SP-17-001 Individual Grant Awards

The Town of Stoneham is a suburban community of 22,000 confronted daily with big-city issues. Less than ten miles north of Boston's downtown area, Stoneham is inside the Route 128 belt that delineates the core of metropolitan Boston. Major highways and public transportation (bus and rail) travel straight through Stoneham, providing easy, direct access for both commuters and bored youth. In addition, Stoneham's exposure to big-city life is guaranteed by Boston television and radio stations, the Boston Herald, and the Boston Globe. Stoneham Substance Abuse Coalition, along with the legal applicant Town of Stoneham, is addressing local youth substance use issues incident to the Greater Boston area. Supported by quantitative and qualitative data, these include historically high rates of adult consumption of alcohol, historically low perception of disapproval for marijuana use, and the nation's highest heroin and opioid abuse data. Students report that boredom and a lack of entertainment opportunities in town are factors in their high-risk behavior. Because most parents commute to jobs outside of Stoneham, many teens are unsupervised both before and after school. The Coalition is very active in the community and has collected a trove of qualitative data (focus groups, town hall meetings, informal surveys) on youth substance use. A 2015 community forum identified the increased prevalence of community substance abuse – from the highly visible opiate overdose epidemic to acceptable use of marijuana by young adults to on-going adult alcohol abuse – as specific issues that contribute to our community's youth substance use issues. The Coalition's plan addresses key issues with actionable items designed to produce measurable change. The problems to be addressed related to alcohol include the implementation of policy change initiatives to reduce access to alcohol. This will be accomplished through promoting ID check initiatives, advocating for Social Host Ordinance, retailer education on risks and consequences of selling to underage users, and coordinating retailer compliance checks with local police. The Coalition will also increase public awareness of youth alcohol issues through Red Ribbon Week activities, Project Sticker Shock, and other awareness strategies. The problems to be addressed related to marijuana include promoting awareness and education on the health, social, and legal consequences and effect of marijuana through teacher, parent and professional trainings, seminars, and town hall meetings; implement social norms strategies to address misperceptions related to use; and examine and advocate for needed changes to school, law enforcement, and juvenile justice related policies. Finally, the Coalition will restrict the pathway to heroin and opioid addiction via prescription drugs. The problems to be addressed include developing environmental strategies to reduce access to prescription drugs by hosting prescription drug take back events, implementing Operation Medicine Cabinet in collaboration with pharmacies, and educating the community about medication security in homes and safe medication disposal. Much of our strategy will focus on addressing opiate prescription abuse among youth which our data shows to be a leading precursor to later heroin use. The Coalition strives to collaborate with all community organizations focused on youth substance abuse, fostering communication and collaboration among our community's diverse populations. We understand that a community-wide collaboration involves system-wide change and integration of services through a variety of mechanisms. Maintaining this collaboration requires ongoing planning to assess what has been effective, what needs to change, and what needs to be done to reach the community’s goals.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Namesort descending Award Amount
SP080045-01 TOWN OF STONEHAM STONEHAM MA MACNEILL SHELLY $125,000

The CLOSE Community Prevention Project will support coalition efforts in the town of Longmeadow, MA to prevent youth substance abuse. This project includes prevention strategies for each of the following: alcohol, marijuana, tobacco and opiates. CLOSE Community (the Coalition for a Drug Free Community) intends to focus on providing key information on risks of use and local resources and skill enhancement across all sectors of the community: parents, youth, businesses, educators, law enforcement, faith communities, first responders. Additionally, the project would enable law enforcement and the local board of health to increase compliance checks and to better address underage use.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Namesort descending Award Amount
SP080098-01 LONGMEADOW PUBLIC SCHOOLS LONGMEADOW MA WARREN SHELLY $125,000

Impact Norwood is a community coalition, in Norwood, Massachusetts, working to prevent and reduce youth substance use with data driven prevention strategies. Norwood is a suburb southeast of Boston with 28,602 residents. The coalition is comprised of community members, policy makers, community leaders, youth, parents, civic groups, and school, health and police officials, all representing Norwood’s diverse population. Collaboratively, the members aim to decrease the risk factors indicated in substance use and increase the protective factors to empower Norwood’s youth to make healthy and safe choices. Through environmental and sustainable strategies, Impact Norwood will focus on youth alcohol and marijuana uses as priorities. Examples of strategies include educating through information dissemination, and formal evidence-based education with a focus on community/parent education and youth. Additional strategies include limiting access to substances through policy change and increased enforcement efforts, as well as changing the culture and contexts within which decisions are made about substance use by influencing social norms for healthy behaviors and changing the consequences associated with use.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Namesort descending Award Amount
SP080027-01 TOWN OF NORWOOD NORWOOD MA REISS SIGALLE $125,000

