The Lighthouse Project is designed to link homeless, transitional age youth and young adults who identify as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning and their Straight Allies (LGBTQ+) to a trauma-informed system of care that includes linkages to permanent supportive housing and primary health care, case management services, substance abuse and mental health treatment and a wide array of recovery support services. The University of Arizona-Southwest Institute for Research on Women (SIROW), the Southern Arizona AIDS Foundation (SAAF) and CODAC Health, Recovery and Wellness will partner to serve LGBTQ+-identified, transitional age youth and young adults, including those who are veterans, in Southern Arizona, from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds, with a specific focus on those between the ages of 18 and 35 who are chronically homeless. The goals of this project are (1) to provide ongoing outreach to a minimum of 300 individuals annually and screening to a minimum of 100 LGBTQ+ homeless young adults each year, (2) to annually enroll 60 individuals into needs-based, trauma-informed services, including case management, mental health and substance abuse treatment and recovery support services, (3) to develop and implement a coordinated, comprehensive, trauma-informed System of Care for chronically homeless young adults that is sensitive to and focused on the specific needs of those who identify as LGBTQ+, and (4) to evaluate all project activities to examine the impact of the intervention for participants and the longitudinal improvements to the System of Care. To best meet the needs of the 300 participants over 5 years, we will employ two Evidenced Based Practices (EBPs) in addition to other services. Seeking Safety is trauma specific therapy that aims to help participants achieve relief from trauma/PTSD and substance abuse. Motivational Interviewing will be employed during outreach and case management sessions to encourage participants to make positive changes in their lives with regard to substance use, mental health, physical health, stability and self-sufficiency. The Lighthouse Project participants will also have the opportunity to participate in the SIROW Sexual Health Education-Queer HIV prevention education curriculum, LGBTQ-affirming substance abuse and mental health services, vocational programs, financial education, and personal empowerment programs.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080527-01 UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA TUCSON AZ POWELL CLAUDIA $399,990

Amity Foundation proposes this expansion grant for its project, Dragonfly Community Center Supportive Services for Homeless Individuals and Families to provide high quality intensive outpatient substance abuse treatment and case management to homeless individuals and families in Arizona, particularly Pima County, with an emphasis on the Navajo and Tohono Oodham Nations and the Pascua Yaqui and Gila River Tribes all federally recognized tribes. Dragonfly will provide support services including strengths-based case management and counseling services that are gender-specific, trauma-informed, using an evidence-based substance abuse and trauma curriculum (Seeking Safety), and using evidence-based therapeutic community methods. Dragonfly will provide group and individual counseling; trauma-specific groups; veteran-specific groups; 12-step meetings; targeted assistance with finding permanent housing; employment services, adult basic education including GED prep classes, tutoring and testing; access to vocational training; workshops; and job readiness. In addition, participants will receive parenting classes, family sessions, and seminars on topics focusing on housing reintegration. Dragonfly will also provide referrals for primary medical care; prenatal education and care; childcare education services; mental health services; food, clothing and furnishings assistance; education and vocational assessments and placements as well as other wrap around services and active referrals. Treatment length will vary from 3 to 12 months. Dragonfly will collaborate with community-based outreach partners that are rooted in the culture of our target population to conduct outreach. All of Dragonfly's services will be available in English and Spanish and will be inclusive of individuals regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, culture, literacy, sexual orientation, or disability. The unduplicated total of participants we plan to serve is 350 over three years or 70 per year. Expected objectives/outcomes at the 6 mo. follow-up are: 75% will report a decrease or abstinence in substance use 75% will report a decrease in risky behaviors leading to substance abuse or criminality 75% of participants reporting histories of trauma will receive services relating to issues stemming from past trauma 75% will report increased access to at least one of the following support services: medical care, mental health services, employment services, educational services, benefits enrollment. 100% will complete housing plans for achieving and sustaining permanent housing 100% will be referred to permanent housing providers 75% will achieve placement in permanent housing

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080533-01 AMITY FOUNDATION TUCSON AZ CANNON ROBERT $400,000

This project will leverage existing community partnerships and funding to increase linkages to vital services and permanent supportive housing for individuals and families experiencing homelessness in Orange County, CA, while increasing SOS’s capacity to provide behavioral health and case management services tailored to the needs of homeless persons with substance use disorders (SUDs) and co-occurring mental and substance use disorders (CODs). SOS is requesting 400,000 in Grants for the Benefit of Homeless Individuals (GBHI) funding for its Behavioral Health/Case Management Expansion Project, which will allow SOS to add a psychiatrist and Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) certified case manager to its behavioral health team, and support the introduction of a modified version of the evidence-based Maintaining Independence and Sobriety through Systems Integration, Outreach, and Networking (MISSION) program. While MISSION was initially developed to support the transition of formerly homeless veterans with CODs and mental illness to independent living in the community, SOS’s project team will adapt this integrated treatment program to assist veterans and non-veterans achieve their personal goals through rapid community engagement and the provision of comprehensive outpatient mental health and substance abuse treatment services. The project will serve homeless individuals and families within SOS’s Orange County service area, including patients of our health centers, with a primary focus on those who are: 1) experiencing substance use disorders (SUDs) and co-occurring mental and substance use disorders (CODs); and 2) uninsured or covered only under Medi-Cal (California’s Medicaid program). Based on recent Census data, 37.8% of residents live at or below 200% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines, and 44.0% identify as Hispanic or Latino. Approximately 15,000 individuals currently experience homelessness in Orange County, with a 20% increase in 2015 alone. The project goals are: 1) to increase access to integrated behavioral health and substance use disorder treatment and recovery support services throughout SOS’s Orange County service area; 2) to improve collaborative care within a multi-sectoral system leading to improved health outcomes for the population of focus; 3) to reduce the cost of care through efficient delivery of integrated primary, specialty, and enabling medical and behavioral services; and 4) to connect homeless individuals and families to permanent supportive housing. Project objectives will include: 1) enrolling a minimum of 100 homeless participants following screening and assessment for SUDs/CODs; 2) providing comprehensive substance use counseling services for 100% of enrolled participants and combined substance use and mental health services for a minimum of 50% of participants; 3) linking 80% of participants served to recovery services and permanent supportive housing, whereby a minimum of 50 persons are placed each year; and 4) improving the quality of life for participants based on a pre- and post-test assessment using the standardized Addiction Severity Index (ASI).

