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UT Discretionary Funding Fiscal Year 2020

Center: FG

Grantee: URBAN INDIAN CENTER OF SALT LAKE
Program: COVID-19 Emergency Response for Suicide Prevention
City: SALT LAKE CITY
State: UT
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000399-01
Congressional District: 2
FY 2020 Funding: $800,000
Project Period: 7/31/2020 - 2021/11/30

The Urban Indian Center of Salt Lake (UICSL) proposed project for the SAMHSA COVID-19 Emergency Response for Suicide Prevention Grants (Short Title: COVID-19 ERSP) will be used to provide crisis intervention services, mental health, substance use disorder and domestic violence services and treatment for Native American adults impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Native American communities have been hit hard by COVID-19 both on the reservation and in urban areas and access to services to support our communities’ mental, emotional, physical and spiritual health has been greatly impacted. Funding for this project will improve services that the UICSL provides through its Red Mesa Behavioral Health department to address depression, anxiety, grief, isolation, loss of employment, financial instability and domestic violence to reduce the risk of suicide and suicide attempts for Native American adults along the Wasatch Front. With this funding the UICSL will provide new and existing services though tele behavioral health platforms by purchasing necessary equipment; strengthen collaborations with expert individuals, agencies and organizations; obtain training and technical assistance and hire behavioral health, medical and traditional healing service providers. Committed to this project are leaders in the state, including: The University of Utah Neuropsychiatric Institute; Utah Advocates for Recovery Awareness; Sacred Circle Health Care; the University of Utah College of Nursing Faculty Practice and the Utah Division of Substance Use and Mental Health Suicide Prevention Program. This team will create and implement a comprehensive plan of evidence-based and culturally relevant mental health, substance use and domestic violence crisis and treatment services that would improve accessibility to screening and assessment of mental health, substance use and domestic violence needs, such as safety and suicide risk; improve evidence-based and culturally appropriate treatment services; improve access to therapeutic and peer recovery support services; and improve access to crisis mental health services, such as 24-hour mobile crisis teams, and emergency crisis intervention services and psychiatric/medical assessment. The UICSL is located in Salt Lake City, UT among the eight tribal populations located in Utah: the Ute (Northern and Ute Mountain), Paiute (Paiute Indian Tribe and San Juan Band), Navajo, Goshute (Skull Valley and Confederated Bands) and has registered clients from 193 other tribal backgrounds.


Grantee: UTAH STATE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
Program: Emergency COVID-19
City: SALT LAKE CITY
State: UT
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000265-01
Congressional District: 2
FY 2020 Funding: $2,000,000
Project Period: 2020/04/20 - 2021/09/19

The Utah Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) has developed the Utah Emergency COVID19 Program for Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders to bridge gaps in mental health (MH) and substance use (SUD) treatment services which have been exacerbated by the COVID19 pandemic. This program will focus on development and expansion of services across the crisis continuum. A significant majority of COVID19 cases have been located on the Wasatch Front (Salt Lake, Utah, Weber and Davis Counties), Summit County, a community directly east of Salt Lake County, and Washington County in the southern portion of the state. Therefore, any services that are not provided statewide will be targeted to these areas. The multi-pronged implementation plan will include increased and aggressive outreach, screening, referrals and service efforts, with an emphasis on services for those who are particularly vulnerable to the pandemic. This will involve individuals experiencing exposure or exacerbation of symptoms due to their living situation (individuals experiencing homelessness, SUD residential, mental health supportive housing, skilled nursing facilities, domestic violence victims), due to job-related stressors (unemployed), and those who already struggle with access to services (refugees, transition-aged youth, those who are being discharged from incarceration). In addition, special consideration will be given to children and families dealing with disruption in family structure due to COVID19. GOAL 1 - Increase access to the full continuum of crisis services for Utahns (SMI and SED) will focus on targeted development and enhancement of statewide crisis and warm lines, a mobile crisis outreach team, one to two no-refusal receiving centers, and adding the Bridge program to emergency rooms. Improved outreach, screening and referral for healthcare workers and individuals with an exacerbation of symptoms will be included. GOAL 2 - Improve Outreach and Screening Services will include the development of a comprehensive and interactive screening site, a referral list with emphasis on providers with telehealth capability and identification of providers with expertise working with specific populations, and proactive outreach to key stakeholders and partners who may be at increased risk of mental health and substance use disorders from the COVID19 pandemic. Goal 3 - Improve access to mental health and substance use treatment services for healthcare practitioners impacted by COVID19 includes community partnership for the Utah COVID Emotional Relief Line to ensure identification, streamlined referrals and ongoing service delivery to impacted healthcare professionals, and with the two largest employee assistance programs (EAPs) providers among health care practitioners to provide training on evidence-based brief interventions for this population. A minimum of 5,000 people will be served by this program.


