PROJECT ABSTRACTThe National Child Trauma Workforce Development Institute at the Silberman School of SocialWork at Hunter College will expand the trauma-informed workforce by widely disseminating the NCTSN Core Concepts Curriculum (CCC) in the higher education systems that train clinical psychologists, child psychiatrists, social workers, licensed clinical mental health and marriageand family counselors both In and Beyond the Network. The Institute’s In Network strategy that disseminates the CCC to NSTCN Cat II & III sites throughout SAMHSA’s 10 regions reaches our population during their field practicums before graduation. It also builds the site’s CCC facilitator capacity needed to train 3 of the 5 mental health disciplines. Our Beyond the Network strategy reaches the 2 other disciplines, with CCC integration in their classroom curriculum and by partner agency and post-graduate CEU training. Trainee and NCTSN staff demographic information is not collected, however proxy data shows that they will serve multiply traumatized male and female clients 0-18 without regard to race, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, religion, gender identity, sexual orientation, geography, disability or language and literacy. GOALS: (1) (In Network) Build a national organizational infrastructure: Obj. 1. Establish a leadership team (meets at least monthly). Obj. 2. Develop 3 discipline specific planning teams (meets at least 4 time/year) Obj. 3. Develop a minimum of 3 regional work group teams (meets at least twice/year) Obj. 4. Develop a CCC training team (“the College”)-to expand CCC capacity by training 60 facilitators of different experience levels. Obj. 5. Develop an Advisory Board oftrauma experts and consumers; (2) (In Network) Launch CCC dissemination within the system of higher education. Obj. 1. Recruit 28 staff from CAT II & III sites to attend a CCC College Obj. 2. Train 30 clinical psychology interns in at least five sites with APA approved internships.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort descending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM080036-01 HUNTER COLLEGE NEW YORK NY ABRAMOVITZ ROBERT $600,000

The Center for Trauma-Informed Adolescent Suicide, Self-Harm, and Substance Abuse Treatment and Prevention will provide national expertise on adolescents affected by trauma, emphasizing services for suicide/self-harm and substance abuse. By supporting trauma-informed adaptation of effective evidence-based care for these problems, the Center will provide a resource with potential to decrease morbidity and mortality associated with suicidal/self-harm behavior and substance abuse in adolescents suffering the effects of trauma. Due to the potential life-threatening consequences of suicidal and self-harm behavior, and substance abuse, we prioritize services for emergency/acute care and brief time-limited treatments with evidence supporting effectiveness. These include: 1) emergency/acute care for suicidal/self-harm behavior using the Specialized Emergency/Family Intervention for Suicide Prevention (FISP), and Screening and Motivational Interviewing for substance using adolescents; and 2) treatment after the emergency/acute episode using SAFETY, a cognitive-behavioral family intervention that includes dialectical behavior therapy skills for adolescents presenting with suicidal/self-harm behavior, and motivational interviewing plus cognitive-behavior therapy (with optional contingency management) for substance using adolescents. Combining effective emergency care and brief outpatient treatments aimed at establishing safety has potential for reducing high-cost emergency department and hospital care. To facilitate national reach, the Center is structured with hubs in California and North Carolina with the goal of serving health and behavioral health care sites across the nation. Based on the numbers of clients seen at partnering sites, the Center has potential to improve care for over 180,000 youths across four states located across the nation and 400 providers. Sites were recruited with the goal of serving a high proportion of underserved and minority youths, with the goal

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort descending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM080041-01 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES LOS ANGELES CA ASARNOW JOAN $600,000

The proposed project, the University of Southern California Adolescent TraumaTraining Center (USC-ATTC), will train over 5,000 clinicians and disseminateinformation to over 10,000 professionals throughout the United States on the assessment and treatment of trauma in socially marginalized and ethnically-diverse adolescents, including those with, or at risk for, substance abuse, suicide, and self-injurious behavior. Clinicians receiving training and products from this TSA Center of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) will include those in mental health, substance abuse, child welfare, juvenile justice, and military intervention environments. USC-ATTC will disseminate previously developed treatment guides on the evidence-based model, Integrative Treatment of Complex Trauma for Adolescents, including the revised Integrative Treatment of Complex Trauma for Adolescents (ITCT-A) Treatment Guide and Treating Substance Use Issues in Traumatized Adolescents and Young Adults: Key Principles and Components. We will consult with a Consumer/Family Advisory Council and an Expert Panel twice a year on cross-cultural, behavioral health disparity, and LGBT issues relevant to the development of USC-ATTC products and trainings, including two additional treatment guides: Treating Suicidality and Self-Injurious Behaviors in Traumatized Youth and Mindfulness Training for Traumatized Adolescents. This project will also (1) develop a certification program, whereby at least 1,500 clinicians will be certified as competent in ITCT-A over the five-year grant period, (2) develop a Train-the-Trainer program to more widely disseminate ITCT-A throughout the NCTSN and beyond, with an estimated new 100 trainers over the grant period and at least 1,000 new ITCT-A informed clinicians over five years, (3) collaborate with other TSAs to develop and disseminate educational materials and co-conduct at least one training a year on preventing and treating suicidality, self-harm,

