SM-18-009 Individual Grant Awards

To address the growing mental health concerns of youth, we have partnered with a local high needs school district to increase teacher ability to identify mental health concerns and symptomology in youth through training in Youth-Mental Health First Aid, Universal Screening, and Verbal De-escalation. This project will seek to improve the identification and referral process to improve efficiency and effectiveness in serving youth with behavioral and mental health needs by building partnerships with community mental health providers. The project, titled: Improving Access to Mental Health Services through Teacher Training and Universal Screening, is attempting to address the mental health concerns and improve service delivery for youth who may be experiencing mental health problems. To achieve this, researchers at the University of South Florida has partnered with a high needs school district to facilitate building school’s capacity to help students with mental health problems. Given the amount of time spent with students, a promising solution is to train teachers to identify and support children at risk for serious emotional and behavioral disturbances. Further, given the prevalence of mental health disorders that begin between 12-18 years, middle school is an ideal recognize pre-symptomology of mental illness (Patel et al., 2007). In the partnering district, nearly 1 in 10 students are in foster care, over 30% of students indicate having used an illicit substance within the last 30 days, and 43% of students reported being taunted or teased (i.e., bullied) within the last 30 days; all above Florida state averages (PCCHAR, 2012). The goals of this project are to (1) increase capacity of middle school teachers to recognize mental health risk within middle school students, (2) increase teachers’ skill and effective use of screening tools to identify mental health problems, and (3) improve access to school-and community-based mental health services through coaching on data-based decision-making, verbal de-escalation training, and coordination amongst service providers. To achieve these goals, teachers will be trained in Youth Mental Health First Aid (Y-MHFA), which is an evidence-based program which reviews typical adolescent development and how to identify common mental health challenges. Teachers will also be trained on the use of universal screening to enhance decision making and verbal de-escalation techniques. Nine middle schools will be recruited to participate in this project. Approximately, 200 middle school teachers will be trained each year, for a total of 600 teachers across three years. Based on national mental health prevalence data that shown that nearly 20% of children have a diagnosable mental health disorder (Merikcangas et al., 2010), it is expected at nearly 20% of participating youth will be identified for school-based intervention or referred for services at partnering community mental health providers. In an average school, only 20% of students showing symptoms are identified and subsequently provided with services (Hoagwood & Johnson, 2010); however, this project aims to address this discrepancy, leading to better mental health functioning and better student outcomes.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM081115-01 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA TAMPA FL VON DER EMBSE NATHANIEL $113,619

Stockton Unified School District’s (SUSD) Expanded MHAT Initiative will improve students’ academic and developmental outcomes and close a regional healthcare services gap by substantially increasing the number of district personnel, parents and community members trained to recognize the signs and symptoms of youth mental disorders, including the desire to harm themselves or others, and quickly refer students to the relevant mental health resources. Living in conditions as dire as any in the nation, there is an acute need to strengthen the mental health safety net supporting SUSD students. The district serves the city of Stockton, Calif., the nation’s third most diverse metropolitan area, and reflects that diversity with a population that is 65% Latino, 11% African-American, 9% Asian, 6% White, 4% Filipino, 2% American Indian/Alaska Native and 3% Others. Poverty is pervasive (80.3% of students qualify for free or reduced-price meals) as are crime and gangs (Stockton was the state’s second most violent city even before becoming in June 2012 the largest municipality in U.S. history to file for bankruptcy). These conditions make SUSD students particularly susceptible to mental health disorders. School climate data finds that more than 50% of students report having lost someone, while 35% report a parent or family member is alcoholic, 29% have family in rehab and 22% have family in jail. One-third of SUSD students report feeling sad or hopeless for two weeks or more and almost 20% have contemplated suicide. The pressing need to provide greater access to mental health resources has reached crisis proportions due to the service gap that has emerged since budget cuts led San Joaquin County Behavioral Health to suspend its MHAT program, leaving SUSD as the sole organization in an impoverished county of 726,000 people providing the training. The Expanded MHAT Initiative will close that service gap by enabling SUSD to nearly triple to 425 the number of individuals trained annually (1,275 over the course of the grant term). The trainings will utilize evidence-based strategies – Youth Mental Health First Aid (YMHFA), Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST), safeTALK and Threat Inquiry training – to empower diverse participants to recognize the signs and symptoms of youth mental disorders and refer students to mental health resources. The initiative also will educate School Site Crisis Teams to identify individuals with mental disorders, employ de-escalation techniques and accurately assess, refer and monitor students making threats. SUSD’s Expanded MHAT Initiative’s measurable objectives are by June 2019 to train 225 individuals in YMHFA (675 over the grant period); by June 2019, to train 50 high school staff in the aligned safeTALK intervention program (150 over the grant period); by June 2019, to train 40 individuals in ASIST (120 over the grant period); and by June 2019, to train more than 110 staff in Threat Inquiry (330 over the grant period). SUSD will develop a directory of district-based mental health services and partner with Behavioral Health to complete its map of county mental health resources.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM081408-01 STOCKTON UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT STOCKTON CA JENNIFER ROBLES $116,175