Grantee: UTAH STATE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
Program: COVID-19 Emergency Response for Suicide Prevention
City: SALT LAKE CITY
State: UT
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000490-01
Congressional District: 2
FY 2020 Funding: $800,000
Project Period: 7/31/2020 - 2021/11/30

Through the Utah Responds Suicide Prevention Project, the Utah Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) will implement rapid follow-up with adults with adults at risk of suicide, training of clinical and community providers, expansion of nontraditional referral pathways and telehealth services, and enhanced services to survivors of domestic violence and their children. DSAMH will contract with Weber Human Services and Southwest Behavioral Health to implement rapid follow-up/care transition services to recently discharged adults ages 25+ at risk of suicide at two Emergency Departments, one each in northern and southern Utah, serving approximately 1,050 adults over the life of the project. The target areas, Weber County and Washington County, are in the top 5 most populated counties in Utah. Follow-up/care transition services will include the following evidence-based suicide prevention interventions: caring contacts, resource linking, appointments with rapid follow-up clinics, counseling on access to lethal means, safety planning, suicide screening, and clinical risk assessment (as needed). DSAMH will also increase access to quality services, including through non-traditional pathways, by implementing evidence-based suicide prevention training to community and clinical service providers for adults at risk for suicide. Approximately 250 clinicians will receive training in evidence-based suicide assessment and suicide-specific treatment interventions over the life of the project. Approximately 1000 community partners and paraprofessionals serving adults at risk of suicide will receive evidence based suicide prevention gatekeeper and means counseling, over the life of the grant. Additionally, DSAMH will partner with Utah Department of Health to provide phone crisis counseling services to approximately 420 individuals referred through the COVID 19 Active Monitoring program, over the life of the grant. Finally, DSAMH will contract with the Utah Domestic Violence Coalition, using the Home Safe program, to increase safety and stability for victims of domestic violence and their dependents including a safe place to stay in the event that individuals are unable to remain safely in the home setting; serving approximately 98 families over the life of the project. Utah Responds Suicide Prevention Project will allow DSAMH to plan and act now to mitigate the negative mental health impacts of COVID 19 and prevent unnecessary suffering and death.


Center: SM

Grantee: UTAH STATE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
Program: System of Care (SOC) Expansion and Sustainability Grants
City: SALT LAKE CITY
State: UT
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SM082957-01
Congressional District: 2
FY 2020 Funding: $3,000,000
Project Period: 2020/08/31 - 2024/08/30

