SP-19-004 Individual Grant Awards

In order to prevent underage drinking, Fairbanks Native Association (FNA) has developed the Fairbanks Alaska Native Strategic Prevention Framework (Fairbanks SPF). The target population for development of a comprehensive underage drinking plan is Alaska Native/American Indian (AN/AI) youth ages 9-20 who are at risk for or already engaged in drinking in the Fairbanks North Star Borough (FNSB) tribal catchment area. The Overarching Goal is to prevent the onset of and reduce the progression of alcohol abuse and reduce the consequences and related problems of alcohol use/abuse among 9-20 year olds in the Fairbanks North Star Borough (FNSB), our service area. The Fairbanks SPF will be part of FNA’s Behavioral Health Department (BH), Youth and Young Adult (YYA) Services Division. YYA Services was developed through the leadership of a 17-member Interagency Transition Council (ITC), facilitated by FNA. The ITC provides leadership in the development of community-wide infrastructure to support the provision of behavioral health services for AN/AI youth and young adults. The ITC consists of leadership from the service agencies serving AN/AI youth in the community as well as a parent youth and Elder. Note: By tradition AN/AI serve each other when in the other’s service area. AN/AI are at high risk for alcohol use and abuse with addiction patterns that begin in childhood. This risk status is exacerbated by the consequences of underage drinking, which include homicide, suicide, academic failure, high risk behaviors, and health problems. YYA Services is uniquely qualified to implement Fairbanks SPF for the following reasons: 1) it has a strong community coalition (the ITC); 2) it has annually-updated infrastructure plans in place, including Financial, Workforce Development, Sustainability, Cultural Competence, and Access to Care; 3) YYA Services has a cadre of highly qualified Technical Assistants (TA) under contract to assist with the SPF process; and 4) YYA Services has an Evaluator /Epidemiologist with 45 years experience in research and evaluation (including the evaluation of two Alaska Native SPF projects). YYA Services will facilitate the SPF process with the ITC in a circular process with the steps developed concurrently following assessment. The Fairbanks SPF will also provide the following required activities: building capacity, collecting community level data, implementing community coalition strategies, developing prevention messaging and strategies, and utilizing and sharing effective resources. FNA will provide education/training on Individual Prevention Strategies to identified staff and service sectors beginning in the second year, an will conduct meetings/training with lawmakers, police, public safety, juvenile justice and liquor stores on Environmental Strategies to effect change in policies, laws, ordinances to limit access and harmful consequences of alcohol use. FNA will also provide training on evidence-based practices to committed agencies.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081601-01 FAIRBANKS NATIVE ASSOCIATION FAIRBANKS AK AHSOGEAK PERRY $299,593

Through the proposed Strategic Prevention Framework - Partnerships for Success (SPFPFS) project, Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc. (CITC) will collaborate with new and longstanding partners in utilizing SAMHSA’s Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) to address underage drinking among Alaska Native and American Indian youth (ages nine to 20) living in Anchorage, Alaska. CITC is a mature tribally-operated social services agency with an extensive history providing substance abuse prevention, treatment, and recovery services to Alaska Native and American Indian people in Alaska’s Cook Inlet region. There is a profound need for the proposed strategic enhancement of Anchorage’s infrastructure. It will increase capacity in our youth-serving systems and agencies to implement and sustain highly effective prevention services specifically designed to benefit Alaska Native and American Indian young people. Anchorage is an ideal site for heightened systems collaboration. The city’s diversity, complexity, and role as a temporary and permanent migration site for rural Alaska Native families means that systemic collaboration in Anchorage further impacts families originating throughout the state, and further, prevention-focused integration of the Anchorage system of care will also simultaneously integrate and cross-train providers who additionally serve non-Native youth. In alignment with SAMHSA’s funding opportunity, CITC will use a stakeholder-determined, data-driven approach to identify and fund opportunities to increase infrastructure capacity enhancing alcohol abuse prevention efforts serving our high need, at-risk population of focus, Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) youth, ages nine to 20. Proposed project goals and objectives include – GOAL 1: Implement the five steps of the SAMHSA Strategic Prevention Framework in Anchorage. Objective 1.1: Between Months 1 and 3, conduct/update a Community Needs Assessment identifying and prioritizing problems related to alcohol use by AN/AI youth ages nine to 20 in Anchorage. Measured by: Final CNA. Objective 1.2: Between Months 1 and 5, build and mobilize local resources and readiness to address identified prevention needs. Measured by: Contracts for services executed with community agencies. Objective 1.3: Between Months 6 and 7, engage key stakeholders in a strategic planning process regarding alcohol use by AN/AI youth ages nine to 20 in Anchorage. Measured by: Final plan. Objective 1.4: Between Months 8 and 60, implement the comprehensive evidence-based prevention approach selected through the community planning process. Measured by: Documentation of and fidelity reporting on identified evidence-based approach. Objective 1.5: Between Months 8 and 60, evaluate the ongoing and cumulative outcomes achieved through implementation of the community-wide prevention approach and Objectives 1.1-1.4. Measured by: To be determined by parameters of identified evidence-based approach.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081555-01 COOK INLET TRIBAL COUNCIL, INC. ANCHORAGE AK LING REBECCA $300,000

The PPEP, Inc. Community Prevention Coalition 's Partnership for Success Project will utilize a mix of evidence based prevention programs, policies and practices to address the three identified gaps in prevention infrastructure. Primary goals are to enhance infrastructure and capacity between prevention and law enforcement, schools, and treatment communities to reduce and prevent underage drinking (alcohol) and prescription drug (opioid) misuse and abuse among youth ages 12 to 20, in Pima County, Arizona. The services will be delivered using the seven strategies of community change: Provide Information, Provide Support, Enhance Skills, Change Access, Change Consequences, and Change and Modify Policy. The project intends to reach a total of 300,700 persons in Pima County. 700 will be reached through direct service to enhance skills and 300,000 reached through environmental prevention strategies.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081570-01 PORTABLE PRACTICAL EDUCATIONAL PREPARATION, INC. TUCSON AZ BASS AMY $300,000

Community Awareness Resource Entity of Arizona (CAREaz) will implement the Sanders Strategic Prevention Framework Program to the Navajo youth and adult residents of the Sanders Unified School District catchment area on the Navajo Nation in Apache County, Arizona. CAREaz will apply the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) and the Tribal Behavioral Health Agenda (TBHA) to guide planning, implementation, and evaluation of prevention practices and programs to build a sound infrastructure that will foster prevention of alcohol and opioids. The goals of the project are: 1) Prevent the onset and reduce the progression of substance abuse and its related problems among Navajo people aged 9-20 in the target catchment area; 2) Increase the capacity and infrastructure of the target catchment area to develop and deliver culturally competent alcohol and opioid abuse prevention strategies; and 3) Strengthen Navajo families in the catchment area as integral mechanisms to prevent onset and reduce the progression of substance abuse and its related problems. Measurable objectives include a) By September 29, 2021, 75% of physicians in the target catchment area will have attended training for prevention and awareness measures; b) By September 20, 2024, 75% of students who participate in an evidence-based prevention program will have a 50% increase in perception of risk of opioid and alcohol abuse; c) By September 29, 2024, there will be a 10% reduction in the number of students reporting past 30-day use of alcohol; d) By September 29, 2024, there will be a 10% reduction in the number of students reporting using opioid drugs to get high; e) By September 29, 2023, 6,000 adults and 2,000 youth in the target catchment area will receive a combination of culturally competent alcohol and opioid abuse prevention messaging and evidence-based education; f) By September 29, 2023, at least 400 parents will have participated in a culturally adapted evidence-based parenting program; and g) By September 29, 2024, 75% of parents who participate in a culturally adapted evidence-based parenting program will show a 50% increase in perception of harm of opioid and alcohol abuse. The project will serve 1,600 individuals annually and 8,000 individuals throughout the life of the project.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081608-01 COMMUNITY AWARENESS RESOURCE ENTITY OF ARIZONA SAINT JOHNS AZ HAUSER DONNA $152,421

IMPACT: In Mohave Prevention Action Collaboration Team ABSTRACT Seasoned rural-serving prevention non-profit Arizona Youth Partnership (AZYP) proposes to partner with community substance use prevention coalitions in the remote, rural Mohave County, Arizona cities of Kingman, Bullhead City and Lake Havasu City to use the SPF model in addressing the consistently high rates of underage drinking, marijuana and opioid use/abuse across the tri-city area. Vast land mass, warm weather, high visitor and seasonal residency, river and lake access and proximity to casino-driven Laughlin and Las Vegas make these three communities particularly vulnerable to high risk lifestyles, as demonstrated in the county substance use data. Mohave County has Arizona’s highest opioid-related death rate (127.5 annual prescriptions/100 people); significantly higher overall youth-reported substance use rate (30% higher than the state average), and alarmingly low perception of risk/high cultural acceptance of underage drinking, recreational marijuana use, and misuse/mishandling of prescription medication. Over the next five years, AZYP will lead a comprehensive Strategic Prevention Framework process with members of the Mohave Area Partnership Promoting Educated Decisions (MAPPED) in Bullhead City; Kingman Area Prevention Alliance (KAPA) and the Young Adult Development Association of Havasu (YADAH) in Lake Havasu City to address these issues head-on. Efforts will work both at the community and collective tri-city levels to: 1. Assess consumption levels and consequences of alcohol, marijuana and opioids on youth and adults by creating a community needs and readiness assessment led by the contracted Epidemiologist collecting and using the data. 2. Build the capacity of coalition members and community and school-based partners to use the data to effectively plan and implement EBP substance use prevention strategies. 3. Develop data-driven five-year plans for substance use prevention at both the community and regional levels employing a mix of best practice strategies and focusing on leveraging future resources for prevention. 4. Implement a mix of culturally responsive EBP strategies in middle and high schools and in each of the communities including direct prevention programs; messaging and advocacy for practice and systems change. 5. Evaluate efforts through a third-party entity to rigorously determine progress toward addressing SPF-PFS prevention priorities and measure community and regional impact. When implemented, this initiative will result in a number of meaningful short and mid-term outcomes measured through third-party evaluation within and across the tri-cities of Mohave County, including; 1) active and engaged broad-based representation in prevention coalition work with focus on increased youth and adult voice; 2) comprehensive, data-driven five-year community and regional prevention plans for addressing priority substance use issues; 3) increased substance abuse (SA) prevention capacity and sustainable infrastructure; 4) coordinated messaging, service delivery and practice/policy efforts across the cities – filling gaps left between rural communities 1+ hours apart in travel distance; and 5) increased awareness and knowledge among residents of the dangers of underage drinking; marijuana and prescription and illicit opioid use. Mid and long-term outcomes will point to reduced use and delayed onset/progression of targeted substance use among youth and adults.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081715-01 ARIZONA YOUTH PARTNERSHIP TUCSON AZ CRAIG JULIE $250,000

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) is proposing to implement Youth Partnerships for Success (FOA No. SP-19-004), a project to prevent the onset and reduce the progression of alcohol and marijuana use in adolescents while strengthening the prevention capacity of the community and youth leaders. This project will focus on high school students in Northeast LA (NELA), one of the most densely populated and impoverished neighborhoods in Los Angeles. The primary strategy for Youth Partnerships for Success will be to engage youth leaders at 2 charter high schools to develop effective and evidence based substance use prevention messaging. Baseline and annual risk behavior surveys at these two high schools will be used to inform and evaluate the prevention campaigns. The goals of the project are to 1) prevent the onset and reduce the progression of alcohol and marijuana use among high school students in NELA; and 2) To develop a sustainable youth leadership group that is engaged in peer-focused substance use prevention efforts and in local and regional advocacy. Objectives include 1.1: CHLA staff will have trained a minimum of 25 parent leaders and NEC partners in NELA on the SPF, substance use prevention strategies, and effective communication skills. 1.2: CHLA staff will conduct baseline school based surveys at 2 NELA high schools to characterize the substance use prevention needs in the area of underage drinking and marijuana use among students. 1.3: CHLA staff will reach a minimum of 1000 young people in NELA with community prevention activities or events including evidence-based SU prevention education curricula. 1.4: CHLA staff will conduct follow up school-based surveys that demonstrate a statistically significant reduction in underage drinking or marijuana use as compared to baseline, and reduction in the percentage of students that report getting into a car with an impaired driver. 2.1: CHLA staff recruits and trains a minimum of 75 youth leaders in NELA on substance use prevention and SPF. 2.2: CHLA staff will support youth leaders in planning and implementing a minimum of 5 large community prevention events and 10 school-based events. 2.3: CHLA staff will support youth leaders in the selection of 2-5 structural change objectives focused on youth substance use prevention in NELA. 2.4: CHLA staff and youth leaders will plan, implement, and evaluate a data- driven prevention social norms campaign to prevent SU at 2 NELA high schools. We expect to serve an average of 200 youth annually. Based on community and school demographics, the youth served will be 80% Latinx, 9% Other, 3% White, and 1% African American.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081677-01 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL OF LOS ANGELES LOS ANGELES CA LIM IRENE $300,000

