SM-19-005 Individual Grant Awards

Under the FY 2019 Tribal Behavioral Health Grant Program (Native Connections), Maniilaq Association plans to implement a youth-targeted suicide prevention / postvention program in the twelve communities it serves in remote Northwest Alaska. The total population of the Maniilaq Service Area is approximately 8,200 residents, with 37.2 per cent (3,051) falling in the range from youth to 24 years of age with an estimated 50% to be served by this grant through a Tier 1 Universal intervention which will be targeted at the youth age 12-24. Funding awarded toward the Maniilaq Association Youth Suicide Prevention Project will support the expansion of village-based, Native-led wellness and suicide prevention programming. This will expand upon existing village infrastructure established under the PC CARES (Promoting Community Conversations About Research to End Suicide) Program, a successful model in our region in which monthly learning circles are facilitated by community leaders in each of the villages of the Maniilaq Service Area. These learning circles combine region-based research evidence with local knowledge to support suicide prevention at the community level through culturally appropriate strategies. Following on the PC CARES pilot program, Maniilaq Association will partner with researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst to create a 3-part suicide prevention / postvention program targeted specifically to the region’s youth and young adults under the age of 24. These trainings will be delivered via Learning Circles, which have been successfully demonstrated under PC CARES and Maniilaq’s Qargi model. With previous SAMHSA support, Maniilaq Association has made significant strides in addressing the mental health and substance abuse treatment needs of this region’s residents. This FY19 Native Connections support will help Maniilaq Association to build on nearly twenty years of collaboration between researchers, behavioral health practitioners, and the Alaska Native villages of Northwest Alaska to combat the high rates of youth suicide in our region. Goal 1 –Using the Native Connections Public Health Approach, increase the capacity of service providers to address SUD and suicide. *Objective 1A. By May 30, 2019 create a Youth Advisory Council in order to ensure youth community member involvement in all grant activities. *Objective 1B. By September 30, 2019 complete required elements of the Native Connections Public Health Approach (CSA, CNA, CRA, CRAM, SAP). *Objective 1C. By December 31, 2019 draft a report that addresses existing policies and procedures to promote coordination among youth-serving agencies and identifies any gaps. Objective 1D. By December 31, 2019 draft a report that addresses current or revised protocols for youth at risk, ensuring they receive follow-up services. Goal 2 – Increase capacity of the tribal communities to engage in suicide prevention and postvention activities. *Objective 2A. By May 30, 2019 Dr. Wexler’s team will revise PC-CARES materials to create a three-part curriculum to emphasis postvention for delivery to youth and those that work with youth. *Objective 2B. By October 31 of each project year, Project Director and U Mass Amherst educators deliver PC-CARES revised training to 10 Village Wellness Team members. *Objective 2C. By July 31 of each project year, deliver PC-CARES revised training to 15 Northwest Arctic Borough School District teachers or staff. *Objective 2D. By August 1 of each project year, deliver PC-Cares revised training to 12 number Youth Leaders. *Objective 2E. By December 31 of each project year, community Wellness Teams will lead 3 revised PC-CARES learning circles in each of the region’s 12 villages (36 total learning circles). Objective 2F. Between May 1 and September 1 of each project year, Youth Leaders will hold 1 Youth initiated, designed, led, suicide prevention event in each village (12 events total).

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082051-01 MANIILAQ HEALTH CENTER KOTZEBUE AK SWANSON BREE $490,218

The Native Village of Tyonek (NVT), a federally recognized tribe in Alaska, will serve a population of 373 community members an other residents in the area by expanding services to address suicide and substance abuse among young people. The NVT Native Connections Team will engage with the Tribal Youth and Elders to identify urgent or emerging substance use issues; identify project strengths and resources; assess community needs and resources; identify gaps in services; and coordinate available resources and programs. The NVT Behavioral Health Aide will additionally facilitate a plan of action to provide integrated behavioral health screenings to youth ages 24 and younger in primary care settings at Indian Creek Health Center; link youth and to teach Question, Persuade, and Refer (QPR), safeTALK and ASIST Suicide Prevention and Intervention; and provide referrals to Learning Circles to local community youth-serving organizations. This work will be sustained and advised by NVT's Elders and Youth Committee, a group of tribal members including youth established in 2016 in an effort to engage in traditional knowledge sharing and community wellness.The project will be directed by the Tribal Health Director and the Tribal Council's Administrator and will add a part time behavioral health aide/project coordinator. The goal of NVT's Native Connections program is to prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance use among tribal youth ages 24 and younger. The following objectives will support the program's goal to develop a three-tiered Tribal Action Plan that utilizes evidence-based prevention and intervention strategies to serve American Indian/ Alaska Native youth; strengthen partnerships with various youth serving and health organizations and traditional healers/cultural teachers for easy transition and/or referrals to substance abuse or mental health services, life skills training, cultural activities, and family wellness; recruit and work with at least five tribal youth and two Elders for participation in the NVT Native Connections Tribal Youth and Elders Committee to discuss policies and procedures to present to the Tribal Council to promote culturally sensitive suicide postvention and prevention work in the village; train at least forty tribal members (youth and adults) in age-appropriate suicide prevention and resiliency building strategies, including QPR, safeTALK, or traditional learning circles as provided by the BHAC; recruit and train at least five tribal members in suicide crisis response to include Critical Incident Stress Management, safeTALK, and ASIST; and collect, document, and analyze behavioral health service data related to services provided by the NVT Native Connections Program.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082006-01 NATIVE VILLAGE OF TYONEK TYONEK AK BAKER JANELLE $500,000