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080472-01 SHARE OUR SELVES CORPORATION COSTA MESA CA HUANG ERIC $400,000

Nevada County Behavioral Health Department SAMHSA GBHI 2017 Grant Application ABSTRACT The Nevada County Behavioral Health Department's Homeless Wraparound Team aims to increase the quality of life of individuals experiencing homelessness with CODs or SUDs in Nevada County by means of improving a number of key areas in the lives of each participant, including (1) behavioral and physical health, (2) housing stability and sustainability, (3) self-sufficiency, (4) community connectedness, and (5) criminal involvement. Studies show that a large percentage of individuals experiencing homelessness have a history of mental illness and/or substance use disorder. Settled within the Sierra Nevada Mountains, only thirty percent of the population resides in an incorporated area of Nevada County, resulting in barriers to access, service use, and outcomes for homeless individuals with SUDs or CODs. To bridge the gap in services, the Homeless Wraparound Team will employ three components: 1. Outreach, Identification and Assessment: The Homeless Wraparound Team will use the local Coordinated Entry System to identify and conduct vulnerability assessments on 150 homeless individuals per year. 2. Intensive Case Management and Treatment: Treatment services will be provided to eighty (80) participants a year, with each client being given an individualized treatment plan. With treatment services, it is anticipated that eighty percent (80%) of participants will remain engaged with the program, fifty percent (50%) will have fewer emergency room visits, and fifty percent (50%) will have fewer encounters with law enforcement. 3. Housing Navigation and Recovery Support Services: The Homeless Wraparound Team will provide housing navigation and recovery support services to eighty (80) individuals per year, with fifty percent (50%) securing permanent housing. Additionally, seventy percent (70%) will secure or increase monthly income through employment or permanent benefit programs and eighty percent (80%) of program participants will become more engaged within the community through employment, volunteering, or recreational activities. In conclusion, Nevada County Behavioral Health Department’s Homeless Wraparound Team will implement a comprehensive treatment services project to address the disparities of homeless services for individuals with co-occurring disorders (CODs) and substance use disorders (SUDs) in Nevada County.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080596-01 COUNTY OF NEVADA NEVADA CITY CA SLADE REBECCA $400,000

WestCare California, Inc. seeks to increase capacity of services, permanent housing, linkages to evidence-based mental health and substance abuse treatment services, supportive services, intensive case management and linkages to other supportive services, to 300 individuals in Fresno County who have, or are currently experiencing homelessness, and have a substance abuse disorder (SUD) and/or co-occurring mental and substance use disorder (COD). Using the Housing First model, WestCare (WCCA) will partner and contract with the Fresno Housing Authority (FHA), Fresno-Madera Continuum of Care (FMCoC), and the Workforce Development Board (Workforce Development) to provide: 1) linkage to behavioral health and other recovery-oriented services; 2) coordination of housing and services that enhance the long-term sustainability of integrated community systems providing permanent housing and supportive services to the target populations; and 3) outreach, engagement and connection of clients who experience SUDs or CODs to enrollment resources for health insurance, Medi-Cal and mainstream benefit programs. By assisting clients’ entry and continued residence in permanent housing, WCCA will expand the community infrastructure to provide permanent housing and treatment for underlying substance abuse and mental health disorders. Project Name: Opening Doors to Housing and Wellness Population Served: The population of focus is primarily male/female adults, families and youth who are or have experienced chronic homelessness in Fresno County, California, who have a substance use disorder (SUD) and/or a co-occurring disorder (COD). This includes but is not limited to veterans, and victims of domestic violence and human trafficking. The homeless population suffers a variety of ailments and health risks at rates consistently higher, and in some cases dramatically higher, than the housed. Homelessness and Health: What is the Connection, published by the National Health Care for the Homeless Council in June 2011, showed homeless individuals had alcohol dependence (11% vs. 2%), and severe mental illness (25% vs. 12%) when compared to their housed counterparts. Project Goals/Measurable Objectives The goals of this program are to 1) Strengthen behavioral health care for individuals and their family members experiencing homelessness; 2) Improve coordination of housing services for homeless individuals and their family members who are experiencing SUD or COD; and 3) Engage and connect individuals and their family members who experience SUDs or CODs to enrollment resources for health insurance, Medi-Cal, TANF, and mainstream benefits programs. WCCA anticipates serving 60 clients/year or 300 over the lifetime of the grant. Strategies/Interventions: WCCA will use Coordinated Entry and Housing First models to connect with and serve the target populations, and utilize trauma-informed, gender-responsive Evidence-Based Practices to meet the Program’s Goals and Objectives: Motivational Interviewing, VI-SPDAT, Nat. Outreach Guidelines.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080546-01 WESTCARE CALIFORNIA, INC. FRESNO CA PIMENTEL LYNN $399,073

Volunteers of America of Los Angeles (VOALA) will connect homeless and chronically homeless Veterans with substance use and co-occurring substance use and mental disorders treatment integrated with primary health care, trauma-informed care, case management, and linkages to VA and public benefits, recovery-oriented supportive services and permanent housing. This proposed infrastructure will increase the number of program-enrolled Veterans in Orange County, California placed in permanent housing with the supports to ensure recovery from behavioral health issues and maintain their outcomes long-term. Population: VOALA will prioritize services for homeless/chronically homeless Veterans all of whom will have high rates of substance use and/or co-occurring substance use and mental disorders, health care needs and significant socioeconomic disparities. The population includes a heterogeneous mix of races, genders, and ages with post 9/11 Veterans among those with the highest service needs. It is anticipated that the project will serve 54 Veterans in Year 1 and 72 annually in Years 2-5 for 342 unduplicated participants over the five-year period. Interventions: Using a holistic and comprehensive service system, VOALA will utilize the EBPs of Motivational Interviewing, Critical Time Intervention and Peer Support Services through the use of Veteran ""Battle Buddies"" as well as trauma-informed care to link Veterans with permanent housing while also partnering with the VA Long Beach Healthcare System to provide onsite substance use and co-occurring treatment, and access to additional mental health care, MST counseling and primary health care. VOALA will likewise provide intensive case management, connections with public and VA benefits through use of SOAR as well as wraparound/recovery supports to promote stability and improved outcomes. Goals & Objectives: The primary goal of the project is to support the expansion of local implementation of a community infrastructure that integrates behavioral health treatment and services for SUD and COD, permanent housing, and other critical services for Veterans in Orange County who are experiencing homelessness. Expected outcomes by the end of the project period include: 1) Increase coordination with and expansion of the number of entities engaged in responding to Veteran homelessness in Orange County by 25%; 2) Improve identified behavioral health outcomes of participants by 65%; 3) Reduce past 30-day tobacco use of participants engaged in cessation services by 40%; 4) Increase housing stability for participants by 65%; 5) Increase participation rates in peer and recovery-oriented services by 70%; 6) Increase benefits enrollment of participants by 80%; and 7) Maintain operational integrity of the program by completing 100% of required tasks on time and within SAMHSA requirements. Morehead State University will conduct an independent evaluation which will focus on GPRA measures, implementation, achievement of targeted goals, objectives and outcomes, fidelity, assessment of cultural competence, satisfaction, and continuous quality improvement.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080417-01 VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA OF LOS ANGELES LOS ANGELES CA MOORING MONICA $400,000

