Project Abstract Summary: Project FREEDOM: First Responder Expansion of Education and Distribution of Overdose Medication is reducing opioid overdose deaths in rural Alabama through training local EMS workers and municipality and volunteer fire personnel on Narcan administration, increasing the supply of Narcan to certified personnel, referring overdose survivors to treatment and support services, and a media campaign on the Good Samaritan Law. Goal 1: Reduce the number of opioid-related deaths in each county of the projected catchment area by: (a) Increasing the number of first responders equipped with Naloxone by 25% by the end of the 4 year project; (b) At least 10 first responders in each catchment area county will attend monthly training sessions about Naloxone administration and current opioid overdose surveillance data; (c) At least 10 first responders in each catchment area county will attend monthly training sessions about opioid drug safety and occupational hazards; (d) At least 10 healthcare providers in each catchment area county will attend monthly training sessions about opioid overdose dangers, opioid overdose surveillance data in their county, and treatment/recovery options for OUD; (e) Informing 100% of opioid overdose victims to treatment and recovery follow-up services for OUD; (f) Reducing the number of opioid-related overdoses in each county of the projected catchment area by 10% by the end of the 4 year project; (g) Reduce the number of opioid-related overdose deaths in each county of the projected catchment area by 10% by the end of the 4 year project; (h) Screen 10 first responders per month at Naloxone administration trainings on occupational burnout and secondary trauma; and (i) Following screenings for occupational burnout and secondary trauma, inform 100% of first responders about the availability of learning community trainings designed to ensure occupational longevity. Goal 2: Increase education about opioid safety for and promote statewide Good Samaritan Law awareness to the general population via various media outlets by: (a) Initiating an annually broadcasted media campaign centered on opioid safety in each catchment area county by December of 2019; (b) Initiating an annually broadcasted media campaign centered on the Good Samaritan Law in each catchment area county by December of 2019; (c) By the end of each training session on naloxone administration, at least 80% of first responder attendees will report that they feel confident to administer naloxone to an opioid overdose victim; and (d) By the end of each training session on naloxone administration, at least 50% of first responder attendees will report that they learned something new. Goal 3: Identify neighborhoods in the catchment area with the highest opioid overdose rates by: (a) Determining hotspots of opioid overdose first responder service runs in the catchment area in each year of the project using geographic information system (GIS) software and latitude/longitude data for each service run. The unduplicated training count will be a total of 4000 first responders over the four- year project period.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082507-01 ALABAMA STATE DEPT OF MTL HLTH & MTL RET MONTGOMERY AL EMEMBO ALAKE $1,600,000

The Tempe First-Responder Opioid Recovery Project will increase the ability to prevent opioid fatalities in our community, by increasing the capacity for law-enforcement and other key stakeholders to carry and administer Naloxone for suspected opioid overdoses, while connecting at-risk individuals to ongoing appropriate evidence-based treatments and awareness. The City of Tempe is the primary applicant and will partner with EMPACT-Suicide Prevention Center (EMPACT-SPC) to provide rapid follow-up and navigation assistance to connect individuals with an Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) with ongoing Evidence Based Practice treatments and services, and Arizona State University for Evaluation. To accomplish this goal, the Tempe First-Responder Opioid Recovery Project will 1) Equip Tempe Police Officers (TPD) with Naloxone and train them on addiction and resources, 2) Create a 24/7 in-person “Crisis Outreach Response Team” to rapidly respond to any suspected OUD crisis that Tempe First-Responders are involved with, 3) Provide “Post-Crisis Transition Peer-Support Navigator” follow-up support to the individual/family, for up to 30-60 days, during the “post-crisis” period, to assist with “warm-handoffs,” transportation, referrals, and connectivity to ongoing community treatment and recovery services. Over the four-year project period, The Tempe First-Responder Opioid Recovery Project will: • Train and equip 540 Individuals with Naloxone for the emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdoses. Tempe Police Department will equip 250 employees during Year 1. In addition, 290 key community stakeholders (including families of overdose victims) will be trained/equipped. (Year 1-285, Year 2-85, Year 3-85, Year 4-85) • Tempe Police Officers will administer Naloxone to 155 individuals believed to be experiencing an opioid/heroin overdose. (Year 1-20, Year 2-45, Year 3-45, Year 4-45) • Provide 435 in-person, 24/7 behavioral health responses, to individuals who experienced a suspected overdose (Year 1 -60, Year 2-125, Year 3 – 125, Year 4 -125) • Provide 410 of these overdose victims and families with information about treatment services (Year 1- 50, Year 2 - 120, Year 3 – 120, Year 4 -120) o 255 of will accept ongoing short-term post crisis navigation services, helping individuals access and connect to ongoing treatment/services. (Year 1-30, Year 2 – 75, Year 3 – 75, Year 4 -75) • 540 First Responders and key community stakeholders (including families of overdose victims) will be trained on safety around fentanyl, carfetanil and other dangerous and illicit drugs. (Year 1-285, Year 2- 85, Year 3-85, Year 4-85) • Total People Served: 685 (250 TPD Trained/Equipped and 435 Behavioral Health responses)