ABSTRACT Calricaraq: Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation’s Native Connection Program Alaska’s Yukon Kuskokwim Delta region in Southwest Alaska is home to 58 Indigenous communities comprised of Yup’ik, Cup’ik and Athabaskan people. This Native Connections grant proposal will aim to serve youth up to age 24 who reside in these communities, approximately 10,000 in total, through a cadre of strategies and interventions center around Calricaraq, a holistic, culture-based and community-centered approach, to help our communities healing from past traumas and unresolved grief. Calricaraq, translated “helping families heal”, is Calricaraq is a curriculum based on the traditional values and ways of the people in the Y-K Delta region of southwest Alaska, and involves the incorporation of the ancestral traditional values, practices and teachings into prevention and treatment programs to help Yukon Kuskokwim Yup'ik and Cup’ik people heal from mental health and/or substance abuse disorders. Following our completion of the community system analysis and community readiness assessment, our program staff will focus on providing outreach to communities to build their knowledge of identifying youth at risk for suicide, establish protocols for responding to suicides and begin creating crisis response teams in their community so they have the ability to respond to BH crises. An Action Plan will also be developed to provide a guide for the strategies and activities to be completed during the five-year grant period. At the heart of our intervention will be the facilitation of Calricaraq Gatherings, 3-day events that teach participants how to get on the healthy road of life, and the Calricaraq Facilitator Trainings, also 3-days in length, that teach participants how to begin facilitating Calricaraq activities in their own communities to help their community members also get on the road to wellness and recovery. Our measurable objectives include the 1) completion of the community systems analysis and the community readiness assessment, 2) creation of crisis response teams, 3) development of our action plan that we can use as a road map through the different phases of the Native Connections grant, and 4) the number of participants who complete the Calricaraq Gatherings and Facilitator Trainings. The more people we train, the better the chance for the Calricaraq curriculum and teachings to be disseminated to our many communities. It is anticipated that we will serve approximately 150 youth per year, and 800 in the five-year grant cycle. We have been told by many that their participation in a Calricaraq Gathering has been a life changing. This Native Connections Program will help many more of the youth in our communities change their life, and get on the road to wellness.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082030-01 YUKON-KUSKOKWIM HEALTH CORPORATION BETHEL AK DOMNICK ROSE $499,946

The Tanana Chiefs Conference Native Connections Project builds the capacity of the seven communities of TCC’s Upper Tanana Subregion, located in the Interior region of Alaska, to prevent suicide and substance use and promote mental health among youth and young adults age 10-24 through extensive outreach, engagement, community involvement, and training in evidence-based strategies. Project activities will be based on comprehensive assessment and asset mapping processes in each community. Population to be Served: The Tanana Chiefs Conference Native Connections Project serves individuals age 10-24 in TCC’s Upper Tanana subregion. An estimated 349 individuals age 10-24 reside in the seven communities of the subregion, which range in size from just 26 individuals in the smallest community of Healy Lake, to 1,223 in the largest community of Tok. Rates of historical trauma and substance use among the Alaska Native population are high. Suicide rates are anywhere from one to five times higher than for the entire State of Alaska, and more than one in eight high school students report attempting suicide in the past 12 months. Villages are extremely isolated and small, with limited educational and economic opportunities. Strategies/Interventions: Evidence-based strategies and interventions adaptable to the cultural needs of the Alaska Native population will be selected based on community assessment and resource/asset mapping processes conducted during Years 1-2 of the project. Based on action plans developed, a Train the Trainers model will be used to train leaders in each community in the evidence-based strategies, building community capacity to prevent substance use and suicide and promote mental health. Project staff will work with tribal leaders and Community Prevention Response Teams in each community to develop and implement policies and procedures to promote coordination among youth-serving agencies, ensure youth at risk for suicide receive follow-up and treatment, and provide communities with suicide postvention protocols. Project Goals and Measurable Objectives: The project goal is to increase the local infrastructure and capacity of the seven communities of TCC’s Upper Tanana Subregion to build resilience to the impacts of trauma, to promote mental health, to decrease substance use, and to reduce suicidal behavior among youth and young adults age 10-24. Measurable objectives to support this goal are to 1) complete a community assessment, community resource/asset map, and action plan for each community that addresses suicide, impacts of trauma, substance use, and mental health among youth and young adults; 2) train at least three people in each community in culturally relevant Evidence Based Practices shown to reduce suicidal behavior, promote mental health, and build resilience; 3) implement suicide postvention policies and procedures in each community; and 4) establish policies, procedures and protocols in community that ensure coordination and integration of services and supports for youth and young adults at risk for suicide. The project will serve an estimated 349 individuals age 10-24 annually, and a total of 441 individuals over the entire five-year project period.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082041-01 TANANA CHIEFS CONFERENCE, INC. FAIRBANKS AK JOHNSON JASON $500,000

Abstract Kawerak, Inc. proposes a 1,250,000 5 year project to serve the subarctic Bering Strait Region in Alaska. Alaska Native people in the Bering Strait Region had higher rates of suicide than rates for the rest of the state according to the 2013 Alaska Native Mortality Report by the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium. Kawerak, Inc. Wellness has 10 years of experience and history implementing suicide prevention strategies in the Bering Strait Region. The project proposed aims to develop/enhance the bridge between youth, cultural, and community supports through comprehensive & culturally relevant training and intervention to support sustainable, community-level suicide prevention for Alaska Natives. The project is rooted in community partnership. Norton Sound Health Corporation Behavioral Services, Bering Strait School District, Nome Public Schools, Nome Community Center, Nome Youth Facility, and the Northern Alaska Wellness Initiative (NAWI) are invested in the activities listed in the proposal. The primary goal for this program is to develop/enhance the bridge between youth, cultural, and community supports through comprehensive & culturally relevant training and intervention to support sustainable, community-level suicide prevention for Alaska Natives in order to reduce the rate of suicide attempts and substance abuse among youth ages 10 – 24 in the Bering Strait Region. To do this, the Kawerak Youth Initiative Program will utilize a variety of culturally-responsive practices to build a comprehensive program that engages multiple generations to address village needs and promote youth well-being. ? Culture Camps – (for youth and families) create cultural mentors and a skill building experience for youth and families involved in the justice system or foster care ? Story and Skill Sharing – brings mentors and cultural skills into the regional youth facility and schools throughout the region ? Resource Sharing/Connection & Youth Participant Follow-up connects youth and families with agencies and resources during and after participation in programming ? Youth Leaders – develops a Nome Youth Leaders peer mentorship program and provides ongoing support and education to Bering Strait School District Youth Leaders ? Knowing Who You Are – ensures local youth serving institutions and providers will understand the importance of a Healthy Racial and Ethnic identity in Alaska Native youth ? Culturally responsive Media Campaign aimed at youth ad families by utilizing traditional Native values in all messaging ? Collaborative Sustainability Planning- embeds proposed programming into local organizations through Regional Wellness Forum partnerships as well as through 3 intensive community wellness gatherings per year The Kawerak Youth Initiative Program will deliver youth-oriented programs that have been piloted in targeted villages with Elder guidance and promoted positive outcomes for participants. The main focus is the enhancement of youth cultural identity, which is foundational in improving overall outcomes.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082044-01 KAWERAK, INC. NOME AK PUNGOWIYI PANGANGA $500,000

