SP-17-001 Individual Grant Awards

The Livingston County Community (LCCA) is a county-wide coalition that seeks to unite the Livingston County community to reduce and prevent youth substance use and to live a safe and drug-free lifestyle. The LCCA is applying for DFC funding to increase community collaboration within Livingston County, as well as reduce 7th and 9th grade reported past 30-day use, increased perceived risk, increase peer disapproval, and increase parental disapproval of alcohol, prescription drugs, and youth marijuana use, between from September 30, 2017-September 29, 2022. We will utilize the seven strategies for community level change to increase community collaboration by: Providing support in the community, Enhance knowledge and skills, Provide information to the community and coalition partners, Change the consequences/incentives, Provide support for youth, and Enhance skills of youth. We will utilize the seven strategies to decrease 7th and 9th grade youth past 30-day alcohol use, increase perceived risk, increase peer disapproval, and increase parental disapproval by: reducing access and enhancing barriers for parents, reducing access and enhancing barriers in the community, change consequences in the community, provide information to youth, and provide information to parents and community members. We will utilize the seven strategies for community level change to decrease 7th and 9th grade youth past 30-day prescription drug abuse, increase perceived risk, increase peer disapproval, and increase parental disapproval of use by: reducing access and enhancing barriers in the community, provide information to youth, provide support for youth, modifying and changing policies, and providing information to the community. We will utilize the seven strategies for community level change to decrease 7th and 9th grade youth past 30-day marijuana use, increase perceived risk, increase peer disapproval, and increase parental disapproval of use by: providing information to youth, enhancing skills of parents, provide information to parents and community members,change the physical design of the community, and change consequences in the community. With the assistance from an evaluator, we will track our changes and monitor our progress on each of our goals and will modify strategies and specific activities if necessary. The LCCA will remain culturally competent.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort ascending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080065-01 LIVINGSTON COUNTY CATHOLIC CHARITIES HOWELL MI FINK KAITLIN $125,000

The Love Detroit Prevention Coalition has a simple goal as part of our Drug Free Communities grant efforts – to reduce substance abuse amongst youth in our targeted zip codes. Our needs assessment data clearly indicate the top contenders for attention in our targeted zip codes are marijuana, alcohol and the non-medical use of prescription drugs. Based on data from our coalition member substance abuse prevention efforts, it appears that marijuana and alcohol past 30 day use increases with youth ages 14 and 15. Therefore, our goal is to target middle and high school students 12 -20 years of age in our identified zip codes as well as freshman college students attending local community colleges and Wayne State University with our anti-alcohol messages. The concerns and problems our coalition see with marijuana include educating our youth and parents and helping them to understand that any use (including medicinal) of marijuana has serious consequences – including hurting their chances of employment. The youth in the communities we serve are bombarded by hundreds of signs and medical marijuana dispensaries as the walk to and from school and other places. Adjusting their attitudes to focus their attention on the dangers associated with its indiscriminate medical use and alerting them to how its use can impact their education, employment and ability to maintain employment is a serious undertaking. We plan to utilize the most effective champions who can articulate the issues and utilize social media and word of mouth to help move the needle on marijuana use prevention – our youth. We plan to train our youth to take the lead in their schools and in the community to effectively address the concerns and personally represent the issues to the city council, law enforcement, school administrators, parents, and peers. Additionally, our Coalition is working to increase the protective factors available to our youth and parents to help strengthen our families and communities so they can help us address alcohol, marijuana and the non-medical use of prescription drugs. Training our members to provide Strengthening Families sessions and substance use screenings and referrals for youth will contribute to the protective factors to garner a substance free lifestyle. Increasing awareness and dangers of unused prescription medications requires us to provide information to our communities regarding the proper disposal of unused drugs. Through our partnerships with the Detroit Wayne Mental Health Authority, the DEA and local law enforcement we hope to provide an avenue to advocate for placement of prescription drug take-back boxes in our local police precincts. Our Coalition still plans to keep the adults busy by continuing to work with our Prescription Drug and Opioid Abuse key leader round table members to address this concern with our local hospitals, pharmacists, and medical schools. Our pharmacy work group has facilitated trainings and some even implemented procedures to address diversion and over-prescribing. They have asked for and received referral cards they can provide to their patients regarding substance use. The Great Lakes Water Authority is currently working with us to increase awareness of proper disposal of unused medication by placing information in the water bills. It is imperative that we build a strong youth led campaign to spread the word through the mediums they access, utilize and understand. We will continue to work with our Generation Rx pharmacy students to conduct peer to peer focus groups and peer education trainings in an innovative and creative way to help generate the momentum we need to keep our messages in the forefront among high school and college students. It is in these strategies that we hope to reduce and ultimately prevent youth use of alcohol, marijuana and non-medical prescription drugs use in zip codes 48203, 48205, and 48234.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort ascending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080076-01 YOUTH CONNECTION DETROIT MI DUDLEY GRENAE $125,000

