SP-17-001 Individual Grant Awards

Project Abstract The Bienville Community Coalition seeks the award of the Department of Health and Human Services’ Drug-Free Communities Grant in order to aid the Coalition’s mission to combat underage drinking and prescription drug misuse, both of which are extremely high and problematic in a rural parish with very limited resources. Bienville Parish has just over 14,000 residents, most of who live in unincorporated areas of the parish, the highest number of unincorporated residences in the state of Louisiana in the second largest parish in Louisiana. If awarded the DFC Grant, the Coalition intends to address, combat, and prevent the problems of youth alcohol and prescription drug abuse by the following means. They will increase the number of members of the coalition and the Bienville Youth Leadership Initiative in order to implement environmental prevention. They will reduce social access of alcohol by youth by 10% by September 2018 as part of their 12-month action plan by increasing community awareness, providing training and support, media campaigns and other means. Additionally, they will decrease by at least 5% the access by teens of alcohol from retail locations within the parish, partly in conjunction with the Louisiana Alcohol and Tobacco Control agency. They intend to reduce past 30-day use among 6th graders through 12th graders by 5% through classroom-based prevention lesson plans. And they will also use the increased awareness of problems with prescription drug misuse and abuse to garner community support for the sustained use of prescription drug drop boxes in two secure locations in the parish. These goals are the basis of action for a team of experienced professionals in substance abuse, local governance, law enforcement, education, healthcare, media, local commerce, and the community’s faith leadership. They also will work in conjunction with newly chartered S.A.D.D. chapters in area high schools and other community sponsors to fulfill their mission to spread awareness, prevent, and reduce teen alcohol and prescription drug misuse and abuse.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee Citysort descending Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080097-01 COMMUNITY SUPPORT PROGRAMS, INC. SHREVEPORT LA WALTEMATE JILL $125,000

The Coalition serves the City of Sitka, Alaska, a community of 9,060. The goals of the coalition are to establish and strengthen community collaboration in support of local efforts to prevent youth substance use. The coalition will achieve its goals by implementing these strategies: the Strategic Prevention Framework and the Seven Strategies for Community Level Change. Specifically, the coalition will initially target youth non-cigarette forms of tobacco use including electronic vapor products, alcohol use with a focus on binge drinking, marijuana use and abuse and eventually prescription drug use and abuse through education, policy development and social norming campaigns. The first year of grant funding will be focused on developing capacity and data gathering and analysis to help understand local substance use and abuse trends, direct coalition efforts, provide a baseline for evaluation purposes and ensure efficient use of funds. Equity and cultural competence will be integrated throughout all prevention efforts.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee Citysort descending Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080033-01 SITKA COUNSELING AND PREVENTION SERVICES, INC. SITKA AK PLATSON LOYD $125,000