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SM080022-01 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES CA BRIERE JOHN $600,000

Allegheny General Hospital’s Center for Traumatic Stress in Children and Adolescents is applying to continue as a Treatment and Service Adaptation Center in the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) with the following Area of Trauma Focus: Clinical Interventions for Traumatic Stress Reactions. As developers of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) and Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (AF-CBT), we propose to address behavioral health disparities for traumatized LGBTQ youth, commercially sexually exploited children (CSEC), children with parental substance abuse, and military children with traumatic stress reactions. LGBTQ youth are at high risk for developing traumatic stress reactions but rarely access clinical interventions. We will collaborate with Persad Center, the nation’s second oldest LGBTQ counseling organization and six NCTSN Community Treatment and Services (CTS) Centers to adapt TF-CBT for traumatized LGBTQ youth and develop a TF-CBT implementation manual for LGBTQ youth, attending to sexual, gender, ethnic and racial disparities. CSEC are at high risk for developing complex traumatic stress reactions but rarely access clinical interventions. We will collaborate with six CTS Centers to adapt TF-CBT for CSEC with traumatic stress reactions and develop a TF-CBT implementation manual for CSEC, attending to sexual, gender, ethnic and racial disparities. Children with parental substance abuse are at high risk for developing behavioral traumatic stress reactions and for parental maltreatment but rarely access clinical interventions. We will collaborate with four CTS Centers to develop products to improve access to AF-CBT. Military children are at elevated risk for developing traumatic stress reactions due to parental deployment, injury, mental illness, or death but have little access to TF-CBT or AF-CBT. We will provide culturally adapted TF-CBT and AF-CBT training and consultation to therapists who treat milit

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SM080056-01 ALLEGHENY-SINGER RESEARCH INSTITUTE PITTSBURGH PA COHEN JUDITH $600,000

The Adapt for DD Initiative aims to improve well-being of youth with developmental disabilities (referred to as youth with DD) who are impacted by trauma by increasing caregivers' sensitivity and increasing the availability of clinicians who can provide treatment for this double vulnerable population. Strategies include cross-training for developmental disabilities and trauma as well as development of and delivery of DD-appropriate trauma-related assessment tools and treatment adaptations. The project will facilitate dissemination of the recently developed NCTSN toolkit, Road to Recovery, to increase awareness of the impact of trauma on youth with DD, adapt these materials and develop additional materials based on our needs assessment. Initial target audiences are agencies specializing in services for children with developmental disabilities and community-based clinical providers. Our efforts will be expanded to other providers in special education, child welfare, and medical and other clinical fields, and we will specifically address needs of military/veteran families coping with both service-related issues and developmental disabilities. We will collaborate with identified partners already working to adapt assessment and intervention tools for youth with DD in our catchment area and clinics of our identified partners, and seek additional centers to create a collaborative group focusing on this clinical group. The collaborative group will involve stakeholders (i.e., families, service providers, policy makers) on both regional and national level. By the end of the project, we aim to develop a service guide or road mad to assist in matching type of disability with best available practices and develop a methodology for communities to assess their unique combination of needs and resources and to come together to try and fill in gaps and provide more coherent coordination of services to enhance services for the DD youth, their families, and their providers.

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SM080003-01 LONG ISLAND JEWISH MEDICAL CENTER NEW HYDE PARK NY D'AMICO PETER $599,575

ABSTRACT: Project FORECASTFoundations for OutReach through Experiential Child Advocacy Studies TrainingProject FORECAST (Foundations for OutReach through Experiential Child Advocacy Studies Training) will simultaneously train undergraduate university students and community professionals in Problem-Based Learning Simulations (PBL-S) to develop Trauma-Informed Experiential Reasoning Skills (TIERS) in a workforce capable and competent at responding to trauma in a manner that promotes resiliency and reduces further trauma. Project FORECAST will incorporate the Core Concepts for Understanding Traumatic Stress Reactions in Children and Families into the development of PBL-S packages which will be disseminated to interdisciplinary Child Advocacy Studies (CAST) higher education programs and communities across the nation. CAST communities will include CAST University instructors and local workforce trainers. Both face-to-face and mobile/tablet-application teaching tools will be included in the packages. Additionally, communities will be equipped with materials to help supervisors assist CAST students’ transition to the child-serving workforce.Project FORECAST will train over 20 CAST communities, consisting of 6-10 instructors and workforce trainers as part of each community team. Following their participation in FORECAST Learning Communities, instructors and workforce leadership will sustain the Core Concept PBL-S curriculum in their courses and trainings each semester. Project FORECAST anticipates that over 9,000 higher education students and workforce members will improve their decision making skills. If each of those trainees interacts with even 20 children and families in a more trauma-informed manner during their careers, FORECAST will increase trauma-informed care for 180,000 individuals. Project FORECAST also predicts significant cost savings, as workforce retention in child-serving sectors should increase due to better preparation prior to college

