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GA Discretionary Funding Fiscal Year 2023

Center: FG

Grantee: ABOUTFACE-USA INC
Program: FY 2023 Congressional Directive Spending Projects
City: CUMMING
State: GA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000990-01
Congressional District: 6
FY 2023 Funding: $1,279,839
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2024/09/29

Project Name: AboutFace-USA Proactive Veteran Intervention and Recovery Program The population of focus: This effort builds upon known gaps in providing service and education accessibility for U.S. Veterans, their caregivers, and family members in the Atlanta VA Health Care System Area (in/around Forsyth, Dawson, N. Fulton, Cobb, Cherokee, Pickens, Lumpkin, Gwinnett, and Hall Counties). Summary Statement: Veterans in rural areas have 70% lower odds of receiving any mental health treatment. Multisectoral and innovative approaches are needed to increase the availability of services in rural Georgia while. AboutFace-USA and our collaborators will serve 570 Veterans in the first year to address Veteran health and well-being concerns by promoting job skills education, community, clinical services and access, peer support, and leadership training. Project Overview: To meet the study objectives, we will utilize a phased approach that maximizes the expertise of the community collaborators assembled for this project. During the first quarter, we will hire and train peer-support personnel, conduct screenings and referrals to community clinicians, recruit Veterans for agriculture training, and provide transportation to Veterans for their VA appointments. In quarters two through four, we will conduct program evaluations on our community partner’s programs, and continue to recruit, screen, and refer Veterans (N = 570). Key to sustaining our approach is leveraging the GROW (Gardening, Rehabilitation, Outreach, Wellness) program. Project GROW focuses on teaching Gardening to engage veterans and community participants while promoting nutritional and mental wellness. This portion of the program involves weekly education, outreach, and maintenance of equipment while promoting Rehabilitation and the use of learned skills based on the practice of mindfulness and evidence-based behavioral therapy/stress-management techniques. As part of our Outreach portion, we will conduct presentations to promote community connectivity, learn about community needs, and seek out struggling veterans (i.e., those experiencing homelessness, suicidal ideation, financial, and/or mental health concerns). Finally, we incorporate these pieces into a Wellness program where we focus on nutrition, clinical interventions, self-awareness training, relational concerns, holistic healing, and leadership coaching. Addressing Barriers Through Community Partnership: Biases and concerns for treatment-seeking often create barriers within communities, especially for behavioral health concerns. To address these barriers to care, AboutFace-USA will meet with and engage our community and civic leaders to convey the importance of community programming to identify veterans affected by behavioral health concerns. To ensure maximum outreach efforts, AboutFace-USA has partnered with investigators with the AMES Research Center at Kennesaw State University to provide project management and data collection/evaluation. PathLight Counseling will provide clinical services to Veterans. The Overton Institute will facilitate he implementation of “The Relational Communication Program and “The Storying Our Way Home programs.” The Azimuth Leadership organization will provide leadership training for Veterans under the T.E.A.M (Transition, Empowerment, Advocacy & Mindset) change model program. Carolyn Agosta, MSW will provide a mind-body connection for healing and transformation sessions for veterans and their families. LTC (Ret.) Jim Lindenmayer will provide community linkage between veterans and family members with mental health diagnoses and substance use diagnoses and other parties. He will also provide direct supportive housing services in the catchment area.


Grantee: EMORY UNIVERSITY
Program: FY 2023 Congressional Directive Spending Projects
City: ATLANTA
State: GA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001059-01
Congressional District: 5
FY 2023 Funding: $500,000
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2024/09/29