Appalachian Angel Aid is a Frontier Health mental health awareness training project. Frontier Health is the Northeast Tennessee leading provider of behavioral health, mental health, substance abuse, co-occurring, intellectual and developmental disabilities, recovery, and vocational rehabilitation services throughout Northeast Tennessee and Southwest Virginia. Frontier Health acknowledges Serious Mental Illness and Serious Emotional Disturbance impair functioning in everyday life leading to significant social, emotional, financial and physical health decline. We will aid in recovery by developing a strong alliance between faith-based communities and mental health treatment programs through mental health education. We intend to target anyone in the general public (i.e. children, adolescents, adults, veterans) exhibiting signs and symptoms of SMI or SED that may encounter the faith-based community and build a bridge with clergy to improve their skills to identify and intervene early. Mental Health First Aid USA (MHFA) has been selected because faith-based communities in Northeast Tennessee are the first to help those with needs and are often referred to as the First Responders. We want the faith-based community to understand the importance of mental health in overall health and their powerful role in promoting recovery by providing at least 10 outreach community activities each month for a total of 360 for the lifetime of the project. We will provide MHFA training to at least 300 individuals per year and 900 for the lifetime of the project. Disparities in Mental Health will be reduced by improved utilization of mental health services and supports. Faith-based communities will refer at least 50 people for mental health services and supports the first year and increase by 50 each year bringing the referral total to 300 for lifetime of the project. Individuals in community will show improved health status as a result of referral and treatment for mental health services by increased scoring in at least 2 areas on the National Outcomes Measurement System (NOMS). Frontier Health has extensive experience in data collection, management, analysis and reporting. The agency has a data analysis protocol in place and adequate computer systems to complete required data collection and analysis process.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM081073-01 FRONTIER HEALTH GRAY TN PERRY TIM $116,313

Abstract To improve support and referrals for African Americans in Montgomery County with behavioral health issues in the poorest neighborhoods of Dayton, OH, Mt. Olive Baptist Church will provide YMHFA training for 540 adults who live and/or work with African American youth in Montgomery County and Crisis Intervention Training (CIT) to 540 adults who interact with African American adults who may be experiencing or exhibiting symptoms of serious mental illness (SMI) and/or serious emotional disturbance (SED). The level of violence and crime in African American neighborhoods is higher than in other parts of the city, and the residents of these areas experience greater ambient hazards such as crime, violence, and drug use. The perception of the home neighborhood as dangerous influences the mental health of adolescents, resulting in higher rates of depression, anxiety, and other behavioral health issues. The Motivate, Educate, Link and Train (MELT) project will require collaboration between the applicant, other African American churches, schools, community centers, Priority Boards, civic councils, law enforcement and other first responders, two universities, and Samaritan Behavioral Health, Inc. (SBHI), a behavioral health agency located in the poorest neighborhood in Dayton. These partners will form an interagency advisory and leadership team for our project called the “MELT YMHFA Advisory Board,” which will develop a coordinated community-wide plan that addresses strategic and system-wide changes that will improve youth outcomes in Dayton’s lower income areas. The purpose of Mt. Olive’s YMHFA and CI training and outreach program is to build the capacity of adults living and working in Montgomery County to detect and respond to behavioral health issues impacting adolescent and adult African Americans and to connect them in a culturally sensitive manner to needed services provided by SBHI. CI training will focus on educating stakeholders to acquire the skills necessary to respond effectively to anxious, irrational, angry, hostile, or potentially violent behavior. Project goals include: 1) obtain training for project staff to become YMHFA and CI instructors; 2) increase the mental health literacy of adults who interact with African American adolescents and adults and increase their capacity to respond in a culturally appropriate manner to adolescents and adults with SMI and/or SED; 3) conduct outreach and engagement strategies with adolescents and their families or caregivers to increase awareness of and promote positive behavioral health; 4) link African American adolescents and adults with SMI and/or SED to mental, emotional, and behavioral health assistance and services; and 5) increase the number of collaborative partnerships with relevant youth-serving community agencies and programs. Three African American community leaders in Dayton will provide YMHFA and CI training in the MELT project. The data to be collected includes: a) the total number of people trained in YMHFA, broken down by profession; b) the total number of people trained in CI, broken down by profession; and c) the number of individuals referred for mental health or related services

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM081402-01 MOUNT OLIVE BAPTIST CHURCH DAYTON OH WILLIAMS CARLTON $124,578

