With SAMSHA funding, the Native Village of Kivalina will form the Kivalina Wellness Coalition, which will be comprised of the following four task forces: Wellness Promotion; Suicide Prevention; Crisis Intervention; and the Postvention.

The goals of the Kivalina Wellness Coalition will be fourfold:
1) For Kivalina residents to take ownership of the problem and of the solution through wellness promotion;
2) To educate residents on how to effectively and appropriately respond to people at risk of suicide;
3) To connect with other organizations and villages to create a region-wide alliance focused on increasing the quality of life in rural Alaska; and
4) To provide Kivalina residents with immediate access to prevention, treatment, and recovery services when needed.

The overall indicators of success will be a reduction in both the rate of suicide and suicide attempts in Kivalina, Alaska. Other measurable objectives include:
o a reduced rate of adult binge drinking;
o reduced rate of children seeing violence or physical abuse firsthand; increased number of students participating in organized after-school activities;
o increased number of residents with ASIST and Gatekeeper training;
o increased number of community members participating in talking circles and support groups;
o number of youth participating in the Kivalina Youth Council;
o and increased data collection on all factors relevant to suicide prevention.

Each task force will target different areas on the spectrum of suicide prevention. These task forces will consist of IRA staff, city staff, relevant agencies, health and safety officials, and community volunteers. The first year will focus on developing these task forces and creating action plans.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063470-01 KIVALINA VILLAGE COUNCIL KIVALINA AK HAWLEY STANLEY $185,838

The Scammon Bay Native Connections Project aims to partner with the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) to deliver prevention services using a Yup'ik Alaska Native promising practice to serve the 160 youth between the ages of 10 and 24 years old. Through partnership with the university our Tribe seeks to accomplish the following project goals: 1) community mobilization for wellness and readiness assessment, 2) community adaptation of SAMHSA's Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) to identify strategies and outcomes for substance abuse and suicide prevention that are specific to our local context and standards of care for young people, 3) revision of the Qungasvik (Toolbox) Yup'ik community-driven and cultural prevention model to address current needs, readiness and gaps in localized youth services, 4) revision of the Qungasvik (Yup'ik Toolbox) model to include indicated suicide prevention and postvention strategies for youth and community members, 5) implementation of universal prevention strategies utilizing the Qungasvik (Toolbox) prevention model to service
561 Tribal community members, including Elders, adults and youth, 6) implementation of selective prevention strategies with high-risk, transition-age youth between 18 and 24 years, 7) performance and local evaluation to determine impacts of our strategies on wellbeing and resilience and in the reduction of risk among youth for substance abuse and suicide. For nearly two decades, suicide and alcohol-related injuries have been the leading causes of death for Alaska Native youth between the ages of 15 and 24 years. Our community's long-term partnership with UAF led to the development of the Qungasvik (Toolbox) prevention model with evidence demonstrating how our Yup'ik culture is prevention and can protect our young people against the spirit of suicide and substance abuse.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063556-01 UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS FAIRBANKS AK RASMUS STACY $199,987

The Toksook Bay Native Connections Project aims to partner with the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) to deliver prevention services using a Yup'ik Alaska Native promising practice to serve the 180 youth between the ages of 10 and 24 years old. Through partnership with the university our Tribe seeks to accomplish the following project goals: 1) community mobilization for wellness and readiness assessment, 2) community adaptation of SAMHSA's Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) to identify strategies and outcomes for substance abuse and suicide prevention that are specific to our local context and standards of care for young people, 3) revision of the Qungasvik (Toolbox) Yup'ik community-driven and cultural prevention model to address current needs, readiness and gaps in localized youth services, 4) revision of the Qungasvik (Yup'ik Toolbox) model to include indicated suicide prevention and postvention strategies for youth and community members, 5) implementation of universal prevention strategies utilizing the Qungasvik (Toolbox) prevention model to service 660 Tribal community members, including Elders, adults and youth, 6) implementation of selective prevention strategies with high-risk, transition-age youth between 18 and 24 years, 7) performance and local evaluation to determine impacts of our strategies on wellbeing and resilience and in the reduction of risk among youth for substance abuse and suicide. For nearly two decades, suicide and alcohol-related injuries have been the leading causes of death for Alaska Native youth between the ages of 15 and 24 years. Our community's long-term partnership with UAF led to the development of the Qungasvik (Toolbox) prevention model with evidence demonstrating how our Yup'ik culture is prevention and can protect our young people against the spirit of suicide and substance abuse.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063557-01 UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS FAIRBANKS AK RASMUS STACY $199,987

Fairbanks Native Association is proposing its "Synergy" project. The project purpose is to prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance abuse, reduce the impact of trauma, and promote mental health among Alaska Native youth/young adults up to age 24. With three existing youth/young adult SAMHSA grants Synergy's overarching goal to bring all projects together into one coordinated whole creating health and wellbeing for our youth/young adults.

Synergy and the three projects will all be part of Fairbanks Native Association's (FNA) Behavioral Health's Youth and Young Adult (Y/YA) Services, all working towards the same long term outcome -- overall health and wellbeing for a highly vulnerable population AN/AI, free from the ravages of substance abuse, mental illness, historical trauma and suicide.

Integral to our Y/YA projects is the development of an infrastructure to support Y/YA in the Fairbanks North Star Borough, FNA's part of the Doyon tribal service area in Alaska. To accomplish this, Y/YA Services developed a 19 member Tribal Interagency Transition Council (ITC) with the authority to make policy and budget decisions composed of local Native leadership. It also developed a 39 member Tribal System of Care (SOC Collaborative) composed of project director-level representation from services organizations with the focus of service access and systems collaboration. A Youth Council and Young Adult Council have also been implemented to provide a Y/YA voice into planning, operations and evaluation.

The ITC with staff support will continue the SPF process, develop a community readiness assessment, community resource map, needs assessment and strategic action plan to guide efforts throughout the five years as well as develop and implement a variety of universal, selective and indicated prevention activities identified through the needs assessment.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063437-01 FAIRBANKS NATIVE ASSOCIATION FAIRBANKS AK AHSOGEAK PERRY $200,000

Yakutat Community Health Center has created a behavioral health department as part of an initiative to deliver more integrated and comprehensive care within the community. This project will enable a Master's level Clinician to monitor and intervene when problem indicators reveal themselves as well as promote activities that build protective factors.

The community of Yakutat's beginning is enriched with strong cultural ties going back thousands of years when it was a hub for trade among the American Indian and Alaska Native people. Today the population is on the decline and the economy is struggling. Many families are moving from the area in search of better socio-economic and educational opportunities. Although 2015 Census data estimates that the population claiming one race as AI/AN is 35.8%, the 2015 Yakutat School District for Native youth enrolled was 70%. This indicates that many Native families are choosing to remain within the community. This could be occurring for a number of reasons, including not wanting to leave the land from where their ancestors are from, to more dismal supposition like financial insecurity (up to 40% of the Yakutat population is considered LMI) and a lack of knowledge about how to safely navigate in the outside world. There are currently 216 youth ages 24 and under present in the community who could benefit from increasing direct and supportive services specific to youth. Over the course of a five-year period, it is estimated that 264 youth could be impacted.

As illustrated in the body of the narrative, Native youth are more likely to attempt suicide, consume alcohol earlier on, and experience dating violence and/or sexual assault. These rates are much higher for Alaska. Strengthening services and increasing access and awareness will aid us in our overall goal of preventing and reducing suicidal behavior and substance abuse, reducing the impact of trauma, and promoting mental health among our young Native population up to age 24.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063478-01 YAKUTAT TLINGIT TRIBE YAKUTAT AK JENSEN RHONDA $200,000

The Native Village of Unalakleet (NVU) is located on Norton Sound, on the eastern shores of the Bering Sea, at the mouth of the Unalakleet River. NVU has over 1,500 enrolled tribal members, with a year-round residential population of 704. 17% of these residents (120) are between the ages of 10-19.

The Alaska Native Epidemiology Center at the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in Anchorage reported the Norton Sound Tribal Region with the highest rate of suicide (81.6 per 100,000 population) anywhere within Alaska for the 2002-2011 time period, more than six times that of U.S. Whites (74.5:12.6), almost four times higher than the state average (74.5:19.6) and twice the average mortality rate for all AN (74.5:39.7).

NVU's Native Connections (NC) proposal is for the development of a Tier 1 (Universal) project for a suicide prevention approach. Cultural prevention strategies will be developed for all young people in the tribal community. The NC Project will work to develop a broad-base of community support for at-risk youth to strengthen resiliencies and to impart a sense of cultural belonging. NC will engage youth and adults in gatherings and talking circles for planning and strategizing, to help bridge the gap between the generations. The strategies developed for implementation during Years 2-5 will build upon the traditional wisdom and cultural knowledge of Elders within the community through shared activities. The overall Prevention Project goal is to develop balance and well-being for Youth by strengthening cultural ties with Elders and other community members in order to impart a sense of place and belonging, to solidly anchor young individuals within the larger tribal community. The project objective is to build youth resiliencies by reinforcing traditional Alaska Native values such as unconditional love, generosity, respect, patience, kindness and caring.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063486-01 UNALAKLEET VILLAGE COUNCIL UNALAKLEET AK COOPER TRACY $148,363

Ninilchik Traditional Council's Youth Outreach is anchored in education and prevention. By utilizing the elements of positive youth development we are able to help outreach participants develop their personal, social, emotional, and intellectual characteristics and increase positive outcomes and behaviors among our youth. Research conducted in Alaska indicates that there is a 32% reduction of risk factors when youth are engaged in activates that strengthen the cultural values and promote social growth. Our goal is to provide safe, educational, alternative activities to youth where they can develop their interpersonal and character skills in order to reduce their risk of substance abuse and mental health issues.