The Round Valley Indian Tribes will create a prevention program that addresses underage drinking and root causes of Alcohol and other Drug (AOD) abuse. The proposed program - Path to Wellness (PTW) will seek to address historical trauma by promoting protective factors (cultural strengths) and reducing risk factors. The RVIT has made a commitment to create a Tribal Action Plan as decreed by the Tribal Law and Order Act of 2010. The Path to Wellness Project will serve members of the Round Valley Indian Tribes and will utilize prevention strategies that are culturally centered promote the development of tribal infrastructure to address historical trauma experienced by the tribes of Round Valley. The program has 4 main goals: Develop a Tribal Action Plan for Prevention, Decrease Truancy for youth, Implement Youth Wellness Assessment Screening Tool, Identify and Utilize Evidence Based Prevention/Intervention Strategies for youth. Each goal has several objectives intended to carry out prevention strategies that will create positive change and long lasting effects on the ""norms"" that exist in the community related to underage drinking. This project is comprehensive in that it promotes community wellness and addresses issues that have effected this community since the contact period in the mid-1850s. The project will utilize the Community Readiness Model to assist with our program development efforts. The Community Readiness Model will determine readiness levels to help us gauge the pace and starting point of the Tribal Action Plan. Each of our Program Goals will be guided by our readiness level in specific areas. The program seeks to provide historical and intergenerational trauma support systems that promote community connectedness to break the cycle of harmful lifestyles. The utilization of cultural and traditional protocols sustains environmental resources and promotes reliable infrastructure for healthy families and kinship. Our proposed prevention and recovery support programming is intended to be led by community needs, community mobilization and engagement.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081440-01 ROUND VALLEY INDIAN HEALTH CENTER, INC. COVELO CA RUSS JULIA $273,009

Napa County Office of Education (NCOE) and collaborative partners propose to implement the Strategic Prevention Framework Partners for Success prevention initiative to address the use of alcohol, marijuana and vaping in Napa youth ages 9-20, with a focus on the high need priority populations of non-traditional students, LGBTQ, foster, and homeless youth. Project activities will focus on students enrolled in NCOE’s Court and Community Schools & in Napa Valley Unified School District (NVUSD). There are 12,993 students in the targeted age bracket, 284 of whom are enrolled in alternative education. Only 54% of Napa students perceive alcohol as having moderate or great harm (2018). Drinking starts early here, with 11% of 7th graders reporting past 30-day use, more than twice the state rate of 5%; that number jumps to 26% for 11th graders, vs 22% statewide. CHKS data also identifies three key subgroups in need of more intensive intervention to address dramatically higher rates of drinking: non-traditional students, foster/homeless youth, and the LGBTQ population. A staggering 42% of LGBTQ 11th graders have consumed at least one drink of alcohol in the past 30 days, while 43% of foster, 56% of homeless and 50% of non-traditional students have done so. While the county’s efforts to reduce binge drinking have been successful, with rates far lower than the state average, rates of binge drinking for LGBTQ and NT youth are higher than the state average and far higher than the county: 21% (LGBTQ 11th grade) and 20% (NT) vs 9% (Napa 11th graders) and 17% (CA 11th). Project goals include: Strengthening community collaboration and prevention capacity to reduce youth substance use in Napa County; Decreasing youth exposure and access to alcohol, marijuana and vaping at home and in the community; Increasing the capacity of Napa Valley Unified School District and NCOE’s Court and Community Schools to prevent and intervene in student substance use, with a focus on link between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), mental health, and substance use; and Reducing the perception that alcohol, marijuana and e-cigarette use is not harmful for youth through improved school policies and awareness activities, with a focus on non-traditional students, foster and homeless youth, and LGBTQ students. By 2024, Napa County will experience a decrease in the percentage of all youth reporting past-30-day use of: alcohol by 4% /11th grade, 2%/9th and 2%/7th; marijuana by 5%/11th grade, 2%/9th grade, and 5%/7th %. Reported life time e-cigarette use will reduce by 5% across 7th, 9th and 11th grades.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081279-01 NAPA COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION NAPA CA SITCH SARA $300,000

The primary purpose of the South Bay Safe Connections project is to strengthen community capacity and prevention infrastructure to address substance abuse at the community level by reducing behavioral health disparities among racially and ethnically diverse populations residing along the U.S. Southern border with Mexico in San Diego County. More specifically, the project will target underage drinking among youth ages 9 to 20 and opioid abuse across the lifespan. Poverty, language disparities, and unemployment pose major behavioral health problems for youth and families in the South Region of San Diego County. The project population of 498.323 has a large number of economically disadvantaged residents and the highest average percentage of unemployment in the county, according to San Diego Behavioral Health Services; 60% of the region’s population is Hispanic. Household income is lowest in the county; more than a 25% of the population earned incomes less than 35,000, with 18% of families with children under 18 years living 100% below the federal poverty level (FPL). The region holds the lowest levels of education attainment in the county. According to Sweetwater Union High School District, half of the 40,000 students grades 7-12 speak a language other than English at home (2019). These factors, along with geographic location have enormous impact on behavioral health outcomes. Research on substance abuse and proximity to border areas has shown increased risk for underage drinking, Alcohol Abuse Disorder (AUD), drug abuse and Substance Abuse Disorder (SUD). One such study shows that co-occurring hazardous alcohol and drug use was double in the U.S. border cities (14.7%) than off-border (7.2%). These increased rates of co-occurring AUDs and SUDs suggest lower health equity for those living near the Mexico border. The Safe Connections project will increase capacity among four cities and an unincorporated area to collect community-level data in order to advance best policies and practices, engage community coalition building strategies, and conduct linguistically and culturally relevant high visibility media activities to achieve project goals and measurable objectives. The project will have three goals to serve approximately 800 youth/families annually or reach at least 40,000 individuals throughout the five year project: 1.) Increase prevention infrastructure and build capacity of the community to prevent substance abuse among the Hispanic Population in the South Region Border Communities; and 2.) Prevent underage drinking among the Hispanic Population in the South Region Border Communities; and 3.) Prevent Opioid abuse among the Hispanic Population in South Region Border Communities.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081468-01 INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC STRATEGIES SAN DIEGO CA GUILLEN MANOLO $300,000

The Sacramento Strategic Prevention Framework Project (SSPFP) will build capacity to prevent substance use and abuse among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth 9-20 in Sacramento County, using strength-based, systematic, collaborative, culturally-based and data-driven approaches. This project will serve 80 youth annually, 400 youth over 5 years, to reduce onset and progression of alcohol, marijuana, and prescription drug use among AI/AN youth. SSPFP will build local capacity by working with institutional and community partners, developing data capacity and infrastructure, and promoting preventative factors among AI/AN youth. Programming will be based in the Sacramento Native American Health Center’s (SNAHC) Behavioral Health and Prevention Initiative Department and will build off of recent community needs assessment work and prior strategic prevention framework grants. The project goals are to: 1) strengthen local capacity and infrastructure to reduce onset and progression of substance use among AI/AN youth 9-20 in Sacramento County by implementing the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) within a culturally-based format.; 2) strengthen substance abuse preventative factors -- community and cultural connection -- by providing culturally-based prevention services to 80 AI/AN youth ages 9-20 per year; and 3) Increase awareness of substance abuse prevention and services and AI/AN community needs by developing and disseminating peer-to-peer social marketing messaging. Program objectives include: collaboration with institutional system partners to leverage resources and fund prevention work; partnering with the existing State Epidemiological Outcomes Workgroup to advance AI/AN data needs; strengthening community coalitions, local capacity and infrastructure by partnering with local AI/AN youth-serving programs; providing a youth safe space; providing direct substance abuse prevention education; providing regular youth talking circles; implementing a peer mentor program; and promoting program messages with peer-led youth social marketing work. SNAHC will leverage existing partnerships to address substance use prevention, and also engage new partnerships. SNAHC will also engage existing partners: The Multi-Agency Partners consisting of county-wide stakeholders; youth, parent, and evaluation Advisory Groups; and the Intersegmental Group, representing AI/AN serving aspects of educational systems throughout the county. SSPFP staff will also join the State Tribal Epidemiological Workgroup and form a Community Substance Prevention Coalition, made up of key youth-serving partners. Strategies and interventions include Evidence-Based and Community-Defined Practices to best address substance use among urban AI/AN youth. This includes the Strategic Prevention Framework and Gathering of Native Americans, as well as integrating key training approaches based on Native Wellness Institute Curriculum, We R Native, Native Stand and the Native Youth Sexuality Network.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081294-01 SACRAMENTO NATIVE AMERICAN HEALTH CENTER, INC. SACRAMENTO CA CUEVAS-ROMERO VANESSA $300,000

The community-based organization Sunrise Community Counseling Center (SCCC) proposes to implement the Pueblo Sano Project (PSP), a multi-faceted community-approach project to prevent and reduce underage drinking and marijuana use among Latino/Hispanic youth, ages 9-15 years old, in Los Angeles, California. The specific catchment area where SCCC proposes to develop and implement PSP will be Metro Service Planning Area 4 of Los Angeles County. PSP will implement a comprehensive multifarious prevention and infrastructure-building approach, including a mix of an evidence-based program (EBP), policies, and practices that best address the prevention priorities. PSP will rely heavily on the implementation of the Strategic Prevention Framework and the epidemiological findings to identify and select comprehensive data-driven alcohol prevention strategies, increase capacity through community TA/trainings/education sessions, utilize community coalition building strategies to increase prevention reach at the community level, create effective social media prevention messaging, and collaborate with the Prevention Technology Transfer Centers. Additionally, PSP will implement Familia Adelante, a Latino specific EBP, and will serve 220 (Y1: 30, Y2: 50, Y3: 50, Y4: 50, Y5:40) unduplicated youth and their families as part of the direct services component of PSP. For over 40 years, SCCC has provided culturally appropriate behavioral health and substance abuse services in the Westlake neighborhood of Los Angeles County.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081494-01 SUNRISE COMMUNITY COUNSELING CENTER LOS ANGELES CA SA JEFFERSON $300,000

The Lifeworks Community Action Network Project will serve the LGBTQ youth in grades 4-12 in the Los Angeles Metropolitan Area. The goals of this project are to reduce alcohol use among LGBTQ youth, enhance data utilization for prevention services, reduce gaps in stakeholder capacity to provide social services to LGBTQ youth, and increase LGBTQ safe and supportive spaces in schools. This will be accomplished through a variety of environmental strategies. The objectives of this project are as follows: increase percentage of LGBTQ youth reporting they perceive risk of alcohol use, increase percentage of LGBTQ youth who report they disapprove of peers using alcohol, provide an annual epidemiological outcomes report, reach 16,000 people with media advocacy program, implement training curricula for 100 school level faculty and staff, see 500 unique visitors to online training platform, provide Prevention Day gathering to train 100 attendees or more, increase number of schools implementing the Out for Safe Schools (OFSS)approach from 19 to 35, provide technical assistance to 25 on-campus LGBT clubs, 400 youth will participate in Leadership Institute, and increase percentage of youth reporting school connectedness. We will expand OFSS training for school personnel and reach more individuals with Models of Pride Prevention Day. A data work-group will conduct extensive assessment to inform a media advocacy campaign, and we will develop an online training portal for adults to learn cultural competencies in working with LGBTQ youth. The LGBTQ population of LAUSD grades 4-12 is estimated to be as many as 20,000 students and another 17,000 who identify as ""unsure."" Latino students (73.4%)comprise the majority of LAUSD's population, followed by White (10.5%), African American (8.2%), Asian (4.2%), Filipino (2.a%), American Indian/Alaskan Native (less than 1%) students. This multicultural district serves 157,619 students who are learning to speak English proficiently, and teaches 10 languages other than English. We anticipate serving 5,000 people each year and 20,000 people through the life of the project.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081532-01 L.A. GAY & LESBIAN CENTER LOS ANGELES CA MCCLOSKEY KEVIN $300,000

The Native American Health Center’s Red Vision will serve self-identified American Indian/ Alaska Native youth ages 9-20 residing in and around NAHC’s clinics located in the San Francisco Bay Area at-risk for substance misuse and related behavioral health issues. The implementation of this project will strengthen NAHC’s internal and community capacity to provide substance abuse prevention programming to the target population. Project activities combine strengthening the local AIAN community framework to provide holistic prevention programming as well as the delivery of evidence based practices coupled with NAHC’s innovative holistic community based best practices. Through the proposed Red Vision project, NAHC will advance the substance abuse prevention infrastructure for at-risk American Indian/ Alaska Native youth in the SF Bay Area focusing specifically on the use of alcohol. Two-hundred members will be served annually and 1,000 throughout the lifetime of the 5 year project. Proposed project goals are as follows: Goal 1. Increase community-driven capacity efforts to reduce the risk factors that may contribute to substance misuse and related behavioral health problems by strengthening the prevention framework for at-risk AIAN, ages 9-20, living in the SF Bay Area. Proposed objectives include: 1. Plan and implement Traditional Health training and technical assistance through an annual “Culture is Prevention Summit” for NAHC and urban Native serving organization to disseminate best practices surrounding NAHC’s adapted Cultural Connectedness Scale- California, Gathering of Native Americans, and other relevant topics. 2. Provide Gathering of Native Americans technical assistance training to staff from NAHC and urban Native serving agencies per project year. 3. Provide an epidemiological training workshop for urban Native serving organizations to disseminate applicable tools and best practices. 4. Provide targeted outreach and education to using social media and the PTTC. 5. Advance NAHC’s Community-Based Participatory Research through the development of a youth based Community Advisory Board and the facilitation of Community Advisory Board meetings. Goal 2. Decrease the onset and progression of substance misuse by implementing accessible, targeted, culturally appropriate, evidence and community based, best practices that address high-risk behaviors associated with substance misuse among AIAN, ages 9-20, living in the SF Bay Area. Proposed objectives include: 1.Provide substance abuse and related behavioral health screenings using the CRAFFT and PHQ-9 tools. 2. Administer the NAHC amended CCS-CA scale. 3. Modify and pilot the use of the “Sacred Bundle”. 4. Provide integrated behavioral health treatment and coordinated services. 5. Provide culturally based prevention, early intervention, and postvention traditional health services.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081396-01 NATIVE AMERICAN HEALTH CENTER, INC. OAKLAND CA MAMEA AURORA $300,000