The Achieving Resilient Communities (ARC) project, will serve American Indian (AI) youth ages 11-24 residing in the metro Phoenix area and their parents/caregivers. It is estimated that the ARC project will provide direct services to 240 AI youth, and 30 parents/caregivers in the first year of the project; over the lifetime of the project it is proposed that 1,200 AI youth and 150 parents/caregivers will be served. The proposed interventions include a variety of evidence-based programs and training's including Living in Two Worlds, Parenting in 2 Worlds, SafeTALK, Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training and the Gathering of Native Americans. Abbreviated goals and objectives of the project are: Goal 1: Increase resiliency in AI youth in the greater Phoenix area. Objective 1.1: By the end of each calendar year 40 urban AI youth in the Phoenix area will increase the use of the resistance strategies by 2% in order to substance abuse as measured by baseline pre-survey data compared to post-survey data. Objective 1.2: By the end of each calendar year AI youth in the Phoenix area will increase knowledge of and enhance existing protective factors associated with both physical and mental health as measured by an increase of 5% in awareness, referrals and appointments and follow-ups to medical and behavioral health services. Objective 1.3: By the end of each calendar year AI youth in the Phoenix area will increase cultural awareness and language revitalization as measured by at least 60% of participants attending 80% of cultural programming. Objective 1.4: By the end of each calendar year AI youth ages 15 - 24 in the Phoenix area will increase the number of youth trained in evidence-based suicide and substance abuse prevention programming by 200 youth each year. Goal 2: Improve family functioning and communication strategies among parents, caregivers, siblings, and urban AI youth. Objective 2.1: By the end of each calendar year, 30 urban AI families will increase by 5% the communication skills and number of drug prevention resistance strategies taught to their children to improve family functioning and communication as measured by pre-survey data compared to post-survey data. Objective 2.2: By the end of each calendar year, urban AI families will increase cultural skills as a protective factor as measured by at least 60% of adult participants attending 80% of cultural programming. Goal 3: Increase the capacity of local AI-serving organizations to respond to high-risk behaviors among AI youth that may contribute to AI youth substance use and suicide risk. Objective 3.1: By the end of year 1, AI youth-serving organizations will meet quarterly to develop standards, policies and procedures for youth at-risk of suicide; AI youth-serving organizations will meet biannually in each subsequent grant year to review and revise policies and procedures as needed. Objective 3.2: By the end of year 1, AI-serving organizations will develop an action plan that focuses on selective prevention and intervention strategies based on the results of the required community assessments; implementation of the Action Plan will continue through each remaining year of the grant. Objective 3.3: Each calendar year, hold the Suicide Prevention Convening annually.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082060-01 PHOENIX INDIAN CENTER, INC. PHOENIX AZ BEGAY-KROUPA JOLYANA $500,000

Tribal Behavioral Health grant program for suicide and substance abuse prevention

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082064-01 HOPI TRIBE KYKOTSMOVI AZ DALLAS LAVERNE $500,000

Fort Defiance Indian Hospital Board, Inc., (FDIHB) is a tribally chartered, 501(c)(3) nonprofit healthcare organization whose mission is “to provide superior and compassionate healthcare to our community by raising the level of health, Hozho, and quality of life.” FDIHB operates and manages two facilities on the Navajo Nation, Tsehootsooi Medical Center (TMC) and the Nahata’ Dziil Health Center located in Sanders, Arizona. TMC serves approximately 47,000 people in 16 communities located in northeastern area of Arizona including: Cornfields, Crystal (AZ/NM), Fort Defiance, Ganado, Greasewood, Houck, Kinlichee, Klagetoh, Lupton, Nahatadziil, Oak Springs, Red Lake (AZ/NM), Sawmill, Saint Michaels, Steamboat, and Wide Ruins. According to the Navajo Epidemiology Center Update report , suicide remains a significant contributor to mortality among Navajo, contributing to 3 percent of total deaths, and named the 7th leading cause of death. It is the second leading cause of death for youth ages 10-19 and third for ages 20-29. In an effort to reduce these statistics among youth, FDIHB proposes to implement the Native Connections Program to make enhancements to patient services and improve inter-agency collaboration among youth serving agencies in the community. The Adolescent Care Unit at TMC will direct the program activities and ensure that the following objectives are met: Objective 1: By the end of Year One, FDIHB will have completed a Community Health Needs Assessment, System Analysis, and Readiness Assessment. Objective 2: By Year Two, FDIHB will have examined and revised its current policy and/or developed new policy as it relates to transition to treatment, follow-up care services, and postvention protocols with input from organizational partners and youth serving agencies. Objective 3: By July 2020, FDIHB will have developed an Action Plan that addresses at least two tiers of prevention and intervention strategies based on the results of the analysis and assessments. Objective 4: By Year Five, FDIHB will have developed and implemented a sustainability plan to continue the program beyond grant funding. Objective 5: By Year Five, the number of youth suicides and substance abuse reported in the Fort Defiance Service are will have been reduced by 10% as evidenced by the number of reports recorded in RPMS. The program hopes to serve 500 youth per year in the Fort Defiance Service area through treatment, aftercare services, and postvention activities. The overall goal of the program is increase the capacity of health facilities and youth serving organizations to decrease the number of suicides completed by youth, decrease suicidal behavior and substance abuse and reduce the impact of trauma within the Fort Defiance service area.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082028-01 FORT DEFIANCE INDIAN HOSPITAL BOARD, INC FORT DEFIANCE AZ BENALLY SHARMAINE $500,000