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082531-01 TEMPE, CITY OF TEMPE AZ KIM MIYOUNG $500,000

Cook County Department of Public Health proposes to implement the Partnerships to Prevent Opioid Overdose Deaths (P-POD) initiative to provide training on naloxone to suburban Cook County law enforcement entities. In addition, through the establishment of regional taskforces and the deployment of Outreach Coordinators, P-POD will establish deflection programs to route individuals with opioid use disorder to community-based treatment providers, and support those referred to treatment in accessing services. The goals of this project are: (1) Build the capacity of suburban law enforcement agencies to appropriately administer overdose reversal medication to prevent deaths from opioid-related overdose; (2) In partnership with key stakeholders, establish protocols for referring people with opioid use and substance use disorder to community-based treatment providers as an alternative to incarceration in order to support recovery from opioid use disorder; (3) Using Outreach Coordinators, support individuals referred to evidence-based treatment programs in accessing treatment and staying in treatment in order to support recovery from opioid use disorder; and (4) Analyze and evaluate data collection and provide recommendations on how to improve project outcomes and data collection. The Cook County Department of Public Health proposes to coordinate with two key players in the criminal justice and substance use space. Treatment Alternatives for Safe Communities (TASC), a non-profit that provides behavioral health support services and treatment for those involved in the criminal justice, corrections, child welfare, and other public systems, and Cook County Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. The three partners will establish an initiative with the ultimate goal of reducing overdose deaths and increasing the number of people that are accessing and able to stay in evidence-based outpatient treatment programs.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082532-01 COOK COUNTY HEALTH AND HOSPITAL SYSTEM CHICAGO IL JOSHI KIRAN $494,469

For decades illicit drug usage was viewed as a problem for law enforcement to solve. It has become clear that merely arresting those who have become victims is not an effective approach to reducing the impact heroin and opioid abuse has on families and communities. Addiction is rightfully viewed as a public health crisis that requires a community-wide response. As such, Elk Grove Village, in partnership with Kenneth Young Center, a behavioral health organization, and Live4Lali, a leader in addressing the opioid crisis, will provide first responders and community sectors training in administering Naloxone and connections to support services.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082528-01 ELK GROVE VILLAGE, VILLAGE OF ELK GROVE VILLAGE IL GASPARI MICHAEL $385,000

The Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH) submits this proposal to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration in response to Funding Opportunity Announcement No. TI-19-004, First Responders – Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act Grants (FR-CARA). This grant proposal is entitled “Naloxone Dispensing, Information Dissemination, and Training for First Responders in Appalachia.” Kentucky is applying for funds to support activities throughout the state, but will focus some activities in counties identified as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA) by the U. S. Office of National Drug Control Policy, the majority of which are located in Appalachia. High drug use and opioid overdose rates in Kentucky have had an impact on first responders in the state. Emergency Medical Services data shows that first responders in Kentucky’s HIDTA counties need more doses of naloxone than is currently provided to them, with the limiting factor being the availability of local tax dollars. This is particularly true of HIDTA jurisdictions in Appalachia. Also, a recent statewide survey of first responders in Kentucky revealed that a majority was unaware of how to use PPE to protect themselves from opioid exposure, indicating a clear need for training on this subject. The activities described in this grant proposal will build on the recent accomplishments of KPDH and its partners in response to the opioid crisis. The activities proposed herein will accomplish the following goals: 1. Increase the number of first responders statewide who are aware of the opportunity to get naloxone training and ensure more of the product is made available to first responders in HIDTA jurisdictions 2. Increase the number of first responders statewide who are aware of how to protect themselves from opioid exposure and have more information about tools and resources available for connecting overdose victims to treatment 3. Establish a mechanism for public health to track the use of naloxone by first responders statewide 4. Create an Opioid Crisis Subcommittee within the existing Health and Medical Preparedness Committee and recruit additional stakeholders into the subcommittee Grant objectives will be achieved through KDPH’s well-established partnerships with first responder agencies in the state, primarily the Kentucky Board of Emergency Medical Services and the Kentucky Fire Commission, both agencies are under the Kentucky Community Technical College System. Also assisting KDPH with achieving these goals will be the Kentucky Pharmacists Association and the Kentucky Regional Poison Control Center, with oversight provided by the Health and Medical Preparedness Advisory Committee.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082525-01 KY ST CABINET/HEALTH/FAMILY SERVICES FRANKFORT KY GILLIS REBECCA $1,600,000

