Massachusetts
Fiscal Year 2019 Discretionary Funds

Center: SM

Grantee: EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT CENTER, INC.
Program: Suicide Prevention Resource Center
City: Waltham
State: Massachusetts
Grant Award Number: SM062297-05
Congressional District: 5
FY 2019 Funding: $5,634,000
Project Period: 2015/09/30 - 2020/09/29

Education Development Center, Inc. (EDC), will collaborate with SAMHSA to strengthen national suicide prevention infrastructure and capacity. EDC's will help reach groups at disproportionate risk of suicide, including American Indian/Alaska Native youth, Latina adolescent girls, LGBTQ youth and adults, veterans, men in mid-life, people with serious mental illness, and residents of rural areas. EDC will focus on disseminating and supporting the implementation of data-driven, evidence-informed practices and strategies among SPRC's core audiences to reduce disparities. EDC will provide targeted technical assistance, training, and resources to health and behavioral health systems (HBH); SAMHSA suicide prevention grantees; states, territories, and tribes (STTs); and key national players who are ready to implement effective approaches to reduce the suicide burden. SPRC will work toward accomplishing 4 goals and 8 objectives Goal 1: Embed quality, accessible suicide care in HBH systems (1.1. Cultivate adoption and financing of best practices in HBH settings, and 1.2. Build capacity of the clinical workforce); Goal 2: Build SAMHSA grantee and STT capacity to implement effective programs (2.1. Build infrastructure and develop capacity of SAMHSA grantees and STTs, and 2.2. Support the development of state suicide prevention infrastructure); Goal 3: Advance implementation of the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention through national partnerships (3.1. Provide leadership and strategic guidance to national initiatives, and 3.2. Build and sustain national partnerships); and Goal 4: Provide effective, appropriate resources to support suicide prevention efforts (4.1. Enhance and maintain an inventory of suicide prevention resources, and 4.2. Promote effective practices and disseminate research findings). With these goals and objectives, SPRC will serve over 10,000 practitioners, organizations, and systems annually via online learning, virtual events, and in-person trainings.


Grantee: NATIONAL EMPOWERMENT CENTER, INC.
Program: Consumer Support TAC
City: GRAFTON
State: Massachusetts
Grant Award Number: SM062560-05
Congressional District: 2
FY 2019 Funding: $462,600
Project Period: 2015/09/30 - 2020/09/29

Through the "Building Community Networks to Facilitate Mental Health Treatment and Recovery" project, The National Empowerment Center (NEC) will help mental health (MH) consumers develop the community services and supports needed in order to facilitate recovery and community integration. NEC will address gaps in crisis response services and assist in bringing states into compliance with the ADA and Olmstead through promoting consumer involvement in service delivery and policy formation. Building on its 23-year history of engaging consumers to help achieve the promise of the ADA and Olmstead, NEC will accomplish these goals by: 1) Promoting consumer participation in programs, policy development and evaluation; 2) Developing consumer networks; and 3) Providing technical assistance (TA) to enhance the business capacity of those networks. NEC will provide TA on a national level in one of the following subject matter areas: crisis response services or rights protection. NEC will identify the most effective consumer directed approaches and partner with those programs to disseminate practical guidance to consumers for replicating these programs and services in their states. NEC will provide TA to increase the number of consumers providing community-based, Medicaid-reimbursable services such as crisis service providers, peer advocates, and a variety of other roles. NEC will provide TA to assigned regions in the country to assist with the development of consumer-run organizations and MH system transformation. Additional emphasis will be placed on states that have nonexistent or underdeveloped statewide consumer run organizations. Using the Asset-Based Community Development approach, NEC will build on existing strengths to guide consumer leaders through the process of starting their own statewide networks and becoming effective agents of change through leadership development program.