The Ninilchik Tribe has engaged in efforts of universal prevention through partnerships with community, state, and federal organizations and it has dedicated environments to support the community. This application is seeking support to increase universal prevention through intergenerational activities and mentoring to that will help our youth embrace the cultural values of the Alaska Native people and to build the capacity to perform selective and indicted prevention efforts for youths and people who have already experienced life issues and are at higher risk of escalating risk as they transition into adulthood and become the future leaders of the tribe. Information developed through assessments will baseline information about the population and provide qualitative and quantitative data that will help measure program outcomes.

Our vision is to create a community where healthy lifestyles provide safe environments for families, promote resilience among youth, and facilitate support from community members and leadership. Our mission is to promote safe and healthy environments that foster development through early intervention and education focusing on substance use prevention and suicide prevention.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063444-01 NINILCHIK VILLAGE NINILCHIK AK MULLEN JANET $200,000

The Emmonak Native Connections Project aims to partner with the University of Alaska Fairbanks to deliver prevention services to serve the 225 youth between the ages of 10 and 24 years old in our community. Through partnership with the university our Tribe seeks to accomplish the following project goals: 1) community mobilization for wellness and readiness assessment, 2) community adaptation of SAMHSA's Strategic Prevention Framework to identify strategies and outcomes for substance abuse and suicide prevention that are specific to our local context and standards of care for young people, 3) revision of the Qungasvik (Toolbox) Yup'ik community-driven and cultural prevention model to address current needs, readiness and gaps in localized youth services, 4) revision of the Qungasvik (Yup'ik Toolbox) model to include indicated suicide prevention and postvention strategies for youth and community members, 5) implementation of universal prevention strategies utilizing the Qungasvik (Toolbox) prevention model to service 827 Tribal community members, including Elders, adults and youth, 6) implementation of selective prevention strategies with high-risk, transition-age youth between 18 and 24 years, 7) performance and local evaluation to determine impacts of our strategies on wellbeing and resilience and in the reduction of risk among youth for substance abuse and suicide.
For nearly two decades, suicide and alcohol-related injuries have been the leading causes of death for Alaska Native youth between the ages of 15 and 24 years. Our vision for wellness is based on reconnection and reintegration of our young people into our culture and community in ways that create healthy relationships to our past and for their present and future. Qasgiryaraq means to encircle and in coming together around our youth in the ways of our ancestors, we are strengthening our collective spirit in an effort to cast suicide and substance abuse out from our communities, forever.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063445-01 UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS FAIRBANKS AK RASMUS STACY $199,987

In order to address the impacts of trauma, lack of mental health supports, youth suicidal behavior, and substance abuse in Alaska's Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc. (CITC) proposes Mat-Su Native Connections - Youth Suicide Prevention & Recovery. In concert with our other Tribal partners in the Matanuska-Susitna region, Knik Tribal Council and Chickaloon Native Village, and our community partners, including the Mat- Su Health Foundation, Mat-Su Borough School Board, and youth homelessness service provider My House, CITC will conduct a year-long assessment and planning process, followed by four years of indicated services implementation as designated by the community-driven plan of action.

This project to prevent suicide and substance abuse, reduce the impacts of trauma, and promote mental health among Alaska Native and American Indian youth up to and including 24 years of age will extend CITC's time-tested expert services to new populations and geographic areas, in partnership with the other Tribal service providers in our region.

Our action plan and corresponding evaluation strategies will proceed in terms of three related goals, namely, to:
1. Assess community needs, readiness, and resources to address suicidal behavior, substance abuse, trauma, and mental health problems among
Alaska Native and American Indian youth;
2. Build capacity and infrastructure to meet these needs and to create opportunities to prevent suicidal behavior, substance abuse, and trauma among local Alaska Native and American Indian youth, as well as promote their mental health, and
3. Implement and improve comprehensive services and supports to prevent suicidal behavior and substance abuse, reduce the impacts of trauma, and promote mental health among Alaska Native and American Indian youth and young adults of Alaska's Matanuska-Susitna Borough.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063491-01 COOK INLET TRIBAL COUNCIL, INC. ANCHORAGE AK LING REBECCA $1,000,000

There is a fundamental change occurring in Alaska's Yukon Kuskokwim (Y-K) Delta that involves incorporation of traditional values and practices into prevention and treatment programs to help Yukon Kuskokwim Yup'ik people heal from mental health and/or substance abuse disorders. This process reflects the contemporary will of the Y-K people who are seeking traditional solutions to health and social problems that have become endemic in the region. The Yukon Kuskokwim village of Akiak is seeking to enhance its capabilities to respond to the expressed needs of the people by planning and implementing a culturally oriented Native Connections program based on traditional teachings, called "Calricaraq".

Calricaraq, translated "helping families heal," is based on a curriculum grounded in the traditional values and ways of the Y-K Delta's Yup'ik people of southwest Alaska. The primary goal of this project will be to restore cultural pride in our young people, which will help reduce vulnerability to suicide. This formalized suicide prevention program will be the first of its kind in Akiak, and will establish a precedent that other communities will want to emulate. The key to our strategy is the promotion and teaching of our Yup'ik ways of life to young people through local cultural and subsistence activities led by Elders, and administered by local Alaska Native staff that will guide and teach our young people to live a healthy lifestyle, using the familiar surroundings of our land and culture. This way of life our people once knew and practiced, but moved away from, resulted in many of our health and social problems, including suicide, that we suffer from today.

At the heart of this approach are holistic, culture-based and community-centered activities and services that are responsive to the needs of our Alaska Native families, and built on the community's strengths.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063492-01 AKIAK NATIVE COMMUNITY AKIAK AK CARL SHEILA $123,127

The Mt. Sanford Tribal Consortium is a tribal health consortium that represents the Mentasta Traditional Tribe and the Cheesh'na Tribe Tribal Council. Behavioral and mental health supports are limited in our communities, which represent over 200 tribal members. We are currently supported by a single itinerant behavioral health worker from the Copper River Native Association. This is not enough. The SAMHSA Native Connections opportunity provides the resources to create a broad scale community plan that uses our own strengths to strengthen our youth. In Year I, we will accomplish the following goals in order to create culturally appropriate, tribally designed suicide and substance abuse prevention programming in years 2-5 of the grant program.

GOAL 1: A community-created prevention program action plan will be completed and approved by the SAMHSA Grant Program Officer.
GOAL 2: Policies and procedures relating to suicide or substance abuse prevention and treatment will be reviewed, revised and/or created as needed.
GOAL 3: Project staff capacity to both gather and analyze quality data from clients and program initiatives will increase 100%.

Accomplishing these goals is essential for many reasons. The suicide rate amongst Alaska Natives has increased to the highest suicide rate per capita in the country. Suicide in our Alaska Native communities has become "the norm". While we battle with the loss of our children, our youth seem to accept suicide as a solution to immediate problems rather than seeking long-term solutions. Last year there were two youth suicides, one in Mentasta, and one in Chistochina. Research shows that strong cultural identification makes adolescents less vulnerable to risk factors for drug use and more able to benefit from protective factors than adolescents who lack identification. We set our intention to help our youth identify with our traditional culture so they may grow strong and steady on the earth.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063456-01 MT. SANFORD TRIBAL CONSORTIUM GAKONA AK BEETER EVELYN $199,967

The Dena'ina Yinihugheltani Project seeks to reduce suicide rates among Alaska Natives and American Indian youth living in the Central Kenai Peninsula Borough by increasing tribal capacity and enhancing collaboration.

We will serve in a leadership role to guide our partners and collaborators, catalyze community outreach efforts, and foster a highly coordinated response to suicide prevention in our tribal communities throughout the region. We will ultimately impact at-risk youth and young adults of the Kenaitze Indian Tribe, the Alaska Native and American Indian communities of the Central Kenai Peninsula, and our region as a whole, who are at-risk, have experienced mental illness and/or substance abuse, or who have been impacted by this significant issue. Through highly structured and multi-faceted efforts our region will determine its readiness and capacity; it will bring together strong and consistent dialogue across multiple community organizations to ensure its success; it will effectively be data and outcome driven in design and dissemination utilizing multiple quantifiable sources; and it will be highly structured in design and method as its moves from the development of universal prevention and mental health promotion to service continuums that are specific to need in the areas of health, mental health and substance abuse within the target population.

And it will do so within the framework of the Dena'ina history of culture, respect, values, and traditions. It will occupy a place that is currently void of adequate resources and services. In no small measure for youth and young adults it will reduce the occurrence of suicide, reduce the incidence of substance abuse, provide a system of care and resources within the public health continuum to address mental illness, substance use, trauma, and justice challenges through a trauma informed approach in practice and care.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063503-01 KENAITZE INDIAN TRIBE KENAI AK DRAVIS JULIE $199,960

There is a fundamental change occurring in Alaska's Yukon Kuskokwim (Y-K) Delta that involves incorporation of traditional values and practices into prevention and treatment programs to help Yukon Kuskokwim Yup'ik people heal from cultural loss, mental health and/or substance abuse disorders. The Yukon Kuskokwim village of Akiachak is seeking to enhance its capabilities to respond to the expressed needs of the people by planning and implementing a culturally oriented Native Connections program based on traditional teachings, called "Calricaraq".