People involved in criminal justice systems experience high rates of homelessness and HIV risk following transition from jail to communities, compounded by significant medical and psychiatric comorbidity. Though housing, employment, and treatment for psychiatric and substance use disorders improve health outcomes and are stabilizing, services are frequently under-resourced, siloed and challenging to navigate. To address this need, the CHANGE (Comprehensive Housing and Addiction Management Network for Greater New Haven) initiative expands and enhances the local implementation of a community infrastructure that integrates housing, behavioral health, and addiction treatment services for highly vulnerable populations at-risk for or living with HIV, by virtue of their involvement in criminal justice systems and/or engagement in sex work. CHANGE responds to SAMHSA's Grants for the Benefit of Homeless Individuals (FOA TI-17-009) by developing an innovative model of integrated care that creates a ""Patient-Centered Medical Home"" (PCMH) for homeless, justice-involved people at-risk and living with HIV in New Haven, CT enrolling 50 people per year (250 in all). PCMHs provide care that is: comprehensive (including substance abuse and psychiatric treatment in primary care settings), patient-centered, coordinated between service providers, accessible (co-located services with expanded hours of operation), and high quality, all of which facilitates improved health outcomes. The CHANGE program develops a PCMH by: 1) creating and enhancing sustainable partnerships with co-location of services for HIV, HCV, substance abuse and behavioral health treatment using the Community Healthcare Van (a mobile medical clinic); the city's largest HUD provider who will provide harm reduction services, HIV prevention, housing coordination and navigation services; and the Connecticut Department of Correction; 2) fully engaging and retaining homeless people in quality primary care, mental health and substance use treatment; and 3) facilitating increased access to stable/permanent housing for people at-risk for or living with HIV who are transitioning from jail. CHANGE will achieve these goals by using evidence-based practices that include screening, brief intervention, referral to treatment (SBIRT), medication assisted therapies for opioid and alcohol use disorders (buprenorphine, extended-release naltrexone) with nursing-led interventions, network navigators, outreach on the Community Healthcare Van mobile medical clinic for early intervention, co-located and integrated services for HIV prevention and treatment with behavioral and substance abuse treatment, trauma-informed care, directly administered therapy, supported employment, and intensive case management that incorporates elements of the Assertive Community Treatment and Access to Community Care & Effective Services & Supports programs to increase engagement and sustain retention. CHANGE overcomes logistical and organizational constraints by immediately co-locating substance abuse treatment, HIV treatment and prevention, mental health and housing support services for people at-risk for or living with HIV who are justice-involved, rather than being constrained by geographical and brick and mortar restrictions.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080561-01 YALE UNIVERSITY NEW HAVEN CT MEYER JAIMIE $389,054

COMPASS Home CHR is pleased to present COMPASS Home (Coordinated Medical, Psychiatric, Substance Abuse and Social Services for Home Placement), a proposal to establish a multi-disciplinary team who will work intensely to help men, women and their families achieve health and recovery from addictions and other challenges and also find safe and affordable housing that is conducive to sustained wellness and recovery. This proposal builds upon CHR’s years of experience as a behavioral healthcare and housing services provider and its knowledge of the needs in the region of focus. Why: We are especially passionate about this proposal because it begins to fill unmet needs in the region, particularly for people recovering from substance use disorders (SUD). There are so many challenges people face when rebuilding their lives as they enter recovery from SUDs. However, there are no reimbursable and/or grant-funded teams to help this population in the same ways that are accessible to people with serious mental illness. Our goal, in creating COMPASS Home, is to start to build a parallel infrastructure so more people can enjoy lasting recovery, good mental and physical health, and safe housing. Population served: Our proposal envisions the creation of a new infrastructure of services to help a distinct population of focus in a 30-town region in eastern Connecticut who are struggling with SUDs, co-occurring disorders (COD), and experiencing homelessness. We anticipate that some of the clients will have experienced homelessness for long periods of time while others will be transient, moving from place to place every few weeks, and others will be newly homeless due to their SUD and/or COD. We are focusing on adults, including adults with families, whose demographic profile mirrors that of the region. Of note, the region is mostly rural with the exception of the towns of Manchester and Willimantic. Of the towns, Willimantic has the highest density of Hispanic, non-English speaking clients. Manchester has the highest rates of opiate overdoses, though every town has been touched by the opioid-use crisis. Summary of services: Based on CHR’s experience in the region, we expect to serve between 50 and 60 clients every year. We will deliver a range of services including screening and assessment for SUD and COD; screening for communicable diseases and other preventive healthcare needs, in collaboration with primary care partners and supported by navigator-like services by CHR’s team; comprehensive wrap-around supports and case management services; direct care through CHR’s outpatient and intensive outpatient substance use and behavioral health practices in the region; links to a range of housing services to ensure that all clients find safe and affordable places to live that support their recovery and continued health. Local health agencies: CHR will keep local health department representatives apprised of our progress. We will include sub-divisions of the state Department of Public Health with responsibility over this region to participate on the Steering Committee. We will also communicate regularly with DMHAS about the progress of this project as we see this as a model to meet critical needs in the region.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080461-01 COMMUNITY HEALTH RESOURCES, INC. WINDSOR CT HAKIAN ANDREA $400,000