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SM080025-01 UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI-ST. LOUIS SAINT LOUIS MO DUNN JERRY $599,981

Title: Refugee Trauma and Resilience Center at Boston Children?s Hospital: A Treatment and Service Adaptation Center for Refugee Children and FamiliesThe purpose of the project ?Refugee Trauma and Resilience Center at Boston Children's ospital:

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SM080047-01 BOSTON CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL BOSTON MA ELLIS BEVERLEY $599,860

The Center for Treatment of Developmental Trauma Disorders (CTDTD) brings together developers and disseminators of leading evidence-based child developmental trauma treatments, to enable all NCTSN Centers and their affiliated providers nationally to achieve competence in DTD assessment (with NCTSN DTD screening and interview protocols) and treatment (with systematic integrative best practice algorithms for child/family-centered outcome-based care).Over the 5-year funding period, CTDTD will enhance the ability of more than 40,000 peer and professional counselors to treat more than 100,000 children safely and effectively for DTD, operationalizing the Network’s Clinical Competencies guidelines and extending Network Core Concepts/Components initiatives with guidelines for DTD-informed clinical decision-making. In Year 1, CTDTD will: (A) provide all NCTSN centers a DTD screening/assessment guide and protocols developed in the DTD Field Trial (which was conducted by the CTDTD Director and Co-Director) at the new grantees’ and 2017 All Network Conference meetings and through the Affiliates Network and website; (B) survey all NCTSN centers/affiliates and conduct key-informant interviews with providers, children and families to identify critical clinical dilemmas that can lead to: (1) impasses or ruptures in engagement and the therapeutic alliance, (2) crises and significant increases in risk, and (3) ineffective developmental outcomes; and, (C) develop and disseminate a report with integrative practical treatment strategies and al 4-year plan for informing the public, policymakers, and professionals about effective treatment for DTD. In Year 2, CTDTD will collaborate with the NCTSN National Center to present/archive 10 national webinars each with 4 CTDTD faculty, moderated by the Director/Co-Director, and introduced with a youth-written/performed dramatization, across all developmental epochs and emphasizing children facing health disparities, for (i) families an

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SM080013-01 UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCH OF MED/DNT FARMINGTON CT FORD JULIAN $600,000

The Center for Trauma Recovery and Juvenile Justice (CTRJJ) brings together national leaders working with traumatized youth involved in the Juvenile Justice, Courts, and Law Enforcement (JJCLE), and youth advisors, in order to provide traumatic stress treatment and services adaptation services to enable JJCLE systems/providers/organizations to adopt, adapt, and deliver evidence based trauma specific and trauma informed services culturally competently. Since 2012, CTRJJ has developed and disseminated educational products/resources by and for youth, families, clinicians, staff, and policymakers designed to facilitate recovery from traumatic stress for youth at risk or involved in JJCLE systems. CTRJJ has been the leader in the NCTSN and nationally in bringing traumatic stress assessments, evidence-based interventions, public education, workforce development, policy development, and implementation science to JJLCE systems, professionals and advocates (e.g., the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, National Center on Youth Law, Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators). Over the five-year funding period, CTRJJ will provide training and technical assistance to more than 5000 youth/family serving programs and 40,000 professional/peer service providers to enable them to adapt, deliver, and evaluate trauma-specific treatments and trauma-informed services to reduce health disparities for more than 200,000 traumatized youth/families who are at risk or involved in JJCLE. CTRJJ will continue partnering with the National Center for Child Traumatic Stress to lead the NCTSN Juvenile Justice Coordination Committee and the Justice Consortium in creating, refining, and disseminating resources such as the Think Trauma Toolkit, Essential Elements in Trauma Informed Juvenile Justice Systems and Juvenile Court Trauma-Informed Self-Assessment, Fact Sheets on Traumatic Stress Screening, Intervention, and Services for Girls in JJCLE, and the 2015 National Surv

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SM080044-01 UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCH OF MED/DNT FARMINGTON CT FORD JULIAN $600,000

The Center for Resilient Families, a Category II Treatment Services and Adaptation center of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network aims to raise awareness of and increasing access to family interventions to promote resilience in traumatized children. The Center is a partnership of Ambit Network at the University of Minnesota, and developers of evidence-based family programs at Arizona State University’s REACH institute, Implementation Sciences International, and the Research Consortium on Gender-based Violence. The Center will reduce disparities in service access, use, and training by targeting trauma-informed family interventions to isolated families in transition: those with a parent deployed to war, Native American families on reservations, immigrant and refugee families, families involved in the juvenile justice and child welfare systems, and families in which a parent has been killed. We will provide national leadership within and beyond the NCTSN by developing products aimed at helping families, those who provide them with services, and communities, to understand the impact of traumatic stress on parents, and the crucial role of parenting in strengthening children’s resilience. We will work with other Category II sites, the National Center for Child Traumatic Stress, multiple Category III sites, and national organizations to develop and disseminate products and to implement evidence-based parenting programs. We will lead a new NCTSN collaborative group aimed at reducing disparities in access to family programs, and will work closely with other groups. We will adapt and widely implement an array of five evidence-based parenting interventions, all of which have been rigorously tested and shown to be effective at strengthening resilience among traumatized families but none of which have hitherto been available to the NCTSN. These interventions are: Family check-up/FCU; Parent Management Training-Oregon model/PMTO, and its validated adaptations for military