Project Title: Improving Mental Health Awareness and Response in the Great Lakes Region The Great Lakes Region of the United States is a rural and highly underserved area facing considerable behavioral health workforce challenges. Clover Educational Consulting Group (Clover) proposes to bring evidence-based mental health training to Veterans Affairs (VA) providers and staff, veterans, family members and caregivers of veterans, college faculty and staff, college student peer leaders, community mental health staff, and community first-responders in the region. The specific trainings offered will be Mental Health First Aid and Suicide Prevention for College Students. The trainings will focus on serving the populations of veterans, college students, and rural behavioral health service recipients in the Great Lakes Region of the U.S. The three identified populations of focus were chosen due to their high risk of mental health symptomatology and suicide and represent specific areas of significant unmet mental healthcare need. Clover has developed collaborative partnerships with 5 local agencies in the Region who have committed to hosting trainings, assisting with the response to mental health issues, and to improving the coordination of services to the populations of focus. These organizations include the Edward Hines, Jr. Veterans Affairs (VA) Hospital, Lake Superior College, Solutions Behavioral Healthcare Professionals, Lake Superior Community Health Center, and the Human Development Center. Each organization has attested, via a Letter of Commitment, to their support for the project and has described in the LOC how they will facilitate the recruitment of a sufficient number of individuals to be trained. The partner sites included in the current application are all located within designated HPSA’s. The identified populations of focus in the current application represent specific areas of significant unmet need. The three broad goals of the project are as follows: Goal 1- Improve the capacity of local providers, community members, and first responders to identify and respond to signs and symptoms of MH issues in veterans in the Region; Goal 2- Improve the capacity of college faculty, staff, and student peer leaders to identify and respond to signs and symptoms of MH issues in college students in the Region; and Goal 3- Improve the capacity of local providers, community members, and first responders to identify and respond to signs and symptoms of MH issues in rural behavioral health service recipient in the Region. If funded, the proposed project will provide training for 1,180 individuals over the three-year grant term. In Year 1, 280 individuals will be trained, 450 in Year 2, and 450 in Year 3.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM081931-01 CLOVER EDUCATIONAL CONSULTING GROUP, INC. AUSTIN TX DEHAY TAMARA $124,842

The WellSpan Philhaven Mental Health Awareness Training program (WSPHMHAT) will seek to serve individuals ages 18 and over in Adams, Lancaster, Lebanon, and York counties, providing training in the evidence-based practices of Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) and Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR). The WSPHMHAT program will train 596 individuals in year one of the grant, 507 individuals in year two, and 287 individuals in year three for a total of 1,390 individuals during the three-year project period. Providing MHFA and QPR training is both an organizational priority for WellSpan Health and specialty for WellSpan Philhaven (WSPH), the 14th largest behavioral health provider in the country. WSPH has experience providing MHFA and QPR training to law enforcement and correctional officers, veterans, primary and secondary school educators, Pennsylvania State Senate political staff, corporations, local library staff, elder health care organizations, and faith-based communities. For the purpose of the MHAT grant program, training efforts will be focused on veterans’ advocates, correctional facility staff and others who exist at the intersection of the criminal justice system and the mental and behavioral health sphere, and social services providers. The individuals to be served include the approximately 1,207,000 residents of the aforementioned counties, a population where: • An average of 36% of adults report experiencing 1 or more poor mental health days a month; • An average of 18% of adults report having a depressive disorder; • An average of 17% of adults report having an anxiety disorder; • Many adults possess or have experienced risk factors that often contribute to or are associated with poor mental health such as poverty (10% average) and economic hardships (30.8%), obesity (30.3%), and poor health that limits normal activities (40.3%) Focusing on the above described population, the WSPHMHAT program will seek to achieve three primary goals: 1) Increase the number of individuals in WellSpan Health’s (WSH) primary service area (Adams, Lebanon, Lancaster, and York counties) who are trained in QPR or MHFA (measured by the number of individuals trained and the number of trainings held); 2) Expand the capacity of WSPH’s mental Health Care Education training team (measured by the support of 1 FTE Mental Health Care Educator and the hiring and onboarding of a 0.5 FTE Administrative Assistant to provide direct project support); and 3) Increase awareness and understanding of mental health in WSH’s primary service area among those trained in MHFA and QPR by WSPH (measured by trainee responses to pre- and post-training surveys administered by WSPH).

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM081425-01 WELLSPAN HEALTH YORK PA GROFF DARYL $124,886

North Carolina has a population of approximately 9.9 million people, and nearly 5% of adults in the state live with serious mental health conditions. Only 48.2% of adults with mental illness in North Carolina receive any form of treatment from either the public system or private providers. North Carolina is ranked 33 out of the 50 states and Washington D.C. for providing access to mental health services. Additionally, North Carolina is comprised of largely underserved areas and most of the state is designated by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) as a Mental Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA). Clover Educational Consulting Group (Clover) proposes to bring evidence-based mental health training to public school teachers, providers and staff, family members of public school children, college faculty, providers, and staff, and college student peer leaders in North Carolina. The trainings will focus on serving the populations of public school children and college students in the local area. The identified populations of focus were chosen in order to promote early intervention and reduce the risk of mental health symptomatology and suicide. Clover has developed collaborative partnerships with 2 local agencies in the area who have committed to hosting trainings, assisting with the response to mental health issues, and to improving the coordination of services to the populations of focus. These organizations are Guilford County Schools and High Point University. Each organization has attested, via a Letter of Commitment, to their support for the project and has described in the LOC how they will facilitate the recruitment of a sufficient number of individuals to be trained. The two broad goals of the project are as follows: Goal 1- Improve the capacity of local public school teachers, providers, staff, and family members to identify and respond to signs and symptoms of MH issues in school-aged children.; and Goal 2- Improve the capacity of local college faculty, providers, staff, and student peer leaders to identify and respond to signs and symptoms of MH issues in college students. If funded, the proposed project will provide training for 1,680 individuals over the three-year grant term.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM081932-01 CLOVER EDUCATIONAL CONSULTING GROUP, INC. AUSTIN TX GILDEN ALYSSA $124,913

