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WA Discretionary Funding Fiscal Year 2023

Center: FG

Grantee: COLUMBIA RIVER MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
Program: FY 2023 Congressional Directive Spending Projects
City: VANCOUVER
State: WA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001052-01
Congressional District: 3
FY 2023 Funding: $474,000
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2024/09/29

Columbia River Mental Health Services (CRMHS) is requesting $474,000 for its Columbia River Night Crisis Team. The requested funding would be used to support 7 Community Crisis Specialist in providing crisis screenings, interventions, and follow-up to Southwest Washington. CRMHS currently serves over 5,000 unique individuals in our mental health, substance use disorder outpatient programs, and our Northstar Opioid Treatment Program every year. The population of focus are adult individuals experiencing mental health and substance use crises in Clark County, including rural areas such as Yacolt, Amboy, and Washougal. Located in the Southwest corner of the state, Clark County has a total population of 511,404 people and is located in the Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA, Metropolitan Statistical Area. Clark County is 77.5 percent White, 10.2 percent Hispanic or Latino, 4.3 percent Two or More Races, 2.4 percent Black or African American, and 1.2 percent American Indian. The Columbia River Night Crisis Team will increase access to crisis services and expand service to underserved rural areas of the community, serving over 120 unique individuals each year. Our goal is to provide crisis interventions to the community and foster engagement in supportive systems of care. Our approach utilizes several treatment services and partnerships to create a broad, integrated support system for individuals to have all behavioral and physical needs met, while reducing strain on existing emergency responders.


Grantee: EVERETT RECOVERY CAFE
Program: FY 2023 Congressional Directive Spending Projects
City: EVERETT
State: WA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001024-01
Congressional District: 2
FY 2023 Funding: $475,873
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2024/09/29

Everett Recovery Cafe proposes to expand and adapt our current Recovery Coaching Program in order to provide more coaching to more individuals at the Café, and to broaden the presence of recovery coaching in the community and within other organizations that work with similar populations by increasing the availability of Recovery Coach trainings, and inviting other organizations to take part. Recovery Coaching is a goal-oriented form of peer support that is particularly effective in helping people in recovery from substance use disorders and can also be useful for people in recovery from homelessness, trauma, and some mental health challenges. At the Everett Recovery Café, Recovery Coaches are trained and certified, follow a professional and ethical protocol, are supervised and are paid for their time. Recovery Coaches help a person in recovery create a Recovery Wellness Plan, which serves as a framework that helps a person think strategically about what they would like to achieve in various sectors of their life, such as family, housing, employment, relationships, and then develop a step-by-step path toward those objectives. During regular one-on-one sessions, the coach helps the person define their specific recovery goals, assists in breaking those overarching goals into achievable steps, and then works with the individual to overcome any barriers that arise. Recovery Coaching is an action-oriented approach that emphasizes improving someone’s present life. An integral part of Recovery Coaching is helping the person navigate the human services system and access community resources. Recovery Coaching is founded on the belief that there are multiple pathways to recovery and each person’s journey is unique.


Grantee: HOPE FOR HEROES HORSEMANSHIP CENTER
Program: FY 2023 Congressional Directive Spending Projects
City: YELM
State: WA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000955-01
Congressional District: 3
FY 2023 Funding: $70,000
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2024/09/29

SECTION A: Description of Project, Population of Focus, and Statement of Need A-1 Hope for Heroes Horsemanship Center has been providing Therapeutic Horsemanship classes to about 100 individual veterans and active duty personnel annually for the last 5 years. They do this by organizing participants into small group classes of 4 to 6 participants each for weekly 90 minute classes for 8 consecutive weeks. They operate 3 classes daily on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays for each 8-week semester and generally operate 4 semesters annually. Of these (9) classes that are offered weekly, 4 to 5 are for first-time participants and 3 to 4 are for participants who have already completed one semester and are attending for "Postvention" Services. The applicant operates this program through community donations and does not ever charge any of the participants any fees for participation. To-date, the applicant program has never obtained complete and total funding for their operations and relies upon no-interest loans from the program founders to maintain operations. The applicant program will be using this Funding Opportunity FG-23-099 to help pay for the funding of their program in conjunction with other community funding. The Program has consistently grown their community funding base each year by 15% to 30% and received