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SM080009-01 UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA MINNEAPOLIS MN GEWIRTZ ABIGAIL $599,989

In response to the extraordinarily high rates of severe and prolonged trauma experienced by youth treated in residential treatment settings, the Institute for Adolescent Trauma Treatment & Training will utilize its expertise to 1) intensively train multidisciplinary providers to deliver four trauma-informed evidence-based interventions to youth in residential settings across the United States, 2) develop and disseminate multi-media products (e.g. treatment protocols, fact sheets, workshops, webinars, youth-led videos) and specialized resources for youth, families, and providers in various types of residential settings (e.g., juvenile detention, substance abuse treatment), and 3) promote sustainability of these practices through the development of policies and procedures (including creation of internal training teams) that will embed services within residential systems on an organizational level. Training in four leading trauma-specific interventions used in residential settings will be delivered through ongoing Learning Collaboratives/Communities in: 1) Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress (SPARCS), 2) Real Life Heroes (RLH), 3) Think Trauma, and 4) Attachment, Regulation, and Competency (ARC). Systems-level training in Think Trauma and ARC will be delivered first to agencies to help establish a trauma-informed organizational culture and provide foundational support for bringing in trauma-specific clinical interventions. Client-level clinical treatment interventions will then be provided via more intensive Learning Collaboratives for SPARCS and Real Life Heroes. In addition to the extensive training activities, the Institute will focus on creating general and specialized resources for use in various types of residential settings (e.g., intervention adaptations for settings with short-lengths of stay) and with specific subpopulations (e.g., unaccompanied refugee minors). This Project will train 8000 multidisciplinary provide

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SM080023-01 ADELPHI UNIVERSITY GARDEN CITY NY HABIB MANDY $600,000

Experiencing the death of a loved one is the most common and most distressing form of trauma among both clinic-referred and non-referred youth. However, few health service facilities are equipped to offer evidence-based, bereavement-informed assessment and treatment. Access to quality care is also a significant barrier, especially in disadvantaged cities in which deaths are most rampant. The overarching goal of this proposal, "The University of Texas Childhood Bereavement Resource Center (CBRC): Toward the Development of Bereavement-Informed Best Practices", is to raise the standard of care for bereaved youth and families through the dissemination of bereavement-informed, developmentally attuned and culturally appropriate best practices. Primary objectives include: (1)conduct a series of trainings focusing on bereavement-informed risk screening and assessment; (2) convene a series of Learning Collaboratives dedicated to implementing and evaluating three bereavement-informed interventions for grieving youth in a variety of contexts (e.g., bereavement in conjunction with other forms of trauma, deaths occurring under violent circumstances, anticipated deaths of loved ones); and (3) collaborate with NCTSN sites and other national organizations to raise public awareness regarding childhood bereavement, grief, and bereavement-informed best practices. Special attention will be given to disseminating these practices in high-risk populations, including military families and underserved minority youth. With Houston as our hub, we will build upon ongoing dissemination efforts across a highly diverse network of cities, each with high prevalence rates of youth bereavement. Primary partnering organizations will include those located in San Antonio and Brownsville, TX; Detroit and Ypsilanti, MI; Oakland and Richmond, CA; and Durham, NC. The city of Houston (19% Black, 51% Latino, 5% Asian) is the fourth largest city in the U.S., with 27% of youth living below the poverty

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SM080021-01 UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS HLTH SCI CTR HOUSTON HOUSTON TX KAPLOW JULIE $599,862

The University of Utah and Primary Childrens Center for Safe and Healthy Families are collaborating on the project, Pediatric Integrated Post-Trauma Services: an Evidence Based Care Process Model for Pediatric Traumatic Stress. The purpose is to develop and disseminate clinical algorithms and tools for medical providers to detect, assess and manage traumatic stress, facilitating timely treatment and referral and minimizing the misuse of medication. The area of trauma focus is Injuries and Medical Problems/Health Care Settings/Integrated Care. The project goals include 1) Develop an Evidence Based Care Process Model (EB-CPM) and decision support tools for pediatric traumatic stress; 2)Implement and assess pediatric traumatic stress EB-CPM for frontline healthcare providers in primary care and childrens advocacy centers; and 3) Provide national leadership on the use of care process models in trauma exposed children. In order to accomplish these goals, we will compile, synthesize and critically assess evidence for treatments of pediatric traumatic stress pertinent to frontline medical providers, use a modified Delphi process to guide clinical decision points for which there is an absence of evidence, and create a pediatric traumatic stress assessment and management algorithm for frontline providers,including decision support tools that will be piloted and implemented within primary care and childrens advocacy center settings. This will allow us to measure the impact of EB-CPM on management of pediatric traumatic stress and identify facilitators and barriers to implementation. Additionally, we will lead a NCTSN workgroup on revising and disseminating care process models, including sustainability strategies for evidence based care and the use of psychotropic medication in trauma exposed children. Furthermore, we will engage outside the network with national pediatric healthcare provider organizations including the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy o