Medina County Aware (MCA) is a comprehensive and collaborative project designed to use Youth Mental Health First Aid (YMHFA) to train teachers, relevant school personnel, and parents/caregivers and Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) to train individuals who interact with armed services personnel, veterans, and their families in Medina County, Ohio on how to appropriately, effectively, and safely engage and respond to those with mental disorders. In Medina County, 24% of youth (35% among females) reported “feeling sad or hopeless” almost every day for two weeks or more in a row, 14% of youth (18% among females) reported seriously considering suicide in the past 12 months, and 7% of youth (9% among females) reported attempting suicide in the past year (MedinaHealth.org). There are 12,473 (9.4%) veterans residing in Medina County (Veteran’s Administration in Ohio), and through Representative Renacci’s office, MCA will have direct contact with 4,906 veterans. Of these veterans, 8.7% have a diagnosis of PTSD and 1.4% have a diagnosis of depression. Although there are numerous behavioral health agencies in Medina County, there is a service gap in connecting individuals with services partially due to stigma and lack of awareness of mental health services. For example, nearly 50% of youth who reported they would not seek help to deal with a mental health issue, 40% were worried about what others might think, 13% did not know where to go, 13% reported their family would not support them, and 6% reported their friends would not support them. To bridge the service gap, MCA will train approximately 1,740 people (480 in Year 1, 630 in Year 2, and 630 in Year 3) in Y/MHFA. The seven public schools in Medina County have agreed to train 35% of their teachers and relevant school personnel in YMHFA as well a promote Hear to Help, a stigma reduction initiative designed to increase help-seeking behavior and referrals to mental health services. In addition major veteran agencies in Medina County have agreed to participate in MHFA trainings. MCA will certify a total of 18 YMHFA instructors with 16 of these instructors being school employees in each of the seven public schools in Medina County and two being KSU employees who will assist with the trainings. Two additional instructors will be trained in MHFA and work with KSU’s existing MHFA instructors to provide the community trainings. The 20 total instructors will allow the schools and community to sustain the Y/MHFA trainings once funding ends. MCA will partner with the Medina County ADAMH Board, mental health agencies, and public schools in Medina County to create written and electronic mental health resource materials as well as create and improve referral mechanisms in the school and community. MCA will collect referral data and variables of interest (e.g., mental health knowledge, stigma) at several time points to evaluate the effectiveness of the project as a whole and to make program adjustments as necessary.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM081052-01 KENT STATE UNIVERSITY KENT OH KENNE DERIC $124,916

Sinai Health System of Chicago, Illinois, is proposing Promoting Awareness of Mental Health in Chicago’s Underserved Communities (PAMH), a train-the-trainer program with the overarching goal to increase mental health awareness among individuals who interact and come into contact with persons with a serious mental illness (SMI) or serious emotional disturbance (SED) in underserved communities in West and Southwest Chicago. To achieve this goal, the PAMH project will train 80 unduplicated individuals per year for a total of 240 individuals trained by the end of the grant. Sinai has identified individuals from low-income, minority, immigrant, and deaf and/or hard of hearing (DHH) communities as the populations of focus. The most frequently reported clinical characteristics in the geographic catchment area are depression (48%), anxiety (36%), acculturative stress (34%), need for parental support (29%), trauma (27%), anger (23%), feelings of isolation (23%), and need for relationship support (19%) (CMHA, 2017). Sinai’s Under the Rainbow Program (UTR), which has functioned as part of the outpatient programs of the Sinai Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health, has identified that 11% have been diagnosed with depression, 5% have anxiety disorders, 5% have bipolar disorders, 5% have oppositional defiant disorder, and, disturbingly, 7% have experienced post-traumatic stress disorders. As high as 85% of people surveyed in some communities witnessed or experienced traumatic events. In the adult population, Sinai sees high incidence of medical co-morbidities and high-risk behaviors leading to involvement with the justice system, disability, hospitalizations, and substance abuse. Four Sinai behavioral health clinicians will become certified as Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) and Crisis Intervention Training (CIT) trainers for a broad and diverse training audience. The target audience to receive mental health awareness training includes individuals who are likely to encounter the focus populations, such as teachers, school personnel, parents, faith leaders, and community leaders. Additionally, the project will train individuals whose immediate response could be critical in the resolution of a situation, such as police, first responders, and health care promoters (e.g., primary care physicians and health care coordinators). The measurable objectives are to 1) increase the aptitude of mental health literacy, 2) improve the cultural competency of the training audience, and 3) improve knowledge of resources and increase referrals for individuals with the signs or symptoms of mental illness.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM081350-01 SINAI HEALTH SYSTEM, INC. CHICAGO IL BALLESTAS MIRNA $124,976