The Hopland Band of Pomo Indians Reservation is located in the rolling hills of Mendocino County in Northern California. The Hopland Reservation is nestled in the heart of wine country, 90 miles North of San Francisco, California; 13 miles South of Ukiah, California and approximately four miles East of Highway 101 on State Highway 175. The Hopland Reservation originally established by the U.S. Department of the Interior on May 18, 1907 encompasses 3.23 square miles (approximately 2,080 acres) of steep terrain, orchards, vineyards, housing, and businesses. The Hopland Band of Pomo Indians has nine hundred (900) enrolled members including one-hundred sixty-nine (169) enrolled member children under the age of eighteen (18). Tribal Enrollment has grown each year since the BIA listed tribal enrollment at 737 members in 2005, according to the American Indian Population and Labor Force Report. The Hopland Reservation includes approximately 65 housing units. The population of the Hopland community is 1,193. In addition 50 tribal employees work on the Reservation. The population on the Reservation, including all people who enter the boundaries of the Reservation, employees of the Tribe, and during special events throughout the year can reach up to three-thousand three-hundred forty-four (3,344) people per day. Due to the community circumstances such as lack of healthy tribal community activities for ages up to 24, transportation to local actives/ programs/events, youth programs and un-healthy lifestyle choices among the community this has led to wide spread addiction in young children. Among the tribal youth that live on or near the Rancheria, there is a serious drug and alcohol problem and limited services to offer them other than our resources from Consolidated Tribal Health and Mendocino County Services. Although, there is a known problem in the community and it is recognized among the leadership in the Tribe as a problem and priority in solving this problem has been directed to the Hopland Tribal Health Department. The funding of the application will help to conduct a Community Needs Assessment and develop an Action Plan that will guide the implementation of the prevention strategies for the tribal youth located on the Rancheria.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082062-01 HOPLAND BAND OF POMO INDIANS HOPLAND CA LITTLEBEAR KATHY $476,733

The Yurok Tribe SAMHSA Native Connections (5) year grant, titled “Yurok Tribe Youth-At-Risk Program (YTYP)”, is to develop a Yurok Youth Tribal Action Plan (YTAP) in response to serve Yurok Tribal youth through the age of 24 who reside in Del Norte (DN) and Humboldt (HM) County of Northern California where in 2016 the Yurok Tribe declared a State of Emergency due to (7) youth committing suicide on the reservation in less than (18) month period. YTAP will have an emphasis on community engagement, improving coordination and communication between the Tribal and County agencies (United Indian Health Services (UIHS), School Districts, Sheriff, Courts, Probation, Health, Social Services (e.g. Child Welfare Services, Independent Living Program, Foster Care Services) and community coalitions, e.g. HM and DN RxSafe) in addressing needs of at risk youth and their families. YTAP will identify evidence based practices that ensure culturally and developmentally appropriate for population served in areas of youth life skills, family resiliency, peer based leadership and experiential development activities, and traditional healing approaches. The goal of this program is to identify, contact and provide services to youth-at-risk so that they do not enter the criminal justice system or attempt suicide. Approximately (20) at-risk youth will be served quarterly by the Program Director in community outreach activities, (12) at-risk youth with case management, referral services, and engagement leadership activities that are relevant, culturally and age appropriate annually. They will be managed by the case manager, totally (60) through the lifespan of this (5) grant.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082034-01 YUROK TRIBE KLAMATH CA JESSICA CARTER $421,528

The proposed project, Seminole Tribe of Florida (STOF) Native Connections (SM-19-005, CFDA 93.243) will develop and implement programs to reduce and prevent suicidal behavior and substance use, reduce the impact of trauma, and promote mental health among STOF youth through age 24-years-old. These goals will be attained through universal prevention and intervention strategies that include Evidence-Based Practices (EBPs) and STOF community outreach to treat mental health and trauma-related symptoms. Central to this grant will be the integration of EBP with Seminole cultural practices to treat 30 unduplicated Tribal youth annually. Nationally, since 1999, suicide rates have increased across all age groups but most significantly among women ages 10-74 and those who live in the most rural counties. Likewise, American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN), too, have experienced increasing rates of suicidality and it is the second leading cause of death among AI/AN youth. Data show that more than one-third of AI/AN (35.7%) die of suicide among 10-24-year-olds. Moreover, AI/AN suicides are more than twice as likely to involve alcohol or be influenced by the suicide of a friend or family member. Moreover, the rate of substance dependence/abuse among AI/AN over the age of 12 was higher than any other population, with nearly 70% of AI/AN adolescents and young adults having received substance abuse treatment. The trajectory for individuals who develop substance use disorders is associated with negative outcomes, as incidents of death by suicide or homicide, incarceration, and health complications being exponentially higher. STOF, too, has experienced similar struggles that mirror the national averages for AI/AN. At the current rates of substance abuse and suicide, the Seminole Tribe of Florida faces extinction within a generation. STOF’s Health and Human Services (HHS)-Center for Behavioral Health (CBH) clinical team will employ EBPs including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), Motivational Interviewing (MI), and Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MI). These interventions will target children, adolescents, and young adults to increase their protective factors against substance use and suicide in a culturally informed manner. Additionally, Life Skills Training and the Guiding Good Choices (GGC) will be provided to youth and their families to increase resiliency and prepare youth to transition into adulthood. To destigmatize mental health challenges HHS-CBH will increase its community engagement. Staff will provide youth and their families with prevention and recovery community events that incorporate Seminole culture. Furthermore, early intervention of mental health and substance use will be provided to treat symptoms promptly in order to reduce their interference on the member’s quality of life. At present, HHS-CBH staff is accessible to Tribal Members 24 hours every day via their on-call system to respond to mental health and substance abuse crises immediately and address, deescalate, and stabilize Tribal Members in order to ensure their safety. This proposed project will increase utilization of this system among Tribal youth with the goal of decreasing the risk factors for suicide.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082005-01 SEMINOLE TRIBE OF FLORIDA HOLLYWOOD FL OSCEOLA MARCELLUS $476,183

The purpose of this proposal is to address a primary need for the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe. The need is to coordinate the efforts of services and programs on the reservation to specifically address suicide, substance abuse, and the impact of trauma for the youth. Currently on the reservation, several programs exist that provide services in many of the areas that Native Connections funding aims to address. Due to the operational structure for the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe, these services are housed under different divisions; therefore, a bird’s eye view does not provide knowledge of the level of services or extent of programming available for the community. These programs and services primarily fall under three separate divisions: the Health Division, the Human Services Division, and the Education Division. Although these divisions tend to operate in a siloed capacity, they face similar programming challenges. These challenges include reachability, accessibility, adherence, utility, and most importantly, the youth are ill-informed about the services due to a lack of opportunity to consult or advise on which services or practices are best for them to participate in or to promote. This Native Connections funding will allow a consortia of community members and program leaders from the Health, Education, and Human Services divisions, along with a youth advisory council, to meet regularly to address the burdens that are heavily impacting the younger generation on the Leech Lake reservation.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082068-01 LEECH LAKE BAND OF OJIBWE CASS LAKE MN DAHL SONDRA $499,877