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SM080000-01 UNIVERSITY OF UTAH SALT LAKE CITY UT KEESHIN BROOKS $600,000

National statistics illustrate the multi-layered challenges under-resourced families face including higher risk of exposure to victimization and multiple stressors often resulting in major behavioral health disparities. Growing awareness of trauma’s impact on these families – including the critical roles families play in helping children recover – necessitates further development, evaluation, training on and dissemination of Family Interventions. In response to RFA SM-16-008, the Family-Informed Trauma Treatment (FITT) Center, an active and productive NCTSN member since 2007, proposes to 1) lead national efforts to raise awareness of the impact of complex trauma, poverty and inequity on families; 2) elaborate the multi-tiered family interventions and resources needed to optimize healing; 3) train the workforce on family trauma interventions and resources that effectively support healing; and 4) enhance the role of peers by recognizing and empowering families and communities as central to promoting resiliency and positive outcomes for children. The FITT Center will employ ecological and power sharing approaches to improve engagement, effectiveness, and acceptability of family intervention for families who are disenfranchised and living in highly under-resourced communities. We will convene three Breakthrough Series Collaboratives in partnership with three communities highly impacted by trauma, poverty and violence to increase resources for families. We will improve access to, impact and sustainability of three effective family trauma treatments, Strengthening Families Coping Resources (SFCR), Trauma Adapted Family Connections (TA-FC), and a family based assessment and treatment planning tool, Family Assessment of Needs and Strengths-Trauma (FANS-Trauma) through collaborations with 20 CTCs and other organizations that support large numbers of minority families living in poverty. We will increase availability of training and tools for the workforce to enhance knowledge

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SM080034-01 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE BALTIMORE MD KISER LAUREL $599,648

The Center for Child Trauma Assessment, Services and Interventions (CCTASI) at Northwestern University provides national expertise on interventions for the developmental effects of trauma with an emphasis on building infrastructure for trauma-informed, child-serving systems, including child welfare, behavioral health, educational and juvenile justice settings. Our population includes providers, caregivers, and youth from early childhood through transition age youth (TAY); the majority are racial/ethnic minority youth, many with a range of trauma-related needs. We will use a culturally sensitive lens and address gaps in trauma-informed practices for specific subpopulations, including foster care, residential, early education, juvenile probation and diversion, and programs for TAY. Our goals are to 1) enhance trauma-informed screening and assessment practices; 2) offer training and consultation for front line/non-clinical staff on NCTSN interventions/service approaches, including the Resource Parent Curriculum (RPC) and Think Trauma Toolkit (TTT); 3) adapt interventions and services to support culturally diverse and underserved populations; and 4) develop and disseminate trauma-informed products to increase public awareness. Extending the work of our existing NCTSN Center, we will continue to specialize in trauma screening and assessment with an enhanced focus on the meaningful use of tools in practice. The Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths-Trauma Comprehensive (CANS-Trauma), an assessment strategy developed by our Center and national partners, will be further adapted, implemented and integrated into practice across our targeted systems. We will also develop an early childhood CANS-Trauma version in partnership with NCTSN early childhood experts and systems partners. Our focus will broaden to include a range of screening/assessment tools as we develop resources to support meaningful use of tools in practice. We will also emphasize training, widespread dissemina

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SM080018-01 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY AT CHICAGO CHICAGO IL KISIEL CASSANDRA $598,965

Early Trauma Treatment Network: Improving Access and Standard of Care for Young/Preschool Children. The Early Trauma Treatment Network (ETTN) will address the needs of traumatized young/preschool children by increasing access to evidence-based trauma treatment and raising the standard of care in key service systems. ETTN will build capacity and competence in early trauma services in pediatrics, home visiting, childcare, mental health, child welfare, and the military system. Young/preschool children are most vulnerable to trauma due to statistically higher exposure, developmental vulnerability, and dependence on parents or caregivers. Among military families, young children are at risk due to the impact of deployment and parental injury or death on family functioning. ETTN will address training and service gaps by activities that promote workforce development; create culturally informed products, training protocols and resources; and build cross-system linkages to promote collaboration among the key systems of care. ETTN is a collaborative of four leading national programs in early childhood trauma treatment, training, and dissemination. The lead agency is the UCSF Child Trauma Research Program, a multicultural program engaged in developing evidence-based treatments/interventions, training, clinical research, and direct service; the other sites are Child Violence Exposure Program at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Child Witness to Violence Project at Boston Medical Center, and Infant Team at Tulane University Medical Center. All ETTN sites provide training in Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), a manualized treatment for young children listed as evidence-based in the SAMHSA National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices. To enhance access and standards of care, ETTN will create products and conduct activities that increase agency readiness and promote sustainability of evidence-based and promising interventions; conduct 4 CPP Learning Co