The Greater New Bedford TRAIN (Teach, Reach and Initiate Naloxone) Project, will focus on priority populations disproportionally affect by opioids in New Bedford, Dartmouth and Fairhaven (96 square miles of land) which include: Hispanics/Latinos, Portuguese, and those working in the fishing industry. The New Bedford Health Department will work with the New Bedford Police Department and Fishing Partnership Support Services to reach at minimum 7,212 individuals through education and navigation to treatment and recovery services for the duration of the grant. The TRAIN project will train first responders and key community personnel in naloxone administration, licit and illicit drug safety and cultural competency. The TRAIN project will also enhance the Greater New Bedford Opioid Task Force’s Post Overdose Follow-up program through the addition of recovery coach staff who will visit individuals after a suspected overdose to provide individuals and their families with resources and help facilitate pathways to treatment and recovery services, if desired.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082534-01 CITY OF NEW BEDFORD NEW BEDFORD MA CHAPLIN DAMON $480,421

In 2017, almost 80% of Missouri's opioid overdose deaths occurred in nine of its 115 counties. The proposed project, Connecting the DOTS (Drug Overdose Trust and Safety), will reduce the number of fatal opioid overdoses in Missouri and facilitate treatment and recovery service referrals for overdose survivors. DOTS will provide innovative and collaborative public-health and occupational safety-oriented training to first responders and equip them, and members of other key community sectors, with naloxone. The Missouri Department of Mental Health (DMH) - Division of Behavioral Health (DBH), which provides oversight for the SAMHSA funded Missouri Heroine Overdose Prevention and Education (MO-HOPE) project, will lead this program in partnership with the University of Missouri - St. Louis, Missouri Institute of Mental Health (UMSL-MIMH), the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS), which leads the SAMHSA funded Missouri Overdose Rescue and Education (MORE) project, Safety and Heath Integration in the Enforcement of Laws on Drugs (SHIELD) collaborators at Northeastern University, the Missouri Hospital Association and Behavioral Health Network of greater St. Louis, and local public health departments and emergency response agencies in Missouri's highest risk counties. Constituting an expansion of the generalized overdose education and response training provided through the MO-HOPE and MORE projects targeting eastern and rural Missouri counties, respectively, the DOTS project will leverage existing infrastructure, tailor the evidence-based SHIELD training to fit local needs and address all types of first responder audiences, enhance occupational safety, and bridge the gap in post-overdose recipient of care. Simply put, the DOTS project will ""connect the dots"" between overdose prevention and response initiatives across Missouri. DOTS will follow a three-pronged approach: 1) facilitation of cross-sectoral and collaborative curriculum adaptation and train-the-trainer workshops; 2) delivery of occupational safety and public-health oriented overdose response training for first responders, focusing on hotspot areas in high-need counties with unmet need; and 3) implementation of secondary prevention strategies, including the distribution of naloxone. The five primary goals of the DOTS program are to: 1) expand access to occupational safety and public-health oriented training through locally-led adaptation of the SHIELD curriculum to include non-police emergency responders and online modules; 2) implement SHIELD training to improve police practices, responders' ability to respond safely and effectively to overdose events, and attitudes that promote both occupational safety and public health-minded practices; 3) reduce the number of fatal opioid overdose events in Missouri through naloxone distribution; 4) improve first responders' ability to make appropriate post-overdose service referrals by increasing the number and quality of collaborations between first responders and community treatment, recovery, and social service providers; 5) increase the number of overdose survivors who are connected to treatment and/or recovery services following an overdose event.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082515-01 MISSOURI STATE DEPT OF MENTAL HEALTH JEFFERSON CITY MO STUCKENSCHNEIDER ANGIE $1,600,000

Communicare Overdose Prevention Education (COPE) will create an Advisory Council that will include a leadership-driven, safety oriented culture, infusing a trauma-informed, culturally and linguistically appropriate system-level FR-CARA training approach to allow first responders, in Region 1, 2 and 6, including law enforcement,canine drug dogs, firefighters, emergency medical services, healthcare providers and members of other key community sectors to administer a drug or device approved or cleared under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose that intersects with behavioral health, public safety and primary health and includes substance use disorders training, prevention, early identification, stigma reduction and expands access and available treatment, potentially reducing lives lost to opioid overdose in 20 rural counties in the delta and north Mississippi. The training will include training on the use of NARCAN, DEA training on fentanyl and SAMHSA Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit to expand workforce training capacity and develop a confident, competent and caring behavioral healthcare workforce capable of recognizing the signs and symptoms of opioid overdose, safely de-escalating a crisis situation and identifying resources available in the community for individuals with a substance use disorder, and/or co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders to respond safely and appropriately to individuals experiencing an opioid overdose. Training will also include the ""Good Samaritan"" laws. the project will develop an approach to identify, refer and assess individuals experiencing an opioid overdoes including risk for suicide and violence for responders to appropriately refer individuals with signs or symptoms of mental illness to mental health services.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082519-01 COMMUNICARE OXFORD MS ROGERS SANDY $1,000,000