Health360, in collaboration with Western Connecticut State University, University of Bridgeport, Quinnipiac University, University of Connecticut and Yale University, will implement Student Veterans & Health Professions ASIST. Student Veterans & Health Professions ASIST seeks to decrease suicide deaths in veterans and people seeking physical health care by training student veterans and health professions students in the evidenced base Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST), the only suicide intervention model (SIM) listed in the National Register of Evidenced-based Programs and Practices (NREPP). Both student groups are “gatekeepers” with primary or extended contact with persons at risk of suicide which uniquely positions them to help save lives. The project will meet the following goals: 1) increase the capacity of the health care system to reduce deaths by suicide by implementing an evidenced based SIM that improves suicide risk assessment and management skills of primary and specialty care providers; 2) increase the capacity of student veterans to reduce deaths by suicide by implementing an evidenced based SIM that improves suicide risk assessment and management skills of the veteran community; 3) increase the number of persons referred to mental health services; and 4) increase capacity of colleges and universities to support best practice suicide intervention training for health professions students and student veterans. After the three year project (Oct 2018 to Sept 2021) the following objectives will be accomplished: 1) 350 health profession students trained in ASIST; 2) 130 student veterans trained in ASIST; 3) ASIST trained students will demonstrate an 80% increase in a) suicide prevention literacy, b) willingness to perform crisis de-escalation for someone identified as at risk for suicide, c) level of preparedness to help a person at risk for suicide, and d) confidence to help a person at risk for suicide; 4) 480 interventions performed by ASISTers with people at risk for suicide; 5) 480 persons identified as at risk for suicide referred to mental health services; 6) 10 colleges and universities participating in this project; and 7) 3 colleges and universities adopt ASIST as a required component of their health profession training curriculum.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM081184-01 HEALTH360, INC. WATERBURY CT PADILLA YANIA $124,994

The Health Research and Educational Trust of NJ will work closely with the Mental Health Association in NJ to implement a mental health awareness training program that focuses on veterans and military families, titled ""Mental Health First Aid: Increasing Mental Health Literacy, Reducing Stigma Among Veterans, Their Families and Service Providers."" The evidence-based program Mental Health First Aid will be used to train 1,260 veterans, caregivers of veterans and military families, and service providers who focus on or have regular contact with veterans and military families, throughout New Jersey. The focus of the proposed project is to train seven teams of Certified MHFA Instructors - comprised of one veteran and one mental health professional per team - to provide MHFA training, most often using the ""Mental Health First Aid for Military Members, Veterans, and their Families"" module. A train-the-trainer model is proposed as a method to maximize the number of individuals trained in the timeframe of this project. Project activities coalesce around a multi-wave training approach that allows military peers and providers to receive and then provide critical training, while working with veterans and military families. This approach allows the project to have far reaching effects and provides multiple environments (including early and late adopters) to measure the process and outcomes associated with project implementation. The goals of this project are to: (1) Increase mental health literacy among veteran/military peers and service providers, as well as caregivers and military families, and their capacity to de-escalate crisis situations and make appropriate mental health referrals; and (2) Increase access to mental health services, particularly among veterans and military families, by training the peers and providers who contact them on the unique needs of this population and the available resources in the community. Project objectives include: (1) By January 2019, project partners will have developed a referral mechanism to drive collaboration between mental health providers and social service networks; (2) By February 2019, MHANJ staff will have screened and identified a cohort of seven veterans, each paired with a mental health professional, and trained them as Certified MHFA Instructors; (3) By the end of Year 3, Certified MHFA Instructors will have trained 1,260 individuals, from at least 40 organizations, in Mental Health First Aid, particularly the MHFA for Veterans module (210 in Year 1; 525 in Year 2; 525 in Year 3); (4) By the end of Year 3, HRETNJ will have hosted added-value webinars, attended by at least 50% of previously trained individuals and/or 50 professionals in the mental health and related workforce, on mental health-related topics (e.g., opioid crisis); and (5) By the end of Year 3, trained individuals will have logged at least 1,000 referrals (in total) to mental health or related services for veterans and military families.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM080993-01 HEALTH RESEARCH AND EDUC TRUST OF N J PRINCETON NJ DITRI MARY $125,000