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SM080030-01 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO SAN FRANCISCO CA LIEBERMAN ALICIA $600,000

The Childhood Violent Trauma Center (CVTC) of the Child Study Center at the Yale School of Medicine proposes to serve as the lead Treatment and Service Adaption (TSA) Center in the area of acute/early/brief intervention, providing national expertise for early/acute responses to traumatic experiences, and supporting the specialized adaptation of effective early evidence-based treatments and service approaches following recent potentially traumatic events. The proposed project will: 1) expand implementation of acute/early/brief trauma interventions – including the specialized adaptation of the Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI) and Law Enforcement Responses to Children Exposed to Violence (LE CEV). CFTSI is currently the only evidence-based brief, early mental health treatment for children 7-18 who have experienced a recent traumatic event and will be expanded to new populations including Young Children ages 3-6, Military Families and Medically/Physically Injured Children. This will include a focus on service systems where children can be identified in the early phase of traumatic response, including in Emergency Departments and in Child Advocacy Centers. The LE CEV initiative is based on the innovative Child Development Community Policing (CD-CP) program developed in New Haven. The CD-CP program is a groundbreaking model of law enforcement-mental health collaboration which forms the basis for strategies and approaches to enhance the capacity of law enforcement to respond to children and families exposed violence; 2) increase capacity of child-serving systems, including law enforcement, to support identification, referral, access and utilization of evidence-based trauma informed approaches, by developing engagement strategies designed specifically to engage families in the early/acute phase of trauma response that have not yet reached out for mental health treatment and other services; 3) develop, train, implement, and evaluate acute/early/brief

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SM080038-01 YALE UNIVERSITY NEW HAVEN CT MARANS STEVEN $600,000

The Terrorism and Disaster Coalition for Child and Family Resilience (TDC4CFR) will create effective products, programs, and partnerships to enhance national capacity to prepare for and respond to the unique needs of children, families, and communities after terrorism and disaster. As a major objective, the TDC4CFR will create regional coalitions among key stakeholders within 3 selected terrorism-vulnerable or disaster-prone areas to identify regional strengths and service gaps, map resources and network linkages, develop strategies for enhanced social messaging, and create and implement a strategic plan to optimize regional planning and behavioral health response. It will develop enhanced training curricula in evidence-based assessments and interventions, including Psychological First Aid and Skills for Psychological Recovery, for child and family post-incident response, adapt standardized training materials, facilitator guides, and training platforms, design training curricula for intervention with selected vulnerable groups, and utilize an Advisory Board to review training materials for cultural and linguistic relevance. In regard to training, TDC4CFR will identify and establish 3 communities of practice to implement training targeted to child-serving providers within the targeted coalition regions. An estimated 500 providers will be trained each year on Psychological First Aid or PFA for Schools. Further, it will create resources for child-serving providers, parents, and youth to provide information and strategies for preparedness and response to terrorism and disaster, including adding additional terrorism and technological disaster response content to Help Kids Cope. It will create content and implement dissemination strategies for fact sheets, children's activities, and other tools, and develop a toolkit, including elements to implement and sustain post-disaster/terrorism recovery programs. The TDC4CFR will provide consultation and support to regional co

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SM080006-01 LSU HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER NEW ORLEANS LA OSOFSKY HOWARD $599,974

The Urban Youth Trauma Center’s Project T.R.I.U.M.P.H. (Trauma Resiliency through Integrated Urban Models: Partnerships for Hope) seeks to disseminate evidence-based practices to reduce and prevent behavioral health disparities resulting from community violence and traumatic stress with co-occurring substance abuse and behavioral problems among underserved youth and their families, with a special emphasis on low-income urban, ethnic, linguistic, and religious minority communities. Using a comprehensive socio-ecological model of trauma-informed, evidence-based best practices to serve the continuum of needs of underserved minority youth and families, UYTC’s goals are to: a) raise public awareness through NCTSN collaborations and a national media campaign that includes youth-oriented messages; b) provide specialized training and consultation to clinicians and youth serving providers; and c) engage and mobilize partners in strategic collaborations that include clinical, community, and policy constituents spanning across youth service system sectors to address community violence and behavioral health disparities. UYTC will emphasize public awareness, specialized training, and strategic engagement with local and national partners with the following measurable objectives: 1)reach 8000 people (1600 per year) from youth serving systems and general audiences with public awareness messages disseminated in person, online and through social media,2) train 500 clinicians (100 per year) to provide mental health services to 1500 underserved urban youth and families (300 per year) using the two UYTC family-focused treatment protocols of Trauma Systems Therapy for Adolescent Substance Abuse (for co-occurring substance abuse) and STRONG Families (for co-occurring disruptive behaviors); and 3) train 1000 youth-serving providers and community members (200 per year) in best practices promotion to 5000 underserved urban youth and families (1000 per year) using the UYTC community vi