The Mesa County Youth Substance Use Prevention project will serve youth ages 11-18 in Mesa County, Colorado. The project aims to decrease youth use of alcohol, marijuana and prescription medications by implementing a comprehensive prevention approach including increasing coalition response capacity, implementation of Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST), and increasing risk assessment and access to trauma-informed cognitive therapy for court-involved youth. The project has three main goals: 1) increase community capacity to address high-risk behaviors of youth that may contribute to substance use; 2) decrease youth use in the general community population and among a high-risk target group of court-involved youth by implementing the LST program; and 3) increase access to behavioral health and substance use counseling services for court-involved youth by implementing an embedded process of screening and referral to treatment to address behaviors that may contribute to substance use. Community capacity to manage this issue will occur by maintaining and strengthening the existing interagency substance use coalition and training Mesa County Valley School District 51 (D51) staff to facilitate the LST programs. The goal is to reduce youth substance use by providing the Middle School LST Program to middle school students (at three pilot schools starting in 6th grade and going through 8th grade). There are approximately 600 6th graders at the three schools each year. This means that by the end of the program, 1,200 students will receive the full three years of LST, 600 will receive two years, and 600 will receive one year (2,400 students). Additionally, the High School LST Program will be incorporated in the Minors in Possession (MIP) class for court-involved youth and the Transition LST Program will be provided to students at the D51 alternative high school. Approximately 200 youth complete the MIP class each year so an estimated 1,000 will complete the High School LST Program. On average, there are 180 seniors at the alternative high school so approximately 720 students will complete the Transitions LST Program. Together the LST programs will directly impact approximately 4,120 students. Access to behavioral health and substance use counseling services will be increased for court-involved youth by hiring an additional case manager at Mesa County Youth Services dba Partners to screen youth and refer to a counselor embedded part-time at Partners, when clinically indicated. Approximately 350 court-involved youth will be screened and an estimated 120 will receive counseling each year. Over the grant period, approximately 1,750 youth will be screened and 600 will receive treatment. Continuous process evaluation and quality improvement will take place utilizing Botvin’s standardized tools. Outcome evaluation will include a review of multiple sources of data at the participant, school, and community level. Program sustainability will be considered throughout the planning, implementation, and evaluation process. Total reach for the entire project is 5,870 youth.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081712-01 MESA COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT GRAND JUNCTION CO WEIR CHARITY $177,219

This proposal will be implemented within Douglas County, Colorado, the seventh most populated county in the State of Colorado. The County includes five incorporated municipalities and a highly populated unincorporated area. The three largest municipalities each have their own police department and fire protection district, while the entire county is served by one school district and one library system. Douglas County School District (DCSD) is the third largest school district in Colorado, with 89 schools and over 68,000 students. Douglas County is primarily White Non-Hispanic (82.6%) with a growing population of color. The county population includes several communities experiencing inequities, including people experiencing homelessness, those identifying as LGTBQ+, and families living in poverty and/or without health insurance. This project will serve the youth of Douglas County with a goal of reducing youth and young adult use of alcohol, marijuana, nicotine, and prescription drugs and promoting youth protective factors. Emphasis will be placed on communities most at-need in the county, which include the major municipalities and unincorporated areas. The populations impacted will be adolescents ages 9-20 with an emphasis on developing Douglas County School District and the juvenile justice system infrastructures to better serve adolescents who are using substances and assessed to be high-risk for substance use and/or mental illness. High youth substance use rates and identified gaps make Douglas County one of critically high need, and the existing community assets and collaborations are an ideal building block for continued prevention work. Tri-County Health Department (TCHD) and Douglas County School District (DCSD) will partner to lead this project. TCHD will serve as the fiscal agent and provide all oversight to the SPF process. TCHD will sub-contract with DCSD to be the community face of the coalition. This is a model TCHD has used successfully for many years to ensure efforts are truly community-led. Together TCHD and DCSD will implement required activities to achieve goals and objectives through the use of community-based processes and evidence-based interventions. TCHD and DCSD will utilize community coalition building strategies to advance substance abuse prevention efforts across the community by convening a diverse group of stakeholders across sectors to collaborate through the coalition. This project will use the Strategic Prevention Framework to identify and select comprehensive, data-driven substance abuse prevention strategies to achieve goals and objectives. The SPF will be the model for all coalition activities and will guide the coalition through building capacity, assessing the community, and planning, implementing, and evaluation strategies. This project will build upon existing prevention capacity and grow collaboration across a diverse set of community agencies and stakeholders in Douglas County with the intended outcome of reducing underage use of alcohol, marijuana, vaping products, and prescription drugs while increasing youth protective factors.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081620-01 TRI COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT GREENWOOD VILLAGE CO PROSER MAURA $168,881

To prevent the onset and reduce the progression of alcohol, marijuana, and stimulant use among Denver youth, Engaging Youth Expertise for Prevention (“EYE for Prevention”) will partner with youth with lived experience to: assess the prevention needs of youth engaged in substance use; plan, implement, and evaluate needs-based prevention strategies; and provide training and technical assistance to enhance prevention capacity at the community level. EYE for Prevention will serve Denver youth aged 9 to 20. According to 2017 Census Bureau estimates, Denver County is home to 704,621 individuals, with youth ages 10-19 making up 10% of the population. Denver is racially and ethnically diverse; 81% of county residents identify as White, 10% Black or African American, 4% Asian, 2% American Indian or Alaska Native, < 1% Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, 3% bi-racial, and 30% Hispanic or Latino. Youth substance use is an issue of marked concern in Denver County. Per the 2017 Healthy Kids Colorado Survey, 27% of Denver high school students and 9% of Denver middle school students used alcohol in the past month; 24% of high school students and 9% of middle school students used marijuana; and 4% of high school students used prescription drugs without a prescription. EYE for Prevention will: 1) prevent the onset and progression of youth substance use in Denver by implementing data-driven, evidence-based prevention strategies within youth-serving treatment programs, schools, and youth-serving organizations; 2) increase the capacity of local youth-serving treatment programs, schools, and youth-serving organizations to prevent the onset and reduce the progression of youth substance use; and 3) promote a model for engaging youth with lived experience in assessing and addressing youth substance abuse prevention needs. These goals will be achieved through accomplishment of the following objectives: 1) By April 2020, 10 youth with lived experience related to substance use will be hired and trained to co-lead assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation, and capacity-building activities to advance youth substance abuse prevention in Denver; 2) By April 2021 and April 2023, assessment findings related to the substance use experiences and prevention needs of Denver youth who are engaged in substance use will be produced utilizing principles of community-based participatory research and disseminated to 50 stakeholder groups (including youth treatment providers, local prevention coalitions, schools, and youth-serving organizations); 3) By September 2024, 2,000 Denver youth age 9-20 will participate in prevention activities and/or be exposed to prevention messaging developed by youth with lived experience, and community-level data will indicate significant progress toward addressing identified prevention priorities; and 4) By September 2024, 50 stakeholder groups will participate in training and/or receive technical assistance services led by youth with lived experience, and 85% of participants will indicate increased understanding of youth substance abuse prevention needs and uptake of data-driven substance abuse prevention strategies.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081358-01 DENVER HEALTH AND HOSPITAL AUTHORITY DENVER CO SHLAY JUDITH $266,160

The Eagle River Youth Coalition (ERYC) collaborates with all youth-serving entities in the Eagle River Valley to assess, identify and address the most pressing needs of youth in our community, identified as youth substance use and mental health. Youth needs are addressed through coalition efforts related to community-based processes, information dissemination, and environmental efforts in order to prevent you access and use of alcohol, marijuana and tobacco. The project name is the Eagle River Valley Strategic Prevention Efforts and will focus on implementing the strategic prevention framework including assessment, capacity building, strategic planning, implementation, evaluation, and collaboration to serve youth and families to address underage alcohol, marijuana and tobacco use. The target population for this proposal includes youth 9-20, parents and guardians, community members, and youth-serving entities in the boundaries of the Eagle County School District. All efforts are intended to reach the broad community and focus on addressing youth access and use of substance. The goals and measurable objectives of this project include increasing community capacity and infrastructure to prevent youth substance use and decrease contributing factors, and decrease youth substance use by implementing evidence-based programs, policies and practices that address behaviors that may lead to initiation of use. The following strategies will be conducted as part of a comprehensive prevention plan. The coalition will coordinate information dissemination and capacity building trainings to increase community knowledge of and ability to respond to priority youth needs, attendees will feel more knowledgeable about the topic and confident in facility prevention work. ERYC will lead strategic planning processes that result in the development of a youth master plan with partner approval of key strategies, a crisis and community response system with trained youth-serving professionals feeling more capable of responding to youth and families in a time of crisis, and a partner family engagement framework where families engaging in more collaborative programs. The efforts will increase youth engagement and leadership opportunities with participants believing their voice results in positive community change. In-school prevention education will reach middle and high schools. Hot spot mapping with elementary youth will result in one environmental change and affected youth will feel safer and healthier in that environment. Social norms campaigns will result in surveyed youth believing the messages have resulted in one positive decision they've made. Youth alternative activities will be held that allow attendees to recognize one activity to do instead of use substances. Policy education will occur with local municipalities being educated in at least one environmental change strategy that reduces youth access and use of substances. Annually, the coalition anticipates serving 1,500 youth and 1,000 community members through strategies, serving 12,500 individuals over the course of the project. Through a comprehensive and inclusive approach, the coalition aims to prevent youth alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco access and use.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081656-01 EAGLE RIVER YOUTH COALITION Edwards CO STECHER MICHELLE $300,000

The Southeastern Regional Action Council (SERAC) has been awarded a FY 2019 Strategic Prevention Framework - Partnerships for Success Grant in the amount of 297,302 per year for 5 years by the Substance Abuse and Mental Services Administration. With this grant, SERAC will serve the 177,094 residents of the following 21 communities in northeastern Connecticut: Ashford, Brooklyn, Canterbury, Chaplin, Columbia, Coventry, Eastford, Hampton, Killingly, Lebanon, Mansfield, Plainfield, Pomfret, Putnam, Scotland, Sterling, Thompson, Union, WIllington, Windham and Woodstock. The goals of the project are to 1) develop and strengthen the regional infrastructure to implement the steps of the Strategic Prevention Framework to reduce youth substance use in the northeast region of CT and 2) reduce the prevalence and impact of substance abuse among youth and young adults across the northeast region of CT. The primary goal of this project is to build the capacity to address binge drinking among persons aged 9 to 20. SERAC has also opted to address two additional priorities in the community: nicotine use (cigarettes, electronic nicotine delivery systems, and other tobacco products) and marijuana use.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081318-01 SOUTHEASTERN REGIONAL ACTION COUNCIL, INC. NORWICH CT DUHAIME ANGELA $297,302

Manchester Vernon Prevention Partnership (MVPP), a program of applicant agency, The Village for Families & Children (The Village), is a collaboration between two Connecticut coalitions: the Vernon ROCKS Coalition and the Change Collaborative of Manchester. It will, over 5 years, reduce, by 22%, the number of youth ages 11-18 who report alcohol use in the past 30 days from 9.6% in 2019 to 7.5% by 2024. The MVPP approach will directly impact 10,030youth ages 11-18 and 4,074family members over 5 years. Indirect impact is anticipated to influence an additional 1,715youth and 1,068 family members. Annually, the project will directly impact 4,598 youth and 1,978 family members, and will indirectly impact 1,635 youth and 988 family members. Manchester and Vernon are adjacent towns in central Connecticut with respective populations of 58,073 and 29,140, representing 2.45% of Connecticut’s population. Racial and ethnically diverse populations comprise 42% and 20% of their communities, poverty rates are 12.1% and 9.1%; chronic absenteeism are above the state rate at 16.9% and 11.9%; disengaged youth are 56.2% and 54% with lower percent of owner occupied dwelling than the state rate. The Goals of MVPP are; 1) To reduce underage drinking and 2) Increase the capacity of prevention infrastructure in Manchester and Vernon, CT MVPP will achieve these goals with the following objectives involving the increase of; 1) Youth ages 11-18 who report great perceived risk of harm from 78.1% in 2019 to 85% in 2024; 2) Youth ages 11-18 who report perceived parental disapproval against alcohol use from 88.3% in 2019 to 92% in 2024. 3) Increase prevention infrastructure capacity by creating an MVPP Advisory Board with new member sectors including housing, employment and financial agencies by January 2020; 4) Provide two prevention training opportunities to Advisory Board each year; 5) Develop a MVPP Youth Advisory Board, from which to engage at least three youth leaders from each community to create/expand social marketing campaigns and prevention activities; 6) Increase the collaboration of the two communities by increasing the number of prevention activities offered collaboratively from 0 to 2 annually; and 7) Increase Advisory Board member ownership and engagement in activities as measured by the number of members who participate directly or indirectly, each year from 2019-2024. Strategies will include implementation of a life skills curriculum for alternative high school youth and youth identified at risk of alcohol and other drug use; launch of an 8th grade transition program to support social and underage drinking issues that can occur entering high school; and implementation of culturally sensitive media campaigns targeting teens and parents related to underage drinking.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081632-01 VILLAGE FOR FAMILIES AND CHILDREN, INC. HARTFORD CT CARAFA KAITLIN $300,000

The Mashantucket Pequot Tribal nation (MPTN) Strategic Prevention Framework Partnership for Success (SPF-PFS) project will enhance our current efforts to address alcohol, tobacco and substance use among youth ages 9-20. The target community is the tribal community within southeastern Connecticut to be served are the following towns of southeastern Connecticut’s New London County. This is the most densely populated county of the state’s 8 counties with Native American youth and families. There continues to be significant inequalities in income and poverty rates for Native American families in the target area. MPTN will guide community coalitions through the Strategic Prevention Framework using an interactive process of training, technical assistance, and evaluation feedback that includes assistance with assessment and data, capacity-building, strategic planning, selection of appropriate evidence-based strategies, implementation, and evaluation. The purpose of MPTN’s Partnerships for Success program is to enhance the current insufficient prevention infrastructure by expanding the capacity to identify current and emergent prevention populations and concerns and to address those concerns with culturally appropriate evidence-based programs, practices, and policies. The goal of MPTN’s Partnerships for Success program is to support the tribal community of southeastern Connecticut in using evidence-based prevention programs, policies and practices to reduce underage drinking and marijuana use among youth age 9-20. Project objectives: Over the funding period, the project will: 1) complete a substance use needs assessment; 2) identify specific training and technical assistance needs of the target communities and subsequently provide the training and technical assistance to help them prepare local strategic plans; 3) develop strategic plans; 4) implement a comprehensive approach to each locality, which will include an array of evidence-based interventions to produce change in both youth behavior and the community and school environment; and 5) Identify and use data sources that measure risk and protective factors relevant to the local area population(s).

