SP-17-001 Individual Grant Awards

Impact Norwood is a community coalition, in Norwood, Massachusetts, working to prevent and reduce youth substance use with data driven prevention strategies. Norwood is a suburb southeast of Boston with 28,602 residents. The coalition is comprised of community members, policy makers, community leaders, youth, parents, civic groups, and school, health and police officials, all representing Norwood’s diverse population. Collaboratively, the members aim to decrease the risk factors indicated in substance use and increase the protective factors to empower Norwood’s youth to make healthy and safe choices. Through environmental and sustainable strategies, Impact Norwood will focus on youth alcohol and marijuana uses as priorities. Examples of strategies include educating through information dissemination, and formal evidence-based education with a focus on community/parent education and youth. Additional strategies include limiting access to substances through policy change and increased enforcement efforts, as well as changing the culture and contexts within which decisions are made about substance use by influencing social norms for healthy behaviors and changing the consequences associated with use.

Award Number Grantee Organization Namesort descending Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080027-01 TOWN OF NORWOOD NORWOOD MA REISS SIGALLE $125,000

The Town of Stoneham is a suburban community of 22,000 confronted daily with big-city issues. Less than ten miles north of Boston's downtown area, Stoneham is inside the Route 128 belt that delineates the core of metropolitan Boston. Major highways and public transportation (bus and rail) travel straight through Stoneham, providing easy, direct access for both commuters and bored youth. In addition, Stoneham's exposure to big-city life is guaranteed by Boston television and radio stations, the Boston Herald, and the Boston Globe. Stoneham Substance Abuse Coalition, along with the legal applicant Town of Stoneham, is addressing local youth substance use issues incident to the Greater Boston area. Supported by quantitative and qualitative data, these include historically high rates of adult consumption of alcohol, historically low perception of disapproval for marijuana use, and the nation's highest heroin and opioid abuse data. Students report that boredom and a lack of entertainment opportunities in town are factors in their high-risk behavior. Because most parents commute to jobs outside of Stoneham, many teens are unsupervised both before and after school. The Coalition is very active in the community and has collected a trove of qualitative data (focus groups, town hall meetings, informal surveys) on youth substance use. A 2015 community forum identified the increased prevalence of community substance abuse – from the highly visible opiate overdose epidemic to acceptable use of marijuana by young adults to on-going adult alcohol abuse – as specific issues that contribute to our community's youth substance use issues. The Coalition's plan addresses key issues with actionable items designed to produce measurable change. The problems to be addressed related to alcohol include the implementation of policy change initiatives to reduce access to alcohol. This will be accomplished through promoting ID check initiatives, advocating for Social Host Ordinance, retailer education on risks and consequences of selling to underage users, and coordinating retailer compliance checks with local police. The Coalition will also increase public awareness of youth alcohol issues through Red Ribbon Week activities, Project Sticker Shock, and other awareness strategies. The problems to be addressed related to marijuana include promoting awareness and education on the health, social, and legal consequences and effect of marijuana through teacher, parent and professional trainings, seminars, and town hall meetings; implement social norms strategies to address misperceptions related to use; and examine and advocate for needed changes to school, law enforcement, and juvenile justice related policies. Finally, the Coalition will restrict the pathway to heroin and opioid addiction via prescription drugs. The problems to be addressed include developing environmental strategies to reduce access to prescription drugs by hosting prescription drug take back events, implementing Operation Medicine Cabinet in collaboration with pharmacies, and educating the community about medication security in homes and safe medication disposal. Much of our strategy will focus on addressing opiate prescription abuse among youth which our data shows to be a leading precursor to later heroin use. The Coalition strives to collaborate with all community organizations focused on youth substance abuse, fostering communication and collaboration among our community's diverse populations. We understand that a community-wide collaboration involves system-wide change and integration of services through a variety of mechanisms. Maintaining this collaboration requires ongoing planning to assess what has been effective, what needs to change, and what needs to be done to reach the community’s goals.