The Kearny Prevention Coalition, in partnership with the Town of Kearny (Legal Grantee) is requesting FY 2017 Drug-Free Communities Support Program grant funding in the amount of $625,000. The Coalition serves the Town of Kearny, New Jersey, a community of 40,684. The goals of the Coalition are to establish and strengthen community collaboration in support of local efforts to prevent youth substance use. The Coalition will achieve these goals by: establishing and strengthening community collaboration; providing training for Coalition volunteer members and key stakeholders on cutting edge information pertaining to effective prevention strategies; improving the Town’s data-collection and analysis related-systems; establishing an information pipeline to the public, via the development of bilingual website and social media presence that will provide current information to the community on important youth substance use issues; creating opportunities for our youth to participate in drug-free alternative activities that reduce the risk of substance use; changing environmental (parks and recreational areas) physical designs to reduce the risk or youth substance use; modifying or changing formal written policies within the Town of Kearny, local businesses, and other important entities; and enhancing community access to prevention, early intervention and substance abuse-related services.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort ascending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080061-01 TOWN OF KEARNY KEARNY NJ CORBETT JOHN $125,000

The Cobb Community Alliance to Prevent Substance Abuse, Inc. (CCAPSA) has been engaged in prevention work since our founding in 1999. We have effected change across Cobb County by using the Strategic Prevention Framework to engage stakeholders, and the proposed Kickoff Kennesaw program supported by the Drug Free Community Grant will continue the use of this model and this prevention work. The City of Kennesaw is one of the incorporated municipalities within Cobb County, a county that is part of the metropolitan Atlanta region in north Georgia. Kennesaw has nearly 32,000 residents and is one of the fastest-growing cities in the metro Atlanta area. The community is relatively youthful with 71% of the population under the age of 44 and racially diverse with white citizens comprising 59% of population, 22% as black, 11% Hispanic/Latino, 5% Asian, 3.0% Non-Hispanic mixed of two or more races and 4.7% from another race (U.S. Census). The two primary goals of our work will be to 1) increase community collaboration by capacity building within the community; and 2) reduce youth substance abuse related specifically to alcohol and prescription drugs. Within these two goals are a number of strategies that will attract new members who are reflective of the community we are serving while also reinvigorating established members. Our project will be an opportunity to engage stakeholders in a conversation where we agree to work together toward a common goal of building a safe, healthy, and drug-free community. Our objective under the first goal will be to increase community collaboration by recruiting ten new members to our 4 strategy teams (Education, Policy, Enforcement and Youth and solidifying our Kennesaw Coalition partners. For our second goal of reducing youth substance abuse, we will reduce the percentage of Kennesaw high schoolers who reported 30-day use of alcohol by 1.4%, (from 13.4% to 12%.) Likewise, we will work to reduce 30-day non-medical use of prescription drugs by 3% (from 18% to 15%). The results will be tracked using the Georgia Student Health Survey, an annual self-reporting assessment tool. There is a comprehensive plan to change the landscape of the Kennesaw community by (1) limiting access to substances; 2) changing the culture and context within which decisions about substance use are made; and/or (3) shifting the consequences associated with youth substance use. Key activities behind this comprehensive plan include receiving and conducting training, conducting focus groups and Town Hall meetings, surveying stakeholders, establishing action teams, implement Positive Social Norm campaigns, compliance checks. Additional activities in support of reducing the availability of prescription drug are increasing the number and coverage for takeback days, secure storage in the home, safe disposal and youth-inspired messaging and social media campaigns. We are excited about Kickoff Kennesaw as part of a Drug Free Community that will address youth substance issues. Further, we are confident that with the action plan in place, our work will also be successful in reducing substance abuse among adults by addressing the factors in Kennesaw that increase the risk of substance abuse and promoting the factors that minimize the risk of substance abuse