Grantee: MASSACHUSETTS STATE DEPT OF PUB HEALTH
Program: PPHF-2015
City: BOSTON
State: Massachusetts
Grant Award Number: SM062910-05
Congressional District: 8
FY 2019 Funding: $736,000
Project Period: 2015/09/30 - 2020/09/29

The goals of the MA Youth Suicide Prevention Project are: (1) Create Suicide-Safe Centers of Care to enhance effective treatment and care management of youth at-risk; (2) develop Suicide-Safe Communities in which prevention and early identification are priorities and treatment and support are available; and (3) ensure suicide prevention is integrated into state systems to create a Suicide-Safe Commonwealth.

The purpose of the MA Youth Suicide Prevention Project is to reduce the rate of suicide attempts and suicide completions among youth ages 10-24. Two regional hospitals will implement Zero Suicide standards of organizational and clinical practice. Training to enhance treatment skills of clinical and behavioral health providers in treating suicide risk in youth will result in more effective prevention, early intervention and follow-up care for youth and young adults. The high risk populations of focus in these two areas include: rural youth, youth with mental illness and substance abuse disorders, LGBT youth, young veterans, victimized youth and youth who have considered or attempted suicide. Activities in communities focus on strengthening capacities to provide prevention services and early identification, referral and treatment of youth at- risk for suicide through work with schools, colleges and community organizations. System change statewide will be effected by the creation of a Learning Collaborative with the Department of Mental Health and the Massachusetts Behavioral Health Partnership (the Medicaid payor for 1200 providers) for the implementation of Zero Suicide standards and by working with youth serving state agencies to integrate suicide prevention into their services and those of their providers.


Grantee: CLINICAL AND SUPPORT OPTIONS, INC.
Program: NCTSI III
City: NORTHAMPTON
State: Massachusetts
Grant Award Number: SM063057-04
Congressional District: 2
FY 2019 Funding: $396,819
Project Period: 2016/09/30 - 2021/09/29

Clinical and Support Options (CSO) will use Attachment, Self-Regulation, and Competency (ARC) as its primary evidence-based practice in the proposed Trauma Treatment and Training Institute of Western Massachusetts. CSO seeks maximum impact for both trauma treatment and trauma training by reaching out to populations with the highest level of disparities to reduce stigma and foster acceptance and understanding. ARC-trained clinical staff will treat 240 children and families annually, totaling 1,200 for the 5-year period. The Institute will train 160 people in ARC annually including 60 clinicians to be ARC-certified, totaling 775 people over the 5-year period.

Goal 1: CSO will provide and oversee effective service approaches by offering high quality training and technical assistance in ARC, an evidence-based practice. Objective 1.a. CSO will provide free trauma training and technical assistance to institutional workforces; Objective 1.b. Training participants will understand and be able to operationalize the core principles of a trauma-informed approach to care. Objective 1.c. CSO will integrate trauma training with its current community training offerings.

Goal 2: CSO will increase access to high quality trauma treatment services for children and their families. Objective 2.a. CSO will create an ongoing system of outreach and engagement to at-risk children and families. Objective 2.b. CSO will provide screening for trauma to 100% of youth and children referred to CSO for trauma treatment. Objective 2.c. CSO and its partners will provide direct trauma treatment using ARC to 240 children and their families a year.

Goal 3: To create awareness of the importance of recognizing and treating trauma. Objective 3.a. CSO will reduce stigma of trauma induced mental illness/emotional disturbance by general trauma education across communities and agencies. Objective 3.b. CSO will use communication and social marketing tools to engage communities in primary prevention.


Grantee: INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND RECOVERY
Program: NCTSI III
City: Cambridge
State: Massachusetts
Grant Award Number: SM063114-04
Congressional District: 5
FY 2019 Funding: $400,000
Project Period: 2016/09/30 - 2021/09/29

The Institute for Health and Recovery's Project BRIGHT (Building Resilience through
Intervention: Growing Healthier Together) III provides trauma-informed evidence-based
interventions to young children birth to 6 and their parents affected by substance use disorders. The 5 year project will serve 120 parent-child dyads, (18 dyads in year 1 and 5; 28 in years 2, 3 and 4) through supporting children in developing stability and mitigating the effects of trauma, while providing the parents with SUD treatment.

