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MN Discretionary Funding Fiscal Year 2020

Center: FG

Grantee: FOND DU LAC RESERVATION
Program: Emergency COVID-19
City: CLOQUET
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000207-01
Congressional District: 8
FY 2020 Funding: $499,938
Project Period: 2020/04/20 - 2021/09/19

Fond du Lac COVID-19 Emergency Substance Use and Mental Health Reponses Abstract SAMHSA FG-20-006 grant proposal is to assist with maintaining and creating access to Substance Use Treatment Service and mental health counseling during the COVID-19 Pandemic. The pandemic has changed the landscape of how recovery services are access do to social distancing and stay at home orders. Recovery has moved to a virtual world of Telehealth or Telephonic medicine requiring clients to have access to technology that supports both video and voice, like smartphone and internet access at home. The pandemic has created economic hardships to those needing critical telehealth services along with the rural setting of the Fond du Lac Reservation. To ensure that clients and community members have the technology and infrastructure to access Telehealth service, Fond du Lac Health and Human Services is requesting assistance in providing smartphone, phone cards and funds to assist with home internet cost so clients have access to SUD and Mental Health Counselors. To ensure that clients have access to elder traditional counselors, three traditional Alcohol and Drug Counselor's would be retained under the grant and technology that supported their need to deliver telehealth services would be purchased to allow them to work from remotes locations (home). Adding additional layer of safety during COVID-19 pandemic but allowing client's access to their wisdom. One mental health counselor would be provide ongoing mental health counseling and crisis response to community members and clients of HSD/Tagwii. The opioid epidemic/drug addiction is not going to take a backseat or slowdown for a pandemic. The pandemic has added stress, created greater access for drug dealers and the Recovery World has to maintain services so those seeking services have access. Lack of employment, poor infers ruction in rural settings and social distancing have had significant impacts on the Fond du Lac community and HSD clients providing assistance with technology to allow clients to receive Telehealth Services from cultural specific counselors is critical to the wellbeing of clients and the overall health of the Fond du Lac community.


Grantee: MILLE LACS BAND OF OJIBWE
Program: Emergency COVID-19
City: ONAMIA
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000269-01
Congressional District: 8
FY 2020 Funding: $175,980
Project Period: 2020/04/20 - 2021/09/19

The "Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe Emergency COVID-19 SMI and SUD Response" project will provide for expansion of interventions, supports, and programmatic structure for those suffering from SUD and SMI within the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe catchment area. The overall goal of this project is to provide for the necessary expansion and refinement of SUD and Mental Health response mechanisms at MLBO which have resulted and will result from the COVID-19 pandemic. Objectives in pursuit of this goal include 1) By the end of 16 months, MLBO SUD and MH staff will have a system in place accommodating increased demand for assessment and enrollment without significant disruption or overload of mechanisms; 2) By the end of 16 months, MLBO SUD with MLBO HR will have prospected, hired, and trained a new LADC for delivery of SUD programming in response to increased demand resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic; 2b) By the end of 8 months, the hired LADC will have a full caseload of successfully managed and reached clients; 3) By the end of 16 months, MLBO SUD and MH with the Care Coordinator and Project Director will have successfully expanded the Telehealth and Nontraditional care continuum sufficiently to respond to increased load resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic without significant disruption or overload of mechanisms; 4) By 16 months, MLBO SUD and MH with the Care Coordinator and Project Director will have successfully expanded the Crisis and Triage response continuum sufficiently to respond to increased load resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic without significant disruption or overload of mechanisms; 5) By the end of 16 months, MLBO SUD and MH with the Care Coordinator and Project Director will have successfully integrated expanded and refined services as outlined in Objectives 1-4 with existing data collection system in order to engage in ongoing quality improvement processes for programming sustainability; and 6) By end of 16 months, MLBO SUD and MH with the Care Coordinator and Project Director will have ensured through expansion and refinement of remote communication and care systems that individuals receiving treatment are properly led to needed support services during and after programming.