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort ascending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080256-01 COBB COMMUNITY ALLIANCE TO PREVENT SUBSTANCE ABUSE, INC. MARIETTA GA CARPENTER MICHAEL $125,000

Dubois County Coalition for Adolescent Resilience and Empowerment Strategies (CARES) is seeking five year funding from SAMHSA for a Drug Free Communities Support Grant (FOA SP-17-001). If funded, this grant will allow us to build capacity within our coalition so we can enact cultural change to lower substance use among youth. Capacity building efforts will include training for coalition Sector Reps, Members, and partner agencies. It will also help us to promote CARES within our county to additional stakeholders so that our coalition continues to grow. Currently, we have 12 Sector Reps, four executive leaders, and 34 additional members, representing over 25 different partner agencies. Our people are from every geographical, cultural, and socio-economic area in our county, including diversity of ages, gender, religion, capabilities, and other differences. Our people are also active in numerous other community organizations which broadens our net of influence. With this grant, we'll be able to host high quality trainings and workshops to build understanding of the problems related to youth substance use and build collaboration to effect change. We seek to change the culture behind youth substance use in our county. Dubois County is primarily a white, German-Catholic community, with a large economic gap between the rich and the poor. All segments of our county have substance use issues. The primary substances used among youth and adults are alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and opiates. Our German/Catholic culture encourages significant alcohol consumption among all ages and it is common for people to become vocal against law enforcement when anyone is arrested for substance use. The most common comment made is, ""Don't police have anything better to do than arrest for (insert substance here)?"" CARES seeks to change that culture so that parents, youth, and general public understand the effects of substance use among youth, especially alcohol and marijuana. To enact change, if funded, we plan to work with school administrators to change school drug policies so they are enforced and serve as a barrier to substance use. We also plan to work with city officials to adopt ordinances that prohibit alcohol consumption on city property. Currently, there are significant tail-gating parties at sports events in city parking lots adjacent to sports arenas. With signage to post the new ordinances and the social marketing efforts we propose, we hope to curtail public intoxication and educate people about the signal of acceptance they send when drinking in front of youth. Obviously, we'll need significant dollars to educate the public, parents, and youth about the dangers of substance use. Funds will be used for posters, signs, trainings, and annual meeting (open to the public) to help get our message understood and embraced. We'll also need funding to promote our activities and to conduct a social media campaign of ""Talk, They Hear You"". Grant funds will also be used to obtain and analyze data from a wide variety of sources, including the youth themselves, parents, and general public. We plan to hire a consulting firm to conduct the evaluation of our efforts to assure program fiduciary. We also intend to use funds to disseminate information about our progress, upcoming events, and further solicit community involvement. Information will be disseminated through a wide range of efforts, including presentations to various audiences by our Sector Reps, an annual meeting open to the public, quarterly newsletters, ongoing social media posts, press releases, and a written annual report. Coordination of all of the above will be key to assuring our success. CARES has chosen TRI-CAP to be the fiscal agent for our grant. TRI-CAP has been a community action agency for over 50 years, managing nearly $5000,000 annually in federal, state, and local grants.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort ascending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080149-01 TRI-CAP JASPER IN CAPPS DEBORAH $125,000