Calricaraq, translated "helping families heal," is based on a curriculum grounded in the traditional values and ways of the Y-K Delta's Yup'ik people of southwest Alaska. The primary goal of this project will be to restore cultural pride in our young people, which will help reduce vulnerability to suicide. This formalized suicide prevention program will be the first of its kind in Akiachak, and will establish a precedent that other communities will want to emulate. The key to our strategy is the promotion and teaching of our Yup'ik ways of life to young people through local cultural and subsistence activities led by Elders, and administered by local Alaska Native staff that will guide and teach our young people to live a healthy lifestyle, using the familiar surroundings of our land and culture. This way of life our people once knew and practiced, but moved away from, resulted in many of our health and social problems, including suicide, that we suffer from today.

At the heart of this approach are holistic, culture-based and community-centered activities and services that are responsive to the needs of our Alaska Native families, built on the community's strengths. Only through this method can our Y-K Delta community heal from the distress our people experience. The community of Akiachak is the target site, but we anticipate that neighboring villages will want to follow our lead as we progress in restoring healthy ways

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063507-01 AKIACHAK NATIVE COMMUNITY AKIACHAK AK LOMACK JONATHAN $95,401

The Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska is proposing a 5 year project to plan and implement a traditional suicide prevention model for Native youth within the Juneau urban area. The Native Connections Behavioral Health Project will target Native youth through age 24 at risk for suicide, substance abuse, and related mental health problems. The project will develop and implement a culturally relevant prevention services delivery model within the context of Native cultural values.

The project will enable the Central Council to develop a prevention service model around some key questions relating to suicide prevention and mental health service delivery: 1) What is the long term vision for Native youth suicide prevention/early intervention services; 2) What has worked in the past, what needs to be changed; 3) What constitutes a healthy community, based on Tlingit and Haida values. 4) What should a youth suicide prevention program look like for Tlingit and Haida families and children who are confronted with financial and cultural barriers, and a range of personal and family issues/problems. 5) How has traditional culture addressed issues of healing and mental health in a community setting and how can these concepts be invoked and appropriately applied to the current situation. 6) What are the resources required to adequately address youth suicide prevention needs for Tlingit and Haida families.

The project model will provide culturally appropriate targeted prevention services for these youth and families which will: 1) Connect with at-risk Native youth and their families through culturally acceptable approaches; 2) Work with at-risk Native youth and their families who have unresolved personal issues either with self, their children, and/or family; and 3) Work at the community level to develop a circle of care for youth with suicide, mental health, or substance abuse issues, thereby

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063465-01 CENTRAL COUNCIL TLINGIT AND HAIDA INDIAN TRIBES OF ALASKA (CCTHITA) JUNEAU AK JONES FRANCINE $200,000

The Wecij O'odham Namke (Young People's Connections) Program focuses on creating opportunities for suicide and substance abuse prevention programming for the 3,074 youth ages 13-24 years of age living on the Tohono O'odham Nation. The overall goal of the program is to integrate culturally appropriate, sustainable, community-based prevention programming throughout the Tohono O'odham Nation to address the risk and protective factors for suicide and substance abuse. The Program will reduce the impact of mental and substance use disorders and foster culturally responsive models to reduce and respond to the impact of trauma in our communities through a Tier 1 Universal Prevention Approach by integrating mental health promotion, suicide prevention, and substance use prevention into existing programs. In Year 1 the Program will convene a planning group of partners, including representatives of seven existing entities that serve the youth 13-24 years of age, their families, tribal leaders, elders and spiritual advisors. The Program will guide the group through the Strategic Prevention Framework process to complete an actionable, sustainable suicide and substance abuse prevention plan. Planning group strategic activities include: Conducting a Needs Assessment; Conducting Community Readiness Assessments in agencies/communities; Creation of a Community Resource/Asset Map; Identification of gaps; Development of a pilot plan to fill the gaps; Training for partners and community youth and adults in the planning process, prevention and prevention strategies, including Evidence Based and Practice-Based strategies for suicide and substance abuse prevention; Training in suicide intervention and postvention; Training needed for specific program components and curriculum that are identified by the planning group.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063433-01 TOHONO O'ODHAM NATION SELLS AZ JOHNSON RUSSELL $200,000

Approximately 640 people live in our remote village, Supai, AZ, located in a slot canyon in the bottom of the Grand Canyon. The Havasupai people are a strong and resilient people, possessing deep cultural and familial roots with our home in the Grand Canyon. Historical injustices and limited educational and economic opportunities have had negative effects on our people. Many have preserved but some have turned to unhealthy coping strategies, abusing drugs and alcohol and attempting and carrying out suicide to block the psycho-social pain and intergenerational trauma. This pain is juxtaposed by the beauty and culture of our community. Substance use and substance abuse-related deaths have been increasing in our community over the past two decades. Prevention services and mental health and behavioral health services are inconsistent and often not available to those who need them. Through this project, we hope to conduct a community needs assessment, community readiness assessment, and create a community resource map to guide intervention development to decrease gaps in substance use and mental health services and increase mental health wellness among the Havasupai people.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063477-01 HAVASUPAI TRIBAL COUNCIL SUPAI AZ PAYA BERNITA $199,681

The Building Communities of Hope Project (BCOH) aims to reduce the prevalence and incidence rates of suicidal behavior and substance use disorders on the Navajo Nation (NN) by primarily focusing on the youth population (ages 10-24). The BCOH promotes self-esteem, culture, and resiliency and is a leadership-initiated project developed to respond to the increasing number of suicides on the NN. Since the inception of the BCOH, members of the Interdisciplinary Team cited service gaps and issues in developing a comprehensive and effective follow-up system because of poor infrastructure, inadequate or no funding, and minimal to non- existent protocols and laws to assist individuals with suicidal behavior. Additional work groups were developed focusing on the following areas.

1) Crisis Response/Postvention Team. This team will develop a standard protocol for responding to crises at all major Navajo communities and engage service providers to comply with the protocols developed.
2) Media Team. This team will work on social media, website development, printing and publishing posters, billboards, and flyers to bring awareness to the entire Navajo Nation.
3) Suicide Surveillance System Team. This team will implement the Navajo Suicide Surveillance Instrument at all communities with crisis response/postvention teams intact.

The BCOH will encounter approximately half of the Navajo youth population in a yearly setting (23,125 youth) through the universal prevention approach. Additionally, the BCOH will focus on the selected prevention approach at the following Navajo agency locations: Eastern, Northern, and Ft. Defiance, with a target of 2,000 youth. Finally, data collected will provide a listing of individuals with suicide attempts and substance use/misuse through an indicated prevention approach. The BCOH will follow-up with 100% of all individuals referred for suicidal behavior to ensure individual and family members receive services.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063490-01 NAVAJO NATION DIVISION OF HEALTH WINDOW ROCK AZ KINLACHEENY JB $200,000

The Pascua Yaqui Tribe through the Health Services' Department Sewa Uusim Program submits this proposal for the Pascua Yaqui Native Connections Project (PYNCP) Cooperative Agreement. PYNCP will utilize funds to provide mental health promotion, community awareness and to a develop a group of youth and adult peer and community facilitators to provide the EB models to create awareness of the issues and resources available to address the factors which result in high risk behaviors for youth 12 to 24. The targeted issues and behaviors include youth who are dealing with trauma, depression, substance use, suicide idealizations. PYNCP will create a community wide media awareness campaign which will result in over 2,000 youth taking part in awareness events and activities. PYNCP will implement Tier One, Universal Prevention Strategies principles and interventions tribal wide. Funds will use SAMHSA, Theory of Change model to create a tribal program focused on cultural prevention services. In year one PYNCP will; work with the GPO and the Tribal Training and Technical Assistance Center to develop a plan to support the tribe's work which will be completed and approved by the GPO by the end of Year 1, which will lay out the plan for years 2-5.Year one will; Conduct a Service Delivery Systems analysis, a Community Needs and Community Readiness Assessment, and create a Community Resource /Asset Map that addresses suicide prevention and substance use and misuse prevention. Year 1 will also: Develop or revise protocols to ensure that youth who are at high risk for suicide, including those who attempt suicide, and use or misuse substances, receive follow-up services to ease their transition into treatment.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063498-01 PASCUA YAQUI TRIBE TUCSON AZ NOONAN DENNIS $200,000

The Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians is apply for the SAMHSA Native Connections grant. The Big Valley Rancheria is located in Northern California, Lake County on the shores of Clearlake. Big Valley Rancheria is located adjacent to the small, rural agricultural community of Lakeport, CA, approximately 2 hours from any metropolitan area. Lakeport, California has a staggering unemployment rate, high-school dropout rate, and wide-spread poverty. Big Valley is also located in the poorest County in California, Lake County. Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians has 1,020 total Tribal members, 590 of these members are under the age of 21 years and 774 are under the age of 24. These numbers do not include the approximate 250 non-tribal member and tribal members from other tribes that reside in our community. We have 271 tribal member families within Lake County and approximately 300 individuals live on the Rancheria. Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians Tribal Community is plagued with drug and alcohol addiction. During the SAMHSA 2014 community needs assessment the assessment approximated 70% of our community is in active and/or recovering from addiction of drugs, alcohol, and pharmaceuticals. Due to the community circumstances such as lack of healthy tribal community activities for ages up to 24, transportation to local actives/ programs/events, youth programs and un-healthy lifestyle choices among the community this has led to wide spread addiction in young children. The Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians is experiencing a high rate of suicide within its community. In order to address the issues the Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians plans to provide services to ages 24 and under through intervention, prevention, cultural activities, education and training utilizing all three tiers in the grant.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063514-01 BIG VALLEY BAND OF POMO INDIANS LAKEPORT CA HERNANDEZ NANCY $187,507

The Restoring Balance to Our Youth project at Indian Health Center of Santa Clara Valley (IHC) will prevent and reduce suicide and substance use and abuse among urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth age 10-24 by offering traditional and cultural programs and activities that serve a demonstrated need for reducing the impact of trauma and promoting mental health among young people in the local urban tribal community.