The Vida del Norte Coalition (VIDA) means “Life of the North.” VIDA is a response by key individuals in our rural area of northern New Mexico, to the longstanding and severe substance abuse. Alcohol use permeates every aspect of life; prescription drug abuse reflects the extreme abuse and overdose rates of our state (2nd in the nation until recently); we have lost our sense of safety due to drug-related robbery, burglary and physical attack; and drug dealing and drug gangs are often run by our neighbors and family members. VIDA was galvanized in 2014 after a Questa toddler suffered permanent brain damage from ingestion of his parent’s illicit buprenorphine tablet. The horrific effects on this child awakened the community. VIDA, which had been an emerging coalition, then strengthened the structure of our drug free coalition. VIDA’s mission is “to reduce and prevent substance abuse among Northern Taos County youth.” The village of Questa is the largest of nine villages and communities situated in the Sangre de Cristo mountains and Rio Grande River valley, north of Taos, New Mexico extending to the Colorado border. Agriculture, services and tourism are the base of our economy. A mine that was the largest employer closed permanently 2½ years ago exacerbating the widespread poverty and unemployment here. In 2014, 31% of the population in Questa was determined to have poverty status, compared to 20.4% for the State and 15.4% nationwide. Four of five, 82.1%, residents are Hispanic, most of whom have hundreds of years of history and deep connections to the land and culture. The impact of substance abuse on our youth is extreme. Based on a needs assessment, survey data, and qualitative data, the coalition identified two priorities: underage drinking and improper prescription drug use. More than four in ten, 43.4%, Questa High School students reported 30-day drinking (2015 YRRS), compared to 33.0% in Taos County and 26.1% in the state of New Mexico. Questa high school students’ current use of “painkillers to get high” is slightly higher than the state at 9.0%. More than one in ten (12.3%) had used a prescription drug not prescribed to them. Middle school students misused prescription drugs at more than half the high school students’ rate. Among those committed to VIDA are the Questa mayor who is also a county commissioner, the superintendent of the Questa school district, Questa chief of police, the director of the primary care health center, a pastor, a recovery community leader, parents and youth. Our 12-Month Action Plan details specific strategies and actions we will implement in year one of DFC funding to achieve our two goals: increase community collaboration and decrease youth substance abuse, in particular, abuse of alcohol and prescription drugs. Because of the small population, interconnectedness of systems and families, dedication of VIDA members, and the ability to reach all areas of the community, we are confident that we can unite our community to implement environmental strategies that will achieve our goals. Our evaluation plan has three components: process evaluation, outcome/effectiveness evaluation, and impact evaluation. The plan was designed by an evaluator who has six years experience evaluating a DFC coalition. We have confidence in our ability to collect Core Measures Data, other quantitative and qualitative data, and to use these data to guide effective implementation of our Action Plan and make adjustments as needed.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Namesort descending Award Amount
SP080007-01 NONVIOLENCE WORKS, INC. TAOS NM TORREZ SIMON $125,000

The Wellness & Prevention Coalition(W&PC) is requesting $125,000 in Drug Free Communities funding for 2017-2018. The mission of the W&PC is to ""Empower the community of San Clemente to help youth lead healthy and productive lives - free from alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs. The W&PC has involved all sectors of our community in a collaborative effort to achieve our mission. The key objective of the W&PC is to collaborate to bring quality substance use prevention strategies to the community of San Clemente that builds skills of parents and strengthens the developmental assets in youth. The W&PC spent the last 12 months completing a community wide assessment of youth substance use issues that resulted in the targeting of youth alcohol and marijuana use as the focus of our efforts in fiscal year 2017-2018. The Wellness & Prevention Coalition (W&PC) used SAMSHA’S Strategic Planning Framework (Assess Needs, Build Capacity, Plan, Implement, Evaluate) and Seven Strategies for Community Level Change (Provide Information, Enhance Skills, Provide Support, Enhance Access/Reduce Barriers, Change Consequences, Change Physical Design, Modify/Change Policies) to develop our 12-month action plan. The 12-month action plan are the activities that the W&PC hope to implement with funding from this grant supplemented by the non-federal match.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Namesort descending Award Amount
SP080078-01 WELLNESS AND PREVENTION FOUNDATION SAN CLEMENTE CA PARMELEE SUSAN $125,000