Grantee: MINNESOTA STATE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
Program: FY 2020 Disaster Response State Grant Program
City: ST. PAUL
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000612-01
Congressional District: 4
FY 2020 Funding: $4,000,000
Project Period: 2020/09/30 - 2021/09/29

The Behavioral Health Division, Minnesota Department of Human Services, will focus the 2020 Disaster Response Grant Program from SAMHSA on school-aged children and youth (K-12) and their families, who have been impacted by severe flooding on four American Indian reservations and in 51 counties, including in Ramsey County, the seat of Minnesota’s capital, St. Paul. On 06/12/2019, FEMA declared the severe weather incident a natural disaster, FEMA-4442-DR. School-aged children and youth (K-12) and their families (“population of focus”) who have been impacted by this declared natural disaster, FEMA-4442-DR, present with trauma- and stressor-related clinical symptoms, indicating prolonged and severe stress, anxiety, depression, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and Substance Use Disorder (SUD) which call for specific interventions, including counseling services. In addition, traumatized children and youth show a marked decrease in social functioning and academic performance, further exacerbating their clinical symptoms. The demographic makeup of the population of focus is: 51.5% male and 48.5% female; 36.9% American Indian and Students of Color; 38% are students with a reduced/free school lunch; 16.6% are students in special education; 10% are English language learners; and less than 1% are homeless. The main intervention strategy involves the provision of evidence-based, culturally and linguistically competent, and developmentally appropriate school-based and community-based mental health services across all 51 counties and on four American Indian reservations impacted by the declared natural disaster, FEMA-4442-DR. Mental health services include, but are not limited to, the initial screening and assessment of the client, the referral to a provider, followed by service delivery and counseling. All services provided to the client adhere to the National CLAS Standards. The infrastructure for the implementation of this strategy already exists in form of the school-linked mental health resources and multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS) in Minnesota’s schools, and services related to this declared natural disaster will build on this infrastructure to ensure high efficiency. The respective program goals are: a) train 120 mental health and SUD providers; and b) serve 5000 school-aged children and youth (K-12) and their families in one year.


Center: SM

Grantee: AIN DAH YUNG (OUR HOME) CENTER
Program: Native Connections
City: SAINT PAUL
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM082646-01
Congressional District: 4
FY 2020 Funding: $118,935
Project Period: 2020/07/31 - 2025/07/30

Population Served: American Indian youth ages 8 - 24 Abstract: In order to address the growing problem of suicide and contingent substance abuse in the Twin Cities American Indian community, greater collaboration and organization between Native Agencies is required. With the opening of new comprehensive cultural facilities at Mino Oski Ain Dah Yung in St. Paul, Ain Dah Yung Center is uniquely positioned to correct this disparity by coordinating with its community partners to offer free training in suicide prevention and mental health certification courses in a culturally responsive environment that uses tradition to promote healing, self-esteem and well-being. Together, this network of community partners, youth, and cultural liaisons will create a community response team (CRT) with shared suicide prevention protocols that will provide a safety net for American Indian youth in the Twin Cities. Goals: This grant will fund (1) the development and implementation of an ADYC- led community training program in mental health awareness and suicide prevention; (2) the creation of a community response team to create shared action protocols for responding to suicide, attempted suicides, suicide clusters, and contagion; (3) culturally specific prevention, postvention, and case management services for at-risk youth at Mino Oski Ain Dah Yung; (4) continued weekly after-school Ninijanisag substance misuse prevention programming. Measurable Objectives: • By 30 August 2020, Ninjanisag Cultural Manager (NCM) will be certified to train others in Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) and safeTALK. • By 30 October 2020, NCM will train ADYC key staff in ASIST and safeTALK. • By 30 October 2020, NCM will train representatives of at least two urban Indian agencies in ASIST and safeTALK. • Each quarter, NCM will offer at least one free training to ADYC staff and community partners in ASIST and safeTALK in the Twin Cities metro. • By 30 October 2020, ADYC staff will coordinate with at least two urban Indian agencies to form a community response team and collaborate on a shared action plan for addressing suicide, attempted suicide, suicidal ideation, and contagion in the community. • Every quarter, community response team will meet to share data, re-assess action plan, and identify new community response team members • Each year, at least 100 at-risk youth will receive culturally responsive prevention and postvention services at Mino Oski Ain Dah Yung, including one-on-one counseling, sweat lodge ceremonies, plant harvesting, and postvention and prevention talking circles. • Each year, Transitional Coaches will provide one-on-one case management to 46 at-risk youth to identify risk factors for suicide and chemical dependency. • Each week, an average of 8 youth will participate in after-school substance misuse prevention programming featuring cultural activities including beading, sewing, regalia making, and drum making. Number of people served each year: 100 Number of people served over life of grant: 500


Grantee: MINNESOTA STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Program: FY 2020 Project AWARE
City: ROSEVILLE
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM083652-01
Congressional District: 4
FY 2020 Funding: $1,799,862
Project Period: 2020/09/30 - 2025/09/29

