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AK Discretionary Funding Fiscal Year 2023

Center: FG

Grantee: RURAL ALASKA COMMUNITY ACTION PROGRAM, INC.
Program: FY 2023 Congressional Directive Spending Projects
City: ANCHORAGE
State: AK
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000992-01
Congressional District: At large
FY 2023 Funding: $230,000
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2024/09/29

Compared to all other racial and ethnic groups in the U.S., Alaska Natives and Native Americans have the highest rates of suicide in the nation. As demonstrated by the Suicide Prevention Resource Center in 2020 and Center for American Indian Health in 2021, among others, locally informed and culturally based approaches that leverage strengths within Alaska Native and or Native American communities can significantly protect youth against suicide. The Rural Alaska Community Action Program, Inc., (RurAL CAP) Peer Mentor and Mental Health First Aide in Rural Alaska Project will build community capacity to support mental health and workforce development initiatives for young people, encouraging skill development to create a pipeline to needed community roles such as Behavioral Health Aids, Village Police Officers, school staff, and Tribal Government leaders. The project will support a cohort of approximately 10 Youth Peer Mentors and up to five Adult Mentors from up to seven rural Alaska communities to complete culturally responsive suicide prevention and mental health training. These trainings benefit each Mentor’s ability to create and facilitate safe places for difficult conversations with peers in their respective communities and refer community members to certified, professional health care providers if and as needed. The project pairs each Youth Peer Mentor with an Adult Mentor to ensure that youth have necessary support and processing mechanisms needed to be safe and supported. An estimated 100 people in rural Alaska will receive direct support from Mentors during this one-year project. The project goals are to 1) increase the capacity of the local community to reduce high-risk behaviors of youth that may contribute to self-harm and/or suicide and 2) decrease instances of youth self-harm and/or suicide by implementing a locally informed and peer-based program that addresses behaviors that may lead to harmful actions. Objectives to reach these goals include, but are not limited to, the following: develop formal agreements about capacity building with up to seven rural communities; train up to 10 rural youth and five rural adults on suicide prevention and mental health frameworks; Peer Mentors host up to 20 events to promote mental health awareness in their communities; Youth Peer Mentors successfully connect up to 100 peers in total across their communities to supportive mental health resources and/or methods. The Peer Mentor and Mental Health First Aide in Rural Alaska Project will benefit rural Alaska communities’ ability to create and sustain a healthy youth culture that will contribute to the reduction of self-harm and suicide rates. The project will go further by generating paths for youth and adults to advance from schooling into vital, high-demand workforce positions within their communities, contributing to social, mental, and emotional health as well as community-wide economic development across rural communities.


Grantee: RUSH UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER
Program: Centers of Excellence for Behavioral Health Disparities
City: CHICAGO
State: IL
Grant Award Number: 5 H79 FG000600-03
Congressional District: 7
FY 2022 Funding: $700,000
Project Period: 2020/09/30 - 2025/09/29

Grantee: RUSH UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER
Program: Centers of Excellence for Behavioral Health Disparities
City: CHICAGO
State: IL
Grant Award Number: 5 H79 FG000600-04
Congressional District: 7
FY 2023 Funding: $700,000
Project Period: 2020/09/30 - 2025/09/29

Grantee: RUSH UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER
Program: CoE-Behavioral Health Disparities
City: CHICAGO
State: IL
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000600-01
Congressional District: 7
FY 2020 Funding: $700,000
Project Period: 2020/09/30 - 2025/09/29