Grantee: MONROE, CITY OF
Program: FY 2023 Congressional Directive Spending Projects
City: MONROE
State: WA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001128-01
Congressional District: 1
FY 2023 Funding: $480,804
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2027/09/29

This project is a partnership between City of Monroe, WA and City of Sultan, WA to fund a mental health crisis co-responder who works with emergency services to respond more effectively to callers experiencing a mental health related crisis. The East County Co-responder will be staffed by Volunteers of America Western Washington, our subrecipient who is a local non-profit behavioral health and human services provider. The goals of our program are to provide appropriate and compassionate care to individuals experiencing mental health crises, to reduce the involvement of law enforcement in these situations, and to connect individuals with appropriate mental health services and supports. Our program engages with community members when a 911 call is made regarding a mental health crisis.


Grantee: PUBLIC DEFENDER ASSOCIATION
Program: FY 2023 Congressional Directive Spending Projects
City: SEATTLE
State: WA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001026-01
Congressional District: 7
FY 2023 Funding: $4,417,000
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2024/09/29

CoLEAD mitigates identified homeless encampments by providing outreach, needs assessment, shelter matching individual needs, wraparound stabilization services and coordinated care, short-term shelter, and transition to permanent housing for unhoused people in high-impact areas of Seattle/King County, WA. Operating at the intersection of health, safety, and equity, CoLEAD represents an effective strategy to address crime and public disorder associated with people who have complex behavioral health conditions, are unhoused, and have disproportionately high rates of contact with law enforcement and the criminal legal system. CoLEAD serves individuals 18 years and older who commit, or are at high risk of committing, law violations related to unmet behavioral health needs and/or impoverishment. They are people whose behavioral health issues have typically been met with arrest and prosecution; who are commonly estranged from systems of care; and who require field-based engagement and re-imagination of access points. In addition to their disproportionately high rates of contact with the criminal legal system, participants often lack safe and stable housing, legal income, public benefits, and access to health care. According to a 2023 study, 62 percent of participants reported both a mental health condition and a substance use disorder. More than 94% of people surveyed reported that they had been homeless for more than a year, while 57% indicated that they had been living unsheltered for five or more years. In the one-year funded period, CoLEAD will conduct rapid assessments for at least 200 people with complex conditions living unsheltered in the identified areas of focus; provide harm reduction and overdose prevention supplies and instruction for at least 200 people; provide intensive case management supports for at least 200 people; enroll or renew enrollment at least 100 people in Medicaid and/or Medicare; and place at least 50 people in permanent supportive housing. By combining evidence-based wraparound case management, multi-agency coordination, and short-term, non-congregate, supportive shelter, CoLEAD reduces barriers to services and care for people who otherwise cannot access existing resources; reduces reliance on police and the criminal legal system to address problems of public disorder; and serves as an alternative or supplement to 911 as a primary response to requests for service related to unmet behavioral health needs.


Grantee: PUBLIC DEFENDER ASSOCIATION
Program: FY 2023 Congressional Directive Spending Projects
City: SEATTLE
State: WA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001037-01
Congressional District: 7
FY 2023 Funding: $1,500,000
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2024/09/29

Seattle-King County LEAD (Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion/Let Everyone Advance with Dignity) reduces crime and disorder associated with unmet behavioral health needs and homelessness by diverting people with unmet behavioral health needs away from arrest and into coordinated, community-based systems of response and care. LEAD creates a mechanism by which law enforcement and other stakeholders in Seattle-King County, WA, can divert individuals away from the criminal legal system and into intensive case management services to address needs related to mental health, substance use disorder, and extreme poverty. Seattle-King County LEAD is a structured, collaborative partnership of public agencies, nonprofit service providers, law enforcement and criminal legal entities, business associations, government officials, and other community stakeholders. Participants in Seattle-King County LEAD are individuals 18 years and older who commit, or are at high risk of committing, law violations related to behavioral health challenges and/or income instability. They are people whose behavioral health issues (mental health challenges and/or substance use) have typically been met with arrest and prosecution; who have disproportionately high rates of complex trauma; who are commonly estranged from all systems of care; and who require field-based engagement and re-imagination of access points. They are typically unhoused; disproportionately lack access to public benefits, healthcare, and social services; have high rates of contact with the criminal legal system and with emergency response systems; and have multiple compounding or co-occurring challenges. In the one-year funded period, Seattle-King County LEAD will provide case management for at least 800 participants; make at least 300 referrals to behavioral health resources; make at least 30 referrals to LEAD legal services; and conduct at least five community meetings related to homelessness and public safety to educate a minimum of 50 unduplicated community members about LEAD’s purpose, activities, and access.


