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SD Discretionary Funding Fiscal Year 2023

Center: FG

Grantee: GREAT PLAINS TRIBAL CHAIRMEN'S HLTH BRD
Program: FY 2023 Support for 988 Tribal Response Cooperative Agreements
City: Rapid City
State: SD
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001285-01
Congressional District: At large
FY 2023 Funding: $1,000,000
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2026/09/29

The Great Plains 988 Tribal Response program was developed to increase the awareness and utilization of the 988 as a first step to addressing the mental health crisis through intervention and response. The population of focus is American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) people living in the He Sapa area and statewide South Dakota. 988 data dashboards captured that the counties in tribal communities underutilized the lifeline call center despite the suicide rate from American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) being notably higher, 2.6 times than the majority in the State of South Dakota. The Great Plains 988 Tribal Response program aims to service AI/AN children, youth, and families in the He Sapa area (Rapid City, South Dakota) and tribal communities while using culturally relevant approaches. The program's primary objective is to build the capacity of 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline and improve integration and implementation of AI/AN and tribal crisis response. Goal One: To ensure AI/AN have access to culturally competent, trained 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline support. Goal Two: Improve integration and support of 988 crisis centers with tribal nations to ensure navigation and follow-up care of AI/AN callers. Goal Three: Facilitate collaborations with tribal, state, health providers, urban Indian organizations, law enforcement, and first responders in a manner that respects tribal sovereignty. Strategies include partnerships with the Helpline Center and South Dakota Department of Social Services Division of Behavioral Health (SD DSS DBH) and the collaborative efforts of tribal entities to identify and track referrals and establish follow-up contact protocols for AI/AN callers after all crisis encounters. The program plans to offer training opportunities on trauma-informed, culturally relevant approaches, suicide prevention awareness, and crisis response resources to providers, partners, and tribal communities to service 200 unduplicated participants.


Grantee: ROSEBUD SIOUX TRIBE
Program: FY 2023 Support for 988 Tribal Response Cooperative Agreements
City: ROSEBUD
State: SD
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001287-01
Congressional District: At large
FY 2023 Funding: $416,531
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2026/09/29

The Rosebud Sioux Tribe 988 Lifeline Project will establish a 988 Lifeline response team for the Rosebud Indian Reservation, home to 29,028 Tribal members, as well as members of federally-recognized Tribes who live on or near the Rosebud Indian Reservation. The project will address the transportation barriers to care faced by many individuals in the catchment area, many of whom have to travel over an hour to the single mental health care facility on the reservation. The team will enhance connections between federal behavioral health services, community-based behavioral health services, and off-reservation services, strengthening the network of care for users. The Sicangu Oyate (which translates to English as the “Burnt Thigh Nation”) is also known by its federally recognized name of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST). It is one of the 574 federally recognized American Indian tribal governments in the United States. The Sicangu are one of the seven bands of Lakota people which, together with the Dakota and Nakota, compose the Oceti Sakowin Oyate (which translates to English as the “People of Seven Council Fires”). This group of people is also sometimes referred to as the Great Sioux Nation. Under the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934, the RST was able to re-establish its self-government and is currently a sovereign nation. The RST is located on the Rosebud Indian Reservation, which was established in 1889 after the US partition of the Great Sioux Reservation, created by the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie. The Rosebud Indian Reservation has a geographic area of 882,416 acres located primarily in Todd County, South Dakota and parts of the four adjacent counties in south-central South Dakota. Flanked by the Missouri River on the East and the Badlands on the West, the RST is composed of 20 communities located across the Rosebud Indian Reservation, as well as on off-reservation land known as trust land, which act as political subdivisions for the tribal government. As of 2016, there are approximately 34,150 enrolled RST tribal members. Of those, 29,028 tribal members live on the reservation. In 2010, roughly 44% of the population living on the reservation were 19 years of age or younger. Suicide prevention is a priority among the behavioral health challenges afflicting Rosebud’s tribal community. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American Indian and Alaskan Native (AI/AN) populations had the highest rates of suicide in 2021 at a rate of 28.1 per 100,000 people, twice that of the general population. In 2018, suicide was the leading cause of death for AI/AN between the ages of 10-19 and in 2019, it was the 8th leading cause of death among all AI/AN. The goals of the project include: effectively partnering with the South Dakota 988 Lifeline program to provide culturally competent services for patients in crisis; and assessing the impact of the award, ensuring it meets relevant standards, and sustaining the program beyond the project period. The catchment area and service population for the project may be expanded to other area and regional American Indian communities in discussion with local, regional, and state partners.