The Healthy Cabarrus Substance Use Coalition (hereinafter referred to as the Coalition) serves all of Cabarrus County with targeted efforts in the larger municipalities of Concord and Kannapolis. Established in 2013, the Coalition represents an extensive array of sectors within the community. Served by a six-member Executive Committee and an Advisory Board of over 35 active community members, the Coalition is divided into four sector-specific work groups, one of which is comprised exclusively of youth. In order to obtain quantitative and qualitative data on substance use rates and community perceptions, the Coalition regularly utilizes three assessment instruments. These assessment efforts have demonstrated growing community concern over the prevalence of substance use, particularly among youth. According to the 2016 Cabarrus County Community Needs Assessment, community members identify substance use as the number one priority area needing to be addressed at this time. Survey data supports the concerns they have raised, demonstrating increasingly problematic usage rates for youth, specifically for that of alcohol and prescription drugs. The two most critical factors found to contribute to these increasing rates are youth's access to and favorable attitudes toward substance use. In response to our community's call to action, the Coalition has designed a 12-Month Action Plan utilizing the Seven Strategies for Community Level Change model that is supported by the Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA). The Coalition has identified two goals within its Action Plan: 1) to increase community collaboration, and 2) to reduce youth substance use. The Coalition aims to meet its first goal by expanding the number of training and community engagement opportunities for its members, as well as seeking additional partnerships that could enhance its capacity. The Coalition aims to meet its second goal through: education; reduction of access; enhancement of barriers; modification of consequences; enhancement of media messaging; modification of policies; and provision of support to youth and the community at large. The Action Plan's progress will be monitored and evaluated jointly by the Program Director, Project Coordinator, and an outside Evaluator on an ongoing and annual basis. This will ensure the Coalition's ability to respond to challenges, build on its successes, and utilize new opportunities as they present themselves. Coalition Leadership will also ensure ongoing evaluation through provision of formal and informal avenues of communication, emphasizing the importance of top-down and bottom-up communication among all community partners who are invested in the program's success.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort ascending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080016-01 CABARRUS HEALTH ALLIANCE KANNAPOLIS NC BEAM MARCELLA $125,000