The Town of Stoneham is a suburban community of 22,000 confronted daily with big-city issues. Less than ten miles north of Boston's downtown area, Stoneham is inside the Route 128 belt that delineates the core of metropolitan Boston. Major highways and public transportation (bus and rail) travel straight through Stoneham, providing easy, direct access for both commuters and bored youth. In addition, Stoneham's exposure to big-city life is guaranteed by Boston television and radio stations, the Boston Herald, and the Boston Globe. Stoneham Substance Abuse Coalition, along with the legal applicant Town of Stoneham, is addressing local youth substance use issues incident to the Greater Boston area. Supported by quantitative and qualitative data, these include historically high rates of adult consumption of alcohol, historically low perception of disapproval for marijuana use, and the nation's highest heroin and opioid abuse data. Students report that boredom and a lack of entertainment opportunities in town are factors in their high-risk behavior. Because most parents commute to jobs outside of Stoneham, many teens are unsupervised both before and after school. The Coalition is very active in the community and has collected a trove of qualitative data (focus groups, town hall meetings, informal surveys) on youth substance use. A 2015 community forum identified the increased prevalence of community substance abuse – from the highly visible opiate overdose epidemic to acceptable use of marijuana by young adults to on-going adult alcohol abuse – as specific issues that contribute to our community's youth substance use issues. The Coalition's plan addresses key issues with actionable items designed to produce measurable change. The problems to be addressed related to alcohol include the implementation of policy change initiatives to reduce access to alcohol. This will be accomplished through promoting ID check initiatives, advocating for Social Host Ordinance, retailer education on risks and consequences of selling to underage users, and coordinating retailer compliance checks with local police. The Coalition will also increase public awareness of youth alcohol issues through Red Ribbon Week activities, Project Sticker Shock, and other awareness strategies. The problems to be addressed related to marijuana include promoting awareness and education on the health, social, and legal consequences and effect of marijuana through teacher, parent and professional trainings, seminars, and town hall meetings; implement social norms strategies to address misperceptions related to use; and examine and advocate for needed changes to school, law enforcement, and juvenile justice related policies. Finally, the Coalition will restrict the pathway to heroin and opioid addiction via prescription drugs. The problems to be addressed include developing environmental strategies to reduce access to prescription drugs by hosting prescription drug take back events, implementing Operation Medicine Cabinet in collaboration with pharmacies, and educating the community about medication security in homes and safe medication disposal. Much of our strategy will focus on addressing opiate prescription abuse among youth which our data shows to be a leading precursor to later heroin use. The Coalition strives to collaborate with all community organizations focused on youth substance abuse, fostering communication and collaboration among our community's diverse populations. We understand that a community-wide collaboration involves system-wide change and integration of services through a variety of mechanisms. Maintaining this collaboration requires ongoing planning to assess what has been effective, what needs to change, and what needs to be done to reach the community’s goals.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee Citysort descending Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080045-01 TOWN OF STONEHAM STONEHAM MA MACNEILL SHELLY $125,000

Stoughton Wellness Coalition will work to reduce youth substance use by implementing the following goals. DFC Goal One: Increase community collaboration Objective 1: Increase the capacity of the Stoughton Wellness Coalition by recruiting 3 additional members at large and 1 additional Youth representative by September 29, 2018, as measured by the membership list. DFC Goal Two: Reduce youth substance use Objective 1: Reduce 30-day alcohol use by 3% by September 29, 2018 in youth ages 12-18 as measured by YRBS data. Objective 2: Reduce 30-Day use of prescription drugs by 2% by September 29, 2018 in youth ages 12-18 as measured by YRBS data.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee Citysort descending Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080072-01 STOUGHTON HOSPITAL STOUGHTON WI PARKER ELIZABETH $125,000

The Vida del Norte Coalition (VIDA) means “Life of the North.” VIDA is a response by key individuals in our rural area of northern New Mexico, to the longstanding and severe substance abuse. Alcohol use permeates every aspect of life; prescription drug abuse reflects the extreme abuse and overdose rates of our state (2nd in the nation until recently); we have lost our sense of safety due to drug-related robbery, burglary and physical attack; and drug dealing and drug gangs are often run by our neighbors and family members. VIDA was galvanized in 2014 after a Questa toddler suffered permanent brain damage from ingestion of his parent’s illicit buprenorphine tablet. The horrific effects on this child awakened the community. VIDA, which had been an emerging coalition, then strengthened the structure of our drug free coalition. VIDA’s mission is “to reduce and prevent substance abuse among Northern Taos County youth.” The village of Questa is the largest of nine villages and communities situated in the Sangre de Cristo mountains and Rio Grande River valley, north of Taos, New Mexico extending to the Colorado border. Agriculture, services and tourism are the base of our economy. A mine that was the largest employer closed permanently 2½ years ago exacerbating the widespread poverty and unemployment here. In 2014, 31% of the population in Questa was determined to have poverty status, compared to 20.4% for the State and 15.4% nationwide. Four of five, 82.1%, residents are Hispanic, most of whom have hundreds of years of history and deep connections to the land and culture. The impact of substance abuse on our youth is extreme. Based on a needs assessment, survey data, and qualitative data, the coalition identified two priorities: underage drinking and improper prescription drug use. More than four in ten, 43.4%, Questa High School students reported 30-day drinking (2015 YRRS), compared to 33.0% in Taos County and 26.1% in the state of New Mexico. Questa high school students’ current use of “painkillers to get high” is slightly higher than the state at 9.0%. More than one in ten (12.3%) had used a prescription drug not prescribed to them. Middle school students misused prescription drugs at more than half the high school students’ rate. Among those committed to VIDA are the Questa mayor who is also a county commissioner, the superintendent of the Questa school district, Questa chief of police, the director of the primary care health center, a pastor, a recovery community leader, parents and youth. Our 12-Month Action Plan details specific strategies and actions we will implement in year one of DFC funding to achieve our two goals: increase community collaboration and decrease youth substance abuse, in particular, abuse of alcohol and prescription drugs. Because of the small population, interconnectedness of systems and families, dedication of VIDA members, and the ability to reach all areas of the community, we are confident that we can unite our community to implement environmental strategies that will achieve our goals. Our evaluation plan has three components: process evaluation, outcome/effectiveness evaluation, and impact evaluation. The plan was designed by an evaluator who has six years experience evaluating a DFC coalition. We have confidence in our ability to collect Core Measures Data, other quantitative and qualitative data, and to use these data to guide effective implementation of our Action Plan and make adjustments as needed.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee Citysort descending Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080007-01 NONVIOLENCE WORKS, INC. TAOS NM TORREZ SIMON $125,000