The Minnesota AWARE-SEA Project will expand upon previous work in the area of school-based mental health by implementing evidence-based practices which will positively impact student mental health across the continuum from prevention to treatment services. The Minnesota Department of Education’s (MDE) LEA partners are: Intermediate District 287 (nearly 1,000 of the most high-need, Special Education Setting 4 students from eleven western suburbs of Minneapolis); North St. Paul-Maplewood-Oakdale School District (10,505 students from seven first ring northern and western suburbs of St. Paul); and Redwood Area School District (1,100 students from Redwood Falls and the surrounding area, including the Lower Sioux Indian Reservation). Working together and learning from these different types of districts will help MDE and its’ state partners build our capacity to develop effective policy and provide high-quality training and technical assistance to all districts in Minnesota. This project will indirectly serve approximately 850,000 students across the State of Minnesota as well as 12,605 students across the three target LEAs. The project goals and objectives include: 1.) Increase capacity of the three LEAs to implement comprehensive school mental health systems. a. By November 2020, train-the-trainer cadres will be developed for Youth Mental Health First Aid (YMHFA) and for Sources of Strength (SOS). b. By November 2020, all school staff in each of the LEAs will receive training in the school mental health referrals pathways protocol. c. By January of 2021, all school staff will receive training on trauma informed schools and adverse childhood experiences (ACES). d. By January of 2021, two key staff from each LEA will be trained on Cognitive Behavior Interventions for Trauma in Schools (CBITS) and Bounce Back (BB). e. By September 2021, student supports teams from each LEA will be trained on CBITS and BB. 2.) Increase access to quality and sustainable, culturally responsive and developmentally appropriate school-based mental health services and supports. a. By August 2022, the LEAs will have defined the Interconnected Systems Framework (ISF) for their district. b. By February 2021, CBITS and BB will be utilized as a tier 2 interventions for students who have been exposed to trauma. c. By May 2021, all LEAs will participate in the School Health Assessment Performance and Evaluation (SHAPE) system. i. Each LEA will complete the School Mental Health Quality Assessment by November 2020. ii. Each LEA will complete seven monthly Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles by May 2021. 3.) Improve policy and practices for Comprehensive School Mental Health (CSMH) Systems across Minnesota. a. Governor’s Children’s Cabinet Mental Health and Wellbeing Action Team will implement at least 10 of the 46 action items proposed to expand Minnesota’s CSMH system. b. By August 2021, MN Project AWARE staff will have developed two statewide train-the-trainer cadres in YMHFA and for SOS. c. By August 2021, MN Project AWARE staff will train 100 mental health staff from across Minnesota on identified evidence-based programs (EBPs), outside of the three LEAs. d. By August 2022, MN Project AWARE staff will train 100 district staff on the PREPaRE Model to increase their capacity to respond to school crises. 4.) Increase outreach and engagement with school-aged youth and their families to promote mental health awareness across Minnesota. a. By November 2020, each of the LEAs will have a Project AWARE Advisory Group in place. b. By May 2021, each Project AWARE LEA will host two community-wide mental health awareness events. c. By May 2022, MN Project AWARE staff from each LEA will train a student group on the YMHFA and SOS peer-to-peer programs. d. By August 2021, MN Project AWARE staff will build the capacity of LEAs to conduct inclusive family engagement on CSMH.


Grantee: NATIVE AMERICAN COMMUNITY CLINIC
Program: Circles of Care
City: MINNEAPOLIS
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM083032-01
Congressional District: 5
FY 2020 Funding: $310,000
Project Period: 2020/08/31 - 2023/08/30

Native American Community Clinic (NACC) in Minneapolis MN proposes a 3-year community-based participatory research (CBPR) project entitled, “Building infrastructure and workforce development for American Indian youth and community.” Resulting in a comprehensive and culturally responsive mental health system of care for urban-dwelling American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children and their families. Services will focus on crisis response and school-based care to support family preservation. AI/ANs children are 17.6 times more likely to experience out-of-home care than their white counterparts were. Children under age 2, the most vulnerable, and youth between 15 and 17 years of age were more likely to experience out-of-home care. Likewise, AI/ANs youth between ages 15-18 experience the highest rates of suicide. A substantial portion of children entering the child protective system (23.4 percent) and those continuing (39.8 percent) have a documented disability. This will be accomplished through three goals 1) Increase access to culturally informed community-based crisis response and system of care model for children and youth, and their families, experiencing unmet mental health crisis needs; 2) Increase the communities’ capacity to respond to the needs of urban Native American children and youth in crisis and with high-risk behavior, by training service providers and informal support providers; and 3) Develop a framework and tool for crisis intervention and determining need for mandated reporting, based on the Native American communities’ needs and cultural norms. The CBPR approach will support the capacity building within the community, and workforce development. Targets by year and total: Y1=60; Y2=85; and Y3=110 for a total of 255 unduplicated participants. Together these three goals will enhance the quality and improve access to culturally responsive care provided to AI/AN children and youth, and also reduce the impact of historical trauma and ongoing systematic oppression and structural racism through training and resources.