The Community Action Commission of Fayette County (CACFC) submits this application for the Drug Free Communities Support Program on the behalf of the Faith in Recovery's Prevention Coalition (PC). The PC proposes to serve rural, Fayette County, Ohio. Fayette County is a small community comprised of around 28,679 individuals. The Faith in Recovery Coalition was formed in Spring 2014 and identified the need to expand their focus in June 2016 to include prevention efforts targeted at local youth. A Planner was hired through an opportunity through the Department of Job and Family Services Healthier Buckeye Program in August 2016 to complete a community needs assessment using the Strategic Prevention Framework. The needs assessment uncovered that many community members, while concerned about the growing heroin epidemic, did not understand the progression of addiction and how early onset of use contributed to this public health crisis. In a survey of 6,8, and 10th graders in the local school districts, serving over 4,600 youth, found the combined use of all grades of substances as follows: alcohol 12%, tobacco 5%, marijuana 5%, and prescription drugs 3%. The greatest percentage of alcohol use was found within the county school district, Miami Trace, at 26%. The greatest amount of marijuana use was found at the city schools, topping out at 13%. In terms of perceived risk/harm of use, marijuana had the greatest number of individuals, 15%, sharing they thought that marijuana was of no risk. Marijuana was also perceived to be the perceived to be of no risk/harm by parents and peers, at the rates of 4% and 12%, respectively. Given these numbers and feedback from focus groups with youth, law enforcement, the school districts, and the community, the coalition determined the need to target alcohol use and perceived risk/harm of marijuana use. To combat these issues the coalition identified the following goals for the project: 1-Increasing Community Collaboration: Attract new members to participate in the coalition, participate on subcommittees, or volunteer to work towards our community’s goal of keeping our youth drug free. The coalition will attract 20 new members or volunteers by 9/29/18. 2-Reducing Youth Substance Use: Reduce youth (6th, 8th, and 10th graders) alcohol use by 5%, as evidenced by the Core Measures Survey, by 9/29/2018. 3-Increase youth (6th, 8th, and 10th graders) perception of the risk of harm of marijuana use by 5%, as evidenced by the Core Measure’s Survey by 9/29/18. To accomplish these goals, the coalition will have three part time staff and members of the youth and adult coalitions implement the following activities: Publicize the coalition's work and recruit new members and volunteers through Facebook, its web-page, and the local radio, television, and newspaper; Enhancing the skills of the coalition through partner provided training, training through the Drug Free Action Alliance, and Youth-to-Youth International; Recognizing youth, coalition members, volunteers, and business supporting the coalition's efforts on social and traditional media outlets; Conducting public awareness prevention campaigns, attending community events and meetings to spread the prevention message; Providing Too Good for Drugs and Life Skills for grades 1-8 in both of the local school districts; Implementing PAX Good Behavior Games incrementally at the local Head Start program and in the elementary schools. One Coordinator will serve as the teacher mentor for the county; Having a prom and graduation pledge campaign and the ""Blunt Truth"" campaign; Supporting youth-led peer to peer prevention projects, training them, and having one Coordinator per school district serving as staff support to those efforts; Conducting a Reward and Reminder Campaign, advocate for businesses to hide paraphernalia, researching teen party and social host ordinances for feasibility, and many other strategies.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort ascending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080019-01 COMMUNITY ACTION COMMISSION OF FAYETTE COUNTY WASHINGTON COURT HOUSE OH BAUGHN LUCINDA $125,000

Old Colony Y through through the Easton Wings of Hope Coalition is proposing to establish and strengthen community collaboration in support of local efforts to prevent youth substance use. The coalition has developed a comprehensive 12 month action plan to impact specifically marijuana and alcohol use in 7th through 12th graders with strategies that include: increasing coalition capacity through training and development, yearly assessment and analysis of youth substance use in Easton, education through community programming, youth leadership development, implementing a marketing campaign around positive social norms, community environmental strategies to decrease marijuana and alcohol strategies, and Shoulder Tap Strategies to prevent alcohol sales to minors.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort ascending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080108-01 OLD COLONY YMCA BROCKTON MA BARTELL LAUREN $125,000

The Alachua County Health Promotion and Wellness Coalition, Inc.(HPW) is prepared to engage with the award of SP-17-001 SAMSHA grant. HPW has sufficient infrastructure to manage and implement the grant objectives, strategies and produce measurable outcomes. HPW has broad networking and collaborative agreements to help facilitate the indicated structure of the DFC grant submission and guarantee described outcome measures. It is the purpose of HPW to establish and strengthen collaboration among communities, public and private non-profit agencies, as well as federal, state, local governments to support efforts of HPW to prevent and reduce substance abuse among youth 18 years of age or younger. Further, efforts will reduce substance abuse among youth and over time, reduce substance abuse among adults by addressing the factors in our community that increase the risk of substance abuse and we will promote the factors that minimize the risk of substance abuse. HPW will support established effective community level change. HPW currently has cooperative and collaborative sector agreements to work together toward a common goal of building a safe, healthy, and drug-free community. HPW will conduct the day-today operations of this grant. HPW will work with leaders in this community to identify and address local youth substance use problems and create sustainable community-level change. HPW will not serve as a conduit for funds to passing through to HPW or to another agency. HPW's narrative describes three major areas of concern within Alachua County. These specific zip code areas have years of data collection and research surrounding and supporting their need for attention and resources directed toward prevention of youth substance use and abuse. These areas were selected from the analysis of data indicating areas of high concentration of youth drug use, youth drug sells, school drop-outs, gang involvement and other related crimes. These three areas also present as under-served and poverty laden. It is with this funding that HPW seeks to focus on community education, enlist participation excite the community, and empower members with alternative outcomes for their youth to become more successful with obtaining their goals in life. HPW's broad base of volunteers serve with passion and determination to personally impact youth in our area and work feverishly to help youth who respond to be resources providing from the award of this grant. HPW believes that within each child lies the potential to be a leader. It is with opportunities provided that will pave the way for their strengths to grow, futures to change, and for us to reinforce their value in society.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort ascending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080135-01 ALACHUA COUNTY HEALTH PROMOTION AND WELLNESS COALITION, INC. GAINESVILLE FL BAKER DOTTIE $125,000