The Vigo County Local Coordinating Council's current role as an information facilitator will continue with the expectation of an increased mandate for community prevention programming and activities. Additional objectives will be identified that will improve the ability of individuals in need of services, with transportation or other access issues, to obtain the services they need. The objectives will identify and address problems and issues relating to cultural differences existing within the community, address conditions that allow for easy and opportunistic access to drugs and alcohol by youth, and also address consequences involved with the issue of availability. The LCC will increase community awareness activities that will encompass alcohol and prescription drug abuse/use by youth. Through the use of a action plan, the LCC will work with area organizations, Indiana State University, local police departments, media outlets, and the Vigo County School Corporation to develop a comprehensive problem oriented plan that addresses youth substance use. These actions include, but are not limited to, utilizing evidenced base programming, further development of youth councils, develop a media campaign, implementing the seven strategies for community level change, and creating an evaluation format to identify successes or needed changes within the plan. Finally, the Vigo County LCC Marketing Plan will be utilized for the purposes of educating our community, engaging members of the community to action, changing perceptions, promoting our unique goals, and setting the venues and avenues for feedback to track and measure the results of our 12-Month Action Plan yearly. The results will be used to solidify or modify current goals for greater effectiveness and more accurate reporting for stakeholders within the parameters set by the 12-Month Action Plan.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee Citysort descending Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080077-01 CHANCES AND SERVICES FOR YOUTH, INC. TERRE HAUTE IN HALLECK BRANDON $125,000

The Torrington Coalition to Reduce Youth Substance Use serves the Torrington Connecticut community of 36,000. The goals of the coalition are to establish and strengthen community collaboration in support of local efforts to prevent youth substance use. The coalition will achieve its goals by implementing these strategies: (1) Increase the resources and readiness of the Torrington Coalition to Reduce Youth Substance Use (2) Ensure that all 12 sectors of the Torrington Community engage in evidence based environmental strategies (3) Change attitudes and behaviors of both youth and adults by increasing penalties for breaking alcohol and drug laws (4) Conduct local evaluation in order to adjust coalition activities accordingly to maximize reductions in youth substance abuse

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee Citysort descending Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080035-01 MCCALL FOUNDATION, INC. TORRINGTON CT WRIGHT JESSICA $125,000