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort descending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM080017-01 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO CHICAGO IL SUAREZ LIZA $600,000

COMPLEX TRAUMA TREATMENT NETWORK (CTTN)Suffolk U, Justice Resource Institute, Adelphi U, Los Angeles Children’s Hospital, U Chicago, ACMHS NATIONAL CHILD TRAUMATIC STRESS INITIATIVE CAT II TSATrack: Complex Trauma: Residential Treatment Settings, Shelters & Juvenile Justice Detention CentersThe project proposes the continuation/expansion of the Complex Trauma Treatment Network (CTTN), a Category II NCTSN Center established in 2009 to develop, adapt, and disseminate trauma-informed systems interventions and evidence-based practices (EBPs) for agencies and programs nationwide serving youth and families with complex trauma (CT), including residential treatment settings (RTS), homeless shelters (HS) and juvenile justice detention centers (JDC). During the 2016-21 cycle, the CTTN will provide intensive training and technical assistance (T/TA) to over 190 RTS, HS and JDC programs operated by 43 governmental agencies and nonprofit organizations participating in 2 Learning Communities (LCAs), 17 Learning Collaboratives (LCs) and 3 CT EBP Consortia (CTCs) from 15 states and 4 US territories that collectively span all 10 HHS/SAMHSA service regions. The CTTN will train over 40,000 multidisciplinary providers, impacting over 200,000 US children and families. Goals for 2016 cycle: (1) establish CT-informed infrastructure across high-need systems of care; (2) increase national dissemination of EBPs for CT (ARC, SPARCS, and Think Trauma) in RTS, JDC, and HS; and (3) achieve regional sustainability of CT EBPs through establishment of inter-agency consortium addressing CT within large metropolitan regions, multistate urban corridors, and national service organizations. Implementation science-driven objectives will address goals based on three levels of system readiness. Level 1 will continue CTTN’s work of enhancing CT-informed infrastructure across the care continuum addressing behavioral health disparities in regions of the US with history of limited access to N

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort descending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM080037-01 SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY BOSTON MA SUVAK MICHAEL $600,000

The Pediatric Approach to Trauma, Treatment and Resilience, PATTER,is designed to educate pediatricians about childhood trauma to improve the identification, management and outcomes of millions of traumatized children who currently have limited access to mental health resources. PATTER is proposed and led by the Department of Pediatrics at UCLA, in collaboration with that of the University of Massachusetts and the American Academy of Pediatrics. In 2013, only 4 percent of pediatricians who responded to the Academy's national Periodic Survey were familiar with childhood trauma. Yet, pediatricians are likely to be the first, and often only, professionals who encounter the 68 percent of American children who have experienced trauma. Because pediatricians currently lack the knowledge and skills to undertake trauma care and there is a dearth of mental health trauma resources, the Departments of Pediatrics at UCLA and the University of Massachusetts are partnering with the American Academy of Pediatrics to achieve PATTER's 3 primary goals - 1. To develop and adapt curricula to train pediatricians about the trauma-informed approach to pediatric care in every interaction with children and families, 2. To educate pediatricians recruited nationally about the PATTER curriculum via multiple American Academy of Pediatrics' venues to create a trauma-aware pediatric workforce, and 3. To educate a subset of nationally representative pediatricians using an advanced PATTER curriculum to create a trauma-responsive system of care. Specifically, trauma-responsive leaders will receive training about quality improvement to promote the implementation of trauma screening and evidence-informed trauma-specific anticipatory guidance, known as Child Health Advice for Trauma, in their offices. Trauma-responsive leaders will also acquire the knowledge and skills to train their colleagues, thus expanding the population of trauma-informed pediatricians. In a trauma-responsive system

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort descending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM080001-01 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES LOS ANGELES CA SZILAGYI MOIRA $600,000

The National Native Children’s Trauma Center (NNCTC) will continue to work across educational, mental health, child welfare, and juvenile justice systems for the purpose of enhancing system capacity to address the effects of childhood traumatic stress among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations, to increase access to care for AI/AN children and youth who have been exposed to trauma, and to improve the standard of mental health care for AI/AN children in Indian Country and urban areas. Studies indicate that AI/AN children and young people are exposed to trauma at rates far exceeding those of U.S. children at large, and current system capacity to address resulting traumatic stress in AI/AN communities is insufficient. Our project will be guided by seven basic goals: 1. Build and maintain long-term partnerships with tribal, local, and regional stakeholders and with NCTSN centers to enable responsiveness to locally identified needs and to promote policies benefitting traumatized AI/AN children; 2. Increase school-based supports and services for AI/AN students with trauma exposure by integrating universal school-wide interventions with selective clinical resources; 3. Increase supports for at-risk AI/AN children involved with the child welfare system; 4. Increase supports for at-risk AI/AN children involved with the juvenile justice system; 5. Increase number of clinicians serving AI/AN youth who use evidence-based, culturally adapted trauma treatment; 6. Conduct high-fidelity cultural adaptations of EBPs and NCTSN interventions; and 7. Develop, evaluate, and disseminate original products. Measurable objectives include benchmarks for partnership initiation and delivery of trauma-informed suicide prevention interventions, and parameters for interacting with national trauma experts and for providing policy guidance. Trainings will be provided in universal school-based trauma interventions and selective school-based clinical interventions. A first-of-its-kind