Violence is a public health problem in under-resourced urban areas with high rates of poverty, crime, and health disparities. (Cunningham R. C., 2015) It is most prevalent among 10-35 yrs. old, with people of color disproportionately impacted (CDC, 2016). Atlanta, Georgia had 157 gun-related homicides among 14-24 yrs. old in 2020, a 58% increase over 2019. (Abusaid & Boone, 2021) At Grady Hospital they sustained 36% of all treated gunshot wounds with blacks (88%) and males (84%) disproportionately affected. Victims of violence often suffer psychological trauma as well as physical injuries. Most are discharged to the challenging and chaotic environments in which they were hurt, without additional supports to address the issues that led to their injuries. (Snider CE, 2007) Nationally, within 5 years of their hospital release, 45% of severely wounded patients will be reinjured; nearly 20% will be dead. (McCoy, Como, Greene, Laskey, & Claridge, July 2013) Hospital-based Violence Intervention Programs (HVIP) have demonstrated effectiveness in preventing trauma re-injury. Where re-injury rates reach up to 50% in their absence, HVIPs can reduce rates to as low as 4%. (Purtle, Rich, Fein, James, & Corbin, 2015) Trauma-focused, community-based interventions including case management, wrap-around and therapeutic resources in conjunction with HVIPs help victims of urban violence heal from their trauma. Emory is partnering with Grady, Ga State University, Cure Violence, and City of Atlanta to launch the region’s first HVIP. UHI’s WWC and Annex programs will provide corollary community interventions to support the victims of urban violence in the greater Atlanta area. The WWC and Annex Programs provide comprehensive, individualized case management, wrap-around, and therapeutic services to individuals ages 14-40 (focus on teens) who have experienced trauma associated with violence, resulting in reduced violence in high-risk communities.


Grantee: GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES (DBHDD)
Program: FY 2023 Cooperative Agreements for States and Territories to Improve Local 988 Capacity
City: ATLANTA
State: GA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001178-01
Congressional District: 5
FY 2023 Funding: $5,106,542
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2026/09/29

Georgia’s 988 Community Expansion Project will use grant funds to maintain and enhance staffing for the Georgia Crisis and Access Line, mobile crisis teams, Peer Warmlines, and Care Coordinators follow-up work as well as supporting mass marketing efforts. Prior grant funding allowed Georgia to expand call center staffing by 16 positions which led to a significant decrease in average speed to answer and abandonment rates. Ongoing funding will be needed to maintain those positions and funding for 16 new call center staff is needed to continue to provide access to help as call volume increases. Georgia will begin statewide mass marketing of 988 this year and plans to use a portion of this grant funding to support the mass marketing campaign. Projections of the impact of mass marketing on call volume suggest the potential to double current call volume. Call volume from July 16, 2022, to June 1, 2023, totaled 255,953 calls. If volume were to double with mass marketing of 988, Georgia could receive over 500,000 calls during the same time period next year. The downstream impact of increased call volume means that additional people will need support through the Peer Warmlines and mobile crisis services. Georgia will use the funding to increase positions at the Peer Warmlines by contracting with the Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network and the Georgia Council on Recovery for 8 additional certified peer specialists to staff the Peer2Peer and CARES Warmlines. Further, Georgia will use the funding to enhance Certified Peer Specialist coverage for mobile crisis services by contracting with Behavioral Health Link and Benchmark Human Services to hire 14 new certified peer specialists. DBHDD recognizes the need to enhance internal capacity to manage the 988 rollout and the services identified in this grant. Prior grants have allowed DBHDD to hire a Project Analyst to manage data and a 988 Community Liaison to enhance community outreach. Funding will be used to sustain these positions. Additional staffing positions, to include a Project Director and Project Evaluator, will be funded with this grant to enhance oversight of grant activities, ongoing 988 rollout, and Georgia’s overall crisis system. The Project Director and Project Evaluator will ensure Georgia is meeting metrics set forth in this grant as well as identify quality improvement efforts. Further, these positions will develop and monitor a return-on-investment plan as it relates to services funded through this grant as well as the other portions of Georgia’s crisis system. Project Goals: 1. Maintain current capacity to answer 988 calls with an average speed to answer of 30 seconds or less, an abandonment rate of 5% of less, and 90% of calls originating in Georgia with increased volume expected to result from 988 mass marketing. 2. Begin Georgia’s statewide mass marketing campaign to educate the general public about 988 and continue community outreach to groups at highest risk of suicide and those who have been historically underserved. 3. Enhance Peer Support staffing on Georgia’s Peer Warmlines and mobile crisis teams to address the downstream impact of increased call volume in the crisis system. 4. Maintain current capacity for post-crisis follow-up for calls resolved by the Georgia Crisis and Access Line, callers who are transferred to 911 for active rescue, and monitor outcomes of follow-up for mobile crisis teams and community crisis centers. 5. Develop and monitor a return-on-investment study related to services funded through this grant as well as the overall crisis continuum. Federal funding request for this application: $ 4,988,884.00.