The Atlantic County Sheriff's Office which has jurisdiction over 23 municipalities in Atlantic County, New Jersey, including the gambling community of Atlantic City, proposes a partnership with Rowan School of Osteopathic Medicine to increase the availability of naloxone to 1,400 first responders and the community using a train-the-trainer approach, provide training on safe handling of fentanyl and carefentanil, and provide outreach to overdose survivors. In 2017, more than 70,000 individuals were killed nationwide due to drug overdoses. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2017, the drug overdose death rate in New Jersey increased 29% from the previous year, the largest in the nation. Cureently, New Jersey ranks 9th in the US for the total number (2,685) of overdose deaths. The gerographic catchment area for the project will be Atlantic County, New Jersey, which has the largest overdose drug death rate of New Jersey's 21 counties and ranks number one in the state for the number of residents with opiste use disorders that entered treatment in 2018. Between 2015 and 2017, fentanyl overdose death rates increased 250% in Atlantic County. Currently, over 50% of the nearly 200 overdose deaths annually in Atlantic County are due to fentanyl. The population of focus will be first responders and survivors of an opiate overdose. First responders will include police officers, emergency medical technicians, firefighters, casino security personnel, and individuals with opiate use disorders and their families. The project will address the lack of a uniform naloxone training program in Atlantic County's first responder system and the lack of a quick response team that includes police officers, EMT, behavioral health, and medical personnel that can provide compassionate outreach and treatment resources to overdose survivors. The goals of the project are designed to address these needs and align with the required activities listed in the funding opportunity announcement, including 1) developing an Atlantic County Overdose Advisory Council to support enhanced naloxone training throughout the county and to ensure that the goals and objectives are met; 2) providing naloxone training to at least 1,400 first responders and community members using a train-the-trainer approach; 3) training at least 1,000 first responders and 400 members of the community on the safety of fentanyl, carfentanil, and other analogs; and 4) providing compassionate outreach to overdose survivors through a project funded Atlantic County Quick Response Team that includes a police officer, EMT, social worker, substance use counselor, and a medical student. Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine will provide the training on naloxone and safety around fentanyl and carfentanil and organize a schedule for medical students to participate on the quick response team. Maryville Addiction Treatment Center, which is one of New Jersey's largest providers of treatment for substance use disorders, will serve on the Advisory Council to enhance treatment access. Rowan's Office of Research will help the county collect real-time data collection during overdose events, GIS mapping, and perform the evaluation of the project.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082527-01 ATLANTIC, COUNTY OF ATLANTIC CITY NJ REED TIMOTHY $500,000

The name of this project will be the NM FR-CARA delivered by the Office of Substance Abuse Prevention (OSAP) of the Behavioral Health Services Division (BHSD), New Mexico Human Services Department (HSD). OSAP will purchase, store and distribute Narcan, an FDA-approved nasal spray; will also utilize the FDA-approved .4 milligram naloxone hydrochloride for intermuscular injection; will train and provide resources to first responders on carrying and administering Narcan and the Good Samaritan Law; will establish processes, protocols, and mechanisms for referral to treatment and recovery communities; and will include the FR-CARA project in its existing Advisory Council. The population to be served will be survivors of opioid overdoses, first responders, and community key stakeholders. State-level will focus on outreach and education to first responder agencies and tribal first responders on integrated survivor follow-up outreach programs, overdose education and naloxone distribution (OEND), and education on fentanyl, carfentanil, and other dangerous licit and illicit drugs; training to first responder agencies on proper and effective reporting practices during adverse opioid related incidents, and grant coordination. Local-level will focus integrated survivor follow-up outreach programs, linkages to treatment and recovery, and technical assistance and training to local survivor follow-up programs. Goal of this project is to increase the capacity of local first responders to improve the outcomes of overdose survivors (of adverse opioid related incidents. Objective 1 (O1) is to annually deliver at least two (2) presentations to first responder agencies per New Mexico Public Health Regions (4 total) and to six (6) tribal first responders on integrated survivor follow-up outreach programs, overdose education and naloxone distribution (OEND), and education on fentanyl, carfentanil, and other dangerous licit and illicit drugs. O2 is to annually, deliver at least two (2) trainings to first responder agencies per New Mexico Public Health Regions (4 total) on proper and effective reporting practices during adverse opioid related incidents. O3 is to provide training/education on OEND, treatment and recovery resources, and fentanyl, carfentanil, and other dangerous licit and illicit drugs to 70 percent of survivors and their family/friends served by Santa Fe City Fire Department (SFFD) and Las Cruces Fire Department (LCFD). O4 is to provide linkages to treatment and recovery for a minimum of 1,500 overdose survivors, served by SFFD and LCFD by end of year 4. O5 is to serve at least 100 overdose survivors, serviced by SFFD and LCFD, through a community-based buprenorphine induction program by end of year 4. O6 is to provide at least 48 technical assistance and training visits to SFFD and LCFD on integrated survivor follow-up outreach programming, OEND, treatment and recovery resources, education on community-based buprenorphine induction and referral to treatment, and fentanyl, carfentanil, and other dangerous licit and illicit drugs. The unduplicated number of individuals New Mexico will serve under this project is 525 annually and 2,100 over the entire project.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082506-01 NEW MEXICO STATE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES SANTA FE NM CHEMAN KAREN $800,000