The Utah Department of Human Services (DHS) proposes to expand Utah's System of Care (SOC) to previously unserved communities, including American Indian communities, in frontier and rural areas of the state. Services will reach across all child/youth-serving Divisions: Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH); Child and Family Services (DCFS): Juvenile Justice Services (DJJS); and Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD). These proposed SOC expansion targets access to services for American Indian, frontier and rural communities utilizing High Fidelity Wrap and Stabilization and Mobile Response; annually serving 400 plus children/you and families with serious mental health challenges statewide while reducing dependency on out-of-home and emergency services. This proposal is a key component of DHS's commitment to serving children, youth and families in their homes and communities when safely possible. As evidenced by the December 11, 20196 Federal Children's Bureau approval of the DHS Family First Prevention Services Act plan, Utah's focus on building an operational foundation for the prevention of foster care is an unwavering priority. Increasing service provider capacity through subsidized training and staff certification offers more evidence-based services to families while reducing foster care. This proposed SOC expansion will extend access to this developing evidence-based continuum of services, specifically for challenged American Indian, frontier and rural communities. Utah's rapidly growing population of 3.1 million live in 29 counties covering over 84,900 miles. 21 of Utah's 29 counties are considered frontier or rural; housing nearly 13% of the State's population. The geographic isolation for these American Indian, rural and frontier communities are also barriers to the well-being of children and youth experiencing mental health challenges. This expansion proposes to roll out over all five established SOC Regions, including a targeted team for the Paiute Tribe, and includes a Center of Excellence to ensure fidelity and continuous evaluation and process improvement for the greatest outcomes and assessment of impact to systems outside of DHS. Goal 1: To improve mental health outcomes for children/youth with serious mental health conditions and who are involved or at risk of involvement with multiple DHS divisions. Measure: Number of children/youth referred, screened, assessed, and served and their outcomes. Goal 2: To keep children/youth in their homes and communities when they are experiencing mental and behavioral health challenges. Measure: Number served that remained in-home. Goal 3: Establish a SOC Center of Excellence to ensure fidelity, quality outcomes, and analyze longitudinal impact on systems outside of DHS. Measure: WFI-EX & Center of Excellence analysis. Goal 4: Increase youth peer voice. Measure: Youth Peer Voice Change/Increase.


Center: SP

Grantee: BRYCE CANYON CITY
Program: Drug-Free Communities Support Program-New
City: BRYCE CANYON CITY
State: UT
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SP082068-01
Congressional District: 2
FY 2020 Funding: $125,000
Project Period: 2019/10/31 - 2024/10/30

The Bryce Valley Prevention Coalition purpose is to reduce substance misuse for youth and adults by addressing risk factors and enforcing protective factors. Implement strategies to address the identified issues with evidence based programs. Also Identify and train key individuals to provide the needed support to achieve the desired outcomes.


Grantee: SOUTHWEST BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CENTER
Program: Drug-Free Communities Support Program-Competing Continuation
City: SAINT GEORGE
State: UT
Grant Award Number: 2 H79 SP081928-06
Congressional District: 2
FY 2020 Funding: $125,000
Project Period: 2019/12/31 - 2024/12/30

Washington County Prevention Coalition Initiative to reduce youth substance abuse.


Grantee: WEBER HUMAN SERVICES CORPORATION
Program: Sober Truth on Preventing Underage Drinking Act Grants
City: OGDEN
State: UT
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 SP081139-01
Congressional District: 1
FY 2020 Funding: $50,000
Project Period: 2020/04/30 - 2024/04/29

The Bonneville Communities That Care Coalition (BCTC) is composed of four cities motivated to reduce underage drinking by reducing negative factors in our community and increasing positive influences. We do this by first starting with a thorough assessment of community needs and strengths, followed by using prevention strategies, programs, and policies to reduce risk and increase protection for our youth. The four cities, Washington Terrace, South Ogden, Uintah, and Riverdale, are united and mobilized with 12 community sectors to organize our efforts to be the most effective we possibly can in this critical work to prevent problems before they happen. We are a community in the southern part of Weber County, Utah and share two zip codes 84403 and 84405. Together, our cities make up the Bonneville 'cone' due to the fact that it is made up of seven elementary schools and two junior high schools that funnel into one high school, Bonneville High. According to the United States 2016 Census Population Estimate, the Bonneville Cone's total population is 35,341. Of that figure, 29% of the population is under the age of 18, demonstrating that our population is relatively young. Fifty-eight percent (58%) fall in the age range of 19-64, and 13% is 65 and older. The average of total persons living below poverty level is 8% and the median annual household income is $51,571. This region is designated as urban. We use the SPF coalition model and the Communities That Care (CTC) model. These models lay the foundation for all our coalition work. Three strategies and we have chosen to focus on for the STOP grant include: 1) Increase capacity of our youth workgroup to identify and address environmental issues that impact underage drinking; 2) Increase the number of compliance checks done by law enforcement; and, 3) Increase public awareness of the problem of underage drinking. Our efforts are aimed at the entire community with emphasis on underage youth. With a cooperative effort and following proven prevention methods, we will reduce underage drinking. Through increasing compliance monitoring, increasing youths knowledge of underage drinking facts (including most kids don't and increasing the publics knowledge of and connections to specific media campaigns, we will reach the majority of our population along with other nearby communities. We have had great success in media coverage at past press conferences. For each annual media event we do, we reach an average of 55,000 people, including our community and nearby neighbors. Because our outreach includes decreasing alcohol availability to underage youth, we will impact the neighboring communities as well, as we know many come to our cities to purchase alcohol. For the next 5 years, we will provide at least 100,000 people with the knowledge and skills they need to reduce underage drinking and increase our community health.