Grantee: SOUTH DAKOTA STATE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES
Program: FY 2023 Cooperative Agreements for States and Territories to Improve Local 988 Capacity
City: PIERRE
State: SD
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001187-01
Congressional District: At large
FY 2023 Funding: $851,468
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2026/09/29

South Dakota 988: State Improvement is a continuation of the joint venture undertaken by the state's only Lifeline crisis center, Helpline Center, and the Department of Social Services (DSS), Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) to assure calls, chats, and texts from South Dakotans experiencing mental health crisis are assisted by in-state resources. The South Dakota 988 State Improvement project will dedicate resources to assuring statewide awareness of available resources to all South Dakotans including Native American and high-risk populations across the state. DSS will allocate funds to launch statewide marketing campaigns. DSS dedicate additional funds to assure comprehensive evaluations of mental health crisis services will be complete as part of this project. Additionally, DSS will continue to engage the Behavioral Health Crisis Response Stakeholder Coalition (BHCRSC), formed in February 2021 as part of the 988 Planning Grant from Vibrant, to inform the evolution of the state's 988 and mental health crisis response systems. This project builds upon the work completed and outlined by the 988 planning coalition, and the 988 implementation and supplemental grants. The Helpline Center is the only entity in the state accredited by the Alliance for Information and Referral Systems, and the only entity in the state that provides a certified crisis line through the American Association of Suicidology. In July 2022, The Helpline Center launched a separate division to house the 988 call center, with shared administration services provided by existing Helpline Center staff. The new 988 call center is housed in the same location as the existing 211-based information and referral call center, but staff separately due to the unique staff and qualifications required for answering 988 calls. The service continuation and improvement approach centers on four key goal areas, all of which build off of initial planning efforts outlined in the state's 988 implementation plan. Key areas of focus center around workforce capacity building, statewide targeted communication plans, evaluation of services including the three pillars of the Crisis Now model (1-Someone to Talk To, 2-Someone to Respond, and 3-Somewhere to Go), and building relationships across mental health crisis response services providers including 988. All four goals will be managed by the Project Director and Co-Director, with considerable input from the Lifeline crisis center / Helpline Center leadership and 988 call center staff. The BHCRSC will continue to convene as an advisory resource for the Directors and Helpline Center team and will be instrumental in ultimately increasing access to quality, responsive behavioral health care for South Dakotans experiencing crisis. Key performance indicators and other measures have been identified in alignment with existing 988 metrics, the required SAMHSA infrastructure, the prevention and promotion indicators, and those that will aid the state in understanding 988 call center workforce staffing, partnership development, and the disposition of people supported by 988 call center staff as capacity expands and public awareness increases.


Center: SM

Grantee: AMERICAN HORSE SCHOOL
Program: Project AWARE (Advancing Wellness and Resiliency in Education)
City: ALLEN
State: SD
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM088010-01
Congressional District: At large
FY 2023 Funding: $1,248,223
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2028/09/29