Grantee: NORTHLAND COUNSELING CENTER INC
Program: CCBHC Expansion Grants
City: GRAND RAPIDS
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM083310-01
Congressional District: 8
FY 2020 Funding: $2,000,000
Project Period: 2020/05/01 - 2022/04/30

Under the proposed project – the North Central Minnesota Behavioral Health Expansion Project – Northland Counseling Center (NCC) proposes to implement a two-year plan to become a CCBHC and increase the accessibility and quality of behavioral health assessment, treatment, and recovery services available in the region. Based in Grand Rapids, Minnesota, NCC’s catchment area includes all of Itasca and Koochiching counties. Within this area, NCC is a hub and is the only community behavioral health agency that serves children and adults with a comprehensive range of services. As such, the non-profit organization serves a broad cross-section of the area population including members of the Bois Forte and Leech Lake Bands. Under the proposed project, the specific population to be served includes individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) or substance use disorders (SUD); including opioid use disorders; children and adolescents with serious emotional disturbance (SED); and individuals with co-occurring mental and substance disorders (COD). The work will focus on underserved subpopulations to reduce disparities in healthcare access and outcomes including low-income individuals, American Indian persons, individuals living in isolated, rural areas, and members of the Armed Forces and Veterans. Under the grant project, NCC will serve 3,300 unduplicated members of the population of focus during the first year and 3,600 in the second year for a total of 6,900. The strategies/interventions to be implemented under the project include the nine required CCBHC services, will be provided in outpatient and community-based settings, and will be evidence-based, trauma-informed, recovery-oriented, integrated, and patient- and family-centered. Services will include comprehensive 24/7 access to mental health and substance use disorder services; treatment of co-occurring disorders; and physical healthcare. The goals for the proposed project are to: 1) Increase NCC’s standard of care by achieving 100 percent compliance with CCBHC criteria in regard to staffing, availability and accessibility of services, care coordination, scope of services, quality and reporting, and organizational authority, governance, and accreditation; and 2) Increase access to and utilization of comprehensive behavioral health services for individuals with SMI or SUD; including opioid use disorders; children and adolescents with SED; and individuals with COD. By the end of the two-year period key measurable objectives will include: 1) NCC will have met criteria to obtain CCBHC certification (within four months of award); 2) Increase by ten percent the number of people served by increasing accessibility through open access and a revamped intake process; 3) Expand care coordination to improve overall health of high-need, low-income adults with SMI, SUD (including opioid disorders), COD, and youth with SED; 4) Improve health and decrease health disparities among the service population by integrating primary care screening and health monitoring services; and 5) Expand quality improvement, data management, and reporting to improve health outcomes for NCC clients and long-term sustainability for NCC.


Grantee: PACT 4 FAMILIES COLLABORATIVE
Program: System of Care (SOC) Expansion and Sustainability Grants
City: WILMAR
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM082970-01
Congressional District: 7
FY 2020 Funding: $575,000
Project Period: 2020/08/31 - 2024/08/30

PACT for Families Collaborative, a mature, five county children’s mental health and social services organization serving rural MN proposes Journey to Independence to expand support to youth ages 16-21 who struggle with recognized (SED/SMI) or emerging mental health issues, and their parents by utilizing the Transition to Independence Planning (TIP) Model® and collaborating with key community, mental health providers and policy makers. Journey to Independence will provide services to 150 unduplicated youth throughout the four year project term. An estimated 30 unduplicated youth will be served in year one with 40 unduplicated youth served per year in years two through four. The project will assist youth in developing greater self-sufficiency and independence while emphasizing the role of parents/guardians in guiding and supporting their youth through the transition to adulthood. Using the TIP Model®, the project will employ in-vivo coaching throughout five domains including employment, education, housing, life skills and wellness. Ensuring these youth receive wraparound support, Journey focuses on enhancing the skills and capacities of parents to support their youth through: one to one support, education and resources. Journey to Independence proposes to serve 300 parents/guardians over the four years through the organization and implementation of an educational seminar series, one to one support sessions, community outreach through correspondence and social media, and by facilitating parent networking groups where resources can be shared between parents, providers, staff, and community members. Additionally, this proposal establishes a Sustainability Task Force in year one to operate over the four years as a steering committee focused on collecting data on service delivery gaps, funding shortfalls, and strategies for institutionalizing the project’s model into the structure of the counties’ social services networks. Putting sustainability at the heart of this project reinforces PACT’s commitment to changing the system of care as it exists today, thereby demonstrating to rural Minnesota communities how they can support this vulnerable population. Journey to Independence represents a shift in service delivery and wraparound support that will improve the resilience of our targeted rural youth, nurture more durable parent-child bonds, and sway communities to adopt similar systems of care and to recognize the value of investing in this particular transition point.


