Main page content

MN Discretionary Funding Fiscal Year 2023

Center: FG

Grantee: FAIRVIEW HEALTH SERVICES
Program: FY 2023 Congressional Directive Spending Projects
City: MINNEAPOLIS
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001044-01
Congressional District: 5
FY 2023 Funding: $1,000,000
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2024/09/29

Fairview Health Services (Fairview) will enhance the breadth and depth of mental health and substance use disorder (SUD) services in greater Minnesota by expanding clinical resources and infrastructure, staffing, and capacity at Fairview’s Mental Health & Addiction Transition Clinic (Transition Clinic) and two rural satellite clinic sites in Itasca and Sherburne Counties. To address barriers individuals seeking mental health and SUD services face, the Transition Clinic facilitates same-day access to bridging services—brief psychotherapy, psychiatry, and care management—for individuals (5 and over) who need next-level mental health and addiction services after a hospital or emergency department (ED) discharge. The Transition Clinic opened in 2021. Co-located in Fairview’s Community Health and Wellness Hub, at the former St. Joseph’s Hospital site in downtown St. Paul, the Transition Clinic is staffed by Licensed Mental Health Professionals (7 FTE) and coordination staff (2.4 FTE). As a mental health provider shortage covers nearly three-quarters of the state (HRSA; 2022), Minnesotans face gaps in emergency and long-term mental health care; the Transition Clinic seeks to fill these gaps. Non-urban communities in Minnesota experience limited access to mental heath and SUD services for myriad reasons, such as geographically constrained broadband service, reduced regional transportation, and fewer primary care sites with integrated behavioral health services. Federal appropriations will support Fairview to extend and enhance its integrated behavioral health services by: • adding telehealth hubs no fewer than two sites in greater Minnesota; • Enhance electronic health records capabilities related to mental health services and SUD; • increasing appointment opportunities; • extending birth to 5 services; • implementing broader chemical dependency services and resources including group, marriage and family therapy; • incorporating peer support specialists into clinical practice team; • training staff in modalities related to younger populations and chemical dependency. Together, these efforts will increase mental health appointments by 30%, increase staff early intervention competencies, increase organizational capacity to address co-occurring illnesses inclusive of SUD and treat 5,150 individuals and their families who otherwise would not have access to mental health services.


Grantee: MINNESOTA MENTAL HEALTH COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
Program: FY 2023 Congressional Directive Spending Projects
City: SAINT PAUL
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001147-01
Congressional District: 4
FY 2023 Funding: $498,674
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2024/09/29

FastTrackerMN.org is available to all Minnesotans to find real-time, mental health and substance use service information and openings direct-from-the-clinics and programs providing the services as a state contract and grant funded, publicly available resource. FastTracker is a successful community partnership sharing vital information as a service to the community. We provide the platform; providers update the information, and the public can search for services they need when they need them. We have invested our energies into building the tool and engaging the provider community so successfully that 75-85% of our community partners update daily or as required. Our user traffic is rising steadily and professionals are increasingly integrating FastTracker into their care- and treatment-planning processes. FastTrackerMN.org can improve and save lives – if Minnesotans know about it. This project empowers young people to lead the way. The FastTracker Ambassadors project will build public awareness in Minnesota’s 3rd Congressional District in these ways: 1. We will build youth awareness and engagement by focusing our efforts on working with youth as “FastTracker Ambassadors;” 2. We will build awareness among school personnel, including administration, student support services, nursing, and mental health staff; 3. We will build community awareness through family engagement events and organizations; 4. We will work with Mental Health Minnesota on its new “We can RELATE” peer warmline service for youth and young adults ages 13-25.


Grantee: MINNESOTA STATE DEPT OF HEALTH
Program: FY 2023 Cooperative Agreements for States and Territories to Improve Local 988 Capacity
City: ST. PAUL
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001157-01
Congressional District: 4
FY 2023 Funding: $2,993,068
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2026/09/29

The Minnesota 988 Lifeline Capacity Improvement Project will advance the existing work to strengthen the infrastructure of the 988 Lifeline system in the state. In total, over 51,000 Minnesotans reached out to the 988 Lifeline in 2022. Data shows that there has been a notable increase in volume across calls, chats, and texts since the transition to 988. Calls have increased by 35%, chats increased by 67% and texts have risen by 658% in Minnesota. Under this cooperative agreement, Minnesota can continue to provide localized suicide, mental health, and substance use crisis support for all Minnesotans who call, chat, or text the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline. At the same time, this project will allow Minnesota to strengthen statewide partnerships across the crisis care continuum. The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) has identified five goals to further support the 988 Lifeline system in Minnesota: 1) Enhance and expand workforce capacity and service within Minnesota Lifeline Centers to achieve a 90% answer rate across calls, chats, and texts. 2) Strengthen coordination across the crisis care continuum with crisis services and public safety answering points. 3) Improve support and service for high-risk and underserved populations statewide, including partnership with Tribal Nations that share geography with Minnesota. 4) Develop a comprehensive quality assurance plan. 5) Establish and implement a comprehensive communications plan. To achieve these goals, MDH will be taking a collaborative approach partnering with 988 Lifeline Centers, Mobile Crisis Teams, Public Safety Answering Points, Tribal Nations, and other state agencies.