In the midst of national news-making events in Santa Clara County and disturbing upward trends in suicide rates nationwide, a project team based in the Traditional Healing Program at IHC will work to: 1) prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance abuse, 2) reduce the impact of trauma, and 3) promote mental health among AI/AN youth.

During Year 1, IHC will dedicate planning efforts to expanding on a recent youth mental health readiness assessment and integrate an array of culturally-based traditional services, focusing on strengthening positive cultural identity and self-understanding. Planning efforts will include expanding an established Community Advisory Board and developing subgroups of youth, elders, family members, and traditional consultants. Restoring Balance to Our Youth will focus on universal prevention strategies for Native youth, with strong linkages to existing behavioral resources for intervention and postvention services as needed. Youth will benefit from expanded traditional cultural interventions including: weekly traditional services, talking circles, a year-long preparation for a Rites of Passage Ceremony, Lakota Yuwipi Ceremony, a California Bear Dance, and a culturally focused Youth Workforce Development Camp. IHC planning efforts will augment and expand on existing collaborations among organizations and develop improved data collection and tracking procedures for suicide and substance use prevention.

It is anticipated that up to 30 youth will be served by the project.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063485-01 INDIAN HEALTH CENTER OF SANTA CLARA VALLEY SAN JOSE CA DURAN MICHAEL $200,000

The Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians (SYBMI) proposes the Native Connections program to address the problem of suicide in our remote rural reservation community. The Santa Ynez Tribal Health Clinic (SYTHC) is the implementing agency for the tribe and is located in Santa Ynez. The population of focus is Native American youth between the ages of 12 to 24 years. Native Connections will provide programming for 590 youth.

Given the need for community awareness about suicide, the lack of suicide prevention programming in the Santa Ynez Valley, and barriers in serving indigenous youth out of the school setting, we propose focusing on Tier 1: Universal.

Prior to launching direct services, the Native Connections program will engage in a Community Readiness Assessment. This structured process facilitates readiness assessment across diverse stakeholder groups and accommodates varying levels of awareness and readiness. Our two key stakeholder groups are: a) Youth Council: an advisory group of Native American middle and high school youth students; and b) SYBMI's Healing Path Committee. Conceptually, the Community Readiness Assessment is part of the broader Strategic Prevention Framework process (SPF). The SPF process facilitates meaningful dialogue with key stakeholders (including youth) to develop an array of prevention services and programming.

SPF involves a five-step process: A) Assessment; B) Capacity-Building; C) Planning; D) Implementation and E) Evaluation. The methodology by which assessment activities will be conducted is Youth Participatory Action Research. The Youth Council and Healing Path Committee will then be guided by Native Connections staff through the remaining SPF steps, in order to complete the Year 1 Planning process and develop a Tier 1: Universal suicide prevention plan for implementation in Year 2, and a plan to address Tier 2: Selective Prevention services during the remainder of Native Connections funding.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063450-01 SANTA YNEZ TRIBAL HEALTH, INC. SANTA YNEZ CA ARMENTA-BELEN KRISTA $154,840

United Indian Health Services, Inc. (UIHS) Youth Suicide and Substance Abuse Prevention
Project will serve American Indians ages 10-24 living in Northwestern California who are at high risk for suicide and substance abuse. Efforts will include developing an integrated service system amongst local providers plus educating the community about suicide and substance abuse in order to build the community's capacity to support tribal youth and their families.

Project goals include: 1) Implement Year 1 activities such as establishing at least twelve collaborative partnerships to implement grant activities, conduct preliminary community assessments, develop policy and procedures that promote coordination across youth-serving organizations, involve community members in the effort, and develop a plan for Years 2 through 5 of the grant; 2) Create effective systems and tools that support evaluation activities such as collection, analysis and reporting of performance, mental health, and prevention measures as well as complete a local evaluability assessment and periodic local performance assessments; 3) Continue to collaborate with at least three partners throughout the grant in order to establish and maintain an integrated infrastructure and effective protocols for serving tribal youth who are at high risk for suicide and substance abuse; 4) Educate the community and build commitment to supporting tribal youth by coordinating an Intertribal Youth Suicide and Substance Abuse Prevention Summit during each year of the grant.

UIHS, established in 1970, is a tribal health organization that serves more than 10,000 American Indians within Humboldt and Del Norte Counties. The Behavioral Health Department will be administering the Youth Suicide and Substance Abuse Prevention Project.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063455-01 UNITED INDIAN HEALTH SERVICES, INC. ARCATA CA BROM AMY $200,000

The Toiyabe Youth Connections Project (TYCP) will be implemented by Toiyabe Indian Health Project, Inc. The overall goal of the TYCP is to provide Native American youth and young adults (14 - 24 years of age), who are at-risk of suicide ideation/suicide with high-quality treatment services. The TYCP will serve a minimum of 120 Native American youth and young adults each year for five years. This will result in a minimum of 600 Native American youth and young adults being served through the TYCP. The project participants will come from the organization's service area - seven federally recognized tribes and two Indian communities in rural and remote Inyo County in Northern California. The individuals served through the TYCP will be transitioning out of a juvenile detention facility or jail, or at risk of entering the criminal justice system. The TYCP will prioritize Tier 2 for the five years of project implementation. Tier 2 was selected because it focuses on the critical behavioral health needs that persist throughout the Toiyabe community. From the time period of April 2015 through April 2016, Native Americans were overrepresented by 300% in the Inyo County Jail population, averaging more than 38% of the jail population while accounting for only 12.7% of the overall Inyo County population. The TYCP will enable the organization's Family Services Department and a treatment team to make contact with juvenile wards and adult inmates identified as having behavioral health needs that are risk factors for suicidal ideations and attempts, and to determine the appropriate outpatient treatment plan for them to begin upon release from jail or juvenile hall, to improve behavioral health outcomes, decrease the risk of suicide, and reduce the risk of reentry into the criminal justice system.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063462-01 TOIYABE INDIAN HEALTH PROJECT, INC. BISHOP CA TURNER SHEILA $200,000

Riverside San-Bernardino County Indian Health, Inc. (RSBCIHI) is a tribal health care consortium that serves nine (9) tribes and two (2) urban AI/AN communities in Southern California. The goal of our project is to expand our current screening efforts to screen all of our patients, age 10 years of age and older, for depression, suicide ideation, alcohol use, and domestic/intimate partner violence. This project will enable us to screen an additional 4,474 more patients each year, including 1,428 (31.9%) more youth and young adults between the ages of 10 to 25. All patients who screen positive for any problem will receive treatment and/or referral services from one of our medical clinics and/or our behavioral health department.

Our service area is home to 45,300 AI/AN people, and we have 31,908 registered patients. Forty- nine percent (49%) of our community members live below the poverty level, with family incomes below 200 percent of the federal poverty level.

Suicide rates are rising among our youth. In the past few years, we have lost several youths to suicide, and at least one suicide became a cluster. Our behavioral health department served 1,322 clients in 2015, and of those clients, 1,122 (84.9%) reported having suicidal thoughts at least once during the past year, with 594 (44.9%) of those clients having suicidal thoughts at least once during the past month. We have specifically chosen to apply for this funding because it will enable us to 1) screen all of our patients for depression, suicide ideation, and other problems, and 2) provide us with the resources to develop suicide intervention protocols, suicide attempt follow-up protocols, and suicide postvention protocols for our entire organization.

Our project will not only help us to save lives, it will also enable us to identify people who need help early, before their problems become severe, and offer them immediate help to reduce their suffering.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063506-01 RIVERSIDE-SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY IND HLTH BANNING CA MCMICHAEL HERBERT $1,000,000

United American Indian Involvement, Inc. (UAII) will utilize SAMHSA Native Connections funding to build an integrated and community-driven approach that will address suicide and substance abuse prevention.

UAII serves the second largest AI/AN population in the United States that includes an inter-tribal community representing approximately 125 federally recognized tribes. Similar to multiple AI/AN communities throughout the country, alcohol and substance abuse continues to have a devastating effect.