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort descending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM080050-01 UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA MISSOULA MT VANDENPOL RICHARD $600,000

The Chadwick Center for Children and Families at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego, in close cooperation with the Child and Adolescent Services Research Center (CASRC), proposes to create the Center for Child Welfare Trauma-Informed Practice and Systems Change (Center) to support child welfare (CW) system efforts across the nation. The objective is to further evolve toward being truly trauma-informed (TI) and to better meet the needs of victims of child abuse and neglect. Expanding on work advanced through the currently funded Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Chadwick Trauma-Informed Systems Dissemination and Implementation Project (CTISP-DI), the Center will develop and evaluate a system of comprehensive training and consultation/coaching for the full CW workforce to support communities seeking to become more TI. This National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) Treatment and Services Adaptation (TSA) Center, in cooperation with the National Center for Child Traumatic Stress, other select TSA and Community Treatment and Services (CTS) Centers across the country, appropriate NCTSN committees, and public CW organizations nationwide, will continue to lead the transformation of public CW agencies into TI systems. Specifically, the Center will build on lessons of implementation science and experience with current efforts to support CW systems and expand upon the existing Child Welfare Trauma Training Toolkit (CWTTT). Developed by the Chadwick Center-led NCTSN CW Committee and revised and refined under the formerly SAMHSA-funded Chadwick Trauma-Informed Systems Project (CTISP), the CWTTT will be adapted into four new curricula for use with specific targeted segments of the CW system workforce including caseworkers, supervisors, leaders (directors and managers), and support staff (receptionists, case aides, etc.). Each curriculum will provide information on how culture and trauma intersect and all four of these curricula wil

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort descending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM080039-01 RADY CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL - SAN DIEGO SAN DIEGO CA WALSH CAMBRIA $600,000

Summary: The Pediatric Integrated Care Collaborative will disseminate trauma-informed integrated care for families with young children. It will promote an expanded model of integrated care that includes core family partnerships and linkages with community services addressing the social determinants of healthy development. PICC will support self-sustaining practice transformation suited to evolving health care financing and policy.Background: Primary care plays an essential role in the primary and secondary prevention of childhood trauma and its long-term impact on children’s healthy development. Much progress has been made integrating primary care with mental health and trauma services, and changes in health care financing and policy continue to make integration more desirable and feasible. However, the process of practice transformation to trauma-informed integrated care remains difficult, and integration needs to additionally include services that are multi-generationally focused and that provide interventions that simultaneously target social determinants of health.Goals: The application seeks to extend the work of the currently-funded NCTSN Category II Pediatric Integrated Care Center (PICC) to a) enroll an additional 30 teams from sites wishing to initiate or expand trauma-informed integrated care for families with young children; b) expand the integrated care model being disseminated to include methods for addressing social determinants; and c) promote sustainable integration efforts through enhanced documentation of outcomes, links to community organizations and policy-makers, and support for long-term sharing of expertise among sites. We anticipate that over the lifetime of the project, the participating teams will directly serve upwards of 8,000 children/families (an average of 2-3,000 per year) with the potential to serve considerably more as they take on their own dissemination roles.

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SM080010-01 JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY BALTIMORE MD WISSOW LAWRENCE $598,934

The Treatment and Services Adaptation Center for Resiliency, Hope and Wellness in Schools (TSA for Schools) is dedicated to preventing and reducing distress from exposure to traumatic events and fostering recovery and wellness among trauma-exposed students, especially those in underserved or vulnerable communities and schools across the country. Informed by implementation science and community-partnered program development, the TSA for Schools will continue its leadership developing and disseminating effective interventions in schools for racially and culturally diverse students. Since 1997, the TSA for Schools has developed and disseminated a range of racially and multiculturally-sensitive effective school interventions and tools for trauma-exposed students, providing resources and training to over 14,000 school professionals in a nationwide network of schools to enhance recovery for over 100,000 trauma exposed students. Throughout our nation's schools are some of the most vulnerable youth: students with pre-existing mental health disorders, students with histories of neglect, trauma or violence, and students who are at-risk because of where they live, because of their ethnic or racial background, or because they are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender. School are often critically important entry point for accessing mental health services, especially for racial and ethnic minority children. Over the next five-year cycle, the TSA for Schools will greatly expand our reach in schools throughout the country by creating unique online supports and new in-person training for school staff, clinicians, and student and their parents by partnering with other NCTSN sites and schools and districts across the country. For school administrators, we will create an online tool for school systems to evaluate their level of being trauma-informed and determine their readiness to adopt trauma-informed practices and next steps in implementation including ways to sustain prac

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort descending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM080054-01 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES CA WONG MARLEEN $599,725