NyE Communities Coalition will serve the Nevada Counties of Nye, Esmeralda, and Lincoln. The Mental Health Awareness Training (MHAT) Project will provide training to a broad group of individuals that are the first responders, caring interveners and educators of the communities; so that they in turn have the skills and knowledge to help prevent mental and behavioral health crisis among community members. Project Name: NyE Communities Coalition MHAT Population to be Serve: Nevada Counties; Nye (45,277), Esmeralda (963), and Lincoln (4,963). Nye County Suicide rate per 100,000 is 32.54 compared to the national average of 12.61 Nye, Esmeralda, Lincoln data reflects that 29.3% of the students reported they felt sad and hopeless and 17.1% reported that they had seriously considered suicide. Goals and Outcomes: Goal 1: Create systems, build infrastructure, and establish responsibilities to address the unmet mental health needs of the communities. Outcome 1): Within 6 months, 10 key decision making partners representing a minimum of 8 different sectors will be regularly attending monthly planning meetings. Outcome 2): By May 2019, partners, community, and staff will use local data and information. Outcome 3): By September 2019, the collaboration will complete an initial plan to address community mental and behavioral health needs. Outcome 4): By March 2020, the collaboration will document a review to assess the changes that have occurred and determine additional goals. Outcome 5): By September 2020, 8 key partner organizations will make procedural and policy changes to sustain and integrate system changes to address mental and behavioral health. Outcome 6): By September 30, 2021, one complete document describing a comprehensive system to address the unique community needs across the three counties will be in place. Goal 2: Increase the capacity of first responders, educators, faith based leaders, parents, students, law enforcement, medical professionals, social service providers, peer supports, and other concerned community members on how to intervene, assist, and support community members with mental and behavior disorders by training these concerned individuals. Trainings include: Mental Health First Aid (MHFA); Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST); Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT); etc… Outcome 1): By September 28, 2019, 500 unduplicated individuals will have attended at least one unique science based training. Outcome 2): By September 28, 2020, 500 unduplicated individuals will have attended at least one unique science based training. Outcome 3) By September 28, 2021, 500 unduplicated individuals will have attended at least one unique science based training.

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SM081019-01 NYE COMMUNITIES COALITION PAHRUMP NV JOHNSON KIM $125,000

The aim of this project, Puerto Rico Outreach Model In Schools Esperanza (PROMISE): Increasing Mental Health Awareness and Access to Care Post Hurricane Maria, is to increase access to treatment for school-aged children in Puerto Rico experiencing mental health problems, including trauma-related distress. It is critical that school personnel understand how to respond to students experiencing mental health problems in a safe and appropriate manner and to help them access needed assistance. PROMISE will focus on school-aged children in western Puerto Rico, who are economically disadvantaged, residing in communities severely impacted by Hurricane Maria, and consequently, are at significantly increased risk for mental health problems, including serious emotional disturbance (SED). A needs assessment conducted by our team revealed high rates of PTSD, depression, and anxiety symptoms among students in the target schools following Hurricane Maria. The goal of PROMISE is to increase the capacity of school personnel to: 1) recognize signs and symptoms trauma-related mental health problems and other types of SED; 2) recognize signs of suicidal risk and employ appropriate crisis de-escalation techniques; and 3) refer children with mental health problems to appropriate services. Several evidence-based and culturally-tailored MHATs have been selected: 1) Trauma-Informed Schools Curriculum (NCTSN/SAMHSA, 2008); 2) After the Storm (La Greca & Sevin, 2004); 3) Suicide and Crisis Management Protocol (Martinez, 2017); and 4) Skills for Psychological Recovery (Berkowitz, Bryant, Brymer et al., 2010). The objective of PROMISE is to train 75% of school personnel in each of 20 target schools with over 6,500 students and more than 620 school staff on the selected evidence-based MHATs by the end of the three-year grant period. This will be achieved in collaboration with the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) Medical Sciences and University Carlos Albizu (UCA), Mayaguez through direct trainings and utilizing a train-the-trainer model. Specifically, UCA graduate student therapists embedded within school-based mental health clinics at 20 schools and their clinical supervisors will be trained in selected MHATs, and they will in turn train school staff in these MHATs at their respective schools. In addition, referral mechanisms to school- (UCA school-based therapists) and community-based (APS Clinics) providers will be further developed, and case consultation and crisis management will be available to school personnel via telepsychiatry from UPR psychiatry residents. An estimated 40 clinical graduate students will receive MHATs annually across the 3 years for a total of 120 graduate students through the grant period. An estimated 155 school staff will be trained in Year 1, 155 in Year 2 and 310 in Year 3 for a total of 620 school staff that will have received MHAT. A grand total of 740 mental health and non-mental health professionals will have received MHATs by the end of the project, which has the potential to impact 6, 500 Puerto Rican students.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM081934-01 MEDICAL UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA CHARLESTON SC ORENGO AGUAYO ROSAURA $125,000