During 2014 in LAC, 60% of youth suicides had a documented mental health diagnosis and 20% were receiving mental health services at the time of death. Of increasing significance is the prevalence of bullying, and in particular, various types of cyber- bullying, and the correlation between cyberbullying and recent suicides. In Los Angeles County, of the youth who died by suicide in 2014, 50% had reported being a victim of bullying.

UAII's primary strategy is to build an integrated and community-driven approach to addressing youth suicide and substance abuse prevention that involves multiple systems of client engagement. The ultimate goal is to provide a culturally appropriate, comprehensive and coordinated system of care that addresses the complex needs of AI/AN youth who are, or may be at-risk for suicidal behavior, those who are in the early process of alcohol and substance use experimentation or abuse, and those who have experienced early childhood traumatic experiences.

UAII's proposed approach for this project includes: I) Increase agency capacity to provide outreach and disseminate information related to substance abuse and suicide prevention 2) Develop policies and protocols for a comprehensive and integrated service delivery system of care, and 3) Expand capacity to meet the needs of at-risk populations for suicide and substance abuse.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063508-01 UNITED AMERICAN INDIAN INVOLVEMENT, INC. LOS ANGELES CA GARCIA ALFONSO $200,000

The proposed Native Connections project is geared towards serving rural tribal American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) communities of California, specifically 16 tribes and 9 tribal health programs affiliated with California Rural Indian Health Board (CRIHB). California is home to 109 federally recognized tribes and the largest number of AIAN in any state. Nationally, suicide is the second leading cause of death among AIAN ages 10-34. In California, suicide attempts is greater among AIAN than the general population.

The overall purpose of the proposed project is to prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance abuse, reduce the impact of trauma, and promote mental health among AIAN young people up to and including age 24. This project will incorporate AIAN community involvement to support the implementation of culturally appropriate, community-based mental health promotion, suicide prevention, and substance use or misuse prevention interventions for AIAN youth people up to and including age 24. The project will focus on screenings, cultural responsiveness of care training for tribal health program behavioral health staff, historical trauma and trauma-informed care, postvention strategies, community partnership development, access to care, and data infrastructure development.

The proposed Native Connections project will address the following activities in Year 1:
1) conduct a Service Delivery Systems analysis, a community needs assessment, a community readiness assessment, 2) create a community resource/asset map, 3) implement SAMHSA's
Strategic Prevention Framework to guide the project, 4) develop processes to incorporate local traditional healing practices, and 5) develop culturally-appropriate postvention protocols and suicide attempt follow-up protocols. It is estimated that 400 individuals will be served through the program annually, totaling 2,000 over the five-year period.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063510-01 CALIFORNIA RURAL INDIAN HEALTH BOARD SACRAMENTO CA DOMAGUIN DANIEL $200,000

Native Connection's purpose is to increase access to culturally-appropriate substance abuse and suicide prevention programming and mental health services for American Indian/ Alaska Native youth and young people living in the San Francisco Bay Area ages 10-24 by increasing community engagement and strengthening service delivery. The Project will be available at our Oakland and San Francisco Community Wellness site locations

The Native American Health Center, Inc. provides medical, dental, WIC, nutrition/fitness, counseling/therapy, youth, media, home visiting, and community/cultural based services.

The proposed project goal is to expand and strengthen the CWD's integrated programming capacity and community support systems that a) reduce the impact of trauma; b) prevents suicide/suicidal ideation and substance use; and 3) integrate mental health promotion for AIAN youth and transitional aged youth ages 10 - 24.

Project components include: 1) Planning and building community engagement capacity specific community needs and readiness; 2) Address gaps in service and strengthening current service delivery by developing and implementing transitional aged youth programming; 3) Engaging staff clinicians to participate in youth care coordination activities and programming; and 4) Engage community voice.

Native Connections will increase community voice and engagement through a variety of resource building and readiness activities which will increase the overall effectives of the NAHC's suicide/ substance abuse prevention and mental health programming as well as identify needs and gaps in service. NAHC will proactively target challenges and disparities within current programming through member identification and assessment, enhanced outreach, and integration of traditional healing practices with evidence-based practices.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063468-01 NATIVE AMERICAN HEALTH CENTER, INC. OAKLAND CA THOMAS PODGE $1,000,000

IHC's client population of over 5,000 registered patients is typical of that of many California American Indian clinics, with youth comprising over one-third (34%) of all patients. Through the Native Connections program, IHC will potentially reach up to 15,000 AI individuals through health promotion messages and outreach.

Through Year 1, Community Needs and Readiness Assessments using the Colorado State University model, targeting 45 interviews, multi-stakeholder planning and selection of evidence- based methodologies for improved clinical therapy and capacity building. Planning activities will prepare the clinic to provide Tier 1 health promotion activities, including culturally positive alternative activities for youth; Tier 2 level services that include school-based and community- based postvention counseling follow a suicide or suicide attempt to prevention contagion; and Tier 3 level improved post-treatment counseling of youth in transition from residential treatment through on-site aftercare. In program years 2-5, it is anticipated that 400 community members will benefit annually from health promotion services, 30-50 youth will be served annually through learning and cultural/recreational programming and 20-30 young persons will receive one-to-one prevention and/or post-treatment services each year.

Program objectives are: (1) Identify service gaps through a Community Needs and Readiness Assessment; (2) Develop a plan to support the results and evaluation of the Community Needs and Readiness Assessment; (3) Design and deliver effective suicide and substance use prevention messaging via social media and community outreach; (4) Develop protocols and procedures, with supportive materials for postvention response and contagion prevention; (5) Increase the capacity to deliver extended (6-month) aftercare services.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063511-01 INDIAN HEALTH COUNCIL, INC. VALLEY CENTER CA PFENT CHERYL $200,000

Community Vision: MPTN's vision of its proposed Skeehch Wuyeekan (Pequot for "Good
Medicine") Program is grounded in encouraging systematic efforts to prevent suicide and
substance abuse, provide trauma-informed care, and promote positive mental health and
wellness. A systems approach focuses on quality improvement rather than blame when suicide attempts and deaths do occur. It also emphasizes the potential in improving systems as a whole instead ofrelying solely on the efforts of individuals. It is important to acknowledge that suicide related events will occur, but it is critical to make a fundamental shift away from accepting suicide as an occasional consequence of mental health issues. The belief that suicide is preventable must permeate and inform all efforts in order to reduce suicide among MPTN youth. Mission: Increase the effectiveness and sustainability of substance abuse and suicide prevention programming at the local levels in New London County. The proposed Skeehch Wuyeekan Program is designed to increase the effectiveness of substance abuse and suicide prevention efforts by focusing on a reasonable set of goals that will promote widespread use of evidence based and best practices for prevention in New London County. The aim is to reach "saturation" levels of these practices, whereas they are currently "sprinkled" across the local area, reducing their impact. By working with state agencies and local mental health providers, as well as other partners and interested individuals, this plan is intended to mobilize coordinated, effective efforts to address substance abuse and suicide.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063473-01 MASHANTUCKET PEQUOT TRIBAL NATION MASHANTUCKET CT SCOTT MICHELE $197,194

The Hannahville Indian Community experiences suicide and substance abuse at a disproportionately high rate compared to its small size. The Hannahville Connections Project focuses on two main areas. First, there will be an effort to bring community service providers together to develop policies and protocols for helping at risk youth get linked with effective supports as well as protocols for responding to suicide attempts and completions. Secondly, there will be community assessments completed to help identify the types of interventions and activities that can be implemented in Hannahville to reduce the number of youth who abuse substances and who attempt suicide. The Connections project will primarily target youth up to age 24 and their families. Some interventions will be aimed at the whole Hannahville Community, including the community providers. Under this definition, community members include the Tribal members and descendants living on and outside the Reservation as well as non-Native family members and community providers. Some of the common diagnoses that will be targeted are substance abuse disorders, depression, anxiety, and PTSD.

One of the strategies of the Connections project is educating community members on the risks of substance use and also of the signs of mental health problems and suicide warning signs. The other strategy of the Connections project is to offer healthy recreational activities for youth and their families. Interventions will include presentations that are designed for groups within the community, peer groups in the schools, and providing fun and culturally relevant activities.

It is expected that the Connections project would serve 100 to 150 people annually and 500 to 600 over its entirety. With this request comes an inherent commitment to continue the initiative through collaboration and resource sharing among community programs.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063439-01 HANNAHVILLE INDIAN COMMUNITY WILSON MI CRETENS ERIN $651,450

To the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the
Saginaw Chippewa Tribe continues its determination to address its fears regarding substance abuse and suicide. Engaging community knowledge and experiences, the Tribe will assess and enhance its ability to prevent, monitor and address the issues of suicide and substance abuse in the community, with a focus on youth age 24 and under, and their families. Addressing trauma will be a primary component of our strategy.

An Advisory Circle, Anishnaabe Bimaadiziwin Edbaamjigejik (the Native way of life-the one who leads) that includes multiple community members, employees and youth represented by the Tribal Youth Council will oversee and guide the process. This will include the completion of Service Delivery System Analysis, a Community Needs Assessment, Community Readiness Assessment and Community Resource/Asset map in year one of the grant with period revaluation of community readiness in subsequent years. The Tribe will further develop a system to track and monitor statistics related to suicide, substance, trauma and other important health and safety issues. Through the grant, communication and collaboration between Saginaw Chippewa youth-serving programs and services will result.