Summary: American Horse School AWARE will serve Native American K-8 students on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation by implementing a school-based, recovery-oriented, tiered system of school- and community-based mental and behavioral health interventions. The project will provide counseling, cultural mentorship, suicide awareness and prevention, and related trainings to students, school staff, families, and members of the community. Project Name: American Horse School Project AWARE Population Served: Universal prevention services for Native American K-8 students, with tiered interventions for students experiencing trauma and related mental/behavioral health needs. Strategies & Interventions: This project will equip students with the prevention, intervention, and postvention to promote recovery and reduce the prevalence and impact of trauma-induced mental and behavioral health challenges, substance use, and suicidality. This will be accomplished through school-based mental health counseling, behavioral health counseling; screening, third-party service referrals, and cultural mentorship; teacher and school staff training; and family and community member training. We will use evidence-based programming to promote positive behaviors among students, especially with curriculums and programs designed for use with Native American students. This includes the Reconnecting Youth, Healing Journey of the Canoe, and QPR, among other approaches. All students will receive universal prevention services, and students screened and determined for higher tiers of service will receive individualized counseling plans and the support of a wraparound support specialist to provide coordinated care and community connections. Project Goals & Objectives: Goals include (1) increase student access to trauma-informed, culturally-informed behavioral/mental health counseling by integrating services into their school environment, (2) increase knowledge of students, staff, families, and community members to identify, refer, and support students demonstrating behavioral/mental health consequences of trauma to promote positive youth development, and (3) increase student social and emotional competencies to decrease emotional challenges and negative behaviors among students by implementing school-based, trauma-informed, multi-tiered mental health and social emotional services. Objectives are aligned to each goal and are summarized herein: (1a) provision of individual and small group counseling for students identified at-risk for trauma-induced mental/behavioral health warning signs, (1b) establishment of a crisis response line for client students, (1c) rate of secured informed consent compared to total student body, (2a) rate of staff trained in universal trauma-informed mental health support each year, (2b) staff and community trainings about identifying at-risk warning signs, including of suicidal behavior, (2c) provision of universal prevention services, (3a) decreasing the rate of suicide attempts, and (3b) reducing the rate of negative behaviors in school occurring as a result of student trauma. Number of Individuals Served: This project will serve 650 unduplicated individuals throughout the five year project period (199 in year 1, 226 in year 2, and 75 each year in years 3, 4, and 5) including children, youth, school staff members, and members of the community. Throughout the entire project, including retrainings (duplicated services on a year-over-year basis), the project will serve 1,900 total individuals.


Grantee: CRAZY HORSE SCHOOL
Program: Project AWARE (Advancing Wellness and Resiliency in Education)
City: WANBLEE
State: SD
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM087456-01
Congressional District: At large
FY 2023 Funding: $2,705,726
Project Period: 2022/12/31 - 2026/12/30

Summary: Ta'sunke Witko Owayawa Project AWARE will serve Native American K-12 students by implementing the trauma-informed school model and promoting a recovery-oriented, tiered system of school- and community-based mental and behavioral health interventions. The project will provide counseling, cultural mentorship, suicide awareness and prevention, and related trainings to students, school staff, families, and members of the community. Project Name: Ta'sunke Witko Owayawa Project AWARE Grantee: Crazy Horse School Additional Partnership Members: Oglala Sioux Tribe Health Administration Program, Oglala Sioux Tribe Education Agency, and Mahpiya Sinakiya Win Services. Geographic Catchment Area: Jackson County, South Dakota, and the portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation contained within Jackson County’s borders. Population of Focus: Universal prevention services for Native American K-12 students, with tiered interventions for students experiencing trauma and related mental/behavioral health needs. Number of Individuals Served: 400 students, school staff, and community members annually with the total number of individuals served at 1,600. Goals & Objectives: Goals include (1) increasing child/youth access to school-based trauma-informed, culturally-informed mental and behavioral health services; (2) increasing the knowledge of children/youth and adults to recognize and report signs of at-risk behavior to promote positive personal development; and (3) decrease child/youth measures of suicidality, substance use, and disruptive behaviors. There are three objectives to help measure progress toward each goal, summarized: (1a) implementation rate of individual and small group counseling; (1b) adoption of a 24/7 on-call, crisis-response phone line; (1c) rate of completed informed consent within LEA; (2a) rate of LEA staff trained in trauma-informed model; (2b) number of community members trained annually; (2c) rate of students receiving Tier 1-level, universal prevention services, (3a) decrease in rate of student suicide attempts and completions; (3b) decrease in frequency of substance use among students with substance use disorders; and (3c) decrease in recorded instances of disruptive behavior in school. Strategies & Interventions: The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation is the poorest place in the United States, and our residents experience many historical and contemporary traumas. This project is designed to intervene in this reality and equip students with the prevention, intervention, and postvention to promote recovery and reduce the prevalence and impact of trauma-induced mental and behavioral health challenges, substance use, and suicidality. This will be accomplished through school-based mental health counseling, behavioral health counseling; substance use disorder counseling; screening, third-party service referrals, and cultural mentorship; teacher and school staff trainings; family and community member trainings. We will use evidence-based programming to promote positive behaviors among students, especially with curriculums and programs designed for use with Native American students. This includes the Reconnecting Youth program and the Healing Journey of the Canoe; both are small group-based facilitated counseling sessions to promote positive development. All students will receive universal prevention services, and students screened and determined for higher tiers of service will receive individualized counseling plans and the support of a wraparound support specialist to provide coordinated care and community connections. The project will also launch a 24/7 monitored crisis response phone line to provide immediate intervention to students in need.