Rapid Response Emergency Addiction Crisis Team (RREACT) outreach is an innovative effort to address the opioid crisis ravaging Columbus, Ohio. Trained team members follow up with substance users revived from suspected opioid overdose by police or fire first responders but then refuse immediate transport to clinical facilities. RREACT outreach attempts to connect with survivors in the community within 48 hours of overdose. The team includes a Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) trained peace officer, a paramedic, a social worker and a trauma specialist. The goal of multi-disciplinary outreach is to help stabilize the household in an effort to reduce barriers to accessing drug and/or behavioral treatment for the substance user. RREACT also provides much needed training on naloxone administration and safety practices for handling opioids and other drugs. Naloxone and safe handling training is done for other first responder teams and other organizations operating in high-need zip codes and/or serving high-risk populations Goal 1: Increase use of naloxone for emergency treatment of suspected opioid overdose by first responder teams and other key community sectors. 1a- Administer naloxone as standard protocol for first responders faced with suspected of opioid overdose- administer naloxone to a minimum of 2,500 individuals each year- total 10,000 1b- Train first responder teams, community-based providers, service organizations and families/friends of opioid users on naloxone administration - facilitate 6 trainings each year- total 24 Goal 2: Develop capacity of first responder teams to link opioid overdose survivors and/or children to proper supports and treatment services. 2a- Adopt standard outreach procedures to link overdose survivors and/or children in the home with appropriate case management, treatment and recovery supports 2b- Link individuals impacted by opioid overdose to the proper support resources- link a minimum of 350 people per year- total 1,400 Goal 3: Increase knowledge related to safe handling of/exposure to fentanyl, carfentanil, and other dangerous licit and illicit drugs. 3a- Adopt standard safety protocols for contact/exposure with fentanyl, carfentanil, and other dangerous licit and illicit drugs for Columbus Division of Police, Fire and EMS teams 3b- Train on standard safety protocols for contact/exposure with fentanyl, carfentanil, and other dangerous licit and illicit drugs- facilitate 6 trainings each year- total 24 Goal 4: Increase the capacity of the Columbus community to address opioid use through a coordinated multi-disciplinary effort. 4a- Actively support implementation of local, multi-disciplinary Columbus and Franklin County Addiction Plan with specific focus on first responder committee work

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082508-01 CITY OF COLUMBUS COLUMBUS OH JEFFREY DENNIS $416,116

Sallisaw's Cara Project will serve individuals at risk of opioid overdose of all ages in Sequoyah County. The goals of the project are to increase availability of opioid overdose reversal medications to first responders and community members. Secondary goals are to train and provide resources for first responders and members of other key sectors on carrying and administering naloxone; to train and provide resources for first responders and other community members of safety around fentanyl, carfentanil, and other dangerous drugs to protect themselves from exposure; and establish processes for referral to appropriate treatment and recovery communities. We will train 200 first responders per year, for a total of 800 individuals; distribute 2,000 naloxone kits annually, for a total of 8,000; provide information dissemination to 5,000 individuals annually, for a total of 20,000; and reach 100 individuals with outreach activit8ies, for a total of 400 people. Objectives are to provide monthly community naloxone trainings to 24 community partners annually, develop online training resources, promote use and training of ODMAP in training events, create and implement public education campaign, assist partners with policy development regarding safety precautions around fentanyl, integrate fentanyl safety training into naloxone training, promote trainings, gather feedback, and provide resources through website and social media, conduct policy review of crisis intervention services at clinics and healthcare partners, develop written set of recommendations to enhance Crisis Intervention Team responses, coordinate training and strategic planning sessions for the Northeast Health Systems, develop collaborative system of outreach and referrals materials to be administered to families of individuals receiving naloxone, provide education to policy makers on the utility of a 911 Good Samaritan Law. Sequoyah County is primarily Caucasian (65.5%) with a significant Native American population (22.0%). The poverty rate is 2934% and unemployment rate is 6.6%, much higher than the state rate of 4.1% (U.S. Census Bureau 2016)

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082518-01 CITY OF SALLISAW SALLISAW OK EDWARDS AMY $500,000