HIPS LGBTQ Housing and Support Services Program will work to end homelessness in Washington DC by assisting homeless LGBTQ individuals in accessing DC’s permanent supportive housing services, and helping them remain in housing by addressing social service, behavioral health and social determinants of health. The program was envisioned due to the lack of culturally competent housing services for homeless LGBTQ homeless individuals in Washington DC. While over 6,800 individuals have been assessed for their permanent supportive housing needs in DC, fewer than 2% were listed as LGBTQ. Eighty-seven percent of those transgender or gender-nonconforming individuals scored in the Permanent Supportive Housing range (a score of 8 or higher on the VI-SPDAT v. 2 or 35 or higher on the SPDAT v. 4). This scoring for permanent supportive housing generally indicates comorbid substance use and mental health issues. Utilizing both site based and mobile team approach, the program will give LGBTQ homeless individuals the life skills needed to maintain their housing through case management, psychotherapy, and counseling services, as well as providing an integrated model of support based on harm reduction, trauma informed care, and assertive engagement. The program will operate out of HIPS Center for Health and Achievement, a co-located model of harm reduction, behavioral health and medical services designed to increase the health and self-sufficiency of DC’s most marginalized communities. Each year, HIPS LGBTQ Housing and Support Services Program will provide services to an average of 75 high acuity homeless people, who have substance and mental health issues with the goal of helping at least 125 get and stay housed over the 5 year program.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080489-01 HIPS WASHINGTON DC MACINTOSH ELIZABETH $400,000

LAYC Behavioral Health Program for Homeless Youth Description: Latin American Youth Center (LAYC), a nationally recognized, community-based youth development agency with almost 50 years of service provision to low-income youth from communities of color in the DC metropolitan region, requests support for expanding community infrastructures that integrate behavioral health treatment and services for substance use disorders and co-occurring mental and substance use disorders, including linkages to permanent housing and other critical services for youth and families experiencing homelessness in the District of Columbia. In compliance with DC and federal guidelines and requirements, the proposed program will address the needs of 40 youth per six-month treatment period, for a total of 80 youth served per year for the five years of the grant period. Staff, including a Clinical Supervisor, Mental Health Counselor, Substance Use Counselor, and Outreach/Case Manager will provide: outreach; treatment, including screening, diagnostic assessments, treatment plans, crisis intervention, and individual counseling/treatment using evidence-based practices; drug testing; case management, including linkages to permanent housing, benefits enrollment, community support, medication management, primary care and other referrals, and wraparound services such as life skills workshops. Youth presenting with mental health, substance use, and co-occurring disorders will be treated using four culturally accessible Evidence-Based Practices: 1) Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MET), 2) Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), 3) Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach (A-CRA), and 4) the GAIN-I assessment. Services will be provided by bilingual staff, experienced working with vulnerable, including homeless, youth. Proposed program staff have attended LAYC’s Positive Youth Development and LGBTQ Ally trainings and internal and external trainings on cultural competency, unaccompanied minors, and immigration and immigrant populations. Evaluation data, collected through the SAMHSA-operated database system and data collection tool and our Efforts-to-Outcomes (ETO) database that collects demographic, output, and outcomes measures, will determine program success and the impact on program participants. An Evaluator will support the evaluation of program outcomes, including reporting on program data.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080535-01 LATIN AMERICAN YOUTH CENTER, INC. WASHINGTON DC MOHLER ELIZABETH $253,155

The Puerto Rican Cultural Center (PRCC) is a community-based, grassroots, educational, health and cultural services organization founded on the principles of self-determination, self-actualization and self-sufficiency that is activist-oriented. PRCC’s programs, Vida/SIDA and El Rescate (The Rescue), in collaboration with El Rincon, Norwegian American Hospital (NAH), Franciscan Mission and Sarah’s Circle proposes to enhance and expand its services through the El Rescate: Grants for the Benefit of Homeless Individuals (GBHI) grant. This program will focus on individuals who experience chronic homelessness and have substance use disorder (SUD), serious mental illness (SMI), serious emotional disturbance (SED), or co-occurring mental and substance use disorder (COD). This program will expand evidence-based treatment services, permanent supportive housing, peer supports, and other critical services for minorities with a focus on Latinos, African Americans and the LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning) community between the ages of 18 through 24. The first quarter of FY 2017-18 will consist of staffing, training, infrastructure expansion/set-up. Beginning in the 2nd quarter and extending the duration of the project will be implementation and evaluation. Based on PRCC’s needs assessment, formative evaluation/research and experience working with our target population, the following measurable objectives have been set forth to achieve our goals: 1. Provide onsite intake assessment to homeless clients (Annually: 385 assessments/ Project Total: 1,155 assessments) 2. Conduct SUD assessments (Annually: 200 SA assessment/ Project Total: 600 assessments) 3. Implement SA treatment (Seeking Safety and WRAP) (Annually for SA treatment: Annually: 80 program total GRPA SUD/COD outpatient treatment, case management and treatment plan (Year 1: 60, Year 3-4: 95, Year 5: 60 Project Total: 400 clients) 4. Provide psychiatric treatment and case management services (Year 1: 15, Year 2-4: 30, Year 5: 15, Project Total: 120 clients) 5. Provide Medication Assisted Treatment Annually: Provide (MAT) for alcohol and opioid disorders (Year 1: 10, Year 2-4: 15 and Year 5: 10, Project Total of 65 clients). Provide naloxone education to at least 90% of opioid abusers who are GRPA clients. 6. Provide Motivational Interviewing and Intensive Case Management Annually: Provide (these services to the LGBT community for those who are at risk for HIV with SUD and COD (Year 1: 15, Year 2-4: 30, Year 5: 15, Project Total: 120 clients) 7. Connect at least 80% of GPRA clients to primary health care services when a need is presented. Connect at least 80% of GRPA clients to enrollment resources for health insurance and mainstream benefit programs who are underinsured.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080584-01 PUERTO RICAN CULTURAL CENTER CHICAGO IL CALDERON JUAN $400,000