The Hogar CREA Drug-Free Community Coalition is applying for a federal FY 2017-18 Drug-Free Communities Support Program grant in the amount of $125,000 available through the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy and administered by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Population to be Served: The Hogar CREA Drug-Free Community Coalition serves two contiguous counties, Trujillo Alto and Carolina, in the greater San Juan metropolitan of Puerto Rico. The combined population of these two counties is 206,269 with 16.2% (33,416) age 6-17 years. The Coalition serves the area's 14,831 10-17 year olds (7% of the population). 99% of the population is Hispanic and Spanish is the official and prevalent language. The zip codes targeted are: 00976, 00987, 00985, and 00984. Children and families are deeply impacted by the decade long economic crises in Puerto Rico. An average of 28.2% of the population live in poverty and the unemployment rate is 12%. The island's infrastructure has been depleted and weakened over the past decade and there has been a significant loss of population (-10% in San Juan). Amongst those leaving are professionals who have fled poor economic conditions to seek opportunities especially on the US mainland. The out-migration has broken up families and further undercut capacity to raise drug-free healthy children. Additionally, the island serves as a port for the drug-trade and many area youth are now being swept up into gangs and drug-trafficking. Alcohol is the number one substance of use by PR youth. 46.7% of CREA 12th graders report 30-day past use 23.7% of CREA 12 graders report past 30-day use. This urban area is high-risk for youth substance use and abuse. Strategies and Activities: Coalition goals are to 1. increase community collaboration, and, 2. to reduce youth substance use. The coalition is focusing on alcohol and marijuana as the gateway drugs to deeper drug-use and negative behaviors. The coalition will achieve this by implementing these strategies: reducing retail and social access to alcohol and marijuana, changing social norms and beliefs accepting of substance use, conducting media counter-messaging, and influencing laws and policies. Special activities include: environmental compliance and education scans with local alcohol retail vendors; promoting a community norm of zero tolerance for sale of alcohol to minors; activities aimed at youth and parents to raise prevention awareness of the risk of harm of alcohol and marijuana; family prevention awareness activities; youth pro-social engagement activities; counter-messaging activities to promote prevention; promoting the SBIRT evidence based practice to screen adolescents for drug use; and, promoting ""safe havens"" for youth as positive alternatives for youth during high-risk times when they are out of school. The program will build on the strengths of Puerto Rican culture with its emphasis on family and faith. Coordination with State/Local Health Agencies: The Coalition will coordinate with all appropriate state and local health agencies as well as a network of health and behavioral health providers to implement various activities and promote change strategies including advocating use of SBIRT screening protocols; and addressing health/mental health issues associated with substance use findings. The Coalition is sponsored by a premier Puerto Rican drug treatment provider, Hogar CREA, Inc., that has provided the Coalition with tremendous good will and access in working with the provider and government entities that are key to success including representatives of state agencies located in the San Juan metro area. Several health community leaders are on the Coalition board including the President of Health Medical,Corp. and a representative from the Municipal Government Trujillo Alto Office of Drug Prevention.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee Citysort descending Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080082-01 HOGAR CREA, INC. TRUJILLO ALTO PR PAGAN CARLOS $125,000

Application for Evergreen Public Schools to serve as the applicant and fiscal agent on behalf of Connect Evergreen Coalition. Connect Evergreen Coalition partnered with PREVENT! Coalition of Clark County through the Drug Free Communities Mentoring Program. This collaboration allowed in-depth training for coalition members on the Strategic Prevention Framework, Environmental Strategies, Building Coalition Capacity, recruitment of the the 12 Sector Representatives and the development of a strategic action plan. Coalition members were able to attend and graduate from the CADCA National Leadership Academy. Coalition members attended the CADCA National Leadership Forum. By receiving the DFC Grant, Connect Evergreen will continue to build capacity for prevention work and reduce substance abuse in the the Evergreen School District and the community that it supports.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee Citysort descending Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080106-01 EVERGREEN SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 114 VANCOUVER WA SPOLAR GAIL $125,000