Southern Plains Tribal Health Board's CARA Project will serve Native American/American Indians residing in designated rural areas of Oklahoma. The goals of the project are to increase availability of opioid overdose reversal medications to first responders and community members. Secondary goals are to train and provide resources for first responders and members of other key sectors on carrying and administering naloxone; to train and provide resources for first responders and other community members of safety around fentanyl, carfentanyl, and other dangerous drugs to protect themselves from exposure; and establish processes for referral to appropriate treatment and recovery communities. We will train 200 first responders per year, for a total of 800 individuals; provide outreach activities to 1,000 tribal families per year for a total of 4,000 families; and reach 18,000 Native American adults per year through media campaigns, for a total of 72,000 individuals. Objectives are to convene an advisory group to oversee implementation, provide annual opioid awareness educational opportunities across five target communities to 150 key community leaders, develop 15 written strategic partnerships with tribal first responder agencies to implement naloxone policies and procedures, provide 25 community trainings for 200 first responders annually, purchase 1,008 naloxone kits, purchase and disseminate materials for continued naloxone trainings to 14 partners annually, develop online training resources, promote use and training of ODMAP in training events, promote trainings and gather feedback through website and social media, create and implement public education campaign, assist partners with policy development regarding safety precautions around fentanyl, coordinate training and strategic planning sessions for four main healthcare partners to establish crisis intervention protocol, assist CIT with creating outreach and referral materials to be administered to 250 families of individuals receiving naloxone, provide education to 25 policy makers on the utility of a 911 Good Samaritan Law. The following tribal counties will be served: Cheyenne and Arapaho (Blaine, Custer, Washita), with a Native population of 2.8%; Comanche Nation (Caddo, Kiowa), with a Native population of 19.6%; Chickasaw Nation (Bryan, Johnston, Carter, Pontotoc), with a Native population of 10.5% and; Absentee Shawnee Tribe (Pottawatomi), with a Native Population of 15.1%.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082520-01 SOUTHERN PLAINS TRIBAL HEALTH BOARD FOUNDATION OKLAHOMA CITTY OK PRATHER TRACY $500,000

The following application titled Strategies to Coordinate Overdose Prevention Efforts (SCOPE) in Blair County is being proposed by Blair County Drug and Alcohol Program, Inc. (BDAP). This purpose of this project is to change the practice of emergency response so that all individuals encountered by targeted First Responders in Blair County will have a decreased risk of overdose in the future through an established First Responder training curricula accompanied by implementation. The training curricula was developed alongside First Responders and other experts in the field, which identified best practices for first responder training and implementation. Training objectives include: (1) carrying and administering naloxone for known or suspected opioid overdose in a stigma free environment; (2) leaving behind naloxone and related resources with individuals at risk of an opioid overdose; (3) providing resources and education to First Responders on safety around fentanyl, carfentanil, and other dangerous licit and illicit drugs to protect themselves and respond appropriately when exposure occurs; and (4) using motivational interviewing to screen and conduct referrals and provide post overdose follow up. Four champion first responder agencies in Blair County will be participating in the program: (1) Altoona Mobile Emergency Department (AMED); (2) Duncansville Emergency Medical Services (DEMS); (3) Altoona Police Department (APD); and (4) Logan Township Police Department (LTPD). The project aims to train 179 unduplicated First Responders at the participating agencies, resulting in training 95% of First Responders at participating agencies carrying and utilizing naloxone, 80% of overdose calls who refuse transport to the hospital will receive naloxone leave behind, 80% of individuals encountered by First Responders will be screened for substance use, for which 10% will receive referral and access to treatment and nontreatment resources through coordination with BDAP. BDAP will also be collaborating with the Program Evaluation and Research Unit (PERU) at the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy, who will be providing and completing implementation, technical assistance, and project evaluation activities.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082514-01 BLAIR COUNTY DRUG AND ALCOHOL PROGRAM, INC. ALTOONA PA ROSSER JUDY $500,000

The Pennsylvania Department of Health is proposing the following project titled Strategies to Coordinate Overdose Prevention Efforts (SCOPE). The project aims to train First Responders through an already established, and effective, curricula on subjects that will improve access and utilization of naloxone, and facilitate effective connection of patients with Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) to treatment and nontreatment resources. First responders include law enforcement, emergency medical services (EMS) and fire departments in a thirty-three county catchment area comprising 43% of overdose, 48% of the population, and 22% of the naloxone distributed but not utilized by the county first responders throughout the statewide naloxone distribution led by the Governor’s office in Pennsylvania. The catchment area includes Perry, Monroe, Lehigh, Bradford, Butler, Erie, Delaware, Luzerne, Cambria, Beaver, Somerset, Wayne, Armstrong, Blair, McKean, Northampton, Lycoming, Lebanon, Greene, Chester, Bedford, Bucks, Dauphin, Tioga, York, Lancaster, Wyoming, Montour, Jefferson, Mercer, Northumberland, Indiana, and Crawford counties. Training objectives for First Responders include: (1) utilizing naloxone for emergency treatment of a known or suspected opioid overdose in a culturally competent and patient-centered manner; (2) using motivational interviewing principles to conduct referrals and “warm handoffs” to help patients access OUD, SUD, and/or mental health evaluation and treatment as well as nontreatment resources; (3) increasing access and utilization of naloxone through “leave behinds” to ensure the health and safety of persons refusing services; and (4) training and providing resources to first responders on safety around fentanyl, carfentanil, and other dangerous/illicit drugs. The SCOPE First Responders project aims to serve at least 1320 unduplicated individuals through a guided pathway of an in-person training followed by online refresher trainings, a coordination meeting to create a draft warm-handoff pathway, and identification of a county first responder champion in each of the 33 counties who will receive additional training and concierge technical assistance as the champion conducts a second in-person training in his/her county. The Pennsylvania Department of Health will be collaborating with the Program Evaluation and Research Unit (PERU) at the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy who will be providing training, technical assistance, and project evaluation activities.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082516-01 PENNSYLVANIA STATE DEPT OF HEALTH HARRISBURG PA FERGUSON DYLAN $798,958