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081645-01 MASHANTUCKET PEQUOT TRIBAL NATION MASHANTUCKET CT SWIFT CORETTA $288,052

The Town of Clinton, CT’s Human Services Department and the prevention coalition, Partners in Community, are collaborating on the “Town of Clinton SPF Project to Reduce Youth AMN Use (Alcohol, Marijuana and Nicotine)” which will focus on decreasing alcohol, marijuana and nicotine use by 7-12 grade students in the town of Clinton, CT. Through implementation of the Strategic Prevention Framework prevention model under the SPF-PFS grant from SAMHSA, the Town of Clinton will serve 725 students and their families annually using environmental and individual strategies to achieve the primary goals of: Reducing the percent of 7-12 grade students who have used alcohol within 30 days from 20.8% in 2017 to 17% in 2024, reducing the percent of 7-12 grade students who have used marijuana within 30 days from 11.4% in 2017 to 10% in 2024, and reducing the number of 7-12 grade students using vaping devices from a base level to be established by the fall of 2019 Survey of Student Use, to a lower percentage to be determined post-survey in 2024. The grant will also seek to decrease the percent of 7-12 grade students reporting that they had attempted suicide within one year of survey from 5.4% in 2017 to 4% in 2024. The objectives of this project include increasing the perception of harm of use of alcohol, marijuana and nicotine, increasing the perception of peer disapproval of use of all substances, increasing environmental consequences for use by empowering the police department, school personnel and parents, and educating the entire community on the dangers of adolescent use of substances. Recognizing that mental health and substance use are typically coexistent, the objectives of this project will also include reducing the number of students reporting feelings of depression and/or anxiety. We recognize that in our prevention efforts thus far we have not adequately included our LBGTQ and Hispanic populations. Throughout the SPF process under this grant we will gain understanding of this service disparity as well as the unique cultural challenges each population faces in relation to handling stress and dealing with substance use and addiction. Environmental and individual strategies to be used include: a 145-member youth group focusing on life and leadership skill development and positive peer-to-peer influence; social marketing and norming campaigns run primarily by youth; community events geared to educate parents and other adults on substance use dangers; modifying local policy to increase the legal age of purchasing nicotine products from 18 to 21; empowering the police, school staff and parents to enforce existing laws, policies or rules regarding substance use; rewriting the high school policy for substance use by students; and continuing to develop a community network of support and action by increasing numbers of coalition members, specifically targeting our underrepresented populations. Over the lifetime of the grant it is expected that an unduplicated 1225 students and their families will be served.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081537-01 CLINTON, TOWN OF CLINTON CT MELILLO DAVID $286,389

ABSTRACT The National African American Drug Policy Coalition, Inc. proposes to develop the Wards 1 and 2 Strategic Prevention Framework-Partnership for Success (SPF-PFS) Initiative in the catchment area of the Park View and Shaw neighborhoods in Wards 1 and 2 of the District of Columbia. Park View and Shaw are neighborhoods in adjacent Wards 1 and 2 both located in the center of the city. The Wards 1 and 2 Strategic Prevention Framework-Partnership for Success (SPF-PFS) Initiative will prevent the onset and reduce the progression of substance abuse and its related problems among African American and Latino youth ages 9 to 20. The initiative addresses underage drinking (alcohol), marijuana use, and opioid misuse through a mixture of prevention infrastructure development and evidence base strategies.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081558-01 NATIONAL AFRICAN AMERICAN DRUG POLICY COALITION, INC. WASHINGTON DC BAILEY JEAN $300,000

Planet Youth Coalition will implement a prevention initiative to address underage drinking among persons aged 9 to 20 in New Castle County, Delaware by delivering evidence-based prevention programs through alternative activities at Bellevue Community Center, training educators at Christina School District to implement evidence-based prevention programming, and conducting a youth-led media campaign to change community norms around under-age drinking. New Castle County is home to an estimated 555,036 people. 21.98% of residents, (121,990 people), are under 18. Of the total number of residents, 64.85% are White and 24.61% are African American. 9.57% identify as Hispanic. In state surveys, 59.2% of high school students and 19.3% of middle school students in New Castle County reported ever drinking alcohol. Using the SPF, Planet Youth Coalition identified the need to address marijuana use among youth ages 9-20 as an additional priority. 29.1% of New Castle County high school students reported using marijuana in the last 30 days. Planet Youth Coalition brings together 12 sectors in a unified mission to prevent substance abuse in New Castle County. Planet Youth Coalition will implement a comprehensive community-based prevention program to address under-age drinking and marijuana use with the following goals and objectives:1) Strengthen protective factors among New Castle County youth to resist binge drinking and marijuana use by implementing evidence-based substance abuse prevention programs at Bellevue Community Center. Planet Youth Coalition will engage 200 youth annually (1000 over the course of the project) in evidence-based prevention programs integrated in alternative activities to address individual risk behaviors for under-age drinking; 2) Increase the capacity of the local school district to reduce high-risk behaviors of students that may contribute to under-age drinking. Planet Youth Coalition will train 75% of health educators at Christina School District middle and high schools to deliver evidence-based prevention programming to all students; 3) Reduce peer and parent acceptance throughout New Castle County of under-age drinking, binge drinking and providing alcohol to minors through a comprehensive, county-wide, substance use prevention media campaign with a targeted ad-buy that will reach approximately 280,000 New Castle County residents per year. After five years, high school student survey results will show a 2% increase in perceived risk of binge drinking, a 2.5% decrease in underage drinking, and a 2% increase in the perceived risk of marijuana use by 9-20 year old youth in New Castle County as measured by the Delaware School Drug and Alcohol Survey; 4) Develop the infrastructure of the Planet Youth Coalition to increase community capacity to implement, sustain, and improve effective substance abuse prevention services in New Castle County. The Planet Youth Coalition will coordinate prevention activities and track achievement of measurable prevention objectives and community impact.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081236-01 EDGEMOOR COMMUNITY CENTER, INC. WILMINGTON DE ELKINS DANIEL $222,781

The Gang Alternative Urban Partnership for Success Collaborative-Miami (UPSC) Project will synergize local prevention efforts by building and mobilizing an overarching Collaborative coordinating the work of seven existing DFC Coalitions, including FrontLiners Youth Coalition and key stakeholders from 12 community sectors, strategically engaging partners across systems in a collaborative prevention mission to enhance youth outcomes. They will achieve this through a collective effort to strengthen prevention capacity/infrastructure at the community-level. UPSC will be a data-driven catalyst for capacity-building and systems change. UPSC will use the SAMHSA Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) best practice model to further the capacity of Miami's prevention community to more effectively prevent the onset and progression of alcohol, marijuana and opiate use and related problems among persons 9-20. UPSC will target 15 high-risk, inner-city zip codes experiencing significant behavioral health disparities: 33054, 33056, 33127, 33136-38, 33142, 33147, 33150, 33161-62, 33167-69 and 33181. It will coordinate activities with 22 Miami-Dade County Public Schools (elementary, middle and high school) and 2 colleges. Communities engaged include Little Haiti, Liberty City, Brownsville, Overtown-Allapatah, Carol City/Miami Gardens, OpaLocka, North Miami and North Miami Beach, home to more than 683,446 individuals. Close to 20,000 students attend participating schools, 98% of whom are persons of color with 26% Hispanic and 72% African-American, inclusive of a large population of Haitian students. Project goals are: 1) To strengthen alcohol and substance abuse prevention capacity at the community-level; and, 2) To prevent the onset and reduce the progression of alcohol, marijuana and opioid use in youth aged 9-20. The UPSC-Miami will accomplish these goals by using the SPF and SAMHSA's 7 Strategies for Community Change to reduce risk and increase protective factors for youth substance abuse prevention including implementing series of events and activities that improve prevention capacity county-wide. A major emphasis will be to provide data-driven planning directed by a Lead Epidemiologist and achieve needed system and policy change over the 5-year period. Such change will have enduring impact conditions for youth in high risk neighborhoods and will expand the county's data capacity so existing and future prevention work will be more effective. Planned activities include: Gathering, analyzing and publishing local epidemiological and substance abuse data; Using data-driven identification of risk/protective factors; Identifying and acting on needed system and policy changes to ""move the needle"" positively on youth outcome indicators; Developing and disseminating strong prevention messaging across a broad, multi-cultural Miami-Dade market; Engaging in multi-coalition environmental campaigns; and, Working with the Prevention Technology Transfer Centers to identify, select and provide technical assistance and training for the adoption of effective prevention best practices/strategies countywide. PRIDE Surveys will be used to assess more than 16,000 students during the 5-year grant period, reporting bi-annually the changes in students use, attitudes and norms regarding alcohol, marijuana and opioid use. Over 5-years, the UPSC-Miami will build prevention capacity to reduce behavioral health disparities and achieve a positive move from baseline in the following national outcome measures: A. reduced 30-day alcohol/substance use; B. increased perception of harm or risk of use; C. reductions in age of first use (onset); D. increased perception of disapproval of peers/parents; E. reduction in ATOD suspensions or expulsions; F. reduction in drug/alcohol-related crime/accidents; G. increased # of persons served by prevention activities and increased # of prevention activities occurring.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081409-01 GANG ALTERNATIVES, INC. MIAMI FL NOZILE MICHAEL $300,000

Duval County Public Schools (DCPS) proposes the Substance Abuse Prevention Expansion (SAPE) program to improve and expand existing prevention and intervention strategies for students aged 9-20 years. This program will bolster the district’s support system for substance use and abuse, and will allow DCPS to provide earlier prevention activities; identify students who may have emerging substance abuse issues but who have not yet been identified; and provide clear, available options to tier 2 and tier 3 interventions. The target population of focus is school-aged children aged 9 until graduation (typically 18-19 years of age, but sometimes older) enrolled in DCPS schools in Jacksonville, FL. The program will target students throughout Duval County who are enrolled in traditional elementary, middle and high schools—an estimated 84,000 students total in grades 4th through 12th. Despite current prevention efforts, alcohol and other substance use is present among a large percentage of students. In addition to underage drinking, the district will address of tobacco/vaping and marijuana prevention/use among the target population. In order to meet the needs of our students and close service gaps, DCPS proposes to 1) provide additional targeted training and prevention messaging to students in the identified target groups, 2) train teachers/school personnel and parents how to recognize red flags of substance abuse in students, and 3) increase access to intervention for students who are identified as having an elevated risk of substance abuse. The objectives for the program are as follows: 1.a: To provide up to 20 targeted in-school student trainings in response to risk factors and identified need in year 1. 1.b: To provide targeted substance abuse prevention messaging to up to 20 schools in response to risk factors and identified need in year 1. 2.a: To provide trainings to 150 teachers and school personnel annually on average to increase awareness of substance use/abuse warning signs in students. 2.b: To provide trainings to 150 parents on average annually to increase awareness of substance use/abuse warning signs in students. 2.c: To increase the knowledge of at least 80% of training participants by the end of the training session, as indicated on pre/post training assessments. 3.a: To increase the number of Nighttime trainings provided to students and families. 3.b. To increase the number of referrals to community service providers.4.a: By the end of the 5-year program, a reduction in 30-day use of alcohol, smoking/vaping, and marijuana at targeted schools that exceeds previous change in these indicators. 4.b: By the end of the 5-year program, a reduction in ever use of alcohol, smoking/vaping, and marijuana at targeted schools that exceeds previous change. DCPS anticipates serving 300 adults and up to 20 schools annually.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081667-01 DUVAL COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS JACKSONVILLE FL LAVINE MARCY $300,000