The ACTION (Active Coalition That Influences Outcomes in This Neighborhood) Drug Free Community Coalition serves youth and families in the City of Detroit's 48219 zip code, an urban community in Detroit MI with a population of 48,759. The goals of the ACTION Coalition are to establish and strengthen community collaboration in support of local efforts to prevent youth from abusing marijuana and alcohol. The Coalition will achieve its goals by implementing strategies that provide information and protective factors,such as the “Because I Care” story telling campaign and Media Aware, KIDS TV where youth create drug prevention messaging. These strategies will provide support, reduce barriers and enhance skills needed to strengthen the coalition and reduce youth substance abuse. The ACTION Coalition's efforts have helped define the drug problem and build increased awareness of its root causes. ACTION now provides a common coalition table to discuss the issues, make specific recommendations and carry out an action plan. The diverse ACTION Coalition has created a 12 month action plan to tackle youth drug use in the community. The ACTION Coalition includes representation from all of the 12 required sectors. Sector representatives were selected due to their expertise, commitment to the community and willingness to identify needs and participate in ongoing planning and evaluation. CLASS (Changing Lives and Staying Sober) serves the ACTION Coalition's Fiscal Agent. CLASS is a 501(c)(3)with significant experience as a fiduciary agent. CLASS has Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) prevention accreditation, technical expertise in drug abuse prevention and long-standing, close relationships within the 48219 community.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort ascending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080255-01 CLASS PROGRAM DETROIT MI ANDERSON-KENNEDY CAROLYN $125,000

The Coalition For Health Promotion project will implement environmental prevention strategies in order to (1) reduce youth substance use, and (2) establish and strengthen collaboration among communities, community agencies, systems of care, educational institutions, and existing community coalitions as a means of reducing substance use among youth. The focus community is Youngstown, Ohio, which is located in the northeastern part of the State in Mahoning County. Youngstown is the largest urban area in Mahoning County. Specific census tracts targeted are 8019, 8020, 8021, 8022, and 8023, which are located on the South Side of town, encompassing portions of zip codes 44502, 44507, and 44511. Boundaries for this area are Market Street at Woodland Avenue to Indianola Avenue to Glenwood Avenue and back down to Woodland. Multiple risk factors exist within this community which increase the probability of youth substance uses and the manifestation of the six problem adolescent behaviors, such as extreme economic deprivation, low community attachment and community disorganization, family conflict, academic failure, availability of alcohol, and transitions and mobility, along with limited protective factors. The Strategic Prevention Framework and the Seven Strategies for Community Level Change are the methodological processes that will be utilized and are embedded in all program strategies and evaluation processes. The project will specifically focus on utilizing strategies contained in the 12 Month Action Plan to reduce alcohol and marijuana use among youth. Specific interventions utilized seek to change community norms, reduce access to substances, utilize and target the media, and engage in changing public policy. Enhancing the capability of the existing substance use prevention system to provide innovative service, and facilitating coordination of services among those who work closely with youth (prevention agencies, schools, community based agencies, faith based community, etc.) will be key a key component of programming. Strengthening families will also be targeted through strategies contained in the 12 Month Action Plan. Additionally, the project will implement environmental prevention strategies which will facilitate multi agency and systems collaboration, with the intent of enhancing the local substance use prevention system, the efforts of other local coalitions, community based organizations, educational institutions, and social service agencies, so that collectively we can utilize our professional expertise and resources to reduce youth substance use, improve system collaboration, and facilitate sustainability. The impact of this should be a healthier, safer community where youth thrive and do not succumb to substance abuse and other behavioral health disorders.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort ascending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080140-01 YOUNGSTOWN URBAN MINORITY ALCOHOLISM AND DRUG ABUSE OUTREACH PROGRAM, INC. YOUNGSTOWN OH ALEXANDER DARRYL $125,000