Center: TI

Grantee: CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF THE GOSHUTE RESERVATION
Program: Tribal Opioid Response Grants
City: IBAPAH
State: UT
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 TI083254-01
Congressional District: 2
FY 2020 Funding: $124,881
Project Period: 2020/09/30 - 2022/09/29

Sacred Circle Healthcare (SCHC) proposes to use a hybrid MAT Program ('Medicaid Health Home Model') along with a case management program that relies on the "Accountable Health Community Model" (AHC Model) to service a minimum of 135 OUD/Methamphetamine clients who reside in the Salt Lake Valley region and in the Ibapah, UT region. We believe it ‘takes a village’ that relies on the social-ecological model (individual, family & community-systems efforts) to effectively address OUD/Methamphetamine abuse. Our MAT Program relies on evidence-based medication management, intensive outpatient mental health treatment, supportive and educational programming that uses the 'Living Room Model', and case management that focuses on addressing the clients' social service needs. Our primary health care services are integrated with behavioral health and oral health care. With regard to mental health services, our clients receive evidence-based modalities including: Culturally informed, trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (particularly deconstructing the trauma narrative); Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, to name a few. Given COVID-19, and resulting policies impacting face to face contact, SCHC has telehealth capacity to provide HIPAA compliant services. The Living Room Model provides our clients with access to a therapeutic, supportive milieu where clients can visit to receive informal peer education, programs rendered by our volunteers, and a computer lab to access self-improvement content. The premise of the AHC Model is that social service needs (i.e., food insecurity, housing & employment insecurity, transportation issues, social isolation) must be concurrently addressed to effectively reduce OUD/ Methamphetamine abuse. Failure to do so results in high risk individuals experiencing increased life stressors, which in turn, negatively impacts their sobriety. Once clients start our program, our case manager assesses and helps address their immediate unmet social service needs. The AHC Model also places importance on developing an inter-organizational network where our staff routinely contact with outside agencies to improve collaboration and our cross-referral practices. We also propose to offer workforce development quarterly trainings to our organizational partners in culturally and trauma informed services. Another component of our program is training Elders in issues related to prescription opioid use, prescription misuse and proper disposal of these medications. Once trained, our Elders will provide educational content using social media, and video-based formats on a monthly basis. Our evaluation effort involves process, formative and outcome evaluation strategies. The process evaluation provides frequency counts and percentages of project activities and characteristics about our clientele. Formative evaluation will include conducting focus groups with program participants to assess strengths, weaknesses and recommendations regarding our services. This information is shared with our program staff for the purposes of program refinement. Our outcome evaluation includes pre, mid-point (6 month), and post assessments using multiple psychometrically sound survey instruments that assess: depression/suicide risk; other psychological symptoms (anxiety, panic disorder, mood swings associated with bipolar disorder, eating disorder, alcohol/drug abuse, risk of violence); life functioning (work/school, intimate relationships, social relationships, life enjoyment); current substance abuse; and perceived social support. In case management, we will use a wiki portal allowing clients access to their electronic medicine wheel to document progress they are making on personal goals in four quadrants areas (Health Behaviors; Mental Health; Social Service Needs; Connection to Family/Community).