Jewish Community Services (JCS) of South Florida, in business 99 years, in partnership with: 4 elementary, middle, and high schools; 2 after school programs (Girl Power and Overtown Youth Center) serving high-risk youth; two campuses of Miami Dade College (MDC), the most diverse and one of the largest colleges in the country; the University of Miami (UM) evaluation team; and one of the nation’s leading Epidemiologists, seeks to implement Project Substance-use and Tobacco, Outreach and Prevention (STOP). Project STOP will be implemented within two high-risk communities in Miami-Dade County, Florida among students 9-20 years of age (1500 through direct prevention programming and 10,000 to be served indirectly through social/environmental strategies annually and 7,500 and 50,000 respectively over the life of the project). The racial breakdown in each community of focus is about 2% White; 3% Other/Multiple races; and each varies between 45% Black and 50% Hispanic. With overall prevalence rates of 36.1% for lifetime use and 15.5% for past-30-day use, alcohol is the most commonly used drug among Miami-Dade County students followed by vaping/e-cigarettes (27.9% lifetime and 12.7% past-30-day) and marijuana: 18.6% lifetime and 10.3% past-30-day (all FYSAS 2018). Our proposed approach is data-driven, evidence-based, comprehensive, and multifaceted. Our overarching goal is to: Prevent onset and reduce progression of underage drinking, and use of e-cigarettes, and marijuana among children, youth, and emerging adults aged 9 to 20 in our proposed catchment areas (33147, 33142). We will accomplish this goal by enhancing infrastructure to increase the capacity to implement, sustain, and improve effective substance abuse prevention services for alcohol, e-cigarettes, and marijuana in these target areas through effectuating the following measurable objectives which track the SPF steps and associated activities. Obj.1: Within 60-days of GA, work with our epidemiologist and community partners to build on and finalize our initial needs assessment. Obj. 2: During the first 90 days of GA and on an on-going basis, build and mobilize capacity in our catchment areas of focus to address underage drinking among culturally diverse youth aged 9 to 20 and e-cigarettes and marijuana. Obj. 3: By 90 days of grant award, complete plan to address priority risk and protective factors and associated problems through finalizing culturally-relevant EBPs. Obj. 4: By 120 days of grant award, begin implementation of selected strategies and programs: Project Northland; the gender-specific Voices; and Challenging College Alcohol Abuse (CCAA)/Most of Us, a social norms and environmental management program. Obj. 5: From grant award through Year 5, evaluate and sustain prevention infrastructure initiative. Our longstanding evaluation partner, the University of Miami Comprehensive Drug Research Center (CDRC), a nationally and internationally recognized research team, will lead our evaluation and will work with the nationally renowned epidemiologist Dr. Lee A. Crandall.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081692-01 JEWISH COMMUNITY SERVICES OF SOUTH FLORIDA, INC. MIAMI FL FLEISCHMANN THOMAS $300,000

Wholistic Stress Control Institute, Inc, a 35-year-old award-winning community-based organization, located in Atlanta, GA will implement a community wide substance abuse prevention project, entitled the, “Community Ambassadors Partnership for Success (CAPS).” The goal and objectives are: Goal I: Increase the capacity and infrastructure in the City of Newnan, Coweta County, GA to prevent the onset and reduce the progression of substance abuse and its related problems among youth and young adults (9 to 20 years old) over a five-year period. Objective 1: By the end of March 2020, CAPS will have convened a Coalition of citizens and representatives from various sectors of the community to strengthen Newnan’s substance abuse prevention capacity and infrastructure by completing Steps 1-5 of the SAMHSA’s Strategic Prevention Framework. Objective 2) Each year, CAPS will have maintained 90% of partnerships with the 1) City Council, 2) Mayor Office, 3) Clergy, 4) substance abuse providers; 5) community-based organizations; 6) local businesses and 7) community members in order to increase capacity to fill gaps and address other problems related to substance abuse. Objective 3) By end of 2025, CAPS Coalition will have increased infrastructure to reinforce Newnan City Council and Mayor’s Office policy compliance via three (3) new strategies. Objective 4) By end of 2025, CAPS will have increased Newnan infrastructure by training 150 youth and young adults (30 annually) as Community Ambassador Leaders to disseminate substance abuse prevention information. Objective 5) By end of 2025, the Health Educators and Community Ambassador Leaders will have provided 10 evidenced based prevention mixed best practices sessions to 1,000 youth and young adults (150 to 225 annually) to increase knowledge, perceived risk of harm, and behavioral change regarding alcohol, marijuana and opioid abuse from pre to posttest as measured by the GPRA. Objective 6: By end of 2025, CAPS staff and coalition will have conducted twenty (4 annually) alcohol and drug free activities to provide healthy alternatives to encourage alcohol, marijuana and opioid avoidance. Objective 7: By end of 2025, CAPS will have implemented fifteen (15) traditional and media campaigns (three a year) to reach 5,000 (1,000 a year) youth and young adults targeting the prevention of underage drinking, marijuana use and opioid abuse. Population: The program will reach 1,000 9 – 20-year-old, males and females annually (5,000 over the 5-year grant period), who reside in the City of Newnan, Georgia, zip codes 30263, 30264 and 30365 over the five-year grant cycle. Twenty-two percent of teens and young adults (aged 16 – 24) are considered “disconnected youth” because they are neither working nor in school. Partnerships: The program will collaborate with Newnan City Council and Mayor’s Office, Boys and Girls Clubs, Coweta County Recreation and Parks Department, local businesses and citizens to strengthen the collaboration among the community and governmental agencies to implement comprehensive direct and indirect strategies. The program design is built upon epidemiological research data and utilization of SAMHSA Strategic Prevention Framework process.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081672-01 WHOLISTIC STRESS CONTROL INSTITUTE, INC. ATLANTA GA TROTTER JENNIE $300,000

The Fulton County Substance Abuse Prevention Project's goals are to prevent the onset and reduce the progression of alcohol abuse and its related problems by collaborating with youth-serving organizations in zip codes 30312 and 30315 to facilitate a program that focus on high-risk and predisposed youth to the clinical characteristics of youth alcohol use and abuse such as developmental disabilities; and to reduce heroin use among youth and young adults ages 9 -20.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081330-01 LEARN TO GROW, INC. ATLANTA GA VANDIEGRIFF VINCENT $200,000

The Bulloch County Alcohol and Drug Council (BADC) is partnering with the Decatur Prevention Initiative (DPI) to seek funding for a Strategic Prevention Framework-Partnership for Success (SPF-PFS) grant to prevent the onset of and reduce the progression of substance abuse. The proposed SPF-PFS project will build capacity and expand the prevention infrastructure in Bulloch County and the City of Decatur, Georgia. The focus will be on underage alcohol use and the use of opioids and cocaine among youth from 9-20 years of age, using a rigorous Strategic Prevention Framework planning, implementation, and evaluation protocol. Based on an extensive needs assessment, this project will build capacity to provide data-driven evidence-based individual and environmental prevention programs, policies and practices. Specific attention will be given to identifying and serving any sub-population vulnerable to behavioral health disparities. While some of these populations are more readily identified (i.e., economic, racial and ethnic minority groups), other groups will require more extensive outreach (i.e., the LGBTQ community, victims of abuse, children impacted by familial substance abuse or those with mental health issues). This project will build partnerships with those who can help identify these groups and strategically plan specific ways to serve them. These two agencies have a combined 67 years' experience in providing prevention services in their communities. Each community will strategically implement this project to enhance any existing efforts, to expand the types of substances addressed and to provide services to those currently under-served. Because they each have instituted different programs over the years, this partnership among communities will allow for sharing past successful strategies and leveraging each community's strength. One community is more rural (Bulloch County), and one is urban (Decatur), yet each is concerned about the consequences of underage drinking and its long-term impact on the young brain. Bulloch County has 74,722 residents, with 64% White, 28% African-American, 4% Hispanic, 2% Asian and 2% multiracial. Almost one third (31.3%) live in poverty, compared to the state at 24.7%. Most live in more rural parts of the county. Decatur has 22,813 residents, with 64% White, 28% African American, 4% Hispanic, 2% Asian and 2% multiracial. Decatur has the largest per capita same-sex household rate in the country. Decatur also has great economic disparities, with the White household income growing 10% (2000-2010), while the African American household income declined by 50%. Eleven percent of those in public housing are foreign born (predominantly African), which presents parental cultural and language challenges. Decatur has the highest rate of twelfth-grade alcohol use in Georgia. Both communities have colleges at the city centers, which have a significant impact on decisions about underage alcohol use. Each community has a high density of on-site alcohol retail establishments. From 2017 to 2018, each community has seen a significant increase in high school youth reporting heroin use (Bulloch 0 to 68 youth, Decatur 0 to 23 youth). Unlike alcohol and heroin, cocaine is not included in the annual high school survey, currently leaving a data gap to be addressed. Key informants (law enforcement, students and treatment professionals) are noting an increase in cocaine use. Also, a recent cocaine bust in the nearby port city was the largest seizure in that area's history. With a reported national resurgence in the use of cocaine and the increased prevalence of substances like fentanyl being added to both heroin (opioids) and cocaine, these two substances present a critical health concern that must be addressed. This grant's environmental strategies will target entire communities, impacting over 97,500 residents annually. Individual strategies focusing on high-risk youth will reach at least 200 youth annually.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081346-01 BULLOCH COUNTY ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE COUNCIL, INC. STATESBORO GA STUBBS JOYCE $297,493

The Ewa Beach-Kapolei Collaboration project on the island of Oahu's west side will serve youth ages 9-20 in the communities of Ewa Beach and Kapolei. The project will combine the prevention networks established by the EWAlution 96706 and E Ola Pono Ma Kapolei coalitions to develop a prevention infrastructure across the broader community and enhance prevention efforts for youth at risk including Native Hawaiian, Filipino, and LGBTQ+ youth. The goals of this collaboration are to: 1) increase the capacity of the Ewa Beach-Kapolei community to reduce risk factors that contribute to underage drinking among youth ages 9-20; and 2) develop and strengthen an infrastructure to implement, improve, and sustain effective community-level prevention strategies. The project will serve 1,500 youth each year and 7,500 youth over the project's lifetime. Demographic data from the schools identify the majority of students as Filipino (36.7%) and Native Hawaiian (23.2%) with a mix of Caucasian, Japanese, Samoan, and other ethnicities. Middle and high school students receiving free or reduced lunch ranges from 30% to 50%. The project objectives are to: 1. Convene Ewa Beach-Kapolei Collaboration partners to develop a community-wide SPF-based prevention approach and recruit key community partners to lead three workgroups to build community capacity and infrastructure to improve prevention efforts. 2. Organize and facilitate training, technical assistance, and mentoring in two evidence-based programs, policies, and/or practices to reduce underage drinking with the aim to begin implementation in year two. 3. Convene an epidemiology team to establish agreements with Campbell-Kapolei Complex Area middle and high schools to collect community-level outcome data. 4. Convene an LGBTQ+ leadership workgroup to develop a plan to provide a support network for LGBTQ+ youth and enlist partners from at least one high school and one middle school to begin implementing the plan in the next school year. 5. Convene an outreach workgroup to develop an outreach/engagement plan and enlist partners from the two high schools and three middle schools to begin implementing the plan. 6. Convene a communications workgroup to design a system to disseminate prevention messages and strategies and initiate the system by developing and disseminating at least one message for one audience.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081393-01 COALITION FOR A DRUG-FREE HAWAII HONOLULU HI KAMEOKA CHERYL $300,000

RC RAIL Coalition's Strategic Prevention Framework-Partnerships for Success Program will address underage drinking in Mount Vernon, Lisbon, Central City, Center Point, Alburnett, and Sprigville, Iowa with a total population of 11,677. In the next five years, the program will serve approximately 12,500 people. The strategies include; implementation of Project Northland, ordinance mandating Responsible Beverage Server Training for failed alcohol compliance checks, social norms and media campaign, teacher and community trainings, Responsible Beverage Server trainings to businesses and community festival staff, and evaluation of programs. Mount Vernon has a population of 4,461; including 28% under the age of 19, 14% aged 60 and older, and 3% below the poverty line. Cornell College, in Mount Vernon, is a liberal arts college with 1,000 students. Lisbon has a population of 1,908; including, 27% under the age of 19, 26% aged 60 and older, and 6% below the poverty line. Central City has a population of 1,320; including 25% under the age of 19, 23% aged 60 and older and 7% below the poverty line. Springville has a population of 1,074; including 24% under the age of 19, 20% aged 60 and older and 2% below the poverty line. Alburnett has a population of 673; including 34% under the age of 19, 15% aged 60 and older, and 6% below the poverty line. Center Point has a population of 2,241 including 32% under the age of 19, 10% aged 60 and older, and 2% below the poverty line. The goals include; increase community collaboration, decrease alcohol use among youth by implementing evidence-based programs, increase parental perception of risk and parental disapproval of underage drinking by implementing community-wide campaign, increase the capacity of school districts and Cornell College staff by implementing staff trainings, implementing social norms campaign at Cornell College, and expand Responsible Beverage Server trainings. The objectives include; increase the coalition membership by 3 adult members, increase community readiness to address underage drinking by 5%, implement Project Northland in all 6 school districts, reduce underage drinking of rural Linn County 6th-12th grade students by 3% per grade, increase youth perception of harm of underage drinking by 3% per grade, increase parental perception of risk and awareness of underage drinking by 15%, increase staff knowledge on identifying high-risk underage drinking behaviors by 15%, increase the number of school staff trainings on underage drinking behaviors by 2 per year/per school district, reduce underage drinking among college students by 3%, increase number of Cornell students who report seeing the social norms campaign by 30%, increase perception of risk on underage drinking among Cornell College students by 5%, increase the number of establishments that receive Responsible Beverage Server trainings by 5%, increase knowledge of Responsible Beverage Server guidelines by 10%, and pass a Responsible Beverage Server training ordinance for establishments that fail alcohol compliance checks.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081416-01 MOUNT VERNON COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT MOUNT VERNON IA JOHNSON ERICKA $300,000