Grantee: MOREHOUSE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
Program: Centers of Excellence for Behavioral Health Disparities
City: ATLANTA
State: GA
Grant Award Number: 5 H79 FG000591-04
Congressional District: 5
FY 2023 Funding: $700,000
Project Period: 2020/09/30 - 2025/09/29

Grantee: MOSAIC GEORGIA, (INC.)
Program: FY 2023 Congressional Directive Spending Projects
City: DULUTH
State: GA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000957-01
Congressional District: 7
FY 2023 Funding: $1,027,036
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2024/09/29

People harmed by interpersonal violence are at higher risk for depression, anxiety, substance use disorders, and poly-victimization. To mitigate these additional harms, culturally-responsive and trauma-informed responses to disclosures are critical. STRIVE-COPE improves crisis response (forensic interviews, forensic medical exams, advocacy) and behavioral health care (acute support and healing care) to survivors of interpersonal and sexualized violence. This project also supports outreach, violence prevention, and professional education. Staff: This grant supports 15 specialty staff positions in three areas of care: Sexual Assault Response, Mental Health and Wellness, and Interpersonal Violence Education and Prevention. Several of these positions require bilingual skills and experience navigating systems with a multi-cultural perspective. Population & Primary Service Area: While Mosaic Georgia serves all who request care, STRIVE-COPE focuses on youth and adults, largely female, LGBTQ, and/or BIPOC, who experience dating violence, sexual assault/ abuse, stalking, sex trafficking or other commercial sexual exploitation. In 2022, 45% clients were between ages 13-24; 37% were 12 and under; and 18% were 25-90 years. 77% were BIPOC. The primary geography/catchment area is Gwinnett County, Georgia. With almost 1,000,000 people, 26% of residents were born outside the United States and 1/3 households speak a language other than English at home. There are over 180,000 k-12 students in in 141 public schools. The need for culturally-responsive outreach and care continues to grow. Services: STRIVE-COPE improves Care with practitioners in acute response roles and behavioral health & wellness care. Services include forensic interview and medical services with acute triage and interventions; individual trauma-focused therapy plans, therapeutic and psychoeducational support groups, and trauma-informed healing and wellness modalities with culturally based approaches. Outreach to deliver resources to underserved communities and Prevention initiatives for youth, adults, and parents to reduce stigma and encourage engagement in care. Education for professionals in public safety will help improve trauma-informed responses to victims. All education/training is designed to increase knowledge and enhance practical skills. Project Goals & Measurable Objectives: STRIVE-COPE increases access and improves the level of care for BIPOC and other victims of interpersonal violence: 150 clients served with acute response (forensic interview & forensic medical) care. 180 clients will participate in therapeutic care resulting in decreased trauma symptoms and increased resilience coping skills. Professional education will improve communication and trauma-informed skills of 80% of 100+ participating criminal justice practitioners. Culturally-responsive prevention initiatives will strengthen protective factors for 60% of 160+ participants who are vulnerable to interpersonal violence. Culturally-responsive outreach and education with BIPOC professionals will create 2-4 new collaborations for under-served, at-risk youth and adults.


Center: SM

Grantee: ADVANTAGE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SYSTEMS
Program: FY 2023 Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic Improvement and Advancement Grant
City: ATHENS
State: GA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM088923-01
Congressional District: 10
FY 2023 Funding: $1,000,000
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2027/09/29

Advantage Athens-Clarke CCBHC Improvement project will provide a comprehensive and evidence-based system of care focused on targeted intervention for youth and families, individuals at high risk of suicide or overdose, those in need of integrated health services, and those facing disparities in access to care based on minority or socioeconomic status. We plan to serve 1550 individuals over the course of the project: 200 yr1, 400 yr2, 450 yr3, and 500 yr4. Advantage's Athens-Clarke County Clinic population of focus includes adults and youth with isolated or co-occurring behavioral health disorders and substance use disorders, who are uninsured or underinsured or who lack meaningful access to needed behavioral health care. Athens-Clarke County is an urban community of over 128,000 individuals of whom 58% are white, 25% are Black or African American, 3.8% are Asian, with less than 1% American Indian/Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander and 6.7% identifying as 2 or more races. 11.1% of Athens-Clarke County residents identify as Hispanic. Athens-Clarke County is a community facing significant healthcare access challenges alongside increasing rates of youth behavioral health crises and drug overdose deaths. Suicide remains a leading cause of death, and many residents continue to face chronic health conditions associated with poverty. Advantage's Athens-Clarke County CCBHC Improvement project goals align closely with the needs identified in this community: Goal 1: Enhance programming for youth and families by providing increased staff training on youth-specific interventions and by establishing a Family Treatment Tea (FTT) model for families with youth experiencing significant behavioral health challenges. Goal 2: Enhance our integrated health program through increased coordinated primary care activities, expanded health education programming focused on chronic illness prevention, and expansion of our coordinated care model through improved referral relationships and care coordination activities. Goal 3: Improve substance use disorders programming for high-risk substance users by providing staff training on prevention and intervention with high-risk SUD populations and targeted intervention to address identified risk factors and provide support during times of transition. Goal 4: Elevate standards of care for individuals presenting with recent or current suicidal ideation by providing staff training on suicide specific care and targeted intervention to prevent suicide deaths.