Project goals include decreased children's symptoms of traumatic responses & behavioral problems; increases in capacity for emotional regulation; enhancing the quality of the parent-child relationship; building capacity of partners to provide family centered trauma informed care; and ensuring trauma informed services for children are sustained after the grant ends. The institute will achieve these goals through service provision, collaboration and training. IHR uses Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), the Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery, and Attachment, Regulation, and Competency (ARC). Fall River and New Bedford, the target regions, are located in the Massachusetts communities most impacted by the state's opiate abuse epidemic.

BRIGHT III builds on prior IHR services in this region to develop an integrated behavioral
health treatment system for young children and their parents that coordinates with primary healthcare services and supports family healing and recovery. BRIGHT III will partner with Fall River's SSTAR, which offers a full continuum of behavioral health services. BRIGHT III will also partner with Steppingstone, a SUD provider of women's residential resources. Boston University School of Social Work is an additional partner in the design and implementation of the project, and will serve as evaluators.


Grantee: ALLIANCE FOR INCLUSION AND PREVENTION, INC.
Program: NCTSI III
City: JAMAICA PLAIN
State: Massachusetts
Grant Award Number: SM063126-04
Congressional District: 7
FY 2019 Funding: $400,000
Project Period: 2016/09/30 - 2021/09/29

Alliance for Inclusion and Prevention, Inc. (AIP) proposes to launch the Center for Trauma Care in Schools (CTCS), a hub for training and school-based delivery of evidence- based practices to treat traumatic stress in children in Boston's public schools. The Center's goals are to improve quality and increase access to evidence-based practices for trauma and help schools become more trauma sensitive environments for children. The Center intends to achieve these goals by providing a significant new workforce development infrastructure for training school-based clinicians and clinical interns.

The Center will train 530 professionals who provide clinical services in the Boston Public Schools (BPS) in the use of evidence-based screening tools and treatments for trauma. Over the grant period they will screen17, 000 Boston students for trauma (average of 3,500/year). This represents the first opportunity the school district will have had to undertake a broad trauma screening program. A parallel increase in the number of school-based clinicians to deliver EBPs for trauma will dramatically increase access for these needed services.

The Center's trauma focus will align closely with the school district's initiatives to address trauma and promote social-emotional wellness. The Center will help the Boston Public Schools better serve the impact of high levels of violence and other forms of trauma among its 53,530 students, the majority of whom are classified as "High Needs," a reflection of majority low-income students from distressed and under-resourced neighborhoods.


Grantee: JUSTICE RESOURCE INSTITUTE
Program: SAMHSA Continuations
City: NEEDHAM
State: Massachusetts
Grant Award Number: SM063179-02
Congressional District: 4
FY 2019 Funding: $400,000
Project Period: 2018/09/30 - 2023/09/29

Metropolitan Boston Complex Trauma Treatment Initiative (MB-CTTI)


Grantee: BAYSTATE MEDICAL CENTER
Program: NCTSI III
City: SPRINGFIELD
State: Massachusetts
Grant Award Number: SM063204-04
Congressional District: 1
FY 2019 Funding: $399,702
Project Period: 2016/09/30 - 2021/09/29

Partners in Care: Community-Based Implementation of Evidence-Based Treatment for
Childhood Trauma's (Partners in Care) overarching goal is to improve access to and quality of evidence-based trauma-informed care for children and families who experience trauma throughout Massachusetts. Partners in Care will: 1) Disseminate the In-Home Therapy (IHT) application of Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavior Therapy (TF-CBT) on a statewide scale; 2) Implement a program of training in trauma-informed mental health care for paraprofessionals working in a variety of community-based mental health settings;3) Strengthen cultural competence of the clinical workforce for trauma-informed treatment within special populations. Partners in Care proposes to serve families with children ages 5 to 18 who have experienced trauma regardless of gender, race, or sexual orientation. Partners in Care will serve a total 630 families through TF-CBT throughout the project.