The Nez Perce Tribe (Nimiipuu) propose the Strategic Prevention Framework-Partnerships for Success (SPF-PFS) effort to address the problem of alcohol and marijuana use among 334 Native American children and youth ages 9 through 20 years on our remote rural reservation. The Nez Perce Reservation is in north central Idaho and represents the geographic catchment area. The Students for Success Program within the Education Department is the implementing agency for the tribe and is in Lapwai, the seat of tribal government. Participatory Action Research will guide the SPF-PFS process. According to the University of Kansas’ Community Tool Box, Action Research involves people “who are most affected by a community issue – typically in collaboration or partnership with others who have research skills – to conduct research on and analyze that issue, with the goal of devising strategies to resolve it.” We propose to directly engage youth and young adults in learning more about an issue that affects them (alcohol and marijuana use and binge drinking) and take action (e.g. develop solutions) to help resolve the problem. We will develop a Youth/Young Adult Coalition to assist in this process. The Nez Perce Tribe’s SPF-PFS priorities are to prevent the initiation of alcohol and marijuana use among Native American children and youth and reduce the misuse of alcohol and marijuana by Native American youth and young adults on the Nez Perce Reservation. SPF-PFS goals and objectives include (space limitations prevent listing all objectives): Goal 1: Reduce the percentage of Native American children and youth, ages 9 to 14, reporting lifetime (ever) alcohol use and lifetime (ever) marijuana use. Objective 1.5: By September 30, 2020, the Project Director collaborates with children and youth provider partners, allies and coalitions to establish 1 steering committee responsible for coordinating and streamlining prevention planning across the Nez Perce Reservation. Goal 2: Reduce the percentage of Native American youth and young adults, ages 15 to 20, reporting alcohol and marijuana use within the past 30 days. Objective 2.4: By September 30, 2020, the Prevention Specialist coordinates with the youth/young adult advisory board to identify an EBP for Native American children/youth ages 9-14 to prevent the initiation of alcohol and marijuana use. Objective 2.5: By September 30, 2020, the Prevention Specialist coordinates with the youth/young adult advisory board to identify an EBP for Native American youth/young adults ages 15-20 to prevent the reduce the progression of alcohol and marijuana use. Goal 3: Reduce the percentage of Native American youth and young adults, ages 15 to 20, reporting binge drinking within the past 30 days. Objective 3.6: By September 30, 2024, reduce by 10% the number of Native American youth ages 15 to 20 reporting binge drinking within the past 30 days, as measured by the YRBS (ages 15-17) and AIATS (ages 18-20).

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081446-01 NEZ PERCE TRIBE LAPWAI ID BRONCHEAU ABRAHAM $194,077

The primary population that will be impacted by this project includes students age 11-20 and their parents. This project will be implemented across Bloomington-Normal with messaging and programming designed to reach over 95% of students attending one of the junior high schools (pop 4,400) and high schools (pop 6,000) and their parents, all students age 18-20 attending each of the three local colleges (pop 27,500) and first year and transfer students’ parents. Additional efforts will be focused on creating community norms that encourage responsible practice. Targeted systems include liquor retail and on premise establishments, area hospitals, medical practices and counseling services. Utilizing the SPF process, efforts will first focus on coalition building strategies. The structure of BN Parents will be redeveloped to include the college branch. The primary focus will be to identify stakeholders who are not current members of the coalition. The strategic plan going into the funding cycle will involve an expansion of the strategies currently evidenced as successful by the drop in marijuana and alcohol use rates amongst the high school population and subsequent drops in juvenile delinquency and school dropout. To further enhance the effectiveness of our strategy, we plan to develop messaging that builds and connects from junior high to high school to college to the community. As ongoing assessment and coalition building takes place the strategic plan will continue to evolve with one of our priorities being to focus on non-enforcement based strategies to address the use of fraudulent IDs and underage access to the bars in Bloomington. Assessment and evaluation will take place on multiple levels from multiple sources to determine progress toward addressing our SPF-PFS prevention priorities and further advance them. Given the expansion of BN Parents’ target population and data needs required for this funding, a full community assessment will need to occur. This will give us both a better picture of what is taking place in our community, including strengths and challenges, and provide baseline data to determine future progress. To best approach this, the Epidemiologist (E) in partnership with the Project Director (PD) and Project Coordinator (PC) will develop an assessment plan that addresses the current environment in all three levels of schooling discussed, including current prevention efforts, and the community. The process and outcome data required by SPF-PFS will be gathered and reported by the PD and PC in SAMHSA’s Performance Accountability and Reporting System (SPARS). Daily logs maintained by PD and PC will allow for accurate process reporting for the quarterly and semi-annual reports. Outcome data required for the annual report will be collected from multiple sources once a year for reporting purposes. Epidemiologist will review data/reports and meet with PD and PC on a quarterly basis.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081564-01 CHESTNUT HEALTH SYSTEMS, INC. BLOOMINGTON IL KRETZLER MICHAEL $300,000

Pursuant to the purpose of the Strategic Prevention Framework - Partnerships for Success grant, Drug Free Osage County, Inc. will implement strategies designed to prevent the onset and reduce the progression of substance abuse and its related problems while strengthening prevention capacity and infrastructure in Osage County, Kansas. Osage County, located in Northeast Kansas, is predominately rural and has an estimated population of 15,894 (2017). We will strive to impact our general population, while targeting youth and parents. Drug Free Osage County will implement strategies to address underage drinking among persons aged 9-20, as well as tobacco use. To address these substances, we will employ a variety of strategies including a media campaign, school-based curriculum for 9th and 5th graders, a Safe Prom & Graduation initiative, Sticker Shock, Responsible Beverage Server training, and information dissemination including public presentations. We will also work with school districts and cities to enact comprehensive tobacco free school grounds and tobacco free parks and playgrounds. To address the root causes of substance abuse, Drug Free Osage County will collaborate with school districts and community agencies to host educational and professional development trainings focused on trauma informed care, crisis and social emotional needs, in order to strengthen our capacity to become a resilient community. In order to address the disparity of the lack of substance abuse counselors and limited mental health care in the county, we will partner with a local agency to hire a Master's level social worker to work within the school districts to provide supportive services for issues related to students' social-emotional health and to provide guidance for teaching staff.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081437-01 DRUG FREE OSAGE COUNTY, INC. LYNDON KS CLARK PEGGY $167,246

Mountain Comprehensive Care Center will build upon existing community relationships to expand/enhance programming to prevent the onset and reduce the progression of substance abuse, with a focus on underage drinking among persons ages 9-20, and use of marijuana and prescriptions drugs for persons ages 9 and above and related problems while strengthening prevention capacity and infrastructure in Floyd, Johnson, Magoffin, Martin, Pike counties, KY. Population: The project will target stakeholders within the community including youth/young adults (ages 9-18) at elementary, middle and high schools; families of persons in recovery (ages 9 and up); military families (ages 9 and up); and the community at-large including referrals from schools, courts, and other agencies for at-risk populations to impact prevention efforts and decrease differences in access, service use, and outcomes among the populations served. Interventions: The project will use SAMHSA’s 5-step SPF process along with a three-prong strategy to identify and implement data-driven substance abuse prevention strategies including: 1) Develop/implement the Big Sandy Prevention Workgroup with the assistance of the Lead Epidemiologist from the University of KY to strengthen capacity; 2) Partner with local schools to provide evidence-based curricula including Too Good for Drugs to prevent the onset and reduce the progression of alcohol and other substance abuse and related problems; and 3) Conduct workshops for at-risk youth and their families; families of persons in recovery; and military families using Prime for Life as well as conduct other community education on alcohol and other drug prevention programming and messaging across the community. Goals & Objectives: The project will serve 750 participants annually for a total of 3,750 over the five-year period. Goals for the targeted population in the Big Sandy region include: Decrease underage drinking among youth aged 9-20, and decrease illicit drug use and misuse of marijuana and prescription drugs among youth and young adults aged 9 and above by implementing evidence-based school and community prevention programs along with increased prevention messaging; and improve alcohol and SUD prevention strategies for youth and young adults aged 9 and above by implementing infrastructure development activities with the community. Objectives will be accomplished by the end of each year as measured by - the number of youth and/or adults who engage in programming who: 1) perceive consuming 5 or more alcoholic drinks at one time as a high risk will increase by 20%; 2) report not consuming at least one alcoholic drink in the past 30 days will increase by 5%; 3) perceive use of marijuana as a high risk will increase by 20%; 4) report not using marijuana in the past 30 days will increase by 5%; 5) perceive misuse of prescription drugs as a high risk will increase by 20%; and 6) report not misusing prescription drugs in the past 30 days will increase by 5%. MCCC will also conduct monthly meetings with the Big Sandy Prevention Workgroup, 12 community meetings annually, and utilize/share resources with the PTTCs. The University of KY will conduct the evaluation.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081238-01 MOUNTAIN COMPREHENSIVE CARE CENTER, INC. PRESTONSBURG KY JACOBS MASHAWNA $300,000

The Erlanger-Elsmere Strategic Prevention Coalition's Community Alignment of Resources Team (CART Team) project will insulate a developing community pipeline of services for 1,647 youth ages 9-20 in the Erlanger-Elsmere community by adding comprehensive alcohol prevention services and infrastructures and providing supports for coordination of the pipeline of services. The project goal is to prevent onset and reduce the progression of substance abuse among youth ages 9-20 in Erlanger-Elsmere, Kentucky. Objectives include: By September 29, 2024, to increase alignment of community resources to prevent alcohol abuse and related problems for youth ages 9-20 in Erlanger-Elsmere, as measured by use of Community Alignment of Resources Tool; and by September 29, 2024, reduce reported 30-day alcohol use among 8th, 10th, and 12th grade youth in Erlanger-Elsmere by 2% in 8th grade (from 8% to 6%); by 3% in 10th grade (from 15% to 12%); by 5% in 12th grade (from 27% to 22%) as measured by the KIP Survey. To accomplish these goals and objectives, the CART Project will use the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) to build a living system of comprehensive, data-driven substance abuse prevention strategies that will meet the required activities in a unified, integrated manner and supply resources to address ethnic, racial, economic, and other disparities. It will integrate new strategies and interventions with existing services to meet the specific, individualized needs of each youth aged 9-20 through meetings of the CART Team and use of the CART Tool. New strategies include: professional development related to underage drinking prevention for teachers and counselors; evidence-based Too Good for Drugs curriculum; additional prevention staff for coordination and implementation of services; school psychologist to conduct Functional Behavioral Assessments and to lead staff in related interventions; support for students who need substance abuse and mental health services but are uninsured; an additional school counselor to provide evidence-based substance abuse prevention support to schools, families and community; CRAFFT assessment by school nurses; individual and group therapy for youth with substance abuse and related problems and juvenile delinquency issues; Handle with Care police-school communication model, and more. The CART Tool and local data, coordinated through SPF, will guide programming and services for each at-risk youth.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081316-01 ERLANGER-ELSMERE BOARD OF EDUCATION ERLANGER KY BURCH MARY $300,000

ADAPT, Inc. will implement Project YOU to address preventing the onset and reducing the progress of underaged drinking and opioid use among persons aged 9-20 while strengthing substance abuse prevention capacity and infrastructure. The population to be served includes students between the ages of 9-20 attending public schools and community college in Washington Parish, LA. Partners will join ADAPT in increasing sustainability, protective factors, and strengthening infrastructure. Project YOU expects to serve 1500 students 1000 adults each year. This project will expand the implementation of evidenced-based substance abuse prevention programs in the schools, such as Botvin's Life Skills Training and Generation Rx. These programs will teach our youth to make informed choices about alcohol and opioid use. By the end of the funding period, it is expected that targeted youth who report 30-day use of alcohol will decrease by 8 percent as measured by LA Traffic Safety Commission; and number of youth requiring emergency care as a result of opioid use will decrease by 6 percent as measured by Emergency Room Visit Reports from local hospitals. SAMHSAs Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit will be used to train first responders, health care professionals, community members and parents. Local law enforcement partners will take the lead on alcohol compliance checks, drug take back evens, and awareness programs at schools and within the community. To strengthen infrastructure, Project YOU will build a web-based health and social services directory in efforts to link resources and information regarding substance abuse to change accepted norms for greater net-working opportunities. We will collaborate and coordinate with the LA State Department of Health, Office of Behavioral Health, Office of Public Health, Southeast Region IX and the Florida Parishes Human Services Authority, Office of Addictive Diseases with grant guidance, training, resource development, local and state data and technical assistance. A Licensed Prevention Professional with extensive expertise in prevention work, community development and grant management will be employed as Program Coordinator to provide daily oversight, personnel management, community relations, implementation and evaluation.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081593-01 ADAPT, INC. BOGALUSA LA FORNEA THOMAS $300,000