Award Number Grantee Organization Namesort descending Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080045-01 TOWN OF STONEHAM STONEHAM MA MACNEILL SHELLY $125,000

Dubois County Coalition for Adolescent Resilience and Empowerment Strategies (CARES) is seeking five year funding from SAMHSA for a Drug Free Communities Support Grant (FOA SP-17-001). If funded, this grant will allow us to build capacity within our coalition so we can enact cultural change to lower substance use among youth. Capacity building efforts will include training for coalition Sector Reps, Members, and partner agencies. It will also help us to promote CARES within our county to additional stakeholders so that our coalition continues to grow. Currently, we have 12 Sector Reps, four executive leaders, and 34 additional members, representing over 25 different partner agencies. Our people are from every geographical, cultural, and socio-economic area in our county, including diversity of ages, gender, religion, capabilities, and other differences. Our people are also active in numerous other community organizations which broadens our net of influence. With this grant, we'll be able to host high quality trainings and workshops to build understanding of the problems related to youth substance use and build collaboration to effect change. We seek to change the culture behind youth substance use in our county. Dubois County is primarily a white, German-Catholic community, with a large economic gap between the rich and the poor. All segments of our county have substance use issues. The primary substances used among youth and adults are alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and opiates. Our German/Catholic culture encourages significant alcohol consumption among all ages and it is common for people to become vocal against law enforcement when anyone is arrested for substance use. The most common comment made is, ""Don't police have anything better to do than arrest for (insert substance here)?"" CARES seeks to change that culture so that parents, youth, and general public understand the effects of substance use among youth, especially alcohol and marijuana. To enact change, if funded, we plan to work with school administrators to change school drug policies so they are enforced and serve as a barrier to substance use. We also plan to work with city officials to adopt ordinances that prohibit alcohol consumption on city property. Currently, there are significant tail-gating parties at sports events in city parking lots adjacent to sports arenas. With signage to post the new ordinances and the social marketing efforts we propose, we hope to curtail public intoxication and educate people about the signal of acceptance they send when drinking in front of youth. Obviously, we'll need significant dollars to educate the public, parents, and youth about the dangers of substance use. Funds will be used for posters, signs, trainings, and annual meeting (open to the public) to help get our message understood and embraced. We'll also need funding to promote our activities and to conduct a social media campaign of ""Talk, They Hear You"". Grant funds will also be used to obtain and analyze data from a wide variety of sources, including the youth themselves, parents, and general public. We plan to hire a consulting firm to conduct the evaluation of our efforts to assure program fiduciary. We also intend to use funds to disseminate information about our progress, upcoming events, and further solicit community involvement. Information will be disseminated through a wide range of efforts, including presentations to various audiences by our Sector Reps, an annual meeting open to the public, quarterly newsletters, ongoing social media posts, press releases, and a written annual report. Coordination of all of the above will be key to assuring our success. CARES has chosen TRI-CAP to be the fiscal agent for our grant. TRI-CAP has been a community action agency for over 50 years, managing nearly $5000,000 annually in federal, state, and local grants.

Award Number Grantee Organization Namesort descending Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080149-01 TRI-CAP JASPER IN CAPPS DEBORAH $125,000

The UMES Project Achieve Coalition serves Somerset County, Maryland and surrounding area, a community of 3,500. The goals of the coalition are to establish and strengthen community collaboration in support of local efforts to prevent youth substance use. The coalition will achieve its goals by implementing these strategies to address marijuana and opioid: media advocacy, media campaigns, and peer-to-peer education and outreach.

Award Number Grantee Organization Namesort descending Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080079-01 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE PRINCESS ANNE MD HARPE JOHNNY $125,000