The Permanent Housing Initiative through Treatment and Recovery will establish services and further expand efforts linking individuals with mental illness and substance use disorders (Co-Occurring Disorders) to permanent housing. The initiative targets the Cook County Southland townships of Bloom, Rich and Thornton, Chicago (Chatham, Morgan Park, Roseland, South Shore, West Englewood and West Pullman), and the city of Joliet, Illinois in Will County. Sertoma Centre, Inc. offers a continuum of care that ultimately reduces homelessness throughout the communities served. The project will encounter 2,450 people who are considered homeless and support 140 people to secure permanent housing between September 30, 2017 and September 29, 2022 (450 encounters in Year I and 500 annually for Years II,III,IV, and V). The following overarching goals outline a comprehensive strategy to address all phases for addressing homelessness ranging from increased outreach efforts to supporting the maintenance of established permanent housing. Goal 1: Increase outreach efforts to encounter 2,450 people who are considered homeless. Goal 2: Increase accessibility of services and supports for people with Co-Occurring Disorders who are considered homeless by linking 1,000 of encounters with supports and services. Goal 3: Directly provide outpatient behavioral health services for 875 individuals with Co-Occurring Disorders enrolled in the GBHI initiative. Goal 4: Develop integrated approach between primary and behavioral health services. Both the federal and state levels of government are moving towards establishing an integrated system of healthcare that particularly supports those with Co-Occurring Disorders and other complex behavioral health needs. The initiation of the GBHI will offer an opportunity to begin the implementation of integrated services so that the whole health is managed as part of the recovery process. Goal 5: Link 140 people to sustainable and permanent housing by using the Coordinated Entry Process in alignment with the State of Illinois. Goal 6: Support 70 people who secure housing in maintaining permanent housing.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080404-01 SERTOMA CENTRE, INC. ALSIP IL WIEMEYER SARAH $400,000

The purpose of ACCMHS Maintaining Independence and Sobriety through Systems Integration Outreach and Integration (MISSION) Housing, Integrated Treatment and Recovery Services (HITRS) project is to develop an impressive coordination and integration of health and homeless systems of care to improve access and strengthen engagement to improve housing and recovery outcomes. TARGET POPULATION: The population of focus for this GBHI grant are those persons in Allegan County, Michigan who are HUD Category One homeless 40% who reported a mental health diagnosis (SMI), 14.5% reported substance abuse (SUD), and 25% reported more than one disabling condition(COD) or Chronically Homeless (19 adults) with SUD and co-occurring SMI. STRATEGIES AND INTERVENTIONS: The evidence based model used in the GBHI Project was selected based upon the success in similar populations of focus is: Maintaining Independence and Sobriety through Systems Integration Outreach and Integration (MISSION) Housing, Integrated Treatment and Recovery Services (HITRS). ACCMSH will serve a minimum 20 individuals or families who are experiencing homelessness and living with SUD/CODs each year and 100 persons over the course of the five year project. PROJECT GOALS: ACCMHS will improve access and strengthen engagement to improve housing and recovery outcomes. OBJECTIVES include: 1) Develop and fully implement a homeless crisis system with coordinated entry and prioritization of subsidized housing based upon acuity. 2) Fully integrate primary SUD services with the current primary health and behavioral health services at ACCMHS. 3) Integration of healthcare and homeless service systems to improve access to and engagement with housing services, recovery supports, and treatment services.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080550-01 ALLEGAN COUNTY COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES ALLEGAN MI COLEMAN CARA $400,000

Perspectives, Inc.’s Supportive Housing Program (named: Wheelhouse), the largest therapeutic housing campus for homeless women and children in Minnesota, is applying for funding under GBHI for the purpose of expanding Co-occurring Outpatient Treatment & Trauma Recovery Services for families coming directly from County Shelters. Families arrive emotionally broken from living in a homeless shelter. 100% of women have co-occurring mental and substance use disorders. To address homeless recidivism, they have a critical need for trauma-informed care. Demographic profile: In 2016, of the 194 family members served in our housing program, 64% were female heads of household and/or female children; 36% were young males. Race/ethnicity of those served was: 38% Black; 19% Multi-Racial; 17% White; 12% American Indian/Alaskan Native; 11% Hispanic and Latino; 3% Asian. (Perspectives does not collect data on sexual orientation.) Unduplicated Number of Individuals Served: YR1 – 120; YR2 – 45; YR3 – 45; YR4 – 45; YR5 – 45 = a total of 462 over the 5 year grant period. Perspectives is proposing to expand direct treatment services by increasing hours of service by 100%. Outside the additional treatment hours, other services will include: recovery coaching, employment, vocational support, parenting support, childcare, education, and transportation. Project Goals and Objectives: Goal 1: Increase access and engagement to needed services within evidence-based, trauma-informed housing and recovery services for dual-diagnosed homeless women with children. Obj. A: Provide 462 women and children with therapeutic trauma-informed supportive housing over five (5) years. Obj. B: Screen 100% of the women entering supportive housing for mental and chemical health symptoms and disorders. Obj. C: Offer 100% of mothers free childcare and transportation while participating within Perspectives’ Outpatient Co-Occurring Treatment & Trauma Recovery Services. Goal 2: Decrease mental health and substance use symptoms and disorders. Obj. A: Increase direct co-occurring treatment service hours from a low intensity (9 hours a week) to a medium intensity (19 hours a week). Obj. B: Increase current outpatient treatment offerings by 100%. Obj. C: Offer 100% of women receiving treatment services social connectedness through one (1) hour of recovery coaching per week. Goal 3: Remove barriers to increase retention and link all participants to permanent housing. Obj. A: Provide 100% of women with case management and housing retention services. Obj. B: Provide 100% of women with access to Perspectives’ employment/training program – Jump Start. Obj. C: Connect 100% of women to enrollment resources for healthcare and other benefits programs. Goal 4: Increase capacity for healthy parenting and decrease incidences of child abuse or neglect. Obj. A: Enroll 40% of women with children in Parent Cafe parent education services. Obj. B: Provide 100% of women with children access to the Circle of Parents parenting support group. Obj. C: 70% of women (by pre and post surveys) will report an increase in parenting skills.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080420-01 PERSPECTIVES, INC. MINNEAPOLIS MN KELLY-JACKELS CHRISTINA $290,086