Project evaluation will be conducted by an Evaluation team led by Michigan State University 's Native American Institute and will build the capacity of the Tribe to conduct its own evaluations through a "grow your own" approach, with training and skill-building expertise also provided by the Institute.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063505-01 SAGINAW CHIPPEWA INDIAN TRIBE MOUNT PLEASANT MI GARCIA DAVID $200,000

Project Name: White Earth Band of Chippewa: Maawanji'idiwag Project

Summary of Project: Maawanji'idiwag will provide Crisis Response/Aftercare Intensive Case Management services for youth living on the White Earth Reservation, ages 10-24. In addition to these services, the project will provide School Support/Educational Connections through the multiple school districts that serve the White Earth Reservation. And, finally, the project will feature a comprehensive Public Awareness Campaign focused on promotion of mental health, suicide prevention, and substance use or misuse for all young people and communities. The Public Awareness Campaign will feature radio, newspaper, billboards, social media and other venues available to the White Earth Reservation communities.

Project Goals/Objectives:
Goal 1: Enhance community awareness that suicide is 100% preventable. Estimate reaching a total of 500 people through multiple education efforts on an annual basis throughout the grant period.

Goal 2: Create the positions of Aftercare Workers/Intensive Case Managers for follow-up from Crisis Team calls. Project a total of three (3) positions that will work each year of the grant period. Each staff person will serve an average of 25 youth and their families on an annual basis for a total of 75 youth and their families served on an annual basis throughout the grant period.

Goal 3: Conduct periodic GONA (Gathering of Native Americans) throughout the grant period to increase understanding of cultural values, traditions and practices. Estimated to hold five GONA trainings (one each year of the grant period). Year one: 40 participants; year 2: 80; year 3: 100; year 4: 60; and, year 5: 100 based on the size of the community each year.

Goal 4: Formalize relationships with partner agencies/organizations and define roles and responsibilities. White Earth Tribal Mental Health will partner with a minimum of six agencies/programs annually throughout the grant period.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063475-01 WHITE EARTH TRIBE WHITE EARTH MN WILLIAMS MARTHA $200,000

The Northern Cheyenne Tribal Board of Health will strengthen existing youth suicide prevention programing with the proposed initiative, titled "Cottonwood Connections". Cottonwood Connections is a 5- year culturally-based community driven suicide prevention project that will utilize Tier 1 Universal prevention strategies that include culturally-adapted evidence-based interventions. Primary intervention targets will include: community-wide education and training to promote community and trauma resilience while reducing risk factors and early identification and triage of high-risk youth. In the first year of the grant, the NCTBH will hire one full-time Community Health Specialist to oversee planning and implementation of Cottonwood Connections. The newly hired Community Health Specialist will work with a 10-member community-based work group to revise suicide response and postvention protocols while developing a 4-year Tier 1 universal prevention strategy for youth ages 10-24 years.

Cottonwood Connections will be strengthened by three levels of community involvement: 1) the Northern Cheyenne Tribal Board of Health team trained in trauma and community resilience methods to carry out planning and implementation of culturally-based prevention strategies; 2) existing prevention community partnerships and elders that form the "Cottonwood Connection Workgroup," and 3) traditional Cheyenne societies.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063446-01 NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBAL COUNCIL LAME DEER MT RESTAD DESIREE $1,000,000

The purpose of the Spirit Lake Tribe Connections grant is to enhance and/or revise protocols to ensure that youth who are at high risk of suicide receive appropriate referrals, mental health services and follow-up services that will allow for preventing and reducing suicidal behavior and substance abuse and promote mental health among young people up to and including age 24.
Goals to be achieved through collaborations and determined interventions:
1. Continue to educate our Tribal community that suicide is a public health problem that is preventable and provide suicide prevention related programs in all area schools.
2. Develop Memorandum of Understanding agreements with a broad spectrum of Tribal entities to generate greater and more effective attention to suicide prevention and a referral process.
3. Enhance strategies to reduce the stigma associated with participating in mental health, substance abuse and suicide prevention services.
4. Develop postvention protocols that are in concert with our culture and beliefs.
5. Implement suicide prevention surveillance data collection and evaluation.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063483-01 SPIRIT LAKE TRIBE FORT TOTTEN ND THIELE DARLA $195,587

The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska requests $952,232 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, SAMHSA Native Connections over a five year period with $168,466 of the funds requested in the first year to prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance abuse, reduce the impact of trauma, and promote mental health among Winnebago youth ages 14 to 20 in order to reduce abuse-related problems. This project will further the success of the Strategic Prevention Framework Project (SPF) recently completed and compliment and coordinate efforts of the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska Community Partnership Project, a Strategic Prevention Frameworks-Partnerships for Success Grant (SPF-PFS), to prevent the onset and reduce the progression of underage drinking of youth ages 12-20.

Winnebago is a small Indian Reservation located in northeast Nebraska approximately 20 miles south of the Sioux City, IA metropolitan area and 90 miles north of the Omaha, Nebraska metropolitan area. According to the 2010 U .S. Census the Winnebago Reservation population is 2,694 residents.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063457-01 WINNEBAGO TRIBE OF NEBRASKA WINNEBAGO NE COPPLE THERESE $168,466

The Thoreau Community Center (TCC) seeks to implement the Healing Project, a culturally responsive initiative that reflects the needs, values, and culture of our Navajo community. We will mobilize SAMHSA's 5-step Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) planning process to guide the selection, implementation, and evaluation of effective, culturally appropriate, and sustainable prevention activities and policy and protocol development. To ensure cultural responsiveness and fit, we will involve our youth and community in planning, plan implementation, pre and postvention policy and protocol development, and evaluation. Collectively, our proposed strategies will decrease the differences in access, service use, and outcomes among our Native population of focus.
Between January and October 2010 in a region that encompasses about 15 Navajo communities, there were 54 suicide attempts and deaths among individuals aged 13-45, most of them occurred in our 60-square mile target geographic area of Thoreau New Mexico and its surrounding rural communities. Without truly collaborative planning and data collection, no one can know the true extent of the problem - and young Native people across New Mexico will continue to die. This grant request is offered in their honor with hope that the future of Thoreau's youth, young adults, and families will be better than their past.
The evaluation of our project will be conducted by Support Services International, Inc. (SSI), an Indian-owned consulting firm that specializes in program evaluation and policy analysis. Dr. Walter Hillabrant, a clinical psychologist and statistician, has been the principle investigator or evaluation specialist in more than 20 national, regional, and local evaluations in Indian country. Additionally, the Ohrstrom Family Foundation has committed $20,000 to fund a strategic planning consultant to assist our process.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063512-01 THOREAU COMMUNITY CENTER (TCC) THOREAU NM HENIO JASMINE $800,000

The community's vision for suicide prevention, substance abuse prevention, addressing trauma, and mental health promotion is to have services, programs and campaigns readily available for the Navajo by the Navajo. The Navajo Technical University envisions providing learning and career opportunities for its students and community members in suicide prevention, substance abuse prevention, addressing trauma, and mental health promotion through a Substance Abuse certificate program, the development of a Suicide and Crisis Management certificate program, activities (e.g. youth conferences, trainings, guest speakers, etc.), and mental health promotions (e.g. mental health awareness 365). The emphasis of the programs is to increase the workforce for its graduates who will be able to function on Tier 1, Tier 2, and Tier 3, including suicide education and promotion, direct services to individuals at-risk, and working with suicide survivors post-attempt. The university is an active institution within the communities of the main campus - Crownpoint, NM, branch campuses - Chinle, AZ, Teec nos pos, AZ, and has a working relationship with the Office of Departmental Youth.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063472-01 NAVAJO TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY CROWNPOINT NM AGBARAJI CASMIR $196,750

Among local community data sources, from 2010 to present, the Mescalero Apache Tribe community reported 94 total calls regarding suicide reported to Law Enforcement BIA in Mescalero. Two of those were suicide completions, 56 suicide attempts and 36 suicide threats.

There exists a gap in the tribe's current services to actively and directly address our youth and engage them in depression awareness and suicide prevention. Giving credence to the current environment of services available at MAT, the vision of the MAT Suicide Prevention Program is to keep suicide prevention alive and vigilance sharp using a school-based system as our anchor.

The proposed project will be managed by the Mescalero Apache Tribal Human Services Department, which is important because it directly and consistently interfaces with our target audience at high risk of substance abuse and suicidal behavior.

Year 1 activities will primarily involve Tier 1 (universal prevention strategies), as MAT will integrate the SOS Signs of Suicide Prevention Program (SOS) into the curriculum of the Mescalero Apache School (housing both middle and high school students) and will therefor reach all young people enrolled in the community school system.

Year 2 will utilize Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3, as our work will collaborate, refer and partner with the MAT Behavioral Health Program that provides therapy, counseling, and family group meetings for higher risk young people and their families.

Collectively, Project Staff have deep and long-standing experience supporting MAT programs - they have worked in substance abuse clinical services, cultural programs, and health education.