Webster County represents a constituency which is typical in nature to many rural, primarily agricultural, communities with the exceptions of its high poverty rate (70% overall above 200% poverty index), high drug related incidences by youth(as reported by the 2016 KIP Student Survey for 6th, 8th, 10th and 12th graders)and community members (as reported by law enforcement statistics and community member interviews,a 17% increase in the Hispanic demographic over the past seven years, and limited drug prevention programs or resources within the community at large. Webster County would be a first-time recipient of a Drug Free Communities Grant. With the growing needs as identified above, the Webster County communities would utilize these funds to create new and innovative approaches to substance abuse prevention. Students and community members have identified alcohol, tobacco and marijuana as the ""drugs of choice"" and the most prevalent abused substances in the community. The Webster County Kentucky Agency for Substance Abuse Policy Coalition (WC KY-ASAP) in collaboration with the Webster County Board of Education have outlined a detailed 12 month Action Plan to establish and strengthen community collaboration in support of local efforts to prevent youth and community substance abuse. The plan includes the creation of the Webster County ""True Blue"" Crew which will include representation from all twelve community sectors. The ""True Blue"" Crew will be committed to working together to promote a drug free Webster County. The Coalition's ""True Blue"" Drug Free Community Action Plan proposal will achieve its goals by implementing the following strategies: *Provide Information: The Coalition will utilize a newly created ""True Blue"" website, county proclamations, town hall meetings, brochures and other media outlets to promote the Coalition and the Webster County ""True Blue"" Drug Free Community mission. *Enhance Skills: The Coalition will provide training workshops and activities designed to increase the skills of community members, students and staff through Character Counts and Life Skills Curriculum as well as ATOD training. *Provide Support: The Coalition will create opportunities for participation in activities such as Fifth Quarter, Truth and Consequences, Supt2Kids Advisory Councils, teen leadership conferences, and town hall meetings and forums. *Enhance Access/Reduce Barriers: The Coalition will provide opportunities for all residents to participate in ""True Blue"" activities by hosting events in all four major townships in the county. *Change Consequences: The Coalition will support law enforcement's efforts to curb substance abuse by providing incentives to law enforcement to reward positive student and community member behaviors. *Change Physical Design: The Coalition will collaborate with Webster County Schools to provide a ""True Blue"" School/Community Resource Liaison on the middle and high school campus. *Modify/Change Policies: The Coalition will advocate for a ""smoke free"" Webster County and reward local businesses for adopting smoke-free policies. Additionally, the Coalition's ""True Blue"" Drug Free Community Action Plan will address risk and protective factors through the utilization of a community-wide ""Character Counts"" campaign. The ""True Blue"" Drug Free Community will establish a new and creative approach toward drug prevention that will positively change the Webster County community behavior and environment.

Award Number Grantee Organization Namesort descending Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080026-01 WEBSTER COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION DIXON KY SHOLAR CAROLYN $125,000

The Wellness & Prevention Coalition(W&PC) is requesting $125,000 in Drug Free Communities funding for 2017-2018. The mission of the W&PC is to ""Empower the community of San Clemente to help youth lead healthy and productive lives - free from alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs. The W&PC has involved all sectors of our community in a collaborative effort to achieve our mission. The key objective of the W&PC is to collaborate to bring quality substance use prevention strategies to the community of San Clemente that builds skills of parents and strengthens the developmental assets in youth. The W&PC spent the last 12 months completing a community wide assessment of youth substance use issues that resulted in the targeting of youth alcohol and marijuana use as the focus of our efforts in fiscal year 2017-2018. The Wellness & Prevention Coalition (W&PC) used SAMSHA’S Strategic Planning Framework (Assess Needs, Build Capacity, Plan, Implement, Evaluate) and Seven Strategies for Community Level Change (Provide Information, Enhance Skills, Provide Support, Enhance Access/Reduce Barriers, Change Consequences, Change Physical Design, Modify/Change Policies) to develop our 12-month action plan. The 12-month action plan are the activities that the W&PC hope to implement with funding from this grant supplemented by the non-federal match.

Award Number Grantee Organization Namesort descending Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080078-01 WELLNESS AND PREVENTION FOUNDATION SAN CLEMENTE CA PARMELEE SUSAN $125,000

The Ray County Coalition serves Ray County in MO, a community of approximately 23,000. The goals of the coalition through this grant to reduce youth use of alcohol and other drugs and strengthen community collaboration in support of local efforts to prevent youth substance use. The coalition will achieve its goals of reducing youth use of alcohol, tobacco and marijuana by implementing these strategies: Coalition development, youth/adult education, social marketing, compliance checks and policy development. WestCare Kentucky, Inc. will serve as the administrative and fiscal agent for this grant until the coalition can establish a local 501 C-3 to provide this administrative function.