The Missoula Urban Indian Health Center’s Missoula Native Connections program is aimed at reducing the incidence of suicide and substance abuse among American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) youth ages 15 to 24 in Missoula County through the development and implementation of data- and community-driven, culturally appropriate interventions. Goal One: Increase the capacity of MNC partner agencies to design and implement effective, culturally appropriate youth suicide and substance abuse prevention and intervention strategies. Goal Two: Develop a data- and community-driven, culturally appropriate plan to guide the implementation of project interventions aimed at reducing AIAN youth suicide and substance abuse. Goal Three: Increase the capacity of Missoula Native Connections partner agencies to identify and engage AIAN youth at risk of suicide or substance abuse through culturally-adapted, evidence-based prevention or intervention activities. Goal Four: Using a community-driven evaluation process, develop a Missoula Native Connections Sustainability Plan that provides for seamless transition from direct SAMHSA funding to sustainable, long-term funding. All data collection, analysis, and evaluation methods will be guided by Indigenous Research Methodologies principles. Specifically, the 4 R’s of Indigenous Research—Respect, Responsibility, Relevance, and Reciprocity—will be instituted throughout the project to ensure that indigenous values and world-view are reflected in all work products.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082058-01 MISSOULA URBAN INDIAN HEALTH CENTER INC MISSOULA MT BARNETT D'SHANE $452,834

TeiNii I iinKiin Native Connections will serve 2,545 Aaniih and Nakoda youth through age 24 in the population to be served on or near the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation. Fort Belknap Indian Community seeks funding to plan and implement a culturally competent substance abuse prevention, suicide prevention, trauma reduction and mental health promotion services for Aaniih and Nakoda youth. Our vision of the TeiNii I iinKiin Native Connections is to increase capacity of youth and young adult (up through age 24)-serving agencies to lay the foundation of childhood mental health issues, experiences of trauma, suicide risk, and a perpetuation of the cycle of violence. Goals: 1. Develop a process and structure that involves the community in guiding all grant efforts, including planning, carrying out the plan, and evaluation. 2. Mobilize SAMHSA’s Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF), a five step planning process to guide the selection, implementation, and evaluation of effective, culturally appropriate, and sustainable prevention activities. 3. Develop protocols for responding to suicide, suicide attempts, and clusters. Designed to promote community healing and reduce the possibility of contagion (suicides following and connected to an initial suicide). These ‘postvention’ protocols will reflect the traditions and ways of knowing and being of the Aaniih and Nakoda tribal citizens. Year One’s community needs assessment will shape the direction of Years two through five.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082065-01 FORT BELKNAP INDIAN COMMUNITY HARLEM MT CHANDLER CRAIG $500,000

Summary: The Rocky Boy Health Center Native Connections Project will implement comprehensive and culturally relevant strategies (outreach, implementation of a culturally adapted evidence based curriculum, traditional healing practices, coordinated referral and follow up care) designed to prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance abuse, reduce the impact of trauma, and promote mental health among American Indian youth on the Rocky Boy's Indian Reservation. Project Name: Rocky Boy Health Center (RBHC) Native Connections Population to be served: American Indian (AI) youth through the age of 24 years who reside on the Rocky Boy's Indian Reservation. Strategies/Interventions: Tier One: Universal Prevention Strategies: RBHC currently conducts limited, informal community outreach through local media outlets. The RBHC Native Connections Project will implement a culturally-informed comprehensive formal outreach campaign which will be focused on substance abuse prevention, increasing public awareness of suicide, and reducing stigma surrounding behavioral health disorders. Tier Two: Selective Prevention and Intervention Strategies: Tier two strategies include but are not limited to: 1) implementation of a culturally-adapted evidence-based curriculum (Good Behavior Game) and 2) traditional healing practices (e.g., sweats, ceremonies, and Tribal specific practices). Tier Three: Indicated Prevention and Intervention Strategies: Coordinated referral and follow-up care will be provided and guided by the protocols and procedures developed during the year one planning process. Goal and Objectives: The goal of the RBHC Native Connections Project is ""to prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance abuse, reduce the impact of trauma, and promote behavioral health among American Indian youth on the Rocky Boy's Indian Reservation."" Objective 1: By the end of year one, RBHC will conduct one (1) Community System Analysis; one (1) Needs Assessment; and one (1) Community Readiness Assessment; and will develop one (1) Community Resource/Asset map focused on addressing suicide prevention, substance abuse prevention, and behavioral health disorders on the Rocky Boy's Indian Reservation. Objective 2: By the end of year one, RBHC will develop one (1) set of community-driven suicide prevention policies and procedures; one (1) set of revised protocols; and one (1) set of postvention protocols designed to address the standards of care for youth at risk of suicide. Objective 3: The RBHC will develop (year one) and implement (years two through five) one (1) community-driven action plan that will address the three (3) tiers of prevention and intervention strategies: Universal Prevention Strategies, Selective Prevention and Intervention Strategies, and Indicated Prevention and Intervention Strategies. Number of people to be served: At least 125 (tier one, unduplicated count) per year; 625 (tier one, duplicated count) over the life of the project; 100 (tier two, unduplicated count) per year; 500 (tier two) over the life the project; 75 (tier three, unduplicated count) per year; 375 (tier three) over the life of the project.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082033-01 ROCKY BOY HEALTH BOARD BOX ELDER MT MONTES AIMEE $496,693

Project Abstract Project Name: Turtle Mountain Outreach Suicide Prevention Program Project Period: 04/30/2019 to 04/29/2024 Grant Funds Requested (Year One): 249,998 The purpose of the Turtle Mountain Outreach Suicide Prevention Program (Native Connections) is to enhance and/or revise protocols to ensure that youth who are at high risk of suicide receive appropriate referrals, mental health services and follow-up services that will allow for preventing and reducing suicidal behavior and substance abuse and promote mental health among our youth people up to and including the age of 24 years. The project will serve approximately 5,000 youth. Goal 1: Provide suicide prevention to community, schools to reach 75% of the tribal community. Goal 2: Develop MOU’s with a broader spectrum of tribal entities and community members to enhance community engagement. Goal 3: Increase community engagement in development of suicide prevention action plan that addresses three tiers (Universal, Selective, and Indicated) of prevention and intervention strategies. Goal 4: Enhance mental health, substance abuse, family services, peer leaders, and community members to ensure meaningful communications in the revision of policies, procedures and protocols Goal 5: Implement suicide prevention surveillance data collection and evaluation.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082036-01 TURTLE MOUNTAIN TRIBE BELCOURT ND MCLEOD CLAUDETTE $499,998