The Mescalero Apache Tribe is committed to providing the services and resources necessary to make our people healthier and happier. From tribal leadership to the Program staff, we pledge our best work, enthusiasm and dedication to improving the lives of tribal youth.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063487-01 MESCALERO APACHE TRIBAL COUNCIL MESCALERO NM SAINZ NAOMI $166,991

The Intergenerational Intertribal (I2 ) Positive Solutions for Native Health, aims to decrease suicide and substance misuse among American Indian youth, through age 24, whom have been impacted by trauma. Through the adaptation (year 2) and pilot implementation (year 3) of the evidence-based "Storytelling for Empowerment" intervention, youth in three consortium Tribes of the Albuquerque Area Indian Health Board, Inc., will improve cognitive decision making, achieve positive cultural identity, and strengthen resiliency. By honoring "who they are" youth will be equipped to make informed decisions to prevent substance misuse and promote positive mental health outcomes. This project will be guided by an intergenerational community advisory panel (ICAP), made up of recognized community leaders, advocates and professionals, including both youth and adults, in each participating community. I2 Positive Solutions for Native Health will prioritize both Tier I and Tier II prevention strategies to maximize its reach and impact in the participating communities. It is anticipated that these universal prevention strategies will reach approximately 750 AI youth age 10-24, and family members annually. The primary Tier II strategy (Storytelling for Empowerment Intervention), will focus on providing a culturally-centered intervention to at least 10 at-risk young people in each participating tribal community in project years 4 and 5. In addition to benefiting participating youth, the project will also produce a culturally adapted Storytelling PowerBook that can be utilized beyond the 5-year funding period, and shared with other tribal communities in our region. Project staff will also mobilize SAMHSA's Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF), a five-step planning process, to guide the selection, implementation, and evaluation of effective, culturally appropriate, and sustainable prevention activities throughout all five project years.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063500-01 ALBUQUERQUE AREA INDIAN HEALTH BOARD ALBUQUERQUE NM TENORIO RACHELL $200,000

Title of Project
Washoe Resiliency Project
Population to be served
Native American people ages 0-24 living in the four Washoe reservation communities and the surrounding areas.

Project Goal and Objectives
Our goal is to implement a process of change through which individuals ages 0-24 years will improve their health and wellness, live a self-directed life, and strive to be resilient and reach their full potential. Our objectives in Year One include: (1) Implementation of a community mental health needs assessment to all four Washoe reservation communities within the first six months of the grant (2) Organization of a task force representative of partners and communities to work with the Healing Center, our GPO and TA to identify the best approach to services/programming that will focus on and address trauma as it triggers suicide attempts and drug and alcohol abuse (3) Development and revision of all suicide protocols (4) Training in and utilization of the SAMHSA model program "American Indian Life Skills Development Curriculum" (5) Coordination of wellbriety and other activities so that everyone knows what we are doing, why we are doing what we are doing, what we hope to achieve by doing it and what we did achieve by doing it.

Number of people to be served -
Up to 500 people living in the four Washoe communities and the surrounding areas ages 0-24

Summary of the project for publication -
Our goal is to implement a process of change through which Washoe Tribal community members ages 0-24 years will effectively and successfully address trauma, suicide, and substance abuse to improve their health and wellness, live a self-directed life, and strive to be resilient and reach their full potential.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063442-01 WASHOE TRIBE OF NEVADA AND CALIFORNIA GARDNERVILLE NV DETIERRA CAROLYN $200,000

The purpose of the Saint Regis Mohawk Mental Health Service's Native Connections program is to enhance and expand culturally-relevant programs aimed at preventing and reducing suicidal behavior and substance abuse, reduce the impact of trauma and promote mental health among The People of Akwesasne, Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe ages 24 and younger.
Our guiding principle is to conduct a youth-driven and community driven approach to developing culturally relevant, integrated suicide and drug/alcohol prevention services. The Native Connections program will support expansion and improve our efforts to provide integrated training, education, and information to the youth community regarding mental health, substance abuse and suicide prevention, intervention and postvention. Our goals are to continue to provide, improve, and expand our school-based services by providing screenings, assessments, treatment, and care coordination to Native youth in Salmon River Central School District; to develop a social marketing/media campaign that will reach youth where they learn about information on social media; and to develop and expand services to increase our outreach to Mohawk youth who are attending area schools of higher education to address their behavioral health needs so they may be more likely to remain in school and graduate. We will conduct community readiness and community needs assessment involving our youth, their families, and community while working closely with our partners. The Native Connections grant will assist the Saint Regis Mohawk Mental Health Services to develop and implement strategies aimed enhancing provision of relevant education, increasing youth help seeking behavior, reducing the stigma of being a consumer of mental health and/or substance abuse, and ultimately, saving our youths' lives from substance abuse and suicide.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063471-01 SAINT REGIS MOHAWK TRIBE HOGANSBURG NY VENERY CHRISTINE $198,589

The purpose of the Hakame Clubhouse is to implement a culturally appropriate community change model among the Long Island Native American community, specifically the Shinnecock Indian Nation to strengthen the capacity of tribal and local youth, health, and wellness organizations to delivery services. This model serves to remove barriers to care by providing a point of entry and helping youth and families to navigate the behavioral health system. "Hakame" means welcome in the Shinnecock Language and is the vision for welcoming youth into the clubhouse where they will access to a vast network of behavioral health services including direct and indirect prevention services, wrap around support services, peer recovery group, and referrals to treatment. This Clubhouse will take the view that the community has the strengths and resiliencies within it reduce substance abuse and mental health challenges and activities will be informed by community knowledge. The Clubhouse's role is to help facilitate the community change model.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063495-01 BLOSSOM SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT SOUTHAMPTON NY SMITH AIYANA $200,000

Utilizing a comprehensive community needs assessment and community readiness assessment the Ponca Pathways Programs seeks to provide an evidenced-based, as well as practiced-based strategy with the goal of reducing the impact of trauma, preventing/reducing suicidal behaviors, preventing substance use and misuse, and promoting mental health among Ponca young people (age 10 up to 24- years-old). The Pathways Program looks to serve, at minimum, 100 Ponca and other Tribal young people annually.

The first year activities of this project show how a community based approach to substance abuse and suicide prevention will attempt to curtail problems. The activities proposed for year 1 are: 1) Hire Staff, 2) Involve community input on all grant efforts, 3) Conduct Service Delivery Analysis, Community Needs Assessment, Readiness Assessment, and Create Resource/Asset Map, and 4) Develop Policies and Procedures to Promote Coordination across Youth-Serving Agencies.

A local evaluator, Paradox Consulting LLC, will be utilized to conduct the needs assessment that will follow a participatory research-evaluation model that was in part developed by Paradox over 25 years of conducting health research and program evaluation for American Indian and Alaska Native communities. The approach will include adapting The Community Readiness Model developed by the Tri-Ethnic Center at Colorado State University. The readiness assessment will be used to develop the method and approach to conducting a comprehensive needs assessment. This information will assist the Pathways program in reporting requirements of the Government Performance and Results Modernization Act of 2010 that is required of all SAMHSA grantees. An annual report will also be created to disseminate to stakeholders, community members, and other interested parties to increase investment in this program and provide a model for reducing suicide rates and substance abuse in Indian Country.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063432-01 PONCA TRIBE OF INDIANS OF OKLAHOMA PONCA CITY OK ROBERTS JAKE $200,000

Population Served: Rural non-Reservation American Indian Youth age 12-24

The National Indian Women's Health Resource Center, seeks to forge a comprehensive and integrated suicide prevention, substance abuse prevention, trauma-informed, and mental health promotion system to detect, prevent, and provide early intervention services to American Indian youth who reside within the area of northeastern Oklahoma served by the organization. This system shall both expand and enhance the current program and shall provide the foundation for creating prevention prepared communities, data-driven management, meaningful partnerships, and delivering and sustaining effective, efficient, and culturally appropriate services.

The NIWHRC Many Paths project shall define the need for services, the gaps between needed and available services, barriers to care, and other problems related to the need to implement trauma-informed suicide and substance abuse prevention and early intervention activities for American Indian youth and emerging adults at risk of or currently experiencing issues that may lead to suicide. The project shall involve communities, assess needs, identify organizations, improve coordination, implement evidence-based strategies, and manage youth at risk for suicide within the tribal service area. Further, the NIWHRC shall enlist area communities, tribal members, youth, area child-serving agencies, educational institutions, health facilities, and public schools in the planning, assessment, implementation, and evaluation phases of this project.

Goal 1: Increase the capacity, effectiveness, and efficiency of suicide prevention services for American Indian youth age 12-24 who reside within the area served by the NIWHRC.

Goal 2: Reduce the prevalence suicide among the youth population (12-24) in the area of rural Oklahoma served by the NIWHRC.

Goal 3: Promote systems level change at the organizational level to embrace suicide prevention as a core strategy.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063434-01 NATIONAL INDIAN WOMEN'S HEALTH RES/ CTR TAHLEQUAH OK DIBBLE JANIE $200,000

The Citizen Potawatomi Nation (CPN) is requesting funds to implement a five-year Native Connections project. In the first year, the project team will conduct a complete community assessment, create a community asset map, and create and develop a Native Connections Plan. Years 2-5 will use the Native Connections Plan to implement universal, selective, and indicated prevention strategies for its American Indian/Alaskan Native AI/AN youth for suicide prevention, substance abuse, and promotion of mental health.