Award Number Grantee Organization Namesort descending Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080119-01 WESTCARE KENTUCKY, INC. IRVINE KY WARD VICKY $125,000

The proposed project, ""The Drug Free Communities (DFC) Support Program"", would enable the implementation of strategies to build and strengthen the capacity of the Madison Chatham Coalition (MCC), increase the understanding of the risks of underage drinking and marijuana use; reduce the ease of access to these substances; and increase the perception of parental disapproval of the use of these substances within the communities served by the Coalition, specifically in the age group of 12-17 year olds. It directly meets the DFC Support Program goal ""to prevent and reduce substance use and abuse among youth ages 12-17 in communities throughout the United States."" The communities served by the MCC have a high degree of community readiness and are eager to further develop their leadership capacity around the issue of underage drinking and use of marijuana. The proposed activities will serve three towns in Morris County, New Jersey (Madison Borough, Chatham Borough and Chatham Township). The total population is 35,759, including 9,800 young people under the age of 18. The goal of the proposed project is to reduce the use of alcohol and marijuana by youth ages 12-17 in the targeted communities. Six objectives are necessary to achieve this goal: Establish and strengthen community collaboration: 1. By September 29, 2018, increase Coalition membership by six youth members between the ages of 12-17 and three Coalition members as measured by signed Coalition Involvement Agreements. 2. By September 29, 2018, increase internal capacity by 3% in the number of members who report that they are knowledgeable and prepared to complete the MCC work as measured by the annual Coalition survey. Reduce youth substance use 3. By September 29, 2018, increase the perception of risk of marijuana use by 2% from the data reported in the MCC survey, December 2016. 4. By September 29, 2018, decrease perception of ease of access to marijuana by 2% in youth ages 12-17 from the data reported in the MCC survey, December 2016. 5. By September 29, 2018, increase student self reported perception of parental disapproval of drinking alcohol by 2% as measured by the MCC survey, December 2016. 6. By September 29, 2018, decrease student self perception of ease of access to alcohol by 2% as measured by the MCC survey, December 2016. Proposed activities include training and technical assistance for members to build community capacity about the Strategic Prevention Framework and underage drinking and marijuana research; social and traditional media awareness campaign regarding the consequences of underage drinking and marijuana use/vaping; implement campaigns such as the ""No One's House"" campaign to reduce the number of parents in the community who allow youth to drink in their homes; recruit youth to be a part of the Youth Subcommittee; participation in the planning and implementation of Task Force activities; ongoing monitoring of root causes and local conditions to most effectively address the identified problems; maintain relationships with Partnership for a Drug Free New Jersey, Partnership for Drug Free Kids, New Jersey Prevention Network, The Rutgers School of Addiction Studies and Epiphany Evaluation Services and establish and expand our media footprint on Facebook and community websites to increase education and awareness of health and legal liability risks of underage drinking and use of marijuana.

Award Number Grantee Organization Namesort descending Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080032-01 YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF MADISON, N.J. MADISON NJ SPRAGUE LISA $125,000

The Coalition For Health Promotion project will implement environmental prevention strategies in order to (1) reduce youth substance use, and (2) establish and strengthen collaboration among communities, community agencies, systems of care, educational institutions, and existing community coalitions as a means of reducing substance use among youth. The focus community is Youngstown, Ohio, which is located in the northeastern part of the State in Mahoning County. Youngstown is the largest urban area in Mahoning County. Specific census tracts targeted are 8019, 8020, 8021, 8022, and 8023, which are located on the South Side of town, encompassing portions of zip codes 44502, 44507, and 44511. Boundaries for this area are Market Street at Woodland Avenue to Indianola Avenue to Glenwood Avenue and back down to Woodland. Multiple risk factors exist within this community which increase the probability of youth substance uses and the manifestation of the six problem adolescent behaviors, such as extreme economic deprivation, low community attachment and community disorganization, family conflict, academic failure, availability of alcohol, and transitions and mobility, along with limited protective factors. The Strategic Prevention Framework and the Seven Strategies for Community Level Change are the methodological processes that will be utilized and are embedded in all program strategies and evaluation processes. The project will specifically focus on utilizing strategies contained in the 12 Month Action Plan to reduce alcohol and marijuana use among youth. Specific interventions utilized seek to change community norms, reduce access to substances, utilize and target the media, and engage in changing public policy. Enhancing the capability of the existing substance use prevention system to provide innovative service, and facilitating coordination of services among those who work closely with youth (prevention agencies, schools, community based agencies, faith based community, etc.) will be key a key component of programming. Strengthening families will also be targeted through strategies contained in the 12 Month Action Plan. Additionally, the project will implement environmental prevention strategies which will facilitate multi agency and systems collaboration, with the intent of enhancing the local substance use prevention system, the efforts of other local coalitions, community based organizations, educational institutions, and social service agencies, so that collectively we can utilize our professional expertise and resources to reduce youth substance use, improve system collaboration, and facilitate sustainability. The impact of this should be a healthier, safer community where youth thrive and do not succumb to substance abuse and other behavioral health disorders.