Quality Home Care Services is proposing to implement Supports for Homeless Individuals with Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders to serve 720 homeless individuals and their families, including veterans, who experience mental health, substance use and co-occurring disorders. The program offers placement in housing with mental health and substance use disorder treatment within a comprehensive system of integrated services that support recovery. Quality Home Care Services will implement this program in Charlotte, working a variety of established partners including the Mecklenburg County Department of Health and Charlotte Housing Authority. The homeless population of Charlotte, North Carolina is one of the largest and most diverse in the southeastern US. There are at least 1,818 homeless individuals in Charlotte, or one out of every three hundred and eighty (380) people. Over 20 percent of the state of North Carolina’s homeless population live here. Quality Home Care Services (QHCS) will work with a population of focus that focuses on those with health inequities in the Charlotte area. The population of focus that QHCS has identified for this project are individuals who are homeless and in need of mental health and substance abuse treatment services, as well as additional supports. Quality Home Care Services will increase the number of individuals in permanent housing who are supported in their recovery by providing more comprehensive treatment and recovery-oriented services for behavioral health to those individuals. The goal of this project is to enhance existing evidence-based practices to ensure all homeless individuals with behavioral health disorders are receiving access to an integrated, patient-centered system of care that improves their overall health and wellness and allows them to live self-directed lives in our community. QHCS will provide direct treatment (including screening, assessment and care management) for the population of focus in its Joint Commission-accredited behavioral health program using new counselors hired to work specifically with this population of focus. The process of screening, assessment and care management are not one time events for our clients. The process of screening, assessment and care management takes place throughout the individual’s time in care. The ongoing process ensures flexibility within the structure of services we provide. QHCS operates multiple grant-based programs through the Health Resources and Services Administration, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the State of North Carolina. QHCS has data reporting requirements for its use of Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) funding as well, which utilizes the North Carolina Homeless Management Information System. Staff are accustomed to entering data into multiple systems and understand the importance and value of having meaningful data that is complete, accurate and entered in a timely manner. QHCS IT staff also support field staff in the use of technology, including help with installing, maintaining and troubleshooting issues with data collection systems, including electronic health records.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080431-01 QUALITY HOME CARE SERVICES, INC. CHARLOTTE NC MARSHALL FAYE $399,644

Connections to Recovery will provide Outreach and Case Management services to an estimated 160 single men and women each year who are homeless and who are suffering from SUD/COD disorders in four key regions in the state of New Hampshire, including the Greater Manchester, Greater Concord, Seacoast and Lakes regions. Because outreach and case management services are not funded by Medicaid in NH, this vulnerable population struggles to gain access to treatment and other essential resources needed to improve their long term wellness and stability. Connections to Recovery will connect this population to SUD/COD treatment and essential resources by providing trauma informed, culturally competent outreach services specifically designed to engage individuals with complex needs who may feel reluctant to seek assistance. Clients will be further supported by evidence based case management services, which in addition to helping them identify, access and sustain key resources such as treatment, housing, medical care and income generating supports, will also help them to set achievable personal goals for sustained wellness. A range of complementary evidence based practices will be employed including SUD/COD screening with the SBIRT, Abbreviated PCL-C and PHQ-9, as well as evidence based case management utilizing Critical Time Intervention. Motivational Interviewing, TCU Mapping and Contingency Management are additional tools that will help to sustain engagement in services. Families in Transition will partner with a minimum of 14 SUD/COD treatment, medical and housing providers to ensure that all clients are rapidly connected to essential stabilizing supports in each of the four regions. Connections to Recovery is specifically designed to help clients accomplish a number of essential goals including: 1) Increasing access to appropriate treatment for substance use and co-occurring disorders; 2) Attaining and maintaining safe and affordable permanent housing; 3) Increasing connections to social and life sustaining resources essential to long-term recovery; 4) Increasing connections to key mainstream resources; and 5) Increasing financial self-sufficiency and stability. As an agency with many years of experience providing housing and services, including evidence based SUD/COD treatment, to homeless individuals and families in New Hampshire, Families in Transition is uniquely situated to design, implement, monitor and evaluate a high quality, results-based program for those facing the greatest barriers treatment, housing and other essential resources.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080427-01 FAMILIES IN TRANSITION MANCHESTER NH SAVARD STEPHANIE $312,220

Robins’ Nest Proposal for the Robins’ Nest Recovery and Housing Program Robins’ Nest is proposing to implement the Recovery and Housing Program (RHP) to serve 300 homeless individuals and families who experience substance use disorders and/or co-occurring conditions. The Recovery and Housing Program offers placement into permanent housing and links to behavioral health treatment and medical care, along with a comprehensive set of trauma-informed wraparound services to increase family stability and support individual recovery. Robins’ Nest RHP is designed to address the barriers to physical, mental, and behavioral health care for homeless and unstably housed individuals and families, and link qualifying families and individuals to permanent housing in a trauma-informed, therapeutic context using a “wrap-around” service modality. The project is designed to meet the needs of low-income parents and children with complex psychosocial needs, and to address barriers to access for Black and Latino families and individuals in Cumberland County. Bilingual/bicultural staff are able to work cross culturally. Motivational interviewing, cognitive behavioral therapy, and Seeking Safety modalities will be used to support adults. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and other trauma-informed evidence based practices will be used to support children. Three hundred (300) new families or individuals will receive integrated support services, and assistance with housing through the 5-year grant period. (40 in year one, 60 in year two, 75 in year three, 65 in year four, 60 in year five). The goals of the RHP over the 5-year project period are to 1) Establish connections to housing and enrollment into insurance and other social benefits programs; 2) Expand access to substance abuse, mental health treatment and services focused on other social determinants of health to help ensure sustained housing stability and overall wellness for affected families 3) Establish a best practice model for reducing family homelessness to be replicated by social service and community-based programs nationally, and builds upon existing Robins’ Nest processes and strengths in family support services. The RHP is a partnership with the Vineland Housing Authority, Millville Housing Authority, CompleteCare Health Network, Cumberland County First Step Program, and Public Health Management Corporation [PHMC], and other community social service and medical providers. An experienced evaluator from PHMC will oversee collection of the data and will report on the outcomes. The findings will be reported regularly to Robins’ Nest and the RHP Steering Committee, as well as to SAMHSA, and used to continuously improve the project’s functioning and outcomes.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080593-01 ROBINS' NEST, INC. GLASSBORO NJ FOX MELISSA $400,000