The City of Wilmington, (19801-19810) the largest city in Delaware with a community with long-standing problems of poverty and violence that reached the national stage with the race riots and civil unrest in the city following the 1968 assassination of Dr. King. Many government attempts to overturn conditions have failed and left the population with distrust and a further sense of being disenfranchised. Now labeled “Murder Town USA” and 10th most dangerous city in America. Of the total city population, 19,686 are children and youth (Delaware Population Consortium for 2016), 86 % are receiving some form of public assistance from the State, with many living in families in which the caregiver is unemployed or underemployed and not able to earn a living wage to support their families. Of the population receiving services from DSCYF, 62.6 % are engaged with the Division of Family Services in which there has been a substantiated report of abuse or neglect; 16.2 % are involved with the Division of Youth Rehabilitative Services, the juvenile justice division; 12.3% are receiving services from the Division of Prevention and Behavioral Health, and 8.4% are receiving services from two or more of the divisions. Overall, parents/caretakers of the TLPPC community continue to want a better life for their children but often feel powerless to improve conditions. Wilmington’s high inner-city poverty and unemployment rates persist in making life tenuous and volatile. Conditions support the growth of illegal activities like drug-trafficking as Wilmington is the hub to places like Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Baltimore and New York. Illicit drug sales help support many families. Family conditions lack stability. A loosening of social norms regarding marijuana will continue to be a challenge as Delaware faces legalization legislation. The Lighthouse Project Prevention Coalition (TLPPC) is in its 3rd year of operation. The coalition originated as a collaborative of native community churches, providers, youth and stakeholders from the New Castle County/City of Wilmington community who joined together early-2013 with a sense of importance to address their communities’ high risks for negative child outcomes. Mentored by a statewide coalition, members recognized the importance of addressing the communities’ youth substance abuse issues and conducted a readiness assessment. May 18, 2013 members voted in favor of establishing a drug-free community coalition, namely TLPPC. Members began a strategic planning process and developed coalition direction and capacity. The Coalition has made a positive impact on youth engagement and providing alternative activities and information on the prevalence of youth substance use in their community. However, there is still so much work to be done. The contributing factors (i.e. drugs, alcohol, poverty, gun violence and teen pregnancy) are still there. Drugs become a way of community life and surviving. It is not just lowering the rate of underage drinking, it’s everything that surrounds the community that feeds negative outcomes. The target community is a place where 33.7% of children age 0-17 are raised in poverty (2008-2012 American Community Survey 5-year estimates), where the unemployment rate in the City of Wilmington is 6.3% as of 2016 and increasing; where child homicides are 23.42% of the city’s total; where child safety is of great concern due to unstable homes and neighborhoods and youth-on-youth violence, and substance abuse use; where in 2011 62 per 1000 teen girls had the highest pregnancy rate within the state. In the City of Wilmington 33.7% of children under18 live in poverty and close to 15% of households have an income level under $4,011.00 based on 2015 City-Data. Research shows that inner-city poverty is an insidious condition undermining positive development of strong families and communities that can raise healthy children with positive outcomes.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Namesort descending Award Amount
SP080087-01 DUFFY'S HOPE, INC. WILMINGTON DE MATTHEWS TANYA $125,000