The Community Action Commission of Fayette County (CACFC) submits this application for the Drug Free Communities Support Program on the behalf of the Faith in Recovery's Prevention Coalition (PC). The PC proposes to serve rural, Fayette County, Ohio. Fayette County is a small community comprised of around 28,679 individuals. The Faith in Recovery Coalition was formed in Spring 2014 and identified the need to expand their focus in June 2016 to include prevention efforts targeted at local youth. A Planner was hired through an opportunity through the Department of Job and Family Services Healthier Buckeye Program in August 2016 to complete a community needs assessment using the Strategic Prevention Framework. The needs assessment uncovered that many community members, while concerned about the growing heroin epidemic, did not understand the progression of addiction and how early onset of use contributed to this public health crisis. In a survey of 6,8, and 10th graders in the local school districts, serving over 4,600 youth, found the combined use of all grades of substances as follows: alcohol 12%, tobacco 5%, marijuana 5%, and prescription drugs 3%. The greatest percentage of alcohol use was found within the county school district, Miami Trace, at 26%. The greatest amount of marijuana use was found at the city schools, topping out at 13%. In terms of perceived risk/harm of use, marijuana had the greatest number of individuals, 15%, sharing they thought that marijuana was of no risk. Marijuana was also perceived to be the perceived to be of no risk/harm by parents and peers, at the rates of 4% and 12%, respectively. Given these numbers and feedback from focus groups with youth, law enforcement, the school districts, and the community, the coalition determined the need to target alcohol use and perceived risk/harm of marijuana use. To combat these issues the coalition identified the following goals for the project: 1-Increasing Community Collaboration: Attract new members to participate in the coalition, participate on subcommittees, or volunteer to work towards our community’s goal of keeping our youth drug free. The coalition will attract 20 new members or volunteers by 9/29/18. 2-Reducing Youth Substance Use: Reduce youth (6th, 8th, and 10th graders) alcohol use by 5%, as evidenced by the Core Measures Survey, by 9/29/2018. 3-Increase youth (6th, 8th, and 10th graders) perception of the risk of harm of marijuana use by 5%, as evidenced by the Core Measure’s Survey by 9/29/18. To accomplish these goals, the coalition will have three part time staff and members of the youth and adult coalitions implement the following activities: Publicize the coalition's work and recruit new members and volunteers through Facebook, its web-page, and the local radio, television, and newspaper; Enhancing the skills of the coalition through partner provided training, training through the Drug Free Action Alliance, and Youth-to-Youth International; Recognizing youth, coalition members, volunteers, and business supporting the coalition's efforts on social and traditional media outlets; Conducting public awareness prevention campaigns, attending community events and meetings to spread the prevention message; Providing Too Good for Drugs and Life Skills for grades 1-8 in both of the local school districts; Implementing PAX Good Behavior Games incrementally at the local Head Start program and in the elementary schools. One Coordinator will serve as the teacher mentor for the county; Having a prom and graduation pledge campaign and the ""Blunt Truth"" campaign; Supporting youth-led peer to peer prevention projects, training them, and having one Coordinator per school district serving as staff support to those efforts; Conducting a Reward and Reminder Campaign, advocate for businesses to hide paraphernalia, researching teen party and social host ordinances for feasibility, and many other strategies.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee Citysort descending Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080019-01 COMMUNITY ACTION COMMISSION OF FAYETTE COUNTY WASHINGTON COURT HOUSE OH BAUGHN LUCINDA $125,000