Grantee: UKRANIAN COMMUNITY CENTER OF WASHINGTON
Program: FY 2023 Congressional Directive Spending Projects
City: RENTON
State: WA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001003-01
Congressional District: 9
FY 2023 Funding: $500,000
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2024/09/29

Ukrainian Community Center of Washington (UCCW) is proposing to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate Cross Cultural Counseling and Support (CCCS) services to newly arrived Ukrainians to Washington State who have been traumatically impacted by the war in Ukraine and are at high risk of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, anxiety, depression and other related mental health illnesses. The process of resettlement, limited English-proficiency and negative stigmas about the need and access to mental health services are some of the biggest barriers towards their self-sufficiency and overall health. With this funding support, UCCW aims to help them overcome these barriers and improve their mental health. CCCS mental health services consist of the following components: Case Management, Individual Counseling, Support Groups, Educational Mental health, Resource Center and are based on the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) practices. All staff members who will provide direct services and support for this proposed project are tri-lingual and share the cultural background aspects of the target population for this project. Due to the outbreak of the full scale war in Ukraine as of February, 2022, many Ukrainians who witnessed traumatic events and experienced various losses and horrors of this war fled their homes in search of finding refuge outside of Ukraine. Many others became internally displaced inside Ukraine. According to the estimates of the World Health Organization (WHO), up to 10 million of Ukrainians are at risk of some form of a mental health disorder, varying from anxiety and stress to more severe conditions. According to Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) statistical data, 14,877 Ukrainians arrived in WA between January to December of 2022 alone. These numbers are expected to be much higher following an announcement of the Uniting for Ukraine program as of April 21, 2022. This project is aimed to serve at least 300 newly arrived Ukrainians in WA state throughout the lifetime of this proposed project from Sept. 30, 2023 to Sept. 29, 2024 with the goals and objectives to outreach to the newly arrived Ukrainians and provide them with culturally and linguistically appropriate mental health individual and group services and support, help them reduce their negative stigma about mental health, and provide access to the language appropriate mental health resource center.


Grantee: UNITED TERRITORIES OF PACIFIC ISLANDERS ALLIANCE - WASHINGTON (UTOPIA WA)
Program: FY 2023 Congressional Directive Spending Projects
City: KENT
State: WA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001118-01
Congressional District: 9
FY 2023 Funding: $500,000
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2024/09/29

UTOPIA’s Mapu Maia Clinic serves as a trusted, culturally aligned, free health care resource for the QTPI (Queer and Transgender Pacific Islanders) and the QTBIPoC (Queer and Transgender Black, Indigenous, People of Color) community. The Mapu Maia Clinic provides resources and care for substance use and mental health services, including prevention, harm reduction, treatment, and recovery support services. Mapu Maia is a Samoan phrase that refers to inviting someone over to rest; a sentiment that we wish to communicate to our community, that this is a gender affirming and culturally aligned space for them to receive support and services congruent with their well-being. The Mapu Maia Clinic has served the community for the past four years of experience since the outbreak of the pandemic in 2020 and has provided health care needs and services to community members through trusted partnerships and volunteer efforts of health care providers and organizations. The Mapu Maia Clinic is a place of refuge, aimed at providing our community with quality health care in a space that honors them in all facets of their identities. Mapu Maia is a space where community members access services while feeling safe and valued. It is the goal of the project that through the Mapu Maia Clinic, we will continue to close the gap between health services and the well-being of the community