Center: SM

Grantee: AIN DAH YUNG (OUR HOME) CENTER
Program: Cooperative Agreements for Tribal Behavioral Health
City: SAINT PAUL
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 5 H79 SM082646-04
Congressional District: 4
FY 2023 Funding: $122,111
Project Period: 2020/07/31 - 2025/07/30

Grantee: AMHERST H. WILDER FOUNDATION
Program: FY 2023 Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic Improvement and Advancement Grant
City: SAINT PAUL
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM088933-01
Congressional District: 4
FY 2023 Funding: $999,847
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2027/09/29

Through a FY24-27 CCBHC IA Grant, Wilder will improve access, affordability, and quality of mental health and substance use services to residents in Ramsey County, MN who are underserved and experiencing substantial disparities related to mental health and substance use disorder service access and outcomes – especially culturally and linguistically specific care. Wilder’s project will prioritize residents who are below 200% of the federal poverty line, speak a primary language other than English, and/or are from cultural and ethnic minority communities, with specific efforts to deepen engagement with Black/African American, East African, Afghan, and Southeast Asian communities. The project will reach 2,000 clients annually and 3,500 clients total. This project addresses financial, cultural, and language barriers and overall accessibility to be responsive to clients’ needs, including high-acuity co-occurring mental health and substance use needs, comorbid physical health conditions, and coinciding social determinants of health (e.g. housing, transportation, immigration benefits, civil legal services, government benefits, and food access concerns). Our project proposes the following services to improve our CCBHCs impact in our community: - Expand accessibility and affordability of core CCBHC services by growing our provider base, diversifying provider types, and offering uncompensated care coverage for clients - Refine population health strategies and care management pathways by improving our patient health registry, analyzing trends, and supporting clinicians in data-driven clinical decision-making - Redesign care coordination processes and implementation by engaging community to inform meaningful, whole-family, multilingual/multicultural care coordination needs and shaping our assessments, communications, referrals, and follow-ups on this basis. - Deepen integration and development of our workforce, to reflect these newly-improved strategies for care and to increase our ability to train and team collaboratively/interprofessionally Through these activities, we will accomplish the following goals and measurable objectives: 1. Increase capacity and affordability of culturally-responsive behavioral health services for clients in Ramsey County to reduce current disparities in access among our focus population. a. By end of Y2, Wilder will increase clinical staff capacity from 120 to 134 FTEs and at least 50% of new staff will be representative of our focus population. b. By end of Y2, Wilder will have eight FTE certified peer specialists/cultural brokers (we currently have four FTE) and 75% will represent our focus population. c. By end of Y4, Wilder will increase capacity from 48,824 to 54,683 CCBHC encounters annually (12% increase) with 75% serving our focus population. d. By end of Y4, Wilder will support uncompensated care costs of >3,500 CCBHC encounters for ~500 individuals with 75% from our focus population. 2. Increase and improve care management and care coordination practices to reduce outcome disparities among high-complexity/acuity behavioral health clients in our focus population. a. By end of Y1, 90% of clients will have current CMS Social Determinant of Health screens and follow-up plans in place for client-prioritized social needs. b. By end of Y2, 65% of direct service staff will use data from a refined population health management and care management strategy to inform their client care, documented in EHR and measured by management case audits. c. By end of Y3, 75% of direct service staff will use new care coordination pathways in client care, documented in EHR and measured by management case audits. d. By end of Y3, 75% of clients will self-report that their whole-family care is being successfully coordinated. e. By end of Y4, 75% of clients will maintain or improve functioning as compared to their previous measurement.


Grantee: ASIAN MEDIA ACCESS, INC.
Program: Mental Health Awareness Training Grants
City: MINNEAPOLIS
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM084556-01
Congressional District: 5
FY 2023 Funding: $250,000
Project Period: 2022/12/31 - 2026/12/30