Summary. Housing Works, Inc., in partnership with its affiliate, Intercambios Puerto Rico (Intercambios), is proposing to support the development of local implementation of a community infrastructure that integrates behavioral health treatment and services for substance use disorders (SUD) and co-occurring mental and substance use disorders (COD), permanent housing, and other critical services for individuals (including youth) and families experiencing homelessness. Populations to be served. The population of focus will be Hispanic individuals (including youth) and families experiencing homelessness. Intercambios will focus on serving substance misusers—particularly persons who inject drugs (PWID), cocaine users (both crack and powder), sex workers, and persons experiencing chronic homelessness. The catchment area will be eastern Puerto Rico, including San Juan (Puerto Rico’s largest city), Carolina, Juncos, Canóvanas, Loíza, Río Grande, Luquillo, Fajardo, Ceiba, Naguabo, Humacao, and Las Piedras. The service area population is mostly Hispanic, and suffers from extremely high rates of homelessness, SUD, COD, and chronic diseases. Strategies/interventions. Program activities will include: outreach and other engagement strategies, direct treatment (including screening, assessment, and care management), case management to link with and retain clients in permanent housing and other services, engaging and enrolling the population of focus in enrollment resources for Medicaid and other benefits programs, and providing “wrap-around”/recovery support services, including peer services, care coordination, transportation to appointments, Medicaid office, and job training. Project goals and measurable objectives. The program’s goals are 1) Improve access to behavioral health and other recovery-oriented services, 2) Enhance the sustainability of integrated community systems through the coordination of housing and services, and 3) Increase enrollment in health insurance, Medicaid, and mainstream benefits programs. The program’s objectives are to: conduct outreach and enroll at least 75 participants per year; conduct screening and referral activities using SBIRT for at least 75 program participants; provide Case Management services, incorporating Motivational Interviewing, to 70 participants per year; provide referrals to substance use treatment services and primary care and other supportive services; retain at least 40 program participants in permanent housing; develop and/or enhance linkages with 5 homeless shelters and housing facilities; convene a steering committee to meet quarterly with 8 local providers and other stakeholders; link at least 35 program participants to permanent housing; provide peer-based support activities to increase retention in housing and treatment services; provide entitlement enrollment assistance to all enrolled participants in need of assistance; provide information about peer- and community-based support activities to all enrolled participants; increase access to housing support services by providing housing services referrals to all enrolled participants in need of such referrals; and provide educational/vocational program referrals to all enrolled participants in need of such referrals.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080497-01 HOUSING WORKS, INC. BROOKLYN NY TORRUELLA RAFAEL $400,000

Centerstone’s Nashville-Davidson County Integrated Community Services (NDCICS) will expand the local infrastructure to integrate behavioral health treatment, increase enrollment in permanent housing that supports recovery, and provide other critical services for 260 individuals, youth, and families (Yr 1: 30; Yr 2: 50; Yrs 3, 4, and 5: 60 annually) who experience homelessness and have substance use disorders or co-occurring disorders in Davidson County, Tennessee. Nashville-Davidson faces challenges of socioeconomic disparities (e.g. poverty, affordable housing scarcity) that contribute to homelessness. The Davidson 2016 Point-in-Time (PIT) count identified 2,400 homeless individuals and 2,200 homeless households; they are predominantly male (78%) and White (55%); 8% are children. Chronically homeless individuals/families double that of the state (40.2% vs 20%, respectively). Of local homeless persons, 21% experience chronic SUD; 5%, HIV/AIDS; and 24.5%, severe mental illness. Nearly 10% are victims of domestic violence and 9.7% are Veterans. Many Veterans in Davidson are vulnerable; 7.6% live below poverty and 27% have a disability. The county’s low income areas are designated Medically Underserved and Health Professional Shortage Areas in primary care and mental health. The overall poverty rate is 17.1%, higher than both state (16.7%) and national rates (14.7%). NDCICS will develop/expand a community infrastructure that integrates behavioral health treatment, increases placement in permanent housing that supports recovery, and provides other critical services and support systems in Nashville-Davidson. Using all components of SAMHSA’s Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 55, NDCICS will provide assertive outreach/engagement, screening/assessment/treatment, permanent housing placement, case management, employment assistance, and recovery support services for participants. Project staff will assist participants enroll in Medicaid/VA/other benefits and link them to local resources for supportive services. NDCICS will implement TIP 55’s recommended integrated strategies/interventions (e.g., treatment/prevention planning, recovery management) and evidence-based treatment/services (Critical Time Intervention, Motivational Interviewing, Trauma-focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Supported Employment, Supportive Housing, augmented by Assessment-based Treatment for Traumatized Children: A Trauma Assessment Pathway). A Steering Committee of stakeholders and focus population members will support NDCICS goals and objectives to achieve the following outcomes: (1) Reduce substance abuse, mental health symptomatology, and service/ utilization costs; (2) Increase insurance/Medicaid/VA/other benefits enrollment; (3) Increase placement in permanent housing that supports recovery, employment, and independent living skills; (4) Develop/Disseminate a service model for replication. Key project partners include Nashville-Davidson Metropolitan Homelessness Commission, housing agencies, youth- and Veteran-serving agencies, health department, etc. Evaluation will be conducted by staff experienced in homelessness and SUD/COD, and all GPRA requirements will be met.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080453-01 CENTERSTONE OF TENNESSEE, INC. NASHVILLE TN VILTZ PHYLLIS $400,000