The Pueblo of Nambé Suicide and Substance Abuse Prevention Project is a proposed project designed to 1) create a resilient community in Nambé O-Ween-Gé through prevention techniques and 2) reduce the impact of mental health issues, suicide, and substance abuse through comprehensive experiential intervention techniques and effective crises response. The project will fund application of experiential therapeutic approaches, facilitation of youth engagement techniques, and development of a robust network of resources. Nambé O-Ween-Gé, known as the Pueblo of Nambé, is a small American Indian tribe of less than 1,000 members and is located in northern New Mexico. Surrounded by native and non-native communities in a rural part of the state, Nambé residents, and youth specifically are at high risk for mental health challenges, substance use and abuse, and suicide. New Mexico is one of the states with the highest substance abuse and suicide rates in the nation and the impact to its American Indian communities is disproportionately high, requiring complex and comprehensive mitigation and prevention approaches. In addition, the youth are at great risk of suicide and substance abuse, requiring youth engagement in these approaches. If funded, this project will be managed by the Nambé Healthy Family Services Department, a collective of behavioral health and wellness program coordinators providing services in areas including domestic violence, substance abuse, suicide prevention, health and wellness, and child welfare. To meet the immanent needs of the community, if funded, the programs strives to serve the entire community (500-1000 people for the duration of the project), those at high risk of suicide and substance abuse, and those who have shown signs of or already attempted suicide or are already abusing substances. The program is targeted specifically at youth and their families but extends to the entire community of Nambé. To meet these objectives, the programs goals include 1) Identify high-risk areas in Nambé every two years and target programming to meet the needs of those areas. 2) Increase by 10% each year the engagement of tribal members and their families in the wellbeing of the tribe and its individuals. 3) Increase services offered by Nambé to combat substance abuse and mental health challenges. 4) Establish a crisis response protocol to effectively respond to various crises, as well as build resilience though supporting the wellbeing of the community during times of crisis. These goals will be met through actions including outreach and promotion; establishment of a Native Youth Council; application of an experiential therapy approach; development of crisis response protocols; and development of a robust treatment network outside of what the program can offer.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082063-01 NAMBE PUEBLO GOVERNOR'S OFFICE SANTA FE NM MUSGRAVE LOREN $500,000

The Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma’s “Hin kitogle hine ke” project, which means “We Are Going Together” in the Ioway language seeks to forge a comprehensive and integrated suicide prevention, substance abuse prevention, and mental health promotion system to provide early intervention services to American Indian youth and emerging adults. This system will expand and enhance the current program and provide the foundation for creating prevention prepared communities, tribal mentorship activities with youth, meaningful partnerships that will be created and nourished, and deliver effective, efficient, and culturally appropriate services. The Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma visualizes a future of healthy behaviors for future generations to come. We will go together as we have in the past and will continue in the future. The Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma – Division of Health – Behavioral Health Department offers individual psychotherapy, family psychotherapy, marriage and family counseling, and individual assessment and evaluation for substance abuse for Native and Non-Native individuals within the tribal jurisdiction and surrounding community. On average, two Oklahomans between the ages of 10-24 years old are successful in committing suicide weekly, making Oklahoma the worst in the nation for youth suicide rates. American Indian suicide data is inconsistent, underreported, or often misreported as unintentional injury or death, overdose or accidental death. Our focus for the targeted population with be American Indian children and youth between the ages of 10-24 years living within Lincoln, Logan and Payne counties of Oklahoma that reside within the tribe’s jurisdiction. The following goals are the foundation for the entire five year project. The first goal is to conduct community based strategic planning with community stakeholders and create a strategic planning committee. This is very important as a strategic action plan, community needs assessment, community readiness assessment and a community resource asset map will be developed with community stakeholders and tribal stakeholders along with input from the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma Youth Unity Council. The second goal is update and develop policies and procedures, for the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma Behavioral Health Department, to promote coordination among youth serving agencies. Also, to develop protocols for youth at risk for suicide and postvention protocols for families that are dealing with suicide and suicide attempts. The third goal is to plan Prevention and Intervention Strategies based upon the strategic action plan that is created. A Gathering of Native Americans (GONA) Training will be planned as well as collaborating with the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma Youth Unity Council to develop and create media and marketing outreach materials. Also, discussions with Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma administration in regards to bringing back traditional sweat lodge that was utilized at one time by the tribe. The fourth goal is to improve suicide awareness prevention through training opportunities for the community stakeholders. This goal is aligned with the Tribal Behavior Health Agenda Foundational Elements for community mobilization and engagement. This training will help stakeholders, identify and help tribal youth, regarding suicide prevention, substance abuse prevention and mental health promotion. Finally, the fifth goal is to decrease number of youth with mental health and substance abuse disorders by increasing suicide awareness and community prevention activities. These community activities include a health fair, fun run/walk and a family native comedy night. Additional activities may occur due to the strategic action plan. Based on these goals and objectives, the project plans to reach approximately 300 youth in the first year and 1,500 youth overall.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082050-01 IOWA TRIBE OF OKLAHOMA, INC. PERKINS OK DAUGHERTY ANGELA $500,000

Tribal Behavioral Health Grant Program- Native Connections ABSTRACT Project Name: Native Connections (Ensuring Hope) Population Served: American Indian 10-24 years of age Methods: Needs Assessment, QPR, MHFA, Kognito, Prepare Number served: 1,000 Annually The purpose of this project is to prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance use, reduce the impact of trauma and promote mental health among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth through the age of 24 years. The major outcomes of the project include: immediately increase the number of AI youth identified as at risk for suicide, increase the number of youth referred for services, increase the number of youth who receive services, increase the number of youth-serving individuals trained to identify, refer, assess, and treat at risk youth. Goal 1: Develop a Crisis Response policy and protocol team with tribal law enforcement and other key stakeholders. Goal 2: To increase the capacity, effectiveness, and efficiency of suicide and substance abuse prevention services for American Indian youth who reside within the area of Oklahoma served by the Creek Nation. Goal 3: To reduce the prevalence of suicide, suicidal behaviors, and substance abuse among the at risk youth populations in Creek Nation. The Muscogee (Creek) Nation (MCN) is the fourth largest federally recognized Tribe in the United States with a total population of 86,710 tribal citizens – more than half whom live within the tribal jurisdiction. The tribal jurisdiction spans eleven counties in central northeastern Oklahoma. MCN headquarters are centrally located within the jurisdiction in Okmulgee. Within the tribal jurisdiction, there are two geographical areas – the Northern and Southern regions – connected by tribal headquarters. These two areas have socio-economic differences that create a difference in service needs and delivery.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082037-01 MUSCOGEE CREEK NATION OKMULGEE OK STONE TYLER $500,000