Lead by Asian Media Access, in collaboration with Coalition PHUN (Positively Healthy U Network), Project HEALINGS engages Asian American communities in MN to prepare and train Asian American students, Hmong charter school teachers, first aid staff, and Asian parents on how to appropriately and safely respond to children and youth experiencing mental health issues, particularly individuals with Serious Mental Illness (SMI) and/or Serious Emotional Disturbance (SED). Through approaches that integrate Evidence-Based Practices with biculturalism (“Bicultural Healthy Living”), Project HEALINGS specifically targets Asian Minnesotans with efforts to raise awareness about and de-stigmatize mental illness in children and youth by reaching out to adults in their lives. Surveys show that Asian American youth often struggle with symptoms of anxiety and depression, suffer from suicide ideation and self-harm, and may be impacted by various stressors such as bullying, families’ high expectations, and lack of reliable adult presence, hence our belief that community adults must build connections with youth while demonstrating knowledge of mental health struggles and treatment resources. Project HEALINGS has three major goals: GOAL #1: Train individuals from Asian student clubs, Hmong charter schools (staff, teachers, nurses, emergency services personnel, security guards and families) in MN, to recognize the signs and symptoms of mental health problems, particularly serious mental illness (SMI) and serious emotional disturbances (SED), with a special focus on how to respond to and de-escalate crisis situations in safe and culturally-appropriate ways. GOAL #2: Educate Asian American Minnesotans about resources that are available in the community with a bicultural healthy living approach, in order to better see CULTURE as an asset to decrease identity crises and intergenerational conflicts, to improve communication within Asian families to lower the incidences of SMI and SED, to reduce cultural stigma and discrimination, and to enhance wellness/resilience with linguistically-appropriate approaches. GOAL #3: Create a strong Network with Asian mental health agencies, and mainstream primary care providers to refer individuals with the signs of mental illness to appropriate services. To meet them, Project HEALINGS will offer mental health awareness trainings, establish linkages between Asian communities and mental health providers, ensure a diverse output of awareness-raising materials to reach Limited English Proficiency (LEP) individuals, build a state-wide Asian American Mental Health Network, in order to engage MN Asian communities at a variety of levels. We plan to serve a total of 26,100 individuals over the course of five years.


Grantee: FRASER
Program: FY 2022 Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic
City: MINNEAPOLIS
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 5 H79 SM086568-02
Congressional District: 5
FY 2023 Funding: $1,000,000
Project Period: 2022/09/30 - 2026/09/29

Grantee: HENNEPIN COUNTY
Program: FY 2023 Behavioral Health Partnership for Early Diversion of Adults and Youth
City: MINNEAPOLIS
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM089503-01
Congressional District: 5
FY 2023 Funding: $330,000
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2028/09/29

Abstract SAMHSA Early Diversion Grants, SM-23-012 Hennepin County Behavioral Health Center Expansion The Hennepin County Behavioral Health Center Expansion Project will expand hours at the Behavioral Health Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota to be open 7 days a week from 9 am - 9 pm. The BHC is a walk-in / drop-off center where residents with mental illness and co-occurring disorders who are at risk for committing minor, nonviolent and nuisance offenses can access stabilizing behavioral health and related services instead of receiving a criminal justice response. Hennepin Count's Behavioral Health Center (BHC) is designed to provide an early diversion response for residents with MI/COD who are symptomatic and struggling with community functioning, elevating their risk for criminal justice involvement on minor, nonviolent and nuisance offenses. Almost all BHC participants are Medicaid-eligible and 71% identify as BIPOC, most commonly as Black, Hispanic or American Indian. In 2021, at intake, 27% of BHC participants who were assessed had been booked into the Public Safety Facility within the past six months, 91 % had an inpatient hospitalization, AND 86% utilized the emergency department (average of 5.8 ED visits per person). The BHC provides a low-barrier alternative to jail or hospitalization for residents in behavioral health crisis. Law enforcement and other first responders can quickly transfer qualifying individuals to the BHC's care on a voluntary basis and return to calls for service. Residents can also walk in for services as self-referrals or with the support of trusted family and peers. The three-story BHC offers a comprehensive array of on-site resources including opioid-responsive Withdrawal Management, Mental Health Crisis residence, primary care including medication management and medicated assisted treatment, and county social service intakes. BHC case managers assess needs and connect residents to behavioral health supports of their choice (e.g., MI/COD treatment, rehabilitative services, targeted case management, ACT, permanent supportive housing, supported employment) over an average 60-day intervention. Peer support specialists, person-centered practices, and a Resident Advisory Group of BHC participants create a low-barrier and responsive environment for residents in behavioral health crisis. By the end of the five-year grant period, the BHC project will service 9,000 unique individuals with 20,000 connections to community-based behavioral health services and supports. The targeted benefits are a 10% reduction in jail bookings, a 15% reduction in emergency department visits, a 20% reduction in inpatient hospitalizations, and a 30% increase in the total number of claims for community-based mental health services. The lead applicant is Hennepin County's Behavioral health Division in partnership with justice system partners including the Hennepin County Sheriff's Office, the Minneapolis Police Department, and additional stakeholders within the Hennepin County Criminal Justice and Behavioral Health Initiative. By expanding access to low-barrier, comprehensive supports available at the Behavioral Health Center, Hennepin County will decrease racial disparities and further increase early diversion of residents with MI/COD, connecting them to stabilizing behavioral health and related resources that improve their community functioning.


