will also provide guidance to two Urban Indian Health Organizations (UIHOs) to assist in the facilitation of a community assessment and service assessment, in order to build the capacity of these two urban communities in order to reduce and respond to the impact of suicide and substance abuse in their communities. It is hoped that through this community-driven project to provide support for youth mental health, a more sustainable system of care will see reduced barriers to mental health screening and reduction in the number of Native youth suicides and suicidal ideations. Overall, the SUNY Project will proved better access to health care, improve health equity, and sustain services for AI/AN transitional youth.


Grantee: WILLIAM WENDT CENTER FOR LOSS & HEALING
Program: NCTSI III
City: WASHINGTON
State: DC
Grant Award Number: 5 U79 SM063267-02
Congressional District: 98
FY 2017 Funding: $400,000
Project Period: 2016/09/30 - 2021/09/29

The Wendt Center for Loss and Healing proposes to expand its Resilient Scholars Project (RSP) to increase the impact of, and access to, evidence-based mental health services for low-income minority youth and their families exposed to trauma in the District of Columbia. The Center's existing school-based RSP mental health program will be expanded to include a home-based component implementing Trauma Adapted Family Connections (TAFC). TAFC will be provided to a subset of youth ages 12-17 (75-96 students/year). This subset of students and their families (385 individuals/year) will receive evidence-based mental health services in a home-based setting in addition to school-based TF-CBT provided to all RSP students. Up to 1,740 individuals are served over the lifetime of the grant. Six hundred individuals will be trained over the lifetime of the grant. A critical policy piece is included, as is a research component comparing results of RSP students receiving with those not receiving home-based services.

The goal of this project is to significantly increase the impact and reach of mental health services for low-income, underserved minority youth and their families in the District of Columbia, including veterans and military, who are suffering the adverse consequences of exposure to trauma through a holistic, community-based program of evidence-based interventions delivered at home and in school. Measurable objectives include: 1) promoting stability and facilitating readiness to benefit from clinical services; 2) helping youth/families impacted by trauma overcome mental health barriers to healthy functioning and increasing resilience; 3) improving the ability of school staff/community members to understand, and more effectively respond to, the needs of children impacted by trauma; and 4) effecting systemic change (i.e., developing trauma-sensitive schools in DC) to improve educational outcomes for DC's children and youth.


Center: SP

Grantee: ACCESS TO RACIAL/CULTURAL HEALTH INST
Program: HIV CBI
City: WASHINGTON
State: DC
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SP021771-01
Congressional District: 98
FY 2017 Funding: $190,868
Project Period: 2017/09/30 - 2021/09/29

St. Croix Peer-2-Peer SA, HIV, Viral Hepatitis Prevention Education, Capacity Building, & Media


Grantee: BRIDGING RESOURCES IN COMMUNITIES, INC.
Program: Sober Truth on Preventing Underage Drinking Act
City: WASHINGTON
State: DC
Grant Award Number: 5 H79 SP022053-02
Congressional District: 98
FY 2017 Funding: $47,145
Project Period: 2016/09/30 - 2020/09/29

The Coalition will prevent and reduce youth substance use by implementing the following strategies:

Implementing public awareness/messaging campaigns; providing youth and adults advocacy training focusing on underage drinking/alcohol policies/laws; providing vendor education training and outreach in support of government investigator-led compliance checks; and holding community forums/town halls featuring youth advocates and championing community-level changes regarding underage access and consumption of alcohol.


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