The Osage Defending the Future project is a suicide prevention initiative between the applicant, the Osage Prevention Wa-Hoi^ Project and SAMHSA Native Connections Cohort 5 offering. The project proposes to continue the cutting edge and results driven efforts initiated and sustained by the ONPP Native Connections Cohort 1 initiative. By and through evidenced based positive outcome and resiliency proven methods of the ONPP to prevent and reduce suicide and substance abuse of the 2000 Native American youth at risk within the Osage Nation Reservation/Service area. In the years 2004 - 2017, research indicated the near epidemic status of suicide and substance abuse of Osage and Native American youth between the ages of 9-24 residing within the Osage service area. Scientific validation to a fact, well known in Indian Country, that American Indian youth and young adults (through 24 years old) are dying prematurely at rates not matched by any other race or ethnic group and in many instances, as much as 3 times the national average in regards to suicide. The reasons: suicide and drug overdose which are caused or exacerbated by substance abuse and general acceptance of generational substance abuse. The proposed project’s goals are to reduce the prevalence of suicide, suicidal behaviors, and substance use among the at risk youth populations in Osage Nation by 1) raising awareness of Native Connections suicide prevention and substance abuse prevention resources, 2) providing education on suicide prevention, substance abuse prevention and mental health, 3) increasing access to and community linkages to mental health and substance abuse services, and 4) further developing and expanding the suicide prevention surveillance data collections system. The project employs a family engagement initiative, utilizing the Strategic Action Plan developed during Osage Nation’s Native Connections Cohort 1 project. The program model is built on Native youth, families, communities, service agencies, first responders, and school districts working together in a grass roots, unified approach supporting an aggressive and sustained quest to prevent substance use patterns of youth in Osage country. This approach matches data gleaned from the Pride Survey (ONPP 2004-2014) and supports the belief that generations of Osage have held; Osage and Native youth are at significantly higher risk than most ethnic groups of the same age for suicide, substance abuse and the propensity to develop behavioral health issues. Project staff, in concert with community based, youth involved agencies and vetted evaluators will conduct thorough readiness and needs assessments and aligning these results to the strategic action plan.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082039-01 OSAGE NATION PAWHUSKA OK STANDINGBEAR CHRIS $500,000

The Oglala Sioux Tribe (OST) through their Tribal Emergency Youth Shelter (EYS) proposes the Native Connections Youth Suicide Prevention project to enhance the behavioral health (substance abuse/mental health disorders/suicidal behavior/impact of trauma) care for tribal youth aged youth, 12-17 years old that receive services at the emergency shelter and their families/primary caregivers, residing on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota. The project will assure access to evidence-based assessment, treatment modalities, recovery services and prevention education supported by bolstering the current infrastructure. The goals of the project include: strengthen program services capacity by hiring 4 residential coordinators, clinical social worker and project evaluator; develop the Native Connections program implementation plan and protocols; conduct needs assessments, community readiness assessments and resource maps; develop an action plan; strengthen the capacity of EYS program and tribal systems to increase utilization of evidence-based programs for providing clinical services and supports to address behavioral health disorders among youth 12-17 years old at EYS; increase collaborations among Tribal and non-Tribal agencies to increase early access to behavioral health care for EYS youth; prevent the initiation and progression of youth substance abuse (including tobacco use) in the community by implementing promotion and prevention strategies with school age youth in educational settings; and promote family and community support for individuals with behavioral health issues and their families. To achieve these goals the project team will utilize the following strategies: increase staff capacity through new hires; develop a systematic network of communication channels for improved coordination of care for EYS youth; utilize the Approved Assessments Tool, an online tool that gathers information from patients seeking a substance misuse and mental health assessment; improve patient tracking system among providers; compile existing/or revise/or develop policies and procedures for behavioral health including suicide related response protocols; and postvention protocols for service coordination among youth serving organizations; provide education on the revised/developed protocols; plan and organize culturally relevant and cross-cultural training of primary care, behavioral health providers, and all departments of IHS serving OST Tribal members; and promote healthy lifestyles choices, positive communication, personal success and cultural involvement to support strong family relationships. The project is slated to serve fifty (50) unduplicated youth and their families in the first year, and an additional one hundred fifty (150) unduplicated youth and their families in each subsequent year. Additionally, we hope to reach the reservation population of 28,652 through community education and media messages.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082045-01 OGLALA SIOUX TRIBAL COUNCIL PINE RIDGE SD WHITE DRESS FRANKEE $491,692

The Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas and the Chief Kina Health Clinic is seeking support of its behavioral health program through funding announcement SM-19-005, Tribal Behavioral Health Grant Program: Native Connections. The Behavioral Health Program, along with the Native Connections Grant, will engage in providing the tools necessary to our Tribal members ages 15 - 24 and their families to prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance abuse, as well as promote mental health through the ATI SNAKNI Program, which means ""to be strong"" in the Alabama language. ATI SNAKNI stands for Awareness, Temperance, Independence, Sense of Self, Nurturing, Acceptance, Knowledge, Nobility and Inspirational. There are approximately 248 enrolled Tribal members within the ages 15 - 24, of which this program seeks to service 75% of these enrollees and families over the course of five (5) years. The goal of this project is to increase prevention activities that will reduce the impact of mental and substance use disorders among the target population. Over the course of the five (5) year project, the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas, Chief Kina Health Clinic and its partners will ensure that youth suicide prevention issues are addressed and implemented, coordinate and support training in the area of mental health first aid to community members, work with the Tribal Youth Council to provide oversight and input for the program, and work with Tribal agencies that provide services to Tribal youth in implementing a comprehensive community prevention/early intervention program for suicide and substance abuse, and initiate the process of planning an action plan for the Tribal community.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082059-01 ALABAMA-COUSHATTA TRIBE OF TEXAS LIVINGSTON TX SYLESTINE MYRA $498,700