Consonant with the requirements outlined in the RFP, a Project Advisory Council has been established to oversee all aspects of program development, implementation, management and evaluation. An inventory of NARCAN will be made available to first responders, along with a rigorous training protocol for proper administration, storage, and document. Training to reduce risk exposure related to fentanyl and other dangerous substance will likewise be conducted. Full time positions will be hired and housed at the sheriff’s office, police department, and emergency medical services. In addition, two full time case managers will assist with a state approved model for responding to opioid overdose that involves a home visit within 3 days of the overdose event to offer support and treatment referrals. Finally, a public awareness campaign is proposed to produce materials related to overdose prevention and relative Good Samaritan laws.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082533-01 LANCASTER, COUNTY OF LANCASTER SC MCKENZIE PAUL $807,116

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (TDMHSAS) will implement Tennessee Save a Life: First Responders (TNSAL-FR) for first responders serving individuals with an opioid use disorder (OUD) in rural areas to increase capacity/provide accessible, effective, comprehensive, and evidence-based training, harm reduction strategies, and linkages to resources for individuals with an OUD. TDMHSAS established the Tennessee Save a Life program, through the State Targeted Response Grant, as an Overdose Education and Naloxone Distribution (OEND) program to combat the opioid crisis. To address the OEND needs of first responders in rural areas, TDMHSAS will expand its' program which will allow first responders to administer naloxone for emergency treatment of opioid overdose. TDMHSAS utilizes seven regional divisions to determine geographic boundaries for needs assessments and strategic planning efforts. The non-metropolitan rural geographic catchment area, Region 5 South, was selected due to its increasing number of fatal/non-fatal opioid overdose rates in combination with insufficient first responder training (OMB, 2017). The geographic catchment area includes: Bedford, Coffee, Franklin, Giles, Hickman, Lawrence, Lewis, Lincoln, Marshall, Maury, Moore, Perry, and Wayne counties, Tennessee. Among the 3,909 first responders serving individuals with an OUD comprising the population of focus, only 31% (1,211) have been trained in how to administer Naloxone through the State Targeted Response Grant program. Region 5 South is supported primarily by volunteer fire departments (estimated 46% of focus population) that lack the discretionary funding to support specialized trainings in OUD or mental health disorders (TDMHSAS, 2019; US Census, 2016). The Tennessee Fire Services and Codes Enforcement Academy does not currently offer any courses on Mental Health or Substance Use Disorder (SUD) (TNDCI, 2019). The Tennessee Peace Officer Standards and Training Commission (POST) offers a one-hour course on Fentanyl, Opioids, and Naloxone use; however, it does not currently offer courses on interacting with an individual with an SUD/OUD (TNDCI, 2019). In a local needs assessment of Region 5 South Law Enforcement, 59% (1,294) requested naloxone; only 16% (276) of area fire fighters currently utilize state-funded naloxone. It is essential that first responders are provided with OUD/mental health training and increased access to naloxone resources, as they are the primary source of intervention in rural communities. TNSAL-FR will provide outreach/engagement, training, and naloxone distribution to an estimated unduplicated 3,600 first responders and provide outreach and education to 1,000 community stakeholders (e.g., social service workers, medical providers, Veteran-serving agencies) to strengthen relationships for interagency collaboration. TNSAL-FR expects to yield the long-term benefits of enhanced community capacity, increased efficacy of first responder opioid response efforts, decreased number of opioid outbreak events, overall reduced cost to the community, and development of a comprehensive community network.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082510-01 TENNESSEE STATE DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES NASHVILLE TN JACKSON ANTHONY $1,600,000