Grantee: AGNES SCOTT COLLEGE
Program: GLS Campus Suicide Prevention Grant Program
City: DECATUR
State: GA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM086310-01
Congressional District: 5
FY 2023 Funding: $94,052
Project Period: 2023/08/31 - 2026/08/30

Agnes Scott College (AGS), a small, private residential women’s college outside Atlanta, Georgia, is applying for a SAMHSA GLS grant to support its project, Scotties Mind Your Mental Health. ASC is diverse, with 61.7% of students identified as students of color. The population of focus for the grant is LGBTQIA+ students, who comprise 66.27% of students seen at ASC’s Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) department. CAPS will serve 4,125 people in three years: 1,350 people in Year 1, 1,375 in Year 2, and 1,400 in Year 3. Overall, CAPS sees 32% of ASC college students. CAPS consistently has more appointments with students annually then similarly sized schools. The Student Government Association felt so strongly about needing more services that it passed a resolution for expanding CAPS staffing. GLS funds will be used to hire a new project coordinator who will implement prevention programming, provide educational seminars, and coordinate outreach efforts. Some evidence-based interventions ASC will implement are Mental Health First Aid, QPR, ASIST, and emotional therapy dogs. The grant’s goals and objectives are: Goal 1: To develop an infrastructure of community relationships, trauma-informed and culturally responsive policies, and training to support the well-being, mental health (MH), and academic success of ASC students. Objective (Obj.) 1.1: Formalize partnerships with five off-campus entities to have them: a. provide informational materials on campus, b. attend MH fairs two times per year, and c. develop warm referral network pathways for students. Obj. 1.2: Develop, review, and/or revise policies to ensure they are trauma-informed; recognize under-resourced populations; and are clear and up-to-date, to include academic policies regarding course accommodations, medical leave of absence (MLOA), crisis protocols, including postvention, Students of Concern team procedures, and guidelines for staff on identifying and referring students with MH or AOD issues by the end of the year one. Obj. 1.3: By the end of the grant period, 300 administrative and student leaders will participate in Scottie Safe Zone training for LGBTQIA+. Obj 1.4: By the end of the grant period, 300 staff, faculty, and students will attend QPR, Mental Health First Aid (MHFA), and/or ASIST training. Obj. 1.5: Develop and implement an ongoing monthly training series (eight months per year) for all residence assistants on incorporating trauma-informed practices using trauma-informed values in residence halls and signs of vicarious trauma and what to do when it is experienced. Goal 2: To identify and support ASC students before and if they experience a MH or AOD crisis in order to lessen the impact on their well-being, including academics, and safety. Obj. 2.1: Provide culturally responsive, trauma-informed counseling services to 400 students each academic year via CAPS by the end of Year 3. Obj. 2.2: By the end of the grant period, CAPS will create five new MH support groups for historically marginalized populations, including for the population of focus, LGBTQIA+ students, non-binary and transgender students, and also for immigrants and international students and others identified through student discussions. Obj. 2.3: Facilitate all first-year students developing wellness plans during SUMMIT Legacy (first-year orientation). Obj. 2.4: Each semester, CAPS and Active Minds will hold one MH fair. Obj. 2.5: Engage one student group per semester that represents an under-resourced population to assist in outreach, education, and awareness programming focused on that population. Obj. 2.6: Provide educational health and wellness seminars to150 students each academic year on topics such as self-care, social connectedness, transitioning to college, time management, budgeting, coping skills, stress reduction, eating disorders, intimate partner violence, etc.