Award Number Grantee Organization Namesort descending Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080140-01 YOUNGSTOWN URBAN MINORITY ALCOHOLISM AND DRUG ABUSE OUTREACH PROGRAM, INC. YOUNGSTOWN OH ALEXANDER DARRYL $125,000

Youth & Family Services, Inc. (YFS), the fiscal agent for the Oyate Okolakiciye Coalition, is requesting $125,000 per year for five years to implement a Drug Free Communities project to reach approximately 5,000 youth, ages 12-18, in Rapid City, SD with a focus on American Indian youth. The coalition has developed a 12-month action plan to meet the two DFC goals: increase community collaboration and reduce youth substance use. The objectives and strategies to address the two DFC Goals include: DFC Goal One: Increase community collaboration: Objective 1: By 9/29/18, increase by 10% the coalition’s capacity for community collaboration as measured by an annual coalition survey, coalition and board meeting minutes, meeting attendance records, membership list, and focus groups and/or interviews. Objective 2: By 2/29/18, increase collaboration among community organizations by 10% as measured by an annual community collaboration survey, post-event satisfaction surveys, meeting attendance records, meeting minutes, and focus groups or interviews. DFC Goal Two: Reduce youth substance abuse: Objective 1: By 9/29/18, increase by 4% the perception of risk or harm of use and perception of peer disapproval of use of alcohol by youth, ages 12-18 (with a focus on American Indian youth), as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey and pre and post evidence-based curriculum surveys. Objective 2: By 9/29/18, reduce by 2% past 30-day use of alcohol by youth, ages 12-14, and by 5% for ages 15-18 (with a focus on American Indian youth), as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey and pre and post evidence-based curriculum surveys. Objective 3: By 9/29/18, increase by 5% the perception of risk or harm of use and perception of peer disapproval of use of marijuana by youth, ages 12-18 (with a focus on American Indian youth), as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey. Objective 4: By 9/29/18, reduce by 2% past 30-day use of marijuana by youth, ages 12-14, and by 5% for ages 15-18, as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey. Objective 5: By 9/29/18, increase by 4% the perception of risk or harm of use and perception of peer disapproval of use of meth by youth, ages 12-18 (with a focus on American Indian youth), as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey and pre and post evidence-based curriculum surveys. Objective 6: By 9/29/18, reduce by 1% past 30-day use of meth by youth, ages 12-14, and by 2% for ages 15-18, as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey and pre and post evidence-based curriculum surveys. Strategies include: Increase coalition visibility and credibility as a leader in the field of substance use prevention; Coordinate with other community organizations providing substance abuse services and/or serving the same target population; Provide education and awareness about the consequences of alcohol, marijuana, and meth use and abuse for youth, ages 12-18 (with a focus on American Indian youth); Provide education and awareness about the consequences of youth alcohol, marijuana, and meth use and abuse for parents; Provide Healthy Alternatives to alcohol, marijuana, and meth use for youth, ages 12-18, and their parents (with a focus on American Indian youth); Reduce access to alcohol, marijuana, and meth by youth, ages 12-18, in and out of the home (with a focus on American Indian youth).