Wayside Youth & Family Support Network (Wayside) will build upon our experience training adults in Youth Mental Health First Aid (YMHFA) to also offer Adult Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) trainings in Watertown, Waltham, Belmont and Brookline, MA, and University of Massachusetts Boston (UMB), to school personnel, emergency first responders, Veterans and their family members, parents and others throughout the catchment area. We will also provide trainings in Spanish as well as train on de-escalation skills using evidence-based Crisis Intervention Training (CIT). Through development of training and sustainability plans and collaborative partnerships we propose to improve mental health literacy amongst those who most often interface with youth, adults, Veterans and others experiencing mental health issues. The proposed MHAT grant will train, over the life of the grant, 1000 adults in the catchment area who interface with youth and/or adults in a variety of settings including parents, law enforcement, school personnel, first responders, and Veterans or families of military personnel. Through use of our needs assessment and environmental scan we have identified behavioral health needs and subsequently the need to train stakeholders who interface with youth and adults who may be experiencing a mental health crisis.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM081026-01 WAYSIDE YOUTH AND FAMILY SUPPORT NETWORK FRAMINGHAM MA KURMAN LAURA $125,000

Project Abstract Summary Project Name: Seasons Mental Health Awareness Training (MHAT) Project Applicant: Northwest Iowa Mental Health Center dba Seasons Center for Behavioral Health Project Summary: The proposed project will provide training to recognize the signs and symptoms of mental health disorders and offer strategies for handling crisis situations; establish linkages among community agencies to enhance referral processes for accessing mental health services; and provide education regarding community resources. Target Population to be Served: The proposed training plan is designed to serve a broad base of community agencies and individuals, including child welfare, school personnel, law enforcement, medical staff, veterans and their families, armed services members, behavioral health staff, first responders, and other community members. A minimum of 10 mental health awareness trainings will target veterans, military families, and armed forces. Demographic and Clinical Characteristics of Target Population: The geographic service area for the project encompasses 19 counties in the northwestern corner of the State of Iowa: Buena Vista, Calhoun, Carroll, Cherokee, Clay, Crawford, Dickinson, Emmet, Ida, Lyon, Monona, O’Brien, Osceola, Palo Alto, Plymouth, Pocahontas, Sac, Sioux, and Woodbury. The nineteen county region has a population of 356,856 residents (Census 2017 Estimates). In 2017 Seasons Center provided behavioral health services to 5,338 individuals, including 2,448 youth. Evidence-Based Strategies and Interventions: The evidence-based trainings to be implemented are Mental Health First Aid USA and Youth Mental Health First Aid. Project Goals and Measurable Objectives: The goals of the project are: Goal 1: To increase the number of individuals certified to teach the Adult and Youth Mental Health First Aid USA course over the three year project period. Target Outcome: Train 12 individuals to be certified Instructors. Goal 2: To expand to number of trainings offered in Adult and Youth Mental Health First Aid USA within a 19 county region. Target Outcome: Host 40 training events, with a minimum of 608 participants. Goal 3: To improve collaboration and linkages among community agencies to enhance referral processes for mental health services and resources. Target Outcome: Host 36 community education events and pilot a uniform referral process for mental health services. Number to be Served Annually and Throughout Lifetime of Project: The project proposes to offer 40 trainings (Year 1: 4, Year 2: 12, Year 3: 24); train 608 individuals (Year 1: 80, Year 2: 240, Year 3: 288); and certify 12 Instructors (Year 1: 4, Year 2: 4, Year 4). 10 trainings will target veterans, military families, and armed forces: (Year 1: 1, Year 2: 3, Year 3: 6).

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM081119-01 NORTHWEST IOWA MENTAL HEALTH CENTER SPENCER IA CLAY CHELSEA $125,000

Special Service for Groups, Inc., Occupational Therapy Training Program (SSG/OTTP) proposes to implement a mental health awareness training program in four underserved school districts in Los Angeles County. The Achieving Change in the Environment at School (ACES) Program aims to increase awareness of students with mental illness and available resources among each school community. Each community encompasses all adults who play a significant role in the students’ (ages 5-18) lives, including parents, family members, caregivers, teachers, and other school staff. The targeted school districts include Lawndale Elementary School District, Lynwood Unified School District, and Alliance College-Ready Public Schools, all of which SSG/OTTP currently work with through other youth-based programs. In our work within these schools, we have observed students experiencing a high rate of risk factors known to impact and cause mental health issues and crises, including high poverty rates, school violence, school-based crimes, and truancy. Through a world-renown evidence based-program called Youth Mental Health First Aid training, SSG/OTTP will create a culture that is aware of the students’ mental health needs. The school campus community will have increased access to resources that can help guide them in properly identifying who needs assistance and the appropriate referrals to make. Our four measurable objectives are as follows: 1) By the end of year three of the project, 500 school community members will have been provided information to increase mental health awareness and recruited for mental health awareness training; 2) By the end of year three of the project, 300 school personnel, volunteers and/or parents/guardians will be enrolled in YMHFA; 3) By the end of year three of the project, 150 school personnel, volunteers and/or parents/guardians will have completed training in YMHFA; and 4) By the end of year three of the project, 95% of students identified as needing mental health resources will have been referred to the appropriate community-based mental health agency. We aim to train 25 individuals the first year, 50 individuals the second year, and 75 individuals the third year, for a total of 150 by the end of the three-year project. The total dollar amount for this program is 125,000 per year over a three-year period.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM081170-01 SPECIAL SERVICE FOR GROUPS, INC. LOS ANGELES CA AFUSO-SUGANO SUZANNE $125,000