Partners in Care will train 210 IHT therapists and 170 IHT paraprofessionals within 5 years of the grant. It is anticipated that University based trainings will be conducted 2 times per year, 250 paraprofessionals will be trained throughout the life of the grant, 63 of whom will have lived experiences, and 25 will work in integrated care practices. Increased training throughout the state in culturally-competent trauma-informed care will create a cadre of skilled clinicians and para-professionals that will increase access to and improve delivery and quality of evidence-based trauma-informed treatment.


Grantee: UNIV OF MASSACHUSETTS MED SCH WORCESTER
Program: NCTSI III
City: WORCESTER
State: Massachusetts
Grant Award Number: SM063230-04
Congressional District: 2
FY 2019 Funding: $400,000
Project Period: 2016/09/30 - 2021/09/29

The University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) Department of Psychiatry proposes
to maintain, expand, and enhance the Child Trauma Training Center (CTTC) with the aim of improving identification of childhood trauma, increasing trauma responsiveness among youth-serving professionals, and expanding access to evidence-based practices (EBPs), including the dissemination of Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT). CTTC's population of focus will be children and adolescents (including transition-age youth) who have been exposed to trauma, ages 0-21 years, throughout the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (MA).

CTTC has three primary goals: (1) To provide trauma-informed care (TIC) training;
(2) To strengthen and enhance an innovative and EBP neutral, statewide Centralized Referral
System (LINK-KID); and (3) To provide TF-CBT to youth ages 3-21 by training clinicians statewide through intensive learning communities. These efforts will be informed by advances in implementation science and include specialized trainings for clinicians working with CTTC's priority and underserved populations, a TF-CBT pilot for transition-age youth (18-21 years), and a pilot of TF-CBT Prep, a short-term service to support and engage youth and families until they are able to receive full EBP treatment services.

The CTTC evaluation will include a comprehensive external implementation and outcome study, examining outcomes for 1,520 youth and families receiving TF-CBT. CTTC will utilize NCTSN products and SAMHSA's Ten Guiding Principles of Recovery across all training and treatment efforts. CTTC will continue to serve as a unifying hub for NCTSN sites in MA and New England by connecting Category II and III sites through LINK-KID and by linking families to EBPs disseminated by NCTSN sites. Taken together, CTTC's efforts will provide trauma-informed services across multiple systems and impacting 50,000 youth annually and 250,000 youth throughout the life of the project.


Grantee: JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE, INC.
Program: NCTSI III
City: WALTHAM
State: Massachusetts
Grant Award Number: SM063238-04
Congressional District: 5
FY 2019 Funding: $400,000
Project Period: 2016/09/30 - 2021/09/29

Early Connections/Conexiones Tempranas (EC/CT), a project of the Center for Early
Relationship Support (CERS) of Jewish Family and Children's Service (JF&CS), is designed to address traumatic stress and build resilience in children ages birth to 5 among marginalized populations, particularly Latino immigrant families living in Waltham, Massachusetts and nearby communities.

At the direct-service level, EC/CT will treat 160 children over five years, offering Child-Parent Psychotherapy (the evidence-based practice designed for treating traumatic stress in very young children and their families) augmented by evidence-informed Circle of Security-Parenting groups.

At the community and systems level, EC/CT will build a trauma-informed network of local organizations. Strategies will include: 1) providing training to agencies serving young children; 2) creating an Early Childhood Resilience Network to build community-wide awareness and collaboration that meet the needs of trauma-exposed and marginalized young children and families; and 3) leading a Learning Community of three organizations to build sustained capacity for offering trauma-informed, culturally sensitive treatment built on the principles of CPP.

At all levels of service, EC/CT will seek to reduce the mental health disparities of underserved populations, with particular focus on Latino immigrant families, through 1) bi-lingual/bi-cultural clinical staff trained in evidence-based practices, 2) multiple paths to engagement, 3) assistance with concrete needs, 4) sensitivity to the cultural values of Latino families, and 5) development of a local trauma-informed network of providers that can sustain services beyond the grant period. The work of EC/CT - both with clients and with the community - will be evaluated by researchers at the Boston University School of Social Work.


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