CADA Prevention and Recovery Center, an experienced SAMHSA prevention provider with 59 years of experience and a proven ability to strengthen prevention capacity to address underage drinking, proposes the Greater New Orleans Partnerships for Success, to prevent the onset and reduce the progression of underage drinking among high-risk populations in Orleans and Jefferson Parishes, an area that leads the state in underage drinking. Name. Greater New Orleans Partnerships for Success. Population served. High-risk individuals, ages 9-20, focusing on racial/ethnic minorities; 65% African American, 10% Hispanic; 80% ages 9-17 (N = 360); 20% ages 18-20 (N = 90); 5% LGBTQ; and 10% in need of substance abuse services. Interventions: 1) Complete comprehensive data-driven SPF Steps: within first 6 months; 2) Implement a comprehensive prevention approach, using EBPs: S-BIRT, Project Northland, LifeSkills Training, Alcohol Literacy Challenge, policies, and/or practices that best address the selected prevention priorities; 3) Identify TA and training needs and the development of responsive activities; 4) Build capacity to address underage drinking among participants identified through SPF; 5) Collect and report community-level data to determine progress toward addressing SPF-PFS prevention priorities; 6) Utilize coalition building strategies to advance substance abuse prevention efforts; 7) Develop prevention messaging and other prevention strategies and ensure dissemination of these messages and strategies via a social media campaign; and 8) Utilize and share effective resources with the PTTCs to enhance the wide dissemination and adoption of best practices in substance abuse prevention. Goals. 1) Prevent the onset and reduce alcohol use by participants in HNCs by implementing EBPs, policies, and practices that address individual, relationship, community, and environmental domains; 2) Reduce underage drinking consequences by participants in HNCs by implementing EBPs that address individual, relationship, environmental, and societal domains; 3) Increase the capacity of HNCs to reduce underage drinking consumption, consequences, and risk factors for participants by building coalitions that will employ a comprehensive prevention approach; 4) Strengthen and sustain the capacity of the prevention data management and systems infrastructure at state, community levels; and 5) Increase HNC prevention stakeholders willingness to leverage, and align area prevention funding streams. Objectives. Following completion of the SPF steps, annually and over 5-years: 1) 85% of prevention providers will participate in bi-monthly community prevention activities that address individual, relationship, environmental, and societal domains; 2) At least 85% of youth leaders will participate in community prevention activities that address individual, relationship, environmental, and societal domains; 2) 80% of participants will achieve abstinence from underage drinking; 3) 80% will improve employment status; 4) 80% will improve housing stability; 5) 80% will reduce criminal justice involvement. # of people to be served. 50 = Year 1 and 100/Year(s) 2-5, totaling 450 within 5 years.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081641-01 COUNCIL ON ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE FOR GREATER NEW ORLEANS (CADA) NEW ORLEANS LA PREVOST LINDSEY $300,000

LA Voz de la Comunidad, a prevention coalition working to improve the quality of life for Latino residents of Louisiana, conducts Strategic Prevention Framework - Partnerships for Success activities in 18 zip codes in the Greater New Orleans (GNO) metropolitan area. Approximately half of Louisiana Latino residents reside in the Greater New Orleans area. When compared to the United States, the GNO area: has a lower percentage of population with a high school education; has a lower median family income; has a higher density of air pollution; is more urban; has a higher percentage of residents with no health insurance; has a higher percentage of low income residents; has much smaller population of White,NonHispanic residents; has a shorter life expectancy for residents; and has higher infant mortality rates. LA Voz's PFS goals are to reduce youth substance use and increase community capacity to prevent youth substance abuse. LA Voz utilizes evidence-based strategies and objectives to achieve these goals such as advocating for responsible vendor policies to reduce youth access to alcohol; implementing evidence-based curricula proven effective in reducing youth substance abuse; building capacity of community-based agencies through trainings; and conducting community-wide media campaigns aimed at increasing the perceived risk of harm of substance abuse. LA Voz PFS yearly activities expect to touch over a thousand Latino youth with direct prevention programming and over 40000 Latino residents with media campaigns on a spectrum of platforms. Over the course of the 5 years, LA Voz expects to touch all GNO Latino residents with their media campaigns and over 5 thousand Latino students directly.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081644-01 METROPOLITAN CENTER FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN JEFFERSON LA ALVAREZ DAVID $300,000

As a SPF-PFS grantee, the Healthy Gloucester Collaborative (HGC) will work at the community level to identify service gaps, eliminate barriers, and enhance linkages to care for those impacted by behavioral health disparities and substance use disorders. The following proposal seeks to systematically approach underage drinking, E-cigarette use, and marijuana use youth and young adults ages 9-20 in the City of Gloucester. Educators and law enforcement are often on the front lines of youth risk behaviors. Therefore in creating system-level change in these youth-serving agencies, the HGC will be able to affect sustainable population-level change. Utilizing the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) and trauma-informed best-practices, the HGC will ultimately build upon its established infrastructure to bolster resilience and increase protective factors that may contribute to youth substance misuse and underage drinking among the target population. Now more than ever, there is a need for enhanced capacity and infrastructure to prevent the onset and reduce the progression of substance misuse and its related problems in Gloucester. Recent data patterns suggest increased alcohol and marijuana consumption, reduced perception of harm, and higher than average levels of mental health hospitalizations over the past two year period among Gloucester youth. Furthermore, internal research suggests significant gaps in access to mental health services in Gloucester, which can manifest in behaviors such as higher rates of substance misuse. These findings, coupled with Gloucester’s first medical and recreational cannabis complex set to open its doors summer 2019 put Gloucester’s youth at higher risk for substance misuse than ever before. The HGC has developed goals and objectives that will strengthen prevention capacity and infrastructure to 1) Reduce behavioral health disparities through a trauma-informed approach and 2) Build resilience among the target population. The project will accomplish this through policy and environmental evidence-based best practices that promote good social-emotional health. The HGC is a data-driven coalition that has been actively utilizing the SPF for over 15 years with a history of established partnerships with hundreds of representatives from all sectors, including the SPF-PFS target population, and has earned a reputation for creating strong cross-sector collaborations that produce lasting results. With support from the SPF-PFS grant, the HGC will expand upon successful programming to strengthen and sustain policies, practices, systems and environmental change dedicated to the prevention of underage substance misuse within the City of Gloucester.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081272-01 CITY OF GLOUCESTER GLOUCESTER MA EPSTEIN AMY $248,612

Prevention Services of High Point Treatment Center’s SPF-PFS initiative seeks to increase access to evidence-based prevention services around alcohol and marijuana use among middle school aged youth in southeastern, Massachusetts. The target population for this grant was selected to fill a gap in services for youth impacted by adverse childhood experiences as well as the legalization of recreational marijuana in Massachusetts. The prevention goals of this grant are to increase access to Prevention Services by enhancing capacity and infrastructure, reduce alcohol and marijuana use among persons aged 11-14, and prevent or reduce consequences of alcohol and marijuana use among persons aged 11-14. Prevention Services will create one contiguous infrastructure between eight community coalitions serving ten communities on the south shore of MA to align prevention efforts through a sustainable regional approach. This model will increase collaboration and uniformity of Prevention Services’ cluster of coalitions while building its capacity to address alcohol and marijuana use at the community level. This transformation will ensure that the region will have equitable access to culturally competent prevention services. To increase infrastructure Prevention Services plans to (1) expand the geographic region and capacity by adding Hanson and Raynham through formal agreements (2) increase collaboration among the eight existing community coalitions by developing an Executive Committee, and (3) (3) expand the education sector by adding two middle school-based steering committees in the Brockton and Plymouth region. To reduce alcohol and marijuana use through the implementation of evidence-based policies, programs and strategies Prevention Services seeks to (1) decrease the number of middle school students who report alcohol use within the past 30 days by 2% and (2) decrease the number of middle school students who report marijuana use within the past 30 days by 2%. In addition, Prevention Services will prevent and reduce the consequences of alcohol and marijuana use by (1) increasing the number of middle school students who perceive both drinking alcohol and smoking marijuana as harmful by 5%. Two hundred and seventy-five thousand people will be served annually through the grant and approximately 1,375,000 people throughout the lifetime of the grant.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081298-01 HIGH POINT TREATMENT CENTER, INC. NEW BEDFORD MA DUBOIS HILLARY $223,942

The Town of Lynnfield, Massachusetts' Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition, known as A Healthy Lynnfield, will work to decrease the misuse of alcohol and electronic vaping product use among youth ages 9 to 20 by implementing a comprehensive mix of evidence based programs that address behaviors that lead to the initiation or progression of use. Over the next five years, AHL will strengthen the prevention capacity and infrastructure at the community level by utilizing coalition building strategies to advance substance abuse prevention efforts. Our focus will be on reducing health disparities among youth that are disproportionately impacted by substance misuse. Through partnership development, training, trauma informed approaches, reducing access, increasing enforcement, increasing perception of harm and shifting norms that support use, A Healthy Lynnfield will leverage resources to effectively reduce adolescent substance misuse.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081337-01 LYNNFIELD, TOWN OF (INC) LYNNFIELD MA SALLADE PEG $275,000

Through a proposed project called the North Central Community Action Team (NCCAT), L.U.K. Crisis Center, Inc. (LUK) in partnership with the Community Health Network Area of North Central Massachusetts (CHNA9) will work to prevent alcohol, marijuana, and nicotine use among youth ages 9-20 in the 27 cities and towns of the North Central Massachusetts region. The total population of this area is 270,652. This population is predominantly White, but has become more diverse over the past two decades. A portion of the population speaks Spanish as their first language. LUK plans to work with CHNA9 to enhance and expand their existing infrastructure. CHNA9 brings together and supports diverse voices to promote health equity in our communities. CHNA9 members include three hospital systems, two colleges, and more than 70 other municipalities, and organizations. LUK is an active member of CHNA9. NCCAT will use the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) to guide us in our work by assessing needs and finalizing a plan to prevent underage drinking, marijuana, and nicotine use, to include evidence-based curricula for parents, youth, and schools; social marketing campaigns for youth and parents; and supporting grassroots prevention efforts by local youth groups, including policy and practice changes. The overarching goal of the project is aligned with the purpose of the funding opportunity: To prevent the onset and reduce the progression of substance abuse and its related problems while strengthening prevention capacity and infrastructure at the community level. Our sub-goals are to: Decrease past 30 day use of alcohol, marijuana, and nicotine among high school students by 10% by September of 2024; Increase by 10% the number of parents who report that they have talked to their child about alcohol, marijuana, and/or nicotine; and Increase by 10% the number of parents who report that they feel like they have enough information to talk to high school aged youth about drugs and alcohol. Our objectives are: By the end of the 5-year project, 15 schools in the CHNA9 service area will be providing evidence-based prevention curriculum, 15 youth groups will have received mini-grants to address policy or practice changes, and NCCAT will have created and implemented at least one social marketing campaign each to reduce underage drinking, marijuana and nicotine use. Additionally, we anticipate that by the end of the 5-year project, 125 parents/caregivers will have completed the evidence-based Guiding Good Choices curriculum, and NCCAT will have created and implemented at least three social marketing campaigns directed toward parents/caregivers. We estimate reaching 10,000 youth and parents each year, for a total of 50,000 reached throughout the five-year project.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081512-01 L U K CRISIS CENTER, INC. FITCHBURG MA FOLEY CASSANDRA $300,000

Albuquerque-Bernalillo County Youth Underage Drinking & Rx Opioid Misuse Prevention Partnership (ABC Prevent) The Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation (PIRE) and the Bernalillo County Community Health Council (BCCHC) will partner to enhance community capacity to prevent underage drinking and Rx opioid misuse in Bernalillo County, NM. Coalition-driven, evidence-based interventions will address community-level contributing factors in the misuse of these substances while addressing disparities in a majority-minority county. U.S. Census records show Bernalillo county represents 32% of NM’s total population. Over 50% of county residents and over 63% of its youth identify as Hispanic/Latino, 38.9% White, 6.2% Native American/Alaska Native, 3.4% African American, and 3.0% Asian or Pacific Islander. Approximately 14.6% of all Bernalillo county residents and 18.7% of child residents live in poverty. ABC Prevent will directly and indirectly serve all 676,773 Bernalillo county residents, with a focus on youth, young adults, and parents, aged 9-40, through interventions that are rooted in building community capacity for prevention through culturally responsive application of the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF). Strategies to address underage drinking center on the generation of community support for effective and equitable enforcement of underage drinking laws, and policy change to address ease of access to alcohol, high alcohol outlet density and low alcohol prices. To reduce access to prescription opioids for misuse, ABC Prevent will work directly with youth, parents and medical providers. Through academic detailing supported by community specific educational materials, medical providers will be engaged in responsible prescribing practices and educating their patients about opioid harms. Community-based participatory research methods will be used to engage youth, parents and other key sub-populations disparately impacted by misuse to develop and design strategic campaigns to prevent alcohol and opioid misuse in their own community. This partnership between community health promotion (BCCHC) and prevention research (PIRE) will assure the capacity required to support the strategic and effective application of strategies in a way that is responsive to evolving community needs. This proposal includes three goals: (1) utilize the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) to build capacity of the county health council (BCCHC) to grow sustainable community campaigns/initiatives to reduce underage drinking and prescription painkiller misuse among Bernalillo county youth; (2) decrease under-age drinking by Bernalillo county youth (ages 9-20) through a guided technical assistance (GTA) approach to engage the coalition base to support the effective implementation of evidence-based environmental interventions; (3) decrease prescription painkiller misuse among Bernalillo county youth and young adults (ages 12-25) by implementing programming to reduce dangerous/risky opioid prescribing practices and to build community campaigns to reduce access to opioids from parents and guardians.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081613-01 PACIFIC INSTITUTE FOR RES AND EVALUATION BELTSVILLE MD LILLIOTT ELIZABETH $300,000