The Urban Indian Center of Salt Lake City (UICSL) proposes to collaborate with social service agencies in the Wasatch Range (Salt Lake Valley) to provide integrated, comprehensive services addressing all levels of prevention (universal, selective, indicated) with Native American youth (less than 24 years). We believe it ‘takes a village’ that relies on the social-ecological model (individual, family and community-systems efforts) to effectively address trauma. We envision an “Accountable Health Communities” (AHC) model will improve overall efficacy where UIC SL functions as a ‘bridge organization’ that fosters and coordinates the development of an inter-organizational network of agencies and programs which address the critical gaps that exist between health and mental health services and the unmet need for coordinated, culturally connected community/social services (i.e., housing insecurities, educational programs, vocational services, food insecurities, etc.). We proposed to provide cultural literacy training for staff employed by organizations within our network so they may be more effective in servicing our AI/AN youth. With our treatment services, we rely on multiple, culturally adapted, evidence-based strategies including Trauma-focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (particularly deconstructing the trauma narrative), Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, Historical Trauma and Unresolved Grief (HTUG), and Group Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) to anchor our clinical services. Case managers use motivational interviewing with our youth to identify goals and objectives to be populated on our Wiki-based electronic medicine wheel (physical health, mental health, social/connectedness, and spiritual-being). Our performance assessment consists of a mixed-methods approach in completing our process and outcome evaluations. Nominal group processes (focus groups) provide a feedback loop to our clinical staff to refine our evidence-based approaches. Numerous process measures along with clinical measures (substance abuse and depression screening tools, personality tests, social support measures) are used to ascertain improvements in youth enrolled in our treatment programs. Last, an inter-organizational network analysis is conducted to determine changes in the expansion of our network, and breadth of collaborative interactions between the UIC SL and our organizational partners.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082023-01 URBAN INDIAN CENTER OF SALT LAKE SALT LAKE CITY UT FLACK PAUL $478,754

The Title of this grant application is Kwu ctxtnwixw. Kwu ctxtnwixw means “we help each other”. When our elders speak at gatherings many times they express, “we used to help each other”. We want to reclaim Kwu ctxtnwixw on the Colville Reservation and use this tribal value in our fight to prevent and reduce suicidal behavior, substance abuse and to promote good mental health in our tribal youth age 16-24. From a 2012 a Community Readiness for Change Assessment conducted in the four districts of the Colville Reservation. The Assessment rates the Communities stage of Readiness on a scale of 1-9 (with 9 Community Ownership the optimal score). The Keller and Inchelium communities both scored 3.5 with 3 being Vague Awareness and 4 Preplanning on the scale. Omak scored 3.9 and Nespelem 3.8. The recommendation for the Keller and Inchelium communities was to raise awareness that the community can do something. The goals outlined in the project will target the reduction of suicide, suicide ideation, depression, and mental health issues by continuing the awareness and providing the necessary tools to Tribal programs and local schools requiring assistance for the person. Goal 1 will be the continuation of surveillance program for tracking suicidal ideation, suicidal attempts, suicide completions and non-suicidal self-injury a replicated model from the White Mountain Apache Suicide and Self Injury Surveillance System (SSISS) on the Colville Reservation to addresses the need for a comprehensive and standardized suicide surveillance system that created the suicide risk protocols for prevention and intervention. Goal 2 aims to provide a more efficient community mobile teams by redeveloping a strategic plan unique to each community needs by creating unit for each unique community to address the specific requirements for intervention and prevention. Goal 3 will look to improve the current infrastructure for case management analysis for warm hand-off between Tribal programs, and local schools to other Tribal programs equipped for prevention and intervention, with occasionally outside reference as needed. The recommendation for the Omak and Nespelem communities was to raise awareness with concrete ideas to combat suicide while expanding into the other communities (Inchelium and Keller). We used these recommendations to help define our goals for this grant. All three goals together will begin the process of reclaiming Kwu ctxtnwixw in our communities.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082061-01 COLVILLE CONFEDERATED TRIBES NESPELEM WA BOYD-BALL ALISON $498,016

The population of focus are American Indian/Alaskan Natives (AI/AN) and AI/AN descendant youth through the age of 24 years and their families residing within or near Yakama Reservation. The geographic catchment area is on the Reservation of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation. The Yakama Nation (YN), located within the Yakima and Klickitat County is the largest tribe in central Washington State with over 32,000 individuals living across 1.4 million acres of tribal lands in eastern Washington (U.S census Bureau American Fact finder 2016). There are four rural communities located within the reservation boundaries; Toppenish, Wapato, White Swan, and Harrah. The YN also provided to five communities that borders the reservation; Yakima, Granger, Zillah, Goldendale, and Glenwood. To date there are 10,946 Yakama Nation enrolled member of which 30% are less than 17 years of age. (Office, 2016) We were awarded Native Connection Cohort 1 funds. With those funds, we have been successful in establishing many of the tier 1 strategies. We have an established advisory board, developed serval tribal policies around suicide pre & postvention, trained, credentialed community members and service providers in QPR, AMSR, ASSIT safetalk, and trainings, hosted GONA gatherings across the reservation, and established community outreach and awareness. For this application we need to maintain and expand the momentum we built. Pertaining to tier 2, we have found bullying, lateral aggressions, and a lack of Native identity, self-confidence, personal goals, problem solving skills are big contributed to suicide among our youth and we need to identify and implement a culturally responsive Native pride intervention

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082031-01 CONFEDERATED TRIBES AND BANDS OF THE YAKAMA NATION TOPPENISH WA SALUSKIN KATHERINE $497,804

The Tribe’s 10-year average suicide rate among young people ages 10-24 is 17.52. This rate is based on the number of young people, the base rate, the number of young people who died by suicide. A majority of the suicide attempts and suicide completions identified above involved overdose of prescription medications, over the counter medications, while other incidences involved gunshot wounds, hangings, multi-trauma, and laceration. The overall goal of our Native Connections Program is to prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance use, reduce the impact of trauma, and promote mental health among Menominee youth through the age of 24 years.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SM082032-01 MENOMINEE INDIAN TRIBE OF WISCONSIN KESHENA WI WILBER JONATHAN $250,000