Grantee: ALLIANT HEALTH SOLUTIONS, INC.
Program: FY 2022 Cooperative Agreement for the Center of Excellence for Building Capacity in Nursing Facilities to Care for Residents with Behavioral Health Conditions
City: ATLANTA
State: GA
Grant Award Number: 5 H79 SM087155-02
Congressional District: 4
FY 2023 Funding: $4,755,693
Project Period: 2022/09/30 - 2025/09/29

Grantee: ANIZ, INC.
Program: Treatment for Individuals with Serious Mental Illness, Serious Emotional Disturbance, or Co-Occurring Disorders Experiencing Homelessness
City: ATLANTA
State: GA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM088686-01
Congressional District: 5
FY 2023 Funding: $415,207
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2028/09/29

The selected population focus for the A-RMI Program (Aniz Rehousing for the Mentally Ill) is disadvantaged African-Americans age zero and over in Atlanta, GA. Aniz serves over 2,700 members annually, primarily in metro Atlanta. It additionally conducts street outreach and reaches 2,200 individuals through brief contact SBIRTS, providing HIV testing to over a 1,000 annually. The A-RMI project will serve members of the Atlanta population who are experiencing unstable housing. Aniz is the only wraparound Harm Reduction service provider in Georgia which eliminates the precondition of sobriety for stable housing. Aniz wraparound services provide case management, holistic harm reduction services, mental health counseling and emotional support and therapy, and trauma-informed care. Participants have access to health care through the Aniz, Inc. on-site 340B clinic as well as referrals to primary care, linkage to government benefits such as Medicaid, SNAP, and local government resources. Aniz operates on a holistic harm reduction approach through trauma-informed care. Aniz works to link individuals to health care and support services so that the cycle trauma is broken. Aniz utilizes several Evidence-based Practices (EBPs) targeted specifically to the member’s needs, risk analysis, and trauma. For the purposes of the A-RMI program, the processes are already in place. For SUD COD UHIs, there are three levels based on assessment: low, moderate, and high risk. For SUD SED and SMI, they are classified as minimally, moderately, or severely impaired. For low risk/moderately impaired, the therapeutic strategy is to provide feedback, mental and emotional wellness counseling, education, reinforce Holistic harm reduction and offer positive reinforcement and support and referral to a counselor. For moderate risk/impairment, the therapeutic strategy is to provide brief interventions, mental and emotional wellness counseling including feedback, advice, assessment of readiness to change, assistance in changing. For high risk/severe impairment, the therapeutic strategy is to provide brief intervention and referral to specialty treatment. The goal of a referral is to assure that the individual contacts a specialist for treatment, as the screening indicates that their substance issues may be too severe to be managed with only brief intervention/require additional assessments to determine the severity of the problem. Severely emotionally disturbed and mentally ill are linked to medical care for treatment and medication. Aniz wraparound services provide case management, holistic harm reduction services, mental health counseling and emotional support and therapy, and trauma-informed care. Participants have access to health care through the Aniz, Inc. on-site 340B clinic as well as referrals to primary care, linkage to government benefits such as Medicaid, SNAP, and local government resources.


Grantee: ATLANTA/FULTON COUNTY PREARREST DIVERSION INITIATIVE INC.
Program: FY 2023 Mental Health Awareness Training Grants
City: ATLANTA
State: GA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM088236-01
Congressional District: 5
FY 2023 Funding: $200,000
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2026/09/29

The Policing Alternatives and Diversion Initiative will utilize grant funding to expand its training strategy to include a Mental Health Awareness Training Program that will be made available to the public through monthly interactive trainings co-hosted with partnering agencies and community organizations. In addition, quarterly trainings will be provided to the staff of housing and social service partner agencies as well as the staff of Fulton County Superior Court. The priority audience for training will be people who frequently interact with people who are experiencing unmet mental health needs and who are well-positioned to offer support and referrals to appropriate community resources. We anticipate training approximately 240 individual each year for a total of 720 during the overall project period. The proposed trainings will provide the tools to recognize and address mental health concerns, and to de-escalate potential crisis situations along with offering education on navigating the community's mental health landscape, including referring individuals in need to specific behavioral health providers. PAD has identified three local behavioral health partners who have agreed to accept referrals for services from individuals who receive training. The targeted capacity-building resulting from this training strategy will advance the widespread dissemination and utilization of community-based resources as a viable alternative to police involvement, arrest and incarceration.


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