Project Abstract Summary The youth substance abuse problems Community in Crisis intends to address are prescription opioids and heroin. The explosion of heroin overdoses represents an urgent and deadly problem. We know the gateway to heroin addiction is often prescription pain medications. This epidemic has not been addressed in a comprehensive way, and there is mandate in the community to bring together resources to address the issue. One path to heroin use begins with experimentation with prescription painkillers. It begins in later high school (12th grade: 4% ever used), but attitudes of acceptance begin forming earlier, underscoring the importance of beginning opioid education at a much earlier age. Data shows 6th graders have a lower perception of risk than 12th graders. We will implement awareness and education programs in both middle schools and high schools to reach students, parents, school staff and coaches. We will recommend that schools begin teaching about opioid risks and general respect for medications in elementary school. We will also look to youth sports organizations and scouts to help deliver this message. We will educate parents about signs and symptoms and addiction as a disease to reduce the stigma and encourage early intervention. Heroin use is occurring as early as 8th grade. This suggests the beginnings of a shift where heroin experimentation is no longer outside the boundaries of acceptability. The low cost relative to prescription opioids and the easy access also explain this possible shift. The high risk of death underscores the need to prevent even one child from using. With the recent warnings from the DMI Report about the arrival in NJ of fentanyl and the deadly carfentanyl, 1000 times stronger than heroin, the risks are greatly heightened. Our prevention efforts will include powerful ways to deliver the message of the deadly risk of heroin experimentation beginning in middle school. We will address the ease of access to opioids by promoting and facilitating proper safeguarding and disposal procedures via public outreach and through community organizations, in collaboration with law enforcement. We will work to educate prescribers about the risks and new CDC guidelines and encouraging parents to be active participants in the decision. For those struggling with opioid substance use disorder, we will make sure there is easy access to information on resources, treatment options and Narcan via our website and printed materials. It is extremely difficult to reach post-high school youth with prevention efforts. It is therefore critical to get the message to teens while they are a captive, in-school audience and still under the direct supervision of parents. Our Action Plan will focus on both high school and middle school, with introduction to the opioid issue to younger children. Parents, coaches and prescribers will also be targeted with the prevention message.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Namesort descending Award Amount
SP080029-01 COMMUNITY IN CRISIS, INC. Bernardsville NJ KNOLL TONI $125,000

The Cincinnati for HOPE (Healthy Outcomes through Prevention Efforts) Coalition, the applicant coalition

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Namesort descending Award Amount
SP080159-01 EXCLUSIVE SERVICES, LLC CINCINNATI OH RAWLS TRACY $125,000

Gratiot County Substance Abuse Coalition is submitting for the Drug Free Communities Grant to increase youth prevention efforts for Tobacco, Prescription Drugs and Alcohol. Funding for the DFC grant proposes to target prevention efforts concerning youth alcohol, tobacco and prescription drug use. The coalition feels strongly that each substance presents a problem to the community and needs to be addressed. With extra support, the Coalition feels that it will be able to build off of the foundation it has built. Though this project we will: Expand the coalition’s leadership skills and education by providing opportunities for coalition members to attend training, provide assistance in data dissemination to community members and the organization, Assess and plan with law enforcement and local owners on the best way to increase the best practices for the sales, promotion and store placement, and increase the support and awareness in schools and within the community surrounding the severity of substance abuse among youth with a particular focus on alcohol, tobacco and prescription drugs.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Namesort descending Award Amount
SP080110-01 GRATIOT COUNTY CHILD ADVOCACY ASSOCIATION ALMA MI WARCZINSKY TY $125,000

The Ray County Coalition serves Ray County in MO, a community of approximately 23,000. The goals of the coalition through this grant to reduce youth use of alcohol and other drugs and strengthen community collaboration in support of local efforts to prevent youth substance use. The coalition will achieve its goals of reducing youth use of alcohol, tobacco and marijuana by implementing these strategies: Coalition development, youth/adult education, social marketing, compliance checks and policy development. WestCare Kentucky, Inc. will serve as the administrative and fiscal agent for this grant until the coalition can establish a local 501 C-3 to provide this administrative function.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Namesort descending Award Amount
SP080119-01 WESTCARE KENTUCKY, INC. IRVINE KY WARD VICKY $125,000