Award Number Grantee Organization Namesort descending Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080124-01 YOUTH AND FAMILY SERVICES, INC. RAPID CITY SD ACKERMAN VONNIE $125,000

The Love Detroit Prevention Coalition has a simple goal as part of our Drug Free Communities grant efforts – to reduce substance abuse amongst youth in our targeted zip codes. Our needs assessment data clearly indicate the top contenders for attention in our targeted zip codes are marijuana, alcohol and the non-medical use of prescription drugs. Based on data from our coalition member substance abuse prevention efforts, it appears that marijuana and alcohol past 30 day use increases with youth ages 14 and 15. Therefore, our goal is to target middle and high school students 12 -20 years of age in our identified zip codes as well as freshman college students attending local community colleges and Wayne State University with our anti-alcohol messages. The concerns and problems our coalition see with marijuana include educating our youth and parents and helping them to understand that any use (including medicinal) of marijuana has serious consequences – including hurting their chances of employment. The youth in the communities we serve are bombarded by hundreds of signs and medical marijuana dispensaries as the walk to and from school and other places. Adjusting their attitudes to focus their attention on the dangers associated with its indiscriminate medical use and alerting them to how its use can impact their education, employment and ability to maintain employment is a serious undertaking. We plan to utilize the most effective champions who can articulate the issues and utilize social media and word of mouth to help move the needle on marijuana use prevention – our youth. We plan to train our youth to take the lead in their schools and in the community to effectively address the concerns and personally represent the issues to the city council, law enforcement, school administrators, parents, and peers. Additionally, our Coalition is working to increase the protective factors available to our youth and parents to help strengthen our families and communities so they can help us address alcohol, marijuana and the non-medical use of prescription drugs. Training our members to provide Strengthening Families sessions and substance use screenings and referrals for youth will contribute to the protective factors to garner a substance free lifestyle. Increasing awareness and dangers of unused prescription medications requires us to provide information to our communities regarding the proper disposal of unused drugs. Through our partnerships with the Detroit Wayne Mental Health Authority, the DEA and local law enforcement we hope to provide an avenue to advocate for placement of prescription drug take-back boxes in our local police precincts. Our Coalition still plans to keep the adults busy by continuing to work with our Prescription Drug and Opioid Abuse key leader round table members to address this concern with our local hospitals, pharmacists, and medical schools. Our pharmacy work group has facilitated trainings and some even implemented procedures to address diversion and over-prescribing. They have asked for and received referral cards they can provide to their patients regarding substance use. The Great Lakes Water Authority is currently working with us to increase awareness of proper disposal of unused medication by placing information in the water bills. It is imperative that we build a strong youth led campaign to spread the word through the mediums they access, utilize and understand. We will continue to work with our Generation Rx pharmacy students to conduct peer to peer focus groups and peer education trainings in an innovative and creative way to help generate the momentum we need to keep our messages in the forefront among high school and college students. It is in these strategies that we hope to reduce and ultimately prevent youth use of alcohol, marijuana and non-medical prescription drugs use in zip codes 48203, 48205, and 48234.

Award Number Grantee Organization Namesort descending Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080076-01 YOUTH CONNECTION DETROIT MI DUDLEY GRENAE $125,000

We are excited about the opportunity the Drug-Free Communities Grant gives us in such an important time in our city’s development. Buckeye is a rapidly growing city, witnessing exponential population growth since 2000 (an increase of 857.3%). The proximity to SR85 and I-10 presents a number of challenges, as these highways are considered drug corridors, connecting Mexico, San Diego, Los Angeles, Las Vegas and Phoenix. The Way out West Coalition (WOW Coalition) has developed an Action Plan around the Seven Strategies for Community Level Change that focuses on three (3) substances; marijuana, alcohol and Rx drug misuse. The negative impact these three substances are having on our youth and community are strongly supported by our data. The coalition membership is committed to our mission, goals, objectives and strategies that are focused on 1) increasing community collaboration and cultural competence, 2) increasing perceived risks, 3) reducing access, 4) increasing parent-child communication and 5) building strong youth through peer leadership activities. Our twelve sector representatives which comprise our Executive Committee bring a whatever it takes attitude and are driven by excellence. Most important is the solid foundation the coalition has in place to support our work. The WOW Coalition is excited for our youth and community about the upcoming year and beyond.

Award Number Grantee Organization Namesort descending Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080144-01 YOUTH4YOUTH GLENDALE AZ TRACEY LARRY $125,000

Pages