Our project, titled Downeast Maine Partnerships for Success, will implement community- driven, collaborative efforts to prevent substance use and promote the health of youth aged 9 to 20 in the high-needs region of rural Downeast Maine. Through the use of evidence-based programs, policy changes, and systems development, and with a data-driven approach, we will significantly increase protective factors and reduce risk factors associated with substance use. Based on the evidence-based Icelandic Model for youth substance prevention and tailored to the needs and opportunities in rural Downeast Maine, we will utilize multiple strategies to increase protective factors and decrease risk factors associated with youth substance use, specifically alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana. Project goals include: 1) Increase parental/caregiver, school, and community awareness of and capacity to reduce risk factors and increase protective factors associated with youth substance use through implementation of a comprehensive evidence-based approach; and 2) Implement evidence-based programs, policies and practices to increase protective factors and decrease risk factors for substance use among youth. Objectives for Goal 1 include to: 1.1) increase coalition member participation by 30%; 1.2) conduct media campaign to raise awareness of protective and risk factors to reach 30,000 people; 1.3) provide educational forums to reach 500 individuals; 1.4) increase capacity of at least 40 schools and community-based entities to provide pro-social activities to youth through partner subawards; and 1.5) increase capacity of at least 10 schools/ community-based entities to provide peer-based mental health / social-emotional supports. Objectives for Goal 2 include: 2.1) deliver evidence-based resilience trainings to at least 1,000 youth; 2.2) engage at least 2,000 youth in structured, pro-social activities; 2.3) engage a minimum of 300 students in peer mental health / social-emotional supports through partner subawards; 2.4) engage at least 750 parents/caregivers to increase their time spent with children through a pledge card; 2.5) expand the Downeast Teen Leadership Camp to engage 300 youth in building leadership skills and preventing substance use; 2.6) engage 250 student leaders in local policy-boards and a region-wide Youth Leadership Team to increase their self-efficacy and influence positive policy, systems, and program changes; and 2.7) coordinate an annual region-wide Prevention Day. Annually, we will serve 10,000 people indirectly through media campaigns, and 1,510 youth, parents/caregivers, educators, and community members directly through in-depth programs and services. Over five years, we will engage 30,000 people indirectly and 6,100 youth, parents/caregivers, educators, and community members directly.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081695-01 HEALTHY ACADIA Ellsworth ME DONAHUE MARIA $300,000

The five tribal communities in Maine, Aroostook Band of Micmac; Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, Passamaquoddy – Pleasant Point, Passamaquoddy – Indian Township, and Penobscot Nation are known as the Wabanaki, the People of the First Light, and are the populations to be served through this funding opportunity. WPH recognizes that there is an ongoing need to increase infrastructure support and capacity to adequately serve Wabanaki youth. WPH seeks funding to improve and increase underage alcohol and marijuana use prevention programming available within schools and communities, with the ultimate goal of decreasing youth substance use and delaying the age of initiation. Our goal for this project is to engage more youth in the tribal communities we serve, by providing programs and services that strengthen their cultural identity, build leadership skills, and empower youth to use their voice to create positive change in their communities and beyond. For this project, we will substantially increase the capacity of the schools to address substance misuse, improve the substance use data surveillance system, and improve overall community awareness of youth substance misuse. This will be accomplished by leveraging and expanding culturally-based, trauma-informed youth prevention programming by using evidence-based strategies in school and after-school programs, developing a tribally-developed youth substance use data surveillance system, engaging community coalitions and increasing organization capacity with trainings, professional development, and technical assistance, and ensuring all activities are grounded in culture.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081724-01 WABANAKI HEALTH AND WELLNESS BANGOR ME SOCKABASIN LISA $299,946

The Opportunity Alliance’s (TOA) Public Health Program (PHP) proposes to implement community-driven efforts to advance substance use prevention in four communities in Cumberland County experiencing higher than average risk factors for early substance use and later disorder: Portland, South Portland, Westbrook and Bridgton, Maine. The Strategic Prevention Framework—Partnerships for Success project will impact youth aged 9-20 who are at the greatest risk for substance use and mental health disorders, including persons who have experienced trauma, are part of the immigrant and refugee community and/or identify as LGBT. The project will include a focus on specific neighborhoods to target indicated young people: East Bayside, Riverton and Parkside neighborhoods of Portland; Redbank/Brickhill neighborhood of South Portland; Brown St. in Westbrook; and Lower Main St., Bridgton. It will also focus on universal strategies to reach all youth living in the four communities through partnerships with schools and healthcare practices. The total number of people to be served annually is the entire population of youth 9-20 living in the service area: 14,653. Over the five-year project period, the number of unduplicated people served is 18,500. Data reveals alcohol and marijuana are the substances most prevalently used by young people in the service area. The recreational use of marijuana was recently legalized in Maine, contributing to a low perception of harm among adults and youth as well as greater access to marijuana products. Because data strongly points to the early use of any substance as a risk factor for later substance use disorder, the project will address both underage drinking and marijuana use. The specific goals of the project are: Goal 1: Decrease alcohol and marijuana use among at-risk persons aged 9-20 living in CPPC neighborhoods of Portland, South Portland, Westbrook and Bridgton, Maine; Goal 2: Decrease alcohol and marijuana use among persons aged 9-20 by increasing the capacity and improving the infrastructure of schools to meet the behavioral health needs of students; and Goal 3: Decrease youth alcohol and marijuana use by implementing evidenced-based practice improvements within the healthcare setting. TOA proposes to use the following core strategies to meet project goals: (1) build upon work already happening in neighborhoods with the highest rates of child abuse and neglect to implement effective, evidence-based strategies to reduce substance use and address behavioral health disparities, (2) utilize a learning community model, convening four school districts to improve their behavioral health infrastructure through collaboration, and (3) partner with healthcare providers to implement evidence-based practice improvements to meet the behavioral health needs of young people at greatest risk for substance use.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081511-01 OPPORTUNITY ALLIANCE PORTLAND ME O'CONNOR BRIDGET $300,000

The Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians' SPRING program will provide the LTBB community with culturally based prevention programs to reduce underage alcohol and marijuana use in Native youth ages 9 to 20 years old in the project catchment area of Emmet and Cheboygan counties. We anticipate reaching 120 youth during the first year of the five year project. Cultural-based prevention programs include Nish Fish, Living our Culture Today, Paddle Into New Generations and Camp Us. The Parents Who Host campaign will be conducted in the catchment area and all Tribal youth being issued a Tribal ID will receive a vertical ID to distinguish them from adult ID cards. Prevention programming will expand to include youth ages 9 to 11 years old. Goal 1: Prevent the onset and reduce the progression of substance abuse and reduce substance abuse related problems in Tribal youth ages 9 to 20 years old. Objective 1.1: During the 60-month project, conduct at least 5 LTBB Youth Survey needs assessments based on Tribal data with at least 70% of Tribal youth in the catchment area participating, and assist with collecting local data by assisting 100% of service area schools implement the MiPHY biannually. Objective 1.2: During the 60-month project, implement prevention-based culturally-sensitive programs to reduce Native American youth 30-day use of both alcohol and marijuana by 5%, reduce modifiable risk factors by 5% and increase protective factors by 5% as measured by the MiPHY and LTBB Youth surveys. Goal 2: Strengthen capacity infrastructure for prevention efforts within the Tribal community, including leveraging of community resources, to address substance abuse among Tribal youth ages 9 to 20 years old. Objective 2.1: During the 60-month project, strengthen capacity infrastructure in the LTBB community through implementation of at least four community-based prevention-oriented cultural events or activities annually. Objective 2.2: During the 60-month project, develop a sustainability plan for LTBB substance abuse/use prevention efforts. Activities will center around the SPF process to ensure a community-based approach is utilized. Assessment will take place annually. Capacity will be ongoing to continue development of youth protective factors and community ownership. Planning will be ongoing to determine 9-11 year old prevention programs and to develop a SPRING sustainability plan. Implementation will take place starting in Year 01. Evaluation will be ongoing to ensure data can be provide to SAMHSA at any given interval.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081753-01 LITTLE TRAVERSE BAY BANDS OF ODAWA INDIANS HARBOR SPRINGS MI KOCH RANDALL $300,000

The Alliance of Coalitions for Healthy Communities (the Alliance) will utilize funding from the Strategic Prevention Framework - Partnership for Success (SPF-PFS) Grant to implement a comprehensive youth substance use reduction initiative that will focus on increasing capacity across Oakland County, Michigan and reducing the use of alcohol, marijuana and electronic nicotine delivery system devices (ENDS) used for vaping among 9 to 20 year old youth and young adults. The Alliance will engage multiple sectors and its network of 19 prevention coalitions to implement a comprehensive action plan that will include strategies to increase community capacity to address youth substance use and reduce youth substance use and substance abuse related problems. As of the 2013 census, Oakland County, Michigan's population was 1,231,640, making it the second most populous county in Michigan. The census reported 76.9% of the population identifies as White, 3.7% Hispanic, 14.4% African American and 5% other including Native American, Asian, Arabic, Pacific Islander. The gender make up of this area is 51.5% female and 48.5% male. There are 486,332 households with 10.3% of the population below the poverty level. There are 332 public schools that serve 189,572 students. A 2013 report from Oakland Schools that monitors school districts who offer free or reduced lunch pricing for economically disadvantaged students showed 33.2% of the students are enrolled in this program. The project has the following goals and objectives: Goal 1: Strengthen prevention capacity/infrastructure at the community level. Objective 1: By 9/29/2025, increase community capacity for prevention by increasing community substance use prevention initiatives by 10% percent as measured by the number of prevention activities and campaigns that are implemented at the local level. Goal 2: Reduce youth substance use and substance abuse-related problems. Objective 1: By the end of the 2025 academic school year, reduce past 30-day alcohol use by 5% and increase perception of risk by 10% among middle and high school students within Oakland County schools as measured by the bi-annual MiPHY survey and focus groups. Objective 2: By the end of the 2025 academic school year, reduce past 30-day ENDs use among middle and high school students in Oakland County schools by 5% as measured by the bi-annual MiPHY survey. Objective 3: By the end of 2025, compliance checks conducted by youth inspectors will result in 100 percent compliance of youth between the ages of 12 to 17 unable to purchase ENDS products from merchants throughout Oakland County three out of five years. Objective 4: By the end of the 2025 academic school year, reduce past 30-day marijuana use by 5% and increase perception of risk by 10% among middle and high school students within Oakland County schools as measured by the bi-annual MiPHY survey.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081381-01 ALLIANCE OF COALITIONS FOR HEALTHY COMMUNITIES AUBURN HILLS MI BRENNER JULIE $259,888

The Active Coalition That Influences Outcomes in this Neighborhood (ACTION): Strategic Prevention Framework – Partnerships for Success Project will serve northwest Detroit, prioritizing the 48219, 48235, and 48221 zip codes. With funding from SPF-PFS, ACTION will reduce and prevent underage drinking and youth substance use, serving youth ages 9-20 in this area with the Strategic Prevention Framework and a mix of comprehensive strategies. ACTION historically has served 48219 and will be expanding with this project to include 48235 and 48221. 94.2% of the population in this catchment area are African American, and youth under 18 comprise 24% of the community’s residents (ACS 5-Year Estimates). This area is economically disadvantaged, with 30.8% or residents living below poverty. There are 117 active liquor licenses in this area and 57 marijuana dispensary or delivery services. The CDC YRBS 2017 shows that 18% of Detroit high school students currently use alcohol, 38% have used marijuana, 4% have used heroin, and 13% have taken prescription drugs without a doctor’s note or differently than prescribed. ACTION will implement the SPF to assess needs, build capacity, plan, implement, and evaluate programs to reduce and prevent youth alcohol and substance use in the expanded target area. The Coalition will train local leaders on SBIRT and Raising Healthy Children and provide Hidden in Plain Sight exhibits and Communities Talk Town Halls. ACTION will implement Geofencing, a corporate sector Marketing Strategy, to send prevention education messages to individuals who enter or approach local liquor vendors. ACTION will build capacity by relocating to an accessible location, implementing Salesforce software, and partnering with a neighboring Coalition to reach the new zip codes. ACTION will share PSAs and host the Annual Youth Summit to provide trainings on substance use prevention and reduction. ACTION will reach 52,955 unduplicated people annually, totaling 211,820 (duplicated) people served throughout the duration of the project. Goal 1) Prevent the onset and reduce the progression of substance abuse. Objective 1: Train 20 individuals on the SBIRT model annually, as demonstrated by train-the-trainer attendance sheets. Goal 2) Reducing substance abuse-related problems. Objective 2: Advocate for business owners to install 2 new Greenlight cameras installed near Lahser and Grand River Avenue by the end of Year 3, as demonstrated by an environmental scan. Goal 3) Strengthening prevention capacity/infrastructure at the community level. Objective 3: Increase each sector of the Coalition to 3 members per sector by the end of Project Year 4, as demonstrated by Coalition Involvement Agreements, ensuring the 2 new zip codes are represented in every sector. Goal 4) Leveraging other funding streams and resources for prevention. Objective 4: Leverage existing community relationships to obtain grant funding from the City of Detroit Health Department for prevention services by the end of Year 1, as demonstrated by a grant contract. Goal 5) Implementing a comprehensive prevention approach, including a mix of evidence-based programs, policies, and/or practices that best address the selected prevention priorities. Objective 5: Train 30 new teachers in Year 1 and Year 3 on the Raising Healthy Children evidence-based model, as demonstrated by training attendance sheets. Goal 6) Identifying TA and training needs and the development of responsive activities. Objective 6: Utilize CADCA’s Core Essentials and the Coalition Effectiveness Inventory (CEI) to identify additional training needs by the end of Year 1, as demonstrated by a completed CEI form.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
SP081403-01 CLASS PROGRAM DETROIT MI MITCHELL DR KARLA $300,000

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