Grantee: WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
Program: FY 2023 Cooperative Agreements for States and Territories to Improve Local 988 Capacity
City: TUMWATER
State: WA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001203-01
Congressional District: 10
FY 2023 Funding: $4,635,542
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2026/09/29

The 988 Crisis Systems Section provides behavioral health workforce capacity and services that are culturally, geographically, and linguistically specialized and relevant for people in Washington who experience a behavioral health crisis. Data-driven efforts have led to the creation of the first Native and Strong Lifeline in Washington State; however, additional capacity is continuing to be needed to provide additional relevant services to the communities we serve, and to ensure capacity can continue to scale at the same rate as call, chat and text volume of the 988 Lifeline. With this funding, Washington crisis centers will work to increase their staffing capacity to continue meeting the 90% in-state answer rate, build capacity within student intern programs and follow-up programs, and retain in-house training capacity to help develop the behavioral health workforce and recruit and retain employees. The project team, which includes members from the Department of Health (DOH), all three Washington crisis centers, Health Care Authority, and Washington 911, will continue to work together on capacity building, sustainability, and service coordination. Over the course of the project years the team will submit Washington’s sustainability plan for crisis center workforce capacity and key performance indicators (KPIs). This team will evaluate monthly, quarterly, and annual data including the KPI data to identify solutions to address capacity challenges. This team will also work together to develop and implement a statewide 988 communication plan, joint reports on current 988/911 structures and collaborations, as well as current Mobile Crisis Outreach options. Furthermore, in year one of the project, all three crisis centers will work in collaboration with DOH to review and improve programmatic quality assurance plans and develop standardized protocols and referral resources for 988 contacts requiring substance use crisis care. The Native and Strong Lifeline, in collaboration with DOH, will continue the work to enhance the engagement of all Tribes and Tribal Organizations within the state of Washington. Over the course of year one of the project, these teams will meet to discuss communication strategies and identify gaps in training opportunities to improve 988 services to tribal communities. Washington will also utilize funding to foster the development of Community Crisis Response Teams (CCRTs) to address gaps in the crisis system created by historic and current systemic racism that has created fear in some communities to reach out to the crisis system. These CCRTs will operate independently of the crisis system and be operated by trusted community leaders who will support their communities by responding to people in crisis in their communities. This will improve access to traditionally underserved areas and improve outcomes for people in crisis. The Washington State team is prepared to initiate work, if funded, without delay. Team members have laid an important foundation to build out thus far and if funded, are excited to further support capacity building efforts.


Grantee: WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY
Program: FY 2023 Congressional Directive Spending Projects
City: PULLMAN
State: WA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001041-01
Congressional District: 5
FY 2023 Funding: $425,535
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2024/09/29

Nationwide, 47.1 million Americans live with a mental health condition, but rural Americans are disproportionately represented because of less access to care and greater stigmatization of mental health issues. Washington State's rural counties mirror this national picture, an as a result, suicide rate in Washington's rural counties range from 33-100% above average. This project will engage rural, underserved communities at multiple levels to understand both existing assets and gaps in resources needed to address mental and behavioral health services. At the county level we will meet with staff at 12 rural serving county health districts in Eastern Washington to determine behavioral health workforce needs and impediments to building and maintaining that workforce. At the community level we will conduct a comprehensive survey of all the Extension faculty and staff embedded in each county in Washington with a focus on existing mental health service availability and or gaps in the communities they serve. At the service provider level we will survey (N=80) mental health providers to determine their view of the challenges of providing services in rural areas and the prospects for, and problems with, increased use of telehealth. Then, at the level of schools, we leverage existing partnerships with school districts to add new anonymous survey data from students (N=3000; Grades 6-12) to our large existing data base of student surveys collected since 2019. These surveys will directly address trends in student mental health needs, and we will connect them to school and district level perceptions collected from school staff (N=250). Finally, we will synthesize the data from each of the levels to offer recommendations to discuss with communities to create a foundation for the introduction of new services and interventions. This multi-level community grounded approach for creating new mental health initiatives may be generalized beyond existing sites in Washington to become a national model.


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