The Grants for the Benefit of Homeless Individuals (GBHI) Project that will be implemented by Loaves & Fishes will consist of 250 Hispanic and economically disadvantaged shelter and dining hall/clinic clients who will be the population of focus. Loaves & Fishes will also assist returning veterans and their families by addressing their behavioral health needs, designing appropriate programs, and prioritizing this population for services as needed. According to American Fact Finder, approximately 79.5% of the population of Harlingen, Texas is of Hispanic/Latino descent. Shockingly, 32.5% of that same population is considered below poverty level with an average household income of approximately 34,466 per year. With the percent of unemployment escalating to 4.3%, many of the Harlingen residents are forced to become dependent on organizations such as Loaves & Fishes. The population of focus will include, but is not limited to, bilingual (Spanish speaking) clients of all ages and sexes that need assistance with employment, financial stability, and housing. Loaves & Fishes hopes to accomplish several goals through this project which includes providing Substance Abuse Counseling to homeless individuals and families with substance abuse or mental health disorders; provide housing assistance to homeless individuals and families with substance abuse or mental health disorders; providing job services through Loaves & Fishes Job Shop Program to at least 65% of shelter clients; providing services to 100% of shelter clients, in need of services, through collaboration with Family Crisis Center, whose counselors evaluate the needs of domestic violence and sexual assault victims; providing treatment for at least 80% of the homeless individuals and families with substance abuse or mental health disorders with the partnering organizations; implementing effective evidence-based practices and legal, health, educational services focused on retaining at least 85% homeless individuals and families; and reaching at least 80% of the homeless individuals and families in the local area to offer them our services. To ensure that all shelter clients receive the services they need, Loaves & Fishes will implement several key activities to align with the purpose of this grant. These activities include outreach and engagement strategies; direct treatment; case management in providing permanent housing, primary care services, and support services; enrollment resources for SSI/SSDI; and “wrap-around”/recovery services to improve access and retention. These activities will aid the shelter clients not only in present endeavors, but also for a successful future financially, educationally, and socially. Clients will use third party health insurance or veteran’s benefits before using grant funds. As part of the GBHI Project, Loaves & Fishes hopes to serve at least 1,250 homeless and/or needy individuals (including youth) and families.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080383-01 LOAVES AND FISHES OF THE RIO GRANDE VALLEY, INC. HARLINGEN TX REAGAN WILLIAM $400,000

Via its proposed Montgomery County, TX, GBHI Program, Volunteers of America Texas (VOATX) will use GBHI funds to assist homeless individuals and families in Montgomery County, Texas, who have substance abuse or co-occurring substance abuse and mental health disorders, to acquire and maintain permanent housing that will help them remain engaged in treatment and services and ultimately avoid a return to homelessness. VOATX will enhance integration of evidence-based behavioral health treatment, permanent housing, and critical services for homeless individuals and families with substance use disorders and co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders. The objective is to develop a community-based, collaborative, best-practices housing and services model that incorporates clinical treatment, recovery supports, case management, supportive services, linkages to enrollment resources and benefits, and placement in and retention in permanent housing that will improve the health of individuals and families and prepare them for long-term housing stability. VOATX expects to achieve both increased housing placements and a reduction in returns to homelessness, along with a higher rate of ongoing treatment engagement. The ultimate aim of the project is to reduce homelessness in Montgomery County, Texas, a community where the number of individuals and families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness is growing rapidly. Program partnerships include the Housing Authority of Montgomery County, New Hope Housing, Montgomery County Hospital District (MCHD), Tri-County Services (behavioral health), St. Vincent de Paul, Compassion United, The Salvation Army of Greater Houston, and Northwest Assistance Ministries, and the Montgomery Women’s Center (domestic violence). Targeted populations will enter the GBHI program primarily through the Way Home (Houston Region) Continuum of Care’s Coordinated Access System, but also from VOATX’s existing clientbase and planned outreach strategies in the community, including referral relationships with many homeless providers, supportive services agencies, behavioral health and healthcare providers, veterans programs, reentry programs, and other agencies serving the targeted population. VOATX plans to serve 60 persons in Year 1, for a total of 300 persons over the 5-year grant period. Of total to be served, VOATX predicts 60% will be male, 33% female, and 7% transgender; 60% will be Caucasian, 30% African American, and 10% of other or two or more races; 13% are expected to be Hispanic; and in terms of sexual orientation, 85% are expected to report as straight, 5% gay, 5% lesbian, and 5% bisexual. Key program outcomes anticipated include 100% of participants will be placed in permanent housing within 6 months of enrollment; 70% will demonstrate substance abstinence during the first year of enrollment; and 85% will remain in permanent housing for at least one year post-placement.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080460-01 VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA TEXAS, INC. EULESS TX SMITH ERICA $400,000

Rock Valley Community Programs, Inc. (RVCP) will implement Project MATCH in Rock County, Wisconsin to provide adults, veterans, families, and youth who are homeless or chronically homeless with the appropriate mental health and/or substance use treatment. Through the use of guided self-determination, RVCP will provide a multi-disciplinary approach that will assist the individual in obtaining permanent housing and other wrap around services in order to foster long-term recovery. Project MATCH will serve 200 individuals over the five year grant period. Most recent point-in-time data counts found 5,822 individuals experiencing homelessness in Wisconsin, 6 % of those individuals (349) were found in Rock and Walworth Counties; 64% were households with children, and 36% were households without children. Approximately 14% of the households with children were considered “parenting youth”, individuals between the ages of 18-24 with a child under the age of 18. Veterans accounted for 43 of the individuals. In addition, 185 unaccompanied youth are currently homeless in Rock County. RVCP will take a multi-disciplinary approach to outreach which will foster engagement in a non-threatening and persistent manner. The Outreach Team will be flexible with the individual’s barriers and be knowledgeable about the individual’s service needs, taking into account where the individual is geographically, culturally, philosophically, and emotionally. The Team will focus on relationship building techniques that will demonstrate commitment to a collaborative, participant-led relationship with the individual. The Outreach Team will use the evidence-based practices (EBP): SAMSHA’s Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment; Motivational Interviewing; and Trauma-Informed Care. RVCP will provide a participant-centered care management approach using the EBP’s: Motivational Interviewing and Critical Time Intervention. The Care Manager will assess the individual’s strengths, physical and emotional well being, skill level, and individual service needs; the Care Manager will act as the individual’s advocate and make service referrals to state, local, and community-based organizations, as necessary, for the appropriate wrap-around and recovery services. The Care Manager will assist with admission into RVCP’s behavioral health clinic, Compass Behavioral Health Clinic, for mental health and/or substance use treatment. A dual licensed clinician will conduct a bio-social psycho assessment with the individual, to determine the person’s strengths and appropriate treatment needs. Project MATCH will use the following EBP’s to address the unique needs of the population of focus: Maintaining Independence and Sobriety through Systems Integration; Outreach, and Networking (MISSION); Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach/Assertive Continuing Care; Seeking Safety; Motivational Interviewing; Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing; Solution Focused Brief Therapy; and Prize Incentives Contingency Management. The outcome objectives of the five year Project MATCH proposal are to reduce substance use and mental health episodes among the population of focus and increase long-term recovery; additionally, to achieve social, economic, and housing independence among the population of focus.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI080429-01 ROCK VALLEY COMMUNITY PROGRAMS, INC. JANESVILLE WI WATSON AUSTIN $396,093