This project will serve AI/AN youth (young people up to and including age 24) who reside in CPN's 5 county health service area in central Oklahoma. In Pottawatomie County, home to the CPN, 18% of the current population is AI/AN. Furthermore, suicide was the 2nd leading cause of death among 12-24 year olds and in the last five years there was a 50% increase in mental health and substance abuse treatment among AI/AN youth. This proposal aims to serve 200 AI/AN youth in year 1 and an average of 1,200 in years 2-5 (5,000).

The project goal is to coordinate and connect CPN programs and local partners to reduce behavioral health disparities among AI/AN youth in its community by seeking community input and enhancing access to mental health, substance abuse, and suicide prevention services and treatment through use of evidence-based, trauma-informed, and culturally informed methods, curriculum, and treatment. This project will ultimately impact the CPN community by expanding services through closing existing service gaps and identifying additional services needed. In order to achieve the project goal, the Project Team has created five objectives: 1) form a Community Connections Advisory Board, 2) develop a Native Connections Plan, and 3-5) implement revised universal, selective, and indicated prevention strategies for suicide prevention, substance abuse, and mental health promotion among AI/AN youth.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063435-01 CITIZEN POTAWATOMI NATION SHAWNEE OK STUMBLINGBEAR-RIDDLE GLENNA $748,735

Population Served: Rural non-Reservation American Indian Youth age 12-24

The Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma, seeks to fashion a comprehensive and integrated suicide prevention, substance abuse prevention, trauma-informed, and mental health promotion system to detect, prevent, and provide early intervention services to rural non-reservation American Indian youth and emerging adults who reside within the area of central Oklahoma served by the tribe. This system shall both expand and enhance the current program and shall provide the foundation for establishing prevention prepared communities, data-driven management, meaningful partnerships, and delivering and sustaining effective, efficient, and culturally appropriate services for American Indian youth.

The Kickapoo Tribe's Seeking Hope project shall define the need for services, the gaps between needed and available services, barriers to care, and other problems related to the need to implement suicide and substance abuse prevention, trauma-informed care, and early intervention services for American Indian youth and emerging adults at risk of or currently experiencing issues that may lead to suicide. Further, the Kickapoo Tribe shall enlist area communities, tribal members, youth, area child-serving agencies, educational institutions, health facilities, and public schools in the planning, assessment, implementation, and evaluation phases of this project. The result will raise awareness, improve the continuity of care, and save lives.

Goal 1: Reduce the prevalence suicide among the youth and young adult population (12-24) in the area of rural Oklahoma served by the Kickapoo Tribe.
Goal 2: Increase the capacity, effectiveness, and efficiency of suicide prevention services for American Indian youth age 12-24 who reside within the area served by the Kickapoo Tribe.
Goal 3: Actively promote systems level change at the organizational level to embrace suicide prevention as a core strategy.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063436-01 KICKAPOO TRIBE OF OKLAHOMA MCLOUD OK JOBE PAULETTE $200,000

The Cherokee Nation seeks to fashion a wide-ranging and integrated suicide/substance abuse prevention system to detect prevent, and provide early intervention services to American Indian youth who reside within the rural 14-county area of northeastern Oklahoma served by the tribe. Further, the Cherokee Nation shall enlist area communities, area child-serving agencies, Cherokee Nation health facilities, and schools in the planning, assessment, implementation, and evaluation phases.

Cherokee Nation Behavioral Health Prevention Department's (CNBHPD) Native Connection project is a two-tiered response to the chronic problem of suicide in our communities. This project will focus on universal strategies with a high emphasis on traditional Cherokee traditions and customs.

Through eleven Community Action Groups, this project will increase the capacity of Cherokee Nation systems to respond to risk and protective factors associated with suicide risk. Tier one activities include Cherokee Cultural activities that engage tribal members across generations in order to strengthen familial and tribal bonds. Tier two activities integrate targeted strategies into the cultural activities such as screening for high-risk youth. A key component is to provide mental health training throughout the Tribal Jurisdictional Service Area.

Consistent with SAMHSA's Strategic Initiative #1, Cherokee Nation will focus on primary prevention. Although any given activity will be specific to local community context, all activities in general must build emotional health, reduce suicidal behavior through prevention approaches, prevent the abuse of prescription drugs by young people, prevent or delay the onset of alcohol use by minors, and/or mitigate the impact of suicide, substance use, trauma and mental illness. All strategies employed will be part of a comprehensive Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF)-based approach and based upon relevant scientific and evidence based practices.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063443-01 CHEROKEE NATION TAHLEQUAH OK BRADSHAW SAM $199,999

Oklahoma, a state with the second-highest American Indian (AI) population, has a suicide rate that is one of the highest in the nation. Despite this, there remain significant gaps in prevention, intervention and postvention treatment of AI youth ages 10-24.

The Central Oklahoma American Indian Health Council, Inc, dba Oklahoma City Indian Clinic (OKCIC) proposes this five-year Native Connections project. The first year of the project will entail convening community stakeholders throughout central Oklahoma to conduct a service delivery systems analysis; a community needs assessment; a community readiness assessment; and a community resource/asset map that addresses both suicide prevention and substance abuse and misuse prevention. This work will culminate in a plan the uses the SAMHSA Strategic Prevention Framework planning process to guide the selection, implementation and evaluation of effective, culturally appropriate and sustainable prevention activities that encompass Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3 of this project.

In subsequent years, OKCIC will use the plan developed in Year 1 to provide services to AI youth in central Oklahoma. Evaluation will be a key part of this project, which will be overseen by the OKCIC Director of Quality Improvement.

The OKCIC Behavioral Health Department will conduct this project. Staff are well trained on evidence-based practices as well as experienced in culturally appropriate treatment. Staff members in this department are very active in community efforts to create positive impacts. Staff will leverage these existing relationships to recruit a wide range of community members, including youth and their families, to the planning activities.

Throughout the project, OKCIC will continue to screen all patients ages 11+ for depression, domestic violence, suicide ideation and other risk factors. Patients who are considered at-risk will continue to receive immediate care and/or referrals.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063509-01 CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AMER INDIAN HLTH CNCL OKLAHOMA CITY OK WELCHER-DUKE SUMMER $175,623

The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma (CNO) is committed to preventing and reducing suicide behavior, substance abuse, and the impact of trauma by promoting improved mental health among the American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth residing in the boundaries of the CNO. We propose to accomplish this by launching Project Embrace, an initiative aimed at developing strategies to: 1) reduce the impact of mental and substance use disorders; 2) establish a fast and culturally based response to any suicide intent; and 3) increase the efficacy of the surveillance of suicide, suicide attempts, and mental health challenges in an effort to better support and serve AI/AN youth and young adults up through the age of 24. Four counties within the CNO's service area of 10 1/2 counties will be targeted for this project. These four counties fall within the top 10% of highest suicide rates in the state of Oklahoma. Our vision for healthier youth will be implemented using community driven and culturally based strategies: a) that focus on all young people through age 24, regardless of risk of suicide and substance use and misuse; b) that focus on subgroups of young people through age 24 for whom suicide or substance use and misuse may be much higher than average; and c) that are designed for young people through age 24 who are at high risk for suicide or substance use and misuse, who have already attempted suicide, and/or who are using or misusing substances
Project Embrace will be grounded in the concepts of Community Readiness and it is anticipated that we will complete a Community Readiness Assessment, an assessment of our service delivery system, train Emergency Department and clinic staff in QPR for nurses and other providers, utilize QPR, ASIST and other evidence based curricula as identified by the community in the Strategic Action Plan. It is expected that we will reach approximately 12,000 youth in the four county area over the course of the five year grant.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063430-01 CHOCTAW NATION OF OKLAHOMA DURANT OK BROOKS KRISTIE $200,000

Summary - The Yellowhawk Native Connections Project will support community-wide healing from historical trauma, increased social/emotional skills for young people up to and including age 24, parents, staff, and educators, the development of a Tribal Horse program to support wellness and recovery, the establishment of a community-wide suicide postvention plan, and increased screening to address substance abuse.

Demographics and clinical characteristics - In the past three years, there have been 12 known suicide attempts by Native youth and one youth completed suicide. A study completed in 2009 found that 1 in 7 CTUIR tribal youth had attempted suicide in a 12-month period.

Strategies/interventions Our proposed approach will include the use of the Gathering of Native Americans model, the development of a culturally based Tribal Horse program, the implementation of the Conscious Discipline (CD) model for social and emotional development, intensive suicide postvention training and community planning with the Connect Postvention program offered by NAMI New Hampshire, and the utilization of the Screening, Brief Intervention, Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) for young people between the ages of 12 - 24 who receive care at YTHC.

Goal 1 - To engage and mobilize the tribal community of the CTUIR in promoting healthy and empowered youth and families; Goal 2 -To build youth resilience by strengthening connections to tribal culture and traditions using animal-assisted and related cultural activities; Goal 3 - To strengthen the Tribe's ability to prevent underage substance use, childhood trauma, and suicide while working to support healing and recovery; Goal 4 -To increase the capacity of CTUIR tribal youth-serving agencies and tribal community peers in utilizing trauma-informed, evidence-based and tribal best practices; Goal 5 - To foster internal tribal capacity to do ongoing data collection and evaluation work

Number served - The 725 youth, ages 0 to 24living in Um

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM063493-01 YELLOWHAWK TRIBAL HEALTH CENTER PENDLETON OR GREEAR BECKY $200,000

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