Grantee: GREAT PLAINS TRIBAL CHAIRMEN'S HLTH BRD
Program: Planning and Developing Infrastructure to Promote the Mental Health of Children, Youth and Families in American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) Communities
City: Rapid City
State: SD
Grant Award Number: 5 H79 SM083039-03
Congressional District: At large
FY 2023 Funding: $310,000
Project Period: 2020/11/30 - 2023/11/29

Grantee: GREAT PLAINS TRIBAL CHAIRMEN'S HLTH BRD
Program: Cooperative Agreements for Tribal Behavioral Health
City: RAPID CITY
State: SD
Grant Award Number: 5 H79 SM084070-03
Congressional District: At large
FY 2023 Funding: $250,000
Project Period: 2021/07/31 - 2026/07/30

Grantee: GREAT PLAINS TRIBAL CHAIRMEN'S HLTH BRD
Program: Garrett Lee Smith State/Tribal Youth Suicide Prevention and Early Intervention Grant Program
City: RAPID CITY
State: SD
Grant Award Number: 5 H79 SM082122-05
Congressional District: At large
FY 2023 Funding: $735,998
Project Period: 2019/06/30 - 2024/06/29

Grantee: LAWRENCE COUNTY COALITION
Program: FY 2023 Mental Health Awareness Training Grants
City: SPEARFISH
State: SD
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM088039-01
Congressional District: At large
FY 2023 Funding: $400,000
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2026/09/29

Lawrence County Coalition (LCC) was formed in 2018 to enhance the efforts of preventing and reducing youth substance use in the county. After several years of prevention efforts, LCC and its community partners have identified a deeper issue in substance use, mental illness. Due to the long-standing stigmas and lack of mental health awareness, there is very little identification of mental illness and knowledge of available resources. Efforts surrounding mental health issues have been more about crisis management than education, prevention, and early identification. Lawrence County Coalition is seeking Mental Health Awareness Training (MHAT) funding to help increase overall community wellness and security. Lawrence County, South Dakota is a rural county with a population of 25,687, and an influx of approximately 4,000 college students attending Black Hills State University every year. Located in Western South Dakota, Lawrence County is made up of five small communities – Deadwood, Lead, Central City, Whitewood, and Spearfish. In addition to a state university, Lawrence County is home to 2 public school districts (K-12), 5 law enforcement entities, 5 emergency services, the National Guard, and 2 senior citizen centers. Census data shows there are approximately 11,109 households with 17.3% of the population age 18 and under and 22.4% age 65 and older. The racial make-up of Lawrence County is: 92% White, 3.5% Hispanic or Latino, 2.1% Native American or Alaska Native, 1% Black or African American, 0.7% Asian, 0.1% Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander, and 0.8% other. These percentages include those who identify as one or more race. The population is 98.8% English speaking and gender percentages are 50.4% female and 49.6% male. The county also holds a 10.9% civilian veteran population and 0.2% active duty. (American Community Survey, 2021) LCC plans to provide MHAT curriculum and de-escalation strategies for the community, develop a standardized referral process and tracking system for mental health support, identify community outreach and engagement strategies, and develop educational resource materials. LCC and its partner organizations will achieve the following goals and objectives: (1) Train individuals to recognize the signs and symptoms of mental disorders, particularly serious mental illness and/or serious emotional disturbances. The project will have certified trainers in evidence based MHAT programs, as measured by training certifications earned by project staff and individuals identified with partner organizations. The project will train 1,028 (approximately 300/year) community members (adults and teens) in MHAT as measured by participation and passing grade in MHAT curriculum. (2) Establish and strengthen existing linkages with partner organizations and community-based mental health agencies to refer individuals with the signs or symptoms of mental illness to appropriate services. Partner organizations will demonstrate active participation in the project by each submitting monthly referral tracking & biannual updates. (3) Train law enforcement to identify persons with a mental disorder and employ crisis de-escalation techniques. Police Departments and School Resource Officers will be able to identify individuals with mental disorders and employ crisis de-escalation techniques as measured by participation and passing grade in MHAT curriculum. (4) Educate individuals about resources that are available in the community for individuals with a mental disorder. LCC will directly educate and provide resources to 12,500 Lawrence County community members as measured by attendance at informational sessions, number of resources distributed, website traffic, and media reach.