The Vermont First Responder Emergency Opioid Response Project will enhance the vital work of First Responders, including Firefighters, Emergency Medical Services personnel, and Law Enforcement officers ability to safely provide emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdoses as well as increase the rate of referrals to treatment and recovery in Vermont rural communities with low access to naloxone and high burden of opioid injury and deaths. This project will expand access to over 6,648 First Responders in 12 rural counties. This project will meet the following goals: • Ensure First Responder services (outside of the Chittenden and Grand Isle counties) that elect to carry naloxone have medication for responding to opioid overdoses. • Ensure First Responder agencies have access to trainings to manage opioid overdoses. • Develop and implement a community education plan to improve awareness of opioid overdose harm reduction practices. • Integrate the First Response system and EMS providers as referral partners to assist patients, who are revived by naloxone but are not transported to emergency departments for further treatment, into the referral pathway for treatment and recovery. • Work together in better inter-departmental coordination in data-driven activities in addressing adverse opioid incidents including overdoses. First Responders play a critical role in the State of Vermont’s work in addressing opioid crisis. Vermont has been addressing opioid use and misuse through public information, social marketing and messaging; pain management and prescribing practices; prevention and community mobilization; drug disposal options; early intervention services; overdose prevention and harm reduction programs; and increased access to treatment and recovery services. Over the length of the funding period, the project will reach 2187 unduplicated individuals annually, with at least 6,648 first responders, and 2,100 overdose victims for a total of 8,748 unduplicated individuals.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082511-01 VERMONT STATE AGENCY OF HUMAN SERVICES WATERBURY VT BELL CHRIS $1,600,000

ABSTRACT FOR PROJECT: Reversing Overdose Campaign (ROC) POPULATION TO BE SERVED: Muckleshoot Indian Tribe’s (MIT) First responders (Tribal Security, Law Enforcement, Emergency Medical Service Providers, Fire Department Volunteers and paid staff), and key community sectors (KCS) (service providers, Tribal Staff & Leadership, tribal school staff, tribal schools’ students, Tribal administrators, family members of persons with opioid & opioid related addictions, medical staff, tribal court personnel, veterans and other KCS). GOAL: Increase the capacity of the MIT to reduce the impact of the Opioid Epidemic. STRATEGIES: The Muckleshoot Indian Tribe recognizes that the approach to improving the conditions and lives of the community members on the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe’s Reservation must be multifaceted and responsive to the changing and challenging opioid addiction cycle. The expansion of the Tribe’s Health Committee will establish an advisory council. The ROC Advisory Council will provide insight and guidance so that the ROC-provided workshops and training is up to date and meaningful to the first responders and KCS. A ROC Community Educator (grant funded) will be responsible for organizing and providing educational workshops that focus on issues that impact First Responders & KCS when addressing Opioid –related issues such as Administering Narcan®; Safety with Fentanyl; De-escalating after a Reversal; and other needed topics related to Opioid Overdoses. The Reversing Overdose Campaign proposed by the MIT is focused on 4 main objectives to help the Tribe, Key Community Sectors and its first responders to better meet the Tribal Community’s needs. The objectives and corresponding measurables are as follows: OBJECTIVE #1: Each year distribute 1,500 NarCan® to first responders and representatives of key community sectors (KCS). Annual unduplicated services are: Year 1: 450; Year 2: 50*; Year 3: 50*; Year 4: 50* (*First Responders and KCS are expected to need refills in years 2-4.) OBJECTIVE #2: Conduct a campaign to educate the First Responders and KCS about Opioid Related Issues at 2 events per month to improve the community’s understanding of and commitment to reducing overdoses. Annual Unduplicated services are: Year 1: 250; Year 2: 250; Year 3: 200; and in Year 4: 200 One event/month will be specifically to distribute Narcan®; one event will introduce and educate participants about trending issues related to Opioids. OBJECTIVE #3: Provide follow-up service referrals to at least 48 opioid addicted persons per year, with the focus on persons experiencing a reversal. Year 1: 48; Year 2: 60 Year 3: 72 Year 4: 84 (48 new, others may be duplicated referrals). OBJ ECTIVE #4: The ROC Advisory Council will meet quarterly to review the project evaluation, discuss the opioid related issues impacting the community and identify topics for monthly ROC events.Year 1-Year 4 : Four PAC review meetings will be convened & suggestions documented in program files. One event per year will include a speaker.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082509-01 MUCKLESHOOT INDIAN TRIBE AUBURN WA PETRO CRISSIE $249,665

Jackson County Health Department, along with several community partners will be establishing a Quick Response Team to responsd to overdoses throughout Jackson County, West Virginia. This Quick Response Team will be charged with navigating the treatment system in West Virginia on behalf of an individual who has overdosed and would like to go in to an inpatient treatment setting. In addition, the Health Department will be working with community partners to establish best practices and protocols around first responders carrying and administiring Narcan/Naloxone and identify key community members to also carry this life saving drug.

Award Number Grantee Organization Name Grantee City Grantee Statesort descending Project Director Last Name Project Director First Name Award Amount
TI082513-01 JACKSON COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT RIPLEY WV HASKINS AMY $500,000