Grantee: PACT 4 FAMILIES COLLABORATIVE
Program: Mental Health Awareness Training
City: WILMAR
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM081422-01
Congressional District: 7
FY 2020 Funding: $125,000
Project Period: 2020/04/30 - 2023/04/29

The PACT-MHAT will provide mental health awareness training to elementary, middle, and high school teachers and staff within the service area of PACT (Putting All Communities Together) for Families Collaborative in west central Minnesota. We will train school personnel in our member school districts, help high school youth learn peer support skills and equip parents with increased knowledge of mental health resources in their community. We will impact 19,000 students in grades K-12 attending one of the 14 participating school districts through training 2,200 school personnel, utilizing the 'At-Risk for PK-12 Educators' suite of trainings with simulation software through Kognito. Included in our project will be Kognito's 'Transitions Supporting Military Children.' This component will provide schools and families with resources for children whose parents are involved with the military. These will be accomplished by the following: Goal I: Increase the capacity of PACT member school personnel to gain competency to manage critical conversations in the areas of mental health and non-academic issues that impact school success, and increase early referrals for mental health services. Objective I: By October 1, 2021, PACT-MHAT will have trained at least 2200 (one third each program year) teachers and school staff utilizing 'At-Risk for PK-12 Educators' training simulation through Kognito in school districts within the PACT service area. Goal II: To increase peer-to-peer support in middle and high school through training of youth in a peer support model. Objective I: By October 1, 2021, PACT-MHAT will have trained at least 150 youth in Friend2Friend simulation trainings through Kognito in member school districts (one third each year). Goal III: To increase understanding by parents and school personnel of social/emotional development, mental health indicators, and available mental health resources. Objective I: By October 1, 2021, PACT-MHAT will have supported 14 parent/school nights in PACT elementary school buildings to increase mental health awareness to parents with information on the PACT-MHAT initiative, community mental health resources, distribution of MACMH (Minnesota Association for Children's Mental Health) parent handbooks and other resources, and how to access the Kognito parent training, 'Calm Parents/Healthy Kids.' Objective II: By October 1, 2021, PACT-MHAT will have distributed the 'Children's Mental Health Resource Guide: An Educator's Guide to Children's Mental Health' (fact sheets for teachers on mental health diagnostic categories by MACMH) and other mental health information to the approximately 2200 education personnel in member school districts.


Grantee: WAYSIDE HOUSE, INC.
Program: CCBHC Expansion Grants
City: MINNEAPOLIS
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM083269-01
Congressional District: 5
FY 2020 Funding: $1,947,094
Project Period: 2020/05/01 - 2022/04/30

Wayside Recovery Center’s Expansion of Community-Based Behavioral Health Services and CCBHC Certification Project. This proposed project is an expansion of Wayside’s gender specific, trauma-informed and culturally responsive treatment and recovery services to better serve pregnant, postpartum, and parenting women with SUD and co-occurring disorders (COD) by providing comprehensive, community- and value-based behavioral health services that reduce disparities for women and families from African American and Indigenous communities. The purpose of our project is to provide comprehensive behavioral health services, including crisis mental health services, that address the complex social determinants of health effecting pregnant, postpartum, and parenting women and their families in Hennepin and Ramsey Counties. Wayside CCBHC will serve 1,266 clients in Year 1 and 3,326 clients in Year 2 for a total of 4,588 clients in the grant period. The Project Objectives are to: 1. Increase access to gender specific, trauma-informed, and culturally responsive mental health and SUD services to decrease prolonged symptoms and effects of the diagnosis. 2. Decrease the prevalence of hospital emergency room visits for crisis mental health/substance use episodes by providing immediate access to psychiatric care and referrals. 3. Improve stability and prevent separation for families impacted by SUD/co-occurring disorders by providing comprehensive case management and peer support. 4. Improve our ability to provide an integrated primary and behavioral health approach with designated collaborating organizations (DCO’s) that is timely, trauma-informed and affordable. 5. Increase recruitment and retention of a behavioral health workforce by providing adequate training, resources and competitive pay. Through the expansion of community-based behavioral health services and the development of a community infrastructure that provides critical services for women and families with COD, Wayside Recovery Center CCBHC will improve outcomes not only for women served, but also mitigate the risk of COD for their children and family members.


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