Grantee: LITTLE WOUND SCHOOL BOARD, INC.
Program: FY 2023 Cooperative Agreements for School-Based Trauma-Informed Support Services and Mental Health Care for Children and Youth
City: KYLE
State: SD
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM088433-01
Congressional District: At large
FY 2023 Funding: $802,218
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2027/09/29

Summary: Little Wound School’s Trauma-Informed Support Services Project will serve Native American K-12 students by implementing a school-based, recovery-oriented system of mental and behavioral health counseling support to children and youth experiencing trauma. Services offered by the project include counseling, cultural mentorship, substance use interventions, and related training to students, school staff, families, and members of the community. Project Name: Trauma-Informed Support Services Project: Little Wound School Population Served: Native American (Lakota) students in grades K-12 residing on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and enrolled at Little Wound School (Kyle, South Dakota). Strategies and Interventions: This project will provide mental and behavioral health resources to children and youth who have experienced significant trauma. This includes both historical and contemporary traumas impacting the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, the lowest income place in the United States. Services to address these traumas include the development of a collaborative partnership with Anpetu Luta Otipi, a reservation-based provider of substance use counseling and related services; screening and referral to specific resources provided by the project; development of a coordinated, long-term training plan for school-based staff, including teachers and administrators; development and implementation of a family and community engagement plan; establishment of a local interagency agreement to promote developmentally and culturally appropriate trauma-informed mental health services; implementation of cultural mentorship opportunities for students to promote Lakota self development; provision of cognitive behavioral therapy for clients; provision of internal family systems therapy for clients; and equine therapy. Project Goals and Objectives: The project’s three goals are (1) Expand access to evidence-based and culturally relevant trauma support for the targeted population by implementing school-based mental and behavioral health services; (2) decrease substance use and abuse in the target population by expanding access to culturally-informed, evidence-based treatment programs for Native American youth, and (3) increase the capacity of families of the target population and members of the community to recognize and intervene in trauma-induced negative behaviors and refer those individuals for additional services. Specific objectives align to these goals (objectives 1a and 1b, for example, align to goal 1). Topical summaries of the objectives content are: (1a) solicitation and informed consent collected from students’ legal guardians, (1b) provision of individual and small group counseling for children and youth identified at-risk for trauma- induced mental/behavioral health warning signs, (1c) universal prevention services and training for all students, (2a) rates of screening for substance use disorders, (2b) provision of individualized counseling for clients screened for substance use disorder, (3a) provision of trauma-informed subject training for parents, families, and community members, (3b) provision of substance use disorder prevention training for parents, families, and community members, and (3c) trauma-informed training for Little Wound School staff. Number of Individuals Served: This project will serve 1,480 unduplicated individuals throughout the five year project period (635 in year 1, 575 in year 2, and 135 each year in years 3 and 4) including children, youth, school staff members, and members of the community. As many participants will engage with the project each year, the total number of individuals engaged at least annually, over the entire grant period, will be 4,300 (duplicated number served).


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