Youth & Family Services, Inc. (YFS), the fiscal agent for the Oyate Okolakiciye Coalition, is requesting $125,000 per year for five years to implement a Drug Free Communities project to reach approximately 5,000 youth, ages 12-18, in Rapid City, SD with a focus on American Indian youth. The coalition has developed a 12-month action plan to meet the two DFC goals: increase community collaboration and reduce youth substance use. The objectives and strategies to address the two DFC Goals include: DFC Goal One: Increase community collaboration: Objective 1: By 9/29/18, increase by 10% the coalition’s capacity for community collaboration as measured by an annual coalition survey, coalition and board meeting minutes, meeting attendance records, membership list, and focus groups and/or interviews. Objective 2: By 2/29/18, increase collaboration among community organizations by 10% as measured by an annual community collaboration survey, post-event satisfaction surveys, meeting attendance records, meeting minutes, and focus groups or interviews. DFC Goal Two: Reduce youth substance abuse: Objective 1: By 9/29/18, increase by 4% the perception of risk or harm of use and perception of peer disapproval of use of alcohol by youth, ages 12-18 (with a focus on American Indian youth), as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey and pre and post evidence-based curriculum surveys. Objective 2: By 9/29/18, reduce by 2% past 30-day use of alcohol by youth, ages 12-14, and by 5% for ages 15-18 (with a focus on American Indian youth), as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey and pre and post evidence-based curriculum surveys. Objective 3: By 9/29/18, increase by 5% the perception of risk or harm of use and perception of peer disapproval of use of marijuana by youth, ages 12-18 (with a focus on American Indian youth), as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey. Objective 4: By 9/29/18, reduce by 2% past 30-day use of marijuana by youth, ages 12-14, and by 5% for ages 15-18, as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey. Objective 5: By 9/29/18, increase by 4% the perception of risk or harm of use and perception of peer disapproval of use of meth by youth, ages 12-18 (with a focus on American Indian youth), as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey and pre and post evidence-based curriculum surveys. Objective 6: By 9/29/18, reduce by 1% past 30-day use of meth by youth, ages 12-14, and by 2% for ages 15-18, as measured by the annual Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS) Student Survey and pre and post evidence-based curriculum surveys. Strategies include: Increase coalition visibility and credibility as a leader in the field of substance use prevention; Coordinate with other community organizations providing substance abuse services and/or serving the same target population; Provide education and awareness about the consequences of alcohol, marijuana, and meth use and abuse for youth, ages 12-18 (with a focus on American Indian youth); Provide education and awareness about the consequences of youth alcohol, marijuana, and meth use and abuse for parents; Provide Healthy Alternatives to alcohol, marijuana, and meth use for youth, ages 12-18, and their parents (with a focus on American Indian youth); Reduce access to alcohol, marijuana, and meth by youth, ages 12-18, in and out of the home (with a focus on American Indian youth).

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Namesort ascending Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP080124-01 YOUTH AND FAMILY SERVICES, INC. RAPID CITY SD ACKERMAN VONNIE $125,000

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