Led by the Rush Center for Excellence in Aging, the SAMHSA Engage, Educate, Empower for Equity: E4, The Rush Center of Excellence for Behavioral Health Disparities in Older Adults (E4 Center) will measurably advance workforce capacity expansion through innovative practitioner training, with a specific focus on community-based providers’ implementation of evidence-based practices and programs (EBPs) for vulnerable older adults who experience the greatest behavioral and physical health disparities. Specifically, the E4 Center will target healthcare workforce enhancement to reduce behavioral health disparities for older adults in four SAMHSA strategic priority areas: (1) depression and suicide; (2) substance use disorders; (3) serious mental illness; and (4) socioeconomically disadvantaged and underserved ethnic and racial minority groups, and where they uniquely intersect to negatively impact physical health and mortality of older adults. To achieve this aim, the E4 Center will provide education in the necessary unique knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for providing high quality behavioral health services for older adults. This training will leverage both existing online training developed by the E4 Center team as well as the development of new resources and provision of technical assistance (TA). It will also include the 4Ms (What Matters, Medication, Mentation, Mobility) of an Age-Friendly Health System, which are critical factors in eliminating behavioral health disparities for older adults. Based on that foundation, we will provide extensive training in EBPs addressing mental health and substance abuse prevention, treatment, and recovery support services for older adults by national experts, and the TA to assure effective and efficient implementation. Because care for older adults is complex and fragmented, we will build on our extensive experience in catalyzing integrated partnerships between health systems and community-based organizations (CBOs) to create age-friendly health communities through the development of a Partnership Toolkit along with TA and implementation support. We will also develop a Business Case Toolkit with TA for administrators to provide effective, efficient EBP for older adults in welcoming and inclusive environments. Central to eliminating behavioral health disparities in older adults is patient and family caregiver engagement, for which the E4 Center will create, refine, and disseminate older adult engagement and educational resources to health care systems, clinics and CBOs. E4 Center activities will focus on scaling and spreading culturally tailored EBPs to the broad environment of care, including not only licensed mental health providers but also CBOs, direct care workers, and the aging network, in highly varied modalities and lengths to meet learner preferences. Across the grant period, we anticipate reaching nearly 3,000 learners each year, for a total of 15,000 in five years. The E4 Center will have broad and lasting impact on the care of our most vulnerable older adults with mental health and substance use disorders.


Grantee: RUTH & NORMAN RALES JEWISH FAMILY SERVICES, INC.
Program: Community Funded Project – FY 2022 CDS Project
City: BOCA RATON
State: FL
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000729-01
Congressional District: 21
FY 2022 Funding: $400,000
Project Period: 2022/09/30 - 2023/09/29

This grant will fund accessible counseling and mental health in Palm Beach County via Telemental Health and in-person counseling with a goal of promoting improved emotional well-being to individuals and families. Services will be rendered based on the safety and comfort level of the client.


Grantee: SAC AND FOX NATION
Program: FY 2023 Support for 988 Tribal Response Cooperative Agreements
City: STROUD
State: OK
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001289-01
Congressional District: 5
FY 2023 Funding: $843,401
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2026/09/29

Abstract: Sac and Fox 988 initiative The Sac and Fox Nation will support the 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline in Lincoln, Payne and Pottawatomie counties in central Oklahoma. The three-county area contains 26,000 Native persons from over ten Tribal Nations who are at high risk of suicide, depression and substance use. We will increase the number of Indigenous callers to the Lifeline, facilitate partnerships with local health organizations, and implement culturally appropriate suicide prevention strategies. Our project works with the Sac and Fox Tribe and its partners in the three-county area of central Oklahoma just east of Oklahoma city. The 988 project will provide a suicide and mental health specific Lifeline to Native callers. The new system offers callers a choice to select a counselor who is a Native person and has the life experience of what it means to be Native. National, state and local data highlight two populations where Native suicide disparities are particularly severe: the first is Native Males 15-30, the second are Natives who are LGBTQ in their sexual orientation. Suicide disparities are particularly severe among both groups. Native males between the ages of 15 and 30 have more than double the rate of suicide of Whites of the same age group. Data about the LGBTQ population has been obtained by the US Census in their Pulse Survey. It indicates that LGBTQ individuals are: • 8.4 times more likely to report having attempted suicide, • 5.9 times more likely to report high levels of depression; and, • 3.4 times more likely to use illegal drugs, The Sac and Fox Nation is joined in this effort by two Indigenous organizations working in the Central Oklahoma area: namely, the Association of American Indian Physicians (AAIP) and the National Indian Education Association (NIEA). NIEA funds numerous programs throughout the nation and will provide its message of the importance of Native mental and spiritual wellness to schools, vocational centers and colleges in our Tribal Jurisdiction. AAIP funds scholarships for Native youth who wish to pursue biomedical careers and it convenes a yearly Cross Cultural Workshop that examines cultural influences in different societies. Both NIEA and AAIP will reach different sectors of Indigenous society. Individuals needing additional counseling or hospitalization will be referred to local mental health and substance abuse treatment centers. Native persons who request Native counselors will be offered culture classes to instill knowledge and pride of being Native. We will offer at least two major cultural events about Native history each year. These events will be the Gathering Of Native Americans and the Blanket Exercise. At this time most help calls from potential suicides are received by 911 dispatch centers, most of which are housed in County Sheriff’s offices. All current 911 personnel will be trained in the need for and the advantages of the 988 Lifeline over other help centers. Our work will also identify persons who are in crisis and will need a Crisis Intervention Team to perform an intervention. All information given to 988 calls are strictly confidential. We estimate we will receive over 150 new callers each year (450 over the 3 year project) and that over 10% (45 persons over the 3 year project) will be referred to further services as a result of this grant.