Grantee: UTAH STATE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
Program: State Opioid Response Grants
City: SALT LAKE CITY
State: UT
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 TI083295-01
Congressional District: 2
FY 2020 Funding: $10,721,130
Project Period: 2020/09/30 - 2022/09/29

The Utah State Stimulant and Opioid Response (UT SSOR) Grant, the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) identifies youth ages 12-17 and adults ages 18 years and older, who have a current, or are at risk for an opioid use disorder (OUD) or stimulant use disorder as the population of focus. Priority populations will include pregnant women, individuals who use drugs intravenously, and people who are unfunded or uninsured. There will be UT SSOR projects throughout the state of Utah. The most recent death data available is from the state medical examiner's office indicates that in 2019 Utah had approximately 356 opioid-related overdose deaths. Opioids and psychostimulants, including methamphetamine, were listed on the health certificate as a contributing cause of death more often than any other drug types in 2019. There was a 38% increase in methamphetamine-involved overdose deaths from 2015 to 2019. Furthermore, methamphetamine was involved in 43% of all drug overdoses in Utah.


Grantee: UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY
Program: Rural Opioids Technical Assistance Grants
City: LOGAN
State: UT
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 TI083267-01
Congressional District: 1
FY 2020 Funding: $549,998
Project Period: 2020/08/31 - 2022/08/30

The Tribal and Rural Opioid Initiative (TROI) of Utah State University will expand harm reduction education and outreach into six Utah and two New Mexico counties, including the reservation lands of four tribes (Ute, Skull Valley Goshute, Paiute, and the Confederated Tribes of Goshutes). While whole person health is a tenant of harm reduction, many programs focus largely on naloxone trainings, medication treatment, testing services and syringe distribution. In Utah and New Mexico, opioid overdose deaths exceed national averages, and mortality in rural areas from overdose deaths related to opioid and stimulant use exceed urban mortality rates. These mortality rates suggest an immediate need for harm reduction expansion and education, which hinges upon reducing stigma toward harm reduction interventions. TROI will administer a series of training and technical assistance opportunities, focusing on on-demand and real-time offerings that take advantage of online platforms, seeking to better bridge harm reduction and holistic health approaches. Target audiences will range from health professionals working in the area of chronic pain, to community members, to health professionals who may hold stigmatizing beliefs about harm reduction and substance use disorders. Deliverables include a teleconference, podcast, online and in-person book discussion groups, capacity-building webinars, active social media, and an online Master Health Volunteer Program that trains community members on opioid use disorders and the SAMHSA wellness wheel, before readying them to return 40-hours of service to their communities. In-person activities, particularly with tribal partners, will supplement online activities, and include a Tribal Opioid Summit, naloxone and related education, and harm reduction needs assessments with four targeted tribes. All activities will be facilitated through a Community Based Participatory Action framework, centering community members, locally determined priorities and the voices of tribal members and persons in recovery in rural areas. A Holistic Health Coalition will guide a statewide needs assessment and action plan process, while persons in recovery will co-lead community advisory boards for all major activities. Tangible outputs will include two graphic novels that contain stories of the treatment and harm reduction experiences of persons with opioid/stimulant use disorders, because hearing the stories of persons in recovery has been shown to reduce stigma. Book groups will be supported by the SOR provider in New Mexico and Utah Humanities in Utah, leveraging networks to increase the likelihood that people interested in the arts who might not otherwise engage with this content may be drawn to participate. Overall, this program seeks to leverage networks in Utah and New Mexico to increase acceptance of harm reduction best practices, and ultimately reduce overdose mortality in both states. Over 1000 rural residents will be directly served by these grant activities with an estimated additional 10,000 reached through the podcast, social media, graphic novel readership or other indirect channels.