The City of Wilmington, (19801-19810) the largest city in Delaware with a community with long-standing problems of poverty and violence that reached the national stage with the race riots and civil unrest in the city following the 1968 assassination of Dr. King. Many government attempts to overturn conditions have failed and left the population with distrust and a further sense of being disenfranchised. Now labeled “Murder Town USA” and 10th most dangerous city in America. Of the total city population, 19,686 are children and youth (Delaware Population Consortium for 2016), 86 % are receiving some form of public assistance from the State, with many living in families in which the caregiver is unemployed or underemployed and not able to earn a living wage to support their families. Of the population receiving services from DSCYF, 62.6 % are engaged with the Division of Family Services in which there has been a substantiated report of abuse or neglect; 16.2 % are involved with the Division of Youth Rehabilitative Services, the juvenile justice division; 12.3% are receiving services from the Division of Prevention and Behavioral Health, and 8.4% are receiving services from two or more of the divisions. Overall, parents/caretakers of the TLPPC community continue to want a better life for their children but often feel powerless to improve conditions. Wilmington’s high inner-city poverty and unemployment rates persist in making life tenuous and volatile. Conditions support the growth of illegal activities like drug-trafficking as Wilmington is the hub to places like Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Baltimore and New York. Illicit drug sales help support many families. Family conditions lack stability. A loosening of social norms regarding marijuana will continue to be a challenge as Delaware faces legalization legislation. The Lighthouse Project Prevention Coalition (TLPPC) is in its 3rd year of operation. The coalition originated as a collaborative of native community churches, providers, youth and stakeholders from the New Castle County/City of Wilmington community who joined together early-2013 with a sense of importance to address their communities’ high risks for negative child outcomes. Mentored by a statewide coalition, members recognized the importance of addressing the communities’ youth substance abuse issues and conducted a readiness assessment. May 18, 2013 members voted in favor of establishing a drug-free community coalition, namely TLPPC. Members began a strategic planning process and developed coalition direction and capacity. The Coalition has made a positive impact on youth engagement and providing alternative activities and information on the prevalence of youth substance use in their community. However, there is still so much work to be done. The contributing factors (i.e. drugs, alcohol, poverty, gun violence and teen pregnancy) are still there. Drugs become a way of community life and surviving. It is not just lowering the rate of underage drinking, it’s everything that surrounds the community that feeds negative outcomes. The target community is a place where 33.7% of children age 0-17 are raised in poverty (2008-2012 American Community Survey 5-year estimates), where the unemployment rate in the City of Wilmington is 6.3% as of 2016 and increasing; where child homicides are 23.42% of the city’s total; where child safety is of great concern due to unstable homes and neighborhoods and youth-on-youth violence, and substance abuse use; where in 2011 62 per 1000 teen girls had the highest pregnancy rate within the state. In the City of Wilmington 33.7% of children under18 live in poverty and close to 15% of households have an income level under $4,011.00 based on 2015 City-Data. Research shows that inner-city poverty is an insidious condition undermining positive development of strong families and communities that can raise healthy children with positive outcomes.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee Citysort descending Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080087-01 DUFFY'S HOPE, INC. WILMINGTON DE MATTHEWS TANYA $125,000

The Coalition For Health Promotion project will implement environmental prevention strategies in order to (1) reduce youth substance use, and (2) establish and strengthen collaboration among communities, community agencies, systems of care, educational institutions, and existing community coalitions as a means of reducing substance use among youth. The focus community is Youngstown, Ohio, which is located in the northeastern part of the State in Mahoning County. Youngstown is the largest urban area in Mahoning County. Specific census tracts targeted are 8019, 8020, 8021, 8022, and 8023, which are located on the South Side of town, encompassing portions of zip codes 44502, 44507, and 44511. Boundaries for this area are Market Street at Woodland Avenue to Indianola Avenue to Glenwood Avenue and back down to Woodland. Multiple risk factors exist within this community which increase the probability of youth substance uses and the manifestation of the six problem adolescent behaviors, such as extreme economic deprivation, low community attachment and community disorganization, family conflict, academic failure, availability of alcohol, and transitions and mobility, along with limited protective factors. The Strategic Prevention Framework and the Seven Strategies for Community Level Change are the methodological processes that will be utilized and are embedded in all program strategies and evaluation processes. The project will specifically focus on utilizing strategies contained in the 12 Month Action Plan to reduce alcohol and marijuana use among youth. Specific interventions utilized seek to change community norms, reduce access to substances, utilize and target the media, and engage in changing public policy. Enhancing the capability of the existing substance use prevention system to provide innovative service, and facilitating coordination of services among those who work closely with youth (prevention agencies, schools, community based agencies, faith based community, etc.) will be key a key component of programming. Strengthening families will also be targeted through strategies contained in the 12 Month Action Plan. Additionally, the project will implement environmental prevention strategies which will facilitate multi agency and systems collaboration, with the intent of enhancing the local substance use prevention system, the efforts of other local coalitions, community based organizations, educational institutions, and social service agencies, so that collectively we can utilize our professional expertise and resources to reduce youth substance use, improve system collaboration, and facilitate sustainability. The impact of this should be a healthier, safer community where youth thrive and do not succumb to substance abuse and other behavioral health disorders.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee Citysort descending Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080140-01 YOUNGSTOWN URBAN MINORITY ALCOHOLISM AND DRUG ABUSE OUTREACH PROGRAM, INC. YOUNGSTOWN OH ALEXANDER DARRYL $125,000

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