The Prevention Education for East Ramapo (PEER) Coalition will engage Rockland County students and families within the boundaries of the East Ramapo Central School District. This is a vibrant community that is economically, racially and culturally diverse. East Ramapo’s public school population breaks down into the following demographic categories: 47% Black/African American (of which approximately 30% are of Haitian descent); 41% Latino/Hispanic; 6% White; 6% Asian. ESL students make up 23%, and special education students account for 25% of the population. The East Ramapo Central School District serves a community of approximately 126,000 residents. Almost 18% of the community’s population lives below the poverty level. This poverty is reflected in the schools, where 10% of local children had neither parent in the work force, and 13% live in extreme poverty, with family incomes less than 50% of the federal poverty level. At some schools, almost three quarters of the students are eligible to receive free or reduced lunch. The overall community has experienced substantial growth in the newly-immigrated, foreign-born population, and of non-English speakers. The PEER Coalition is well aware of the need for prevention strategies in the community, as evidenced by the PRIDE Survey and other youth substance abuse data collected by the Coalition. The data throughout this proposal will demonstrate that the PEER Coalition serves a community with great needs. PEER is concluding a two-year DFC mentoring process. We are confident that we now have the proper training and technical assistance for the PEER Coalition to become a powerful change agent in our community, improving the health and wellbeing of youth in East Ramapo. We have become trusted in the community and respected for our inclusive approach in a community where many feel shut out. The coalition has identified alcohol, marijuana and prescription drug use as the priority substances to be addressed in this project. PEER has planned activities in the 12-month Action Plan to address each of the targeted substances utilizing the seven strategies for community change. Given the youth-perceived easy access to alcohol, PEER plans to education retailers about the dangers of youth alcohol use. PEER will develop packets of information for retailers that encourages employees to verify IDs when customers make alcohol purchases, and will work with local law enforcement to conduct compliance checks on local retailers to ensure they are properly enforcing these policies. Additionally, PEER has planned community awareness campaigns including “Parents Who Host Lost the Most” and “Sticker Shock.” To combat youth marijuana use, PEER plans to increase community awareness with Red Ribbon Week activities. Since heroin use frequently follows prescription drug abuse, PEER plans to institute a regular Prescription Drug Take Back event, in order to keep dangerous substances out of the hands of our children. We also plan to continue and intensify our extensive coordination and collaboration with law enforcement efforts to combat the ongoing local heroin epidemic. To increase the youth perception of risk or harm of alcohol, marijuana, and prescription drugs, PEER plans educational events in the local schools to increase student awareness of these issues.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Namesort descending Award Amount
SP080070-01 BIG BROTHERS-BIG SISTERS OF ROCKLAND COUNTY NEW CITY NY WAYSER VICTORIA $125,000

Youth & Family Services, Inc. (YFS), the fiscal agent for the Oyate Okolakiciye Coalition, is requesting $125,000 per year for five years to implement a Drug Free Communities project to reach approximately 5,000 youth, ages 12-18, in Rapid City, SD with a focus on American Indian youth. The coalition has developed a 12-month action plan to meet the two DFC goals: increase community collaboration and reduce youth substance use. The objectives and strategies to address the two DFC Goals include: DFC Goal One: Increase community collaboration: Objective 1: By 9/29/18, increase by 10% the coalition’s capacity for community collaboration as measured by an annual coalition survey, coalition and board meeting minutes, meeting attendance records, membership list, and focus groups and/or interviews. Objective 2: By 2/29/18, increase collaboration among community organizations by 10% as measured by an annual community collaboration survey, post-event satisfaction surveys, meeting attendance records, meeting minutes, and focus groups or interviews. DFC Goal Two: Reduce youth substance abuse: Objective 1: By 9/29/18, increase by 4% the perception of risk or harm of use and perception of peer disapproval of use of alcohol by youth, ages 12-18 (with a focus on American Indian youth), as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey and pre and post evidence-based curriculum surveys. Objective 2: By 9/29/18, reduce by 2% past 30-day use of alcohol by youth, ages 12-14, and by 5% for ages 15-18 (with a focus on American Indian youth), as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey and pre and post evidence-based curriculum surveys. Objective 3: By 9/29/18, increase by 5% the perception of risk or harm of use and perception of peer disapproval of use of marijuana by youth, ages 12-18 (with a focus on American Indian youth), as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey. Objective 4: By 9/29/18, reduce by 2% past 30-day use of marijuana by youth, ages 12-14, and by 5% for ages 15-18, as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey. Objective 5: By 9/29/18, increase by 4% the perception of risk or harm of use and perception of peer disapproval of use of meth by youth, ages 12-18 (with a focus on American Indian youth), as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey and pre and post evidence-based curriculum surveys. Objective 6: By 9/29/18, reduce by 1% past 30-day use of meth by youth, ages 12-14, and by 2% for ages 15-18, as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey and pre and post evidence-based curriculum surveys. Strategies include: Increase coalition visibility and credibility as a leader in the field of substance use prevention; Coordinate with other community organizations providing substance abuse services and/or serving the same target population; Provide education and awareness about the consequences of alcohol, marijuana, and meth use and abuse for youth, ages 12-18 (with a focus on American Indian youth); Provide education and awareness about the consequences of youth alcohol, marijuana, and meth use and abuse for parents; Provide Healthy Alternatives to alcohol, marijuana, and meth use for youth, ages 12-18, and their parents (with a focus on American Indian youth); Reduce access to alcohol, marijuana, and meth by youth, ages 12-18, in and out of the home (with a focus on American Indian youth).

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Namesort descending Award Amount
SP080124-01 YOUTH AND FAMILY SERVICES, INC. RAPID CITY SD ACKERMAN VONNIE $125,000

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