Grantee: SACRAMENTO NATIVE AMERICAN HEALTH CENTER, INC.
Program: Emergency COVID-19
City: SACRAMENTO
State: CA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000690-01
Congressional District: 6
FY 2021 Funding: $1,086,266
Project Period: 2021/02/01 - 2022/05/31

Grantee: SACRAMENTO NATIVE AMERICAN HEALTH CENTER, INC.
Program: Emergency COVID-19
City: SACRAMENTO
State: CA
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000254-01
Congressional District: 6
FY 2020 Funding: $500,000
Project Period: 2020/04/20 - 2021/09/19

Sacramento Native American Health Center is an Urban Indian Health Organization that provides mental health and physical wellness services to residents of Sacramento County, including American Indians/Alaska Natives. The Sacramento Region COVID-19 Emergency Response (ReCOVER) program will provide services related to substance use, serious mental illness, and mild-to-moderate mental health disorder to people impacted by COVID-19, including local health care providers. As a Patient Centered Health Home recognized by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, SNAHC is experienced in providing these services and well-suited to provide whole-person, patient-centered care to individuals experiencing substance use disorder (SUD) and/or mental health (MH) challenges as a result of COVID-19. Evidence-based practices will include the health home model as well as a range of additional approaches to be selected based on client needs. ReCOVER will employ team comprised of a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW), two Associate Clinical Social Workers (ACSW), and two Certified Addiction and Drug Abuse Counselors (CADAC) to provide services to people affected by COVID-19. These services will include support groups as well as individual one-to-one services to people with substance use disorder, those experiencing mild to moderate mental health challenges, as well as to those with serious mental illness. ReCOVER will outreach to local hospitals to promote and engage healthcare workers to participate in a mental health support group specifically for those individuals on the front lines of the COVID-19 epidemic. ReCOVER will provide services to 150 people over the grant period and GPRA 60 who are engaged in direct SUD and/or MH services, in the following formats: 1) Individual SUD and/or MH visits (30 or 60 minutes) to 60 people; 2) Individual services for people with SMI to 5 people; and 3) SUD and/or MH Support Groups to 100 people. Groups will focus on the following subjects: Relapse Prevention Skills, Harm Reduction Approaches, Grief & Loss, Health Providers Mental Health Support Group. Resources will be directed towards support for individuals with SUD, SMI or a combination (70%), with a subset of services to individuals experience mental disorders less severe that SMI (20%) and services health care professionals (10%). Services will be evaluated based on the numbers of individuals we are able to serve and GPRA data.


Grantee: SAGINAW CHIPPEWA INDIAN TRIBE
Program: Emergency COVID-19
City: MOUNT PLEASANT
State: MI
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG000201-01
Congressional District: 4
FY 2021 Funding: $188,187
Project Period: 2021/02/01 - 2022/05/31

Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan’s SAMHSA Emergency Covid 19 grant project is called the Client Protective Response Program (CPRP). Populations to be served by the emergency funds are Native Americans with Serious Mental Illness (SMI), clients with Substance Use Disorders (SUD’s), and those with Co-occurring Disorders (SMI and SUD). Strategies and interventions that will be used with funding is to provide tele-psych services to clients who meet the service population characteristics and to hire two additional staff for our Residential Treatment Center. Over the course of the project, at least 40 participants will be served in the program.


Grantee: SALVATION ARMY
Program: FY 2023 Congressional Directive Spending Projects
City: WEST NYACK
State: NY
Grant Award Number: 1 H79 FG001112-01
Congressional District: 17
FY 2023 Funding: $192,999
Project Period: 2023/09/30 - 2024/09/29

The Salvation Army’s Shelter is Delaware’s only facility dedicated to the housing of victims of human trafficking. Federal funding would support the transformation from a limited availability emergency shelter to a fully dedicated short-term residence to serve the growing cohort of trafficking victims. Funds will be used to hire additional trauma-informed staff, security personnel, professional evidence-based, trauma-informed therapy and for operational support.


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