The project will save lives among transition aged youth by providing MHFA training to the target population with the aim of increasing the mental health literacy of adults who interact with transition-aged youth. Furthermore, the project will help parents, transition-aged youth and the community to understand the symptoms and importance of treatment adherence, which has an impact on recidivism. The goal is to train 8,210 people annually and 24,7630 Mental Health First Aiders over the three years of this project. The target population of this project is ""transition-aged youth"" between the ages of 16 and 24, youth-serving adults, teachers, policy-makers, and administrators of programs, first responders, faith-based leaders, Veterans with children, other adults and families. GPS has prioritized the age group 16-24 because suicide is the 11th leading cause of death in the United States, and the highest incidence of attempts is among those 18 to 24 and the third leading cause of death for those 15 to 24 years of age. In addition, this is generally the age of the first onset of psychosis. Furthermore, those who are already involved in treatment ""age out"" and typically do not return to treatment for adult services due to stigma and lack of ""wrap around"" services they were used to in child and adolescent services. Transitioning teens are near adult age without parental oversight and direction to ensure that they keep mental health appointments. They tend to utilize alcohol and drugs due to being 21 years of age and self-medicate thus, become involved in the criminal justice system. Finally, due to family conflict and conflict with other authority figures, they have a high rate of homelessness. The project will increase mental health literacy of a broad array of actors at the community level who interact with youth through their programs, in MHFA. The project will achieve stated goals by increasing the mental health literacy of adults who interact with adolescents or transition-aged youth; increasing the capacity of adults within the communities to respond to the behavioral health issues of transition-aged youth; increasing awareness and literacy of transition-aged youth about mental health and reduce stigma; linking transition-aged youth with behavioral health issues to mental, emotional,and behavioral health assistance and services; and developing Community Mental Health Coalitions. The stated goals will be achieved by;increasing the number of collaborative partnerships with relevant youth-serving community agencies; increasing the number of adults trained in MHFA; conducting outreach and engagement strategies with transition-aged youth and their families or caregivers to increase awareness of and promote positive behavioral health; increasing the number of referrals of transition-aged youth to mental health services; and increasing the number of collaborative partnerships with relevant youth-serving community agencies and programs. This project will further help to reduce the number of transition-aged youth who utilize inpatient crisis stabilization services, become homeless,engage with the justice system and require Substance Abuse services.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM081429-01 GRAND PRAIRIE SERVICES TINLEY PARK IL WARD SHARRONNE $125,000

Name: Georgia DBHDD Office of Behavioral Health Prevention (OBHP) Mental Health Awareness Training (MHAT) Project Population: OBHP’s MHAT project’s populations of focus for which DBHDD’s mental health awareness training is intended to help will include veterans, youth and teenagers, adults, and older adults. Persons to receive MHAT will include individuals who can provide support to veterans, youth, adults, and older adults. Training participants will include behavioral health professionals, nurses, teachers, clergy, community suicide prevention coalition members, caregivers, correction staff, first responders, youth workers, school support staff, and Veterans and family members of Armed Service Members. Strategies/Interventions: Of DBHDD’s 6 regions, 2016 data indicates that Regions, 2, 5, and 1 had the highest suicide death rates; Regions 2, 5, and 6 had the highest suicide hospital discharge rates; Regions 1, 3, and 2 had the greatest number of both suicide deaths and hospital discharges; Regions 5, 1, and 6 had the highest suicide ER visit rates; and Regions 1, 3, and 6 had the greatest number of suicide ER visits. All five of these regions, had at least 2 counties with high suicide rates. These counties (total of 20) will serve as the geographic catchment area for the project. In implementing its project, OBHP will utilize its safety net of providers know as Tier 1 Comprehensive Community Providers (CCP) to implement training activities in their region as well as to serve as referral agencies. The CCPs, who are DBHDD public providers that have the capacity to deliver comprehensive and vital community mental health and substance use disorder services and that have the stature, visibility, accountability, and credibility to be seen as the local and reliable safety net provider for the delivery of supports and services in the counties targeted by this project. The goal of OBHPs MHAT Project is to increase the capacity of Georgia communities to reduce suicide risk that may contribute to suicide attempts and/or death by suicide. Objectives include the following: Objective 1: By September 29, 2021, a total of at least 20 evidence based mental health awareness trainings will be provided annually targeting counties in DBHDD regions 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 that were identified in 2015 as being the highest death by suicide counties in Georgia. Objective 2: By September 29, 2021, at least 90% of populations of focus referred to participating Tier 1 Comprehensive Community Provider mental health resources by individuals trained in MHAT will be tracked. Objective 3: By the end of the three year project, OBHP proposes to train at least unduplicated 600 individuals (average 200 per year), including fifty certified training of trainers with grant funds. This will enhance the sustainability of mental health awareness training capacity post grant.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee State Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amountsort descending
SM081557-01 GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES (DBHDD) ATLANTA GA FRETWELL TRAVIS $125,000