Grantee: HENNEPIN COUNTY
Program: FY 2022 Cooperative Agreements for Innovative Community Crisis Response Partnerships
City: MINNEAPOLIS
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM087246-01
Congressional District: 5
FY 2023 Funding: $735,353
Project Period: 2022/09/30 - 2026/09/29

ABSTRACT Hennepin County 911 Alternative Mental Health Response Project (ALT) SAMHSA Community Crisis Response Partnerships Grant NOFO No. SM-22-016 Hennepin County Behavioral Health will implement a 911 Alternative Mental Health Response (ALT) pilot in Brooklyn Park, Minnesota. ALT teams consisting of a senior social worker and a community paramedic will respond to low-risk 911 behavioral health calls for service instead of BPPD officers, reducing disparities in justice system involvement for people with mental health disorders and connecting them to stabilizing mental health and social services. ALT teams will assess and respond to urgent behavioral health and medical needs at the scene and stabilize the person in the community or via voluntary transport to Hennepin County’s walk-in / drop-off behavioral health clinic. ALT will also work closely with BPPD’s existing embedded social workers to provide follow-up stabilization services. Over a 45-month implementation period, ALT teams will respond to 4,500 911 mental health calls, reducing the number of mental health calls currently responded to by BPPD officers by 95%, and perform an estimated 3,000 field assessments. The targeted benefits are a 30% increase in connections to stabilizing services for residents involved in 911 mental health calls and a 30% decrease in repeat 911 mental health calls. The lead applicant is Hennepin County’s Behavioral Health Division and the partnering applicant is the Brooklyn Park Police Department (BPPD). Additional partners include the Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office, which operates 911 dispatch, and North Memorial Health, a Level 1 Trauma Center that will provide the community paramedic. A Hennepin County 911 Mental Health Reform Task Force consisting of mental health and justice partners, youth and adults with lived experience of mental health disorders, and BIPOC residents invested in police reform will serve as the project advisory board. Brooklyn Park (population 86,478) is the fourth largest city in the Twin Cities, Minnesota metro area and part of Hennepin County (Minneapolis and its suburbs). It is significantly more racially diverse than the city of Minneapolis, with 60% of residents identifying as BIPOC (30% African American, 20% Asian, 5% Hispanic, and 5% as multi-racial or other identities). Twenty-four percent of residents are foreign-born and 9.2% percent have income below the federal poverty line (2020 US Census data). Brooklyn Park has the highest crime rate in Hennepin County, with 7,820 total crimes in 2020 (90 crimes per 1,000 residents vs. 59.7 for Minneapolis). Brooklyn Park also has over 300 group homes that serve people living with mental illness and/or additional disabilities in congregate care settings. Having police officers respond to 911 mental health calls is contributing to racial disparities in justice system involvement, increasing the potential for escalation, and failing to provide needed mental health, primary care, and stabilizing services. By dispatching ALT teams to 95% of 911 mental health calls in Brooklyn Park, the Hennepin County 911 Alternative Mental Health Response project will produce better outcomes for both public safety and residents with mental health disorders in Brooklyn Park.


Grantee: INDIGENOUS PEOPLES TASK FORCE
Program: FY 2023 Tribal Behavioral Health
City: MINNEAPOLIS
State: MN
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM088758-01
Congressional District: 5
FY 2023 Funding: $250,000
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2028/09/29

Native American young adults, aged 18-24, are at higher risk than their peers to use opioids, experience an overdose, and die by overdose or die by suicide. This program is taking an innovative and practical approach to increase the protective factors for preventing death. The Healing Circle and Native Internship Program at Indigenous Peoples Task Force is a long-term intervention building capacity among this high-risk group. The participants will be trained in QPR, NARCAN, the Mending Broken Hearts curriculum, and as Peer Recovery Support Specialists. Additionally, the capacity of 25 Native American specific organizations in the Twin Cities Metro area will be increased. The Healing Circle and Native Internship Program at Indigenous Peoples Task Force will decrease risk factors for suicide and substance use among Twin Cities Metro area Native American adults 18-24 years old through developing cultural strengths, education on dangers of opioid use, connection to resources for treatment, mental health, and financial well-being through job training, paid internship, and connection to sustained employment opportunity in the Native American community. At least 75 Native American young adults will complete 237 hours of training, and internship over 5 years. The 75 participants will refer at least 225 other peers to treatment and or resources for suicide prevention and substance abuse prevention. The 75 program participants will move closer to financial wellness and managing their mental health will positively impact an estimated 300 family members (siblings, children, relatives) within their homes. Accurate and current information will be collected about the Twin Cities Metro area Native American community members on current needs assessment, development of a strategic action plan. Throughout the project a postvention protocol will be developed and implemented.


Displaying 1 - 10 out of 41