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Contributors

Contributors

The process for developing the TBHA was the result of months of information-gathering and discussing, analyzing, validating, sharing, and revalidating the input received. SAMHSA’s Office of Tribal Affairs and Policy (OTAP) worked with the Indian Health Service’s (IHS) Office of Clinical and Preventive Services (OCPS) and the National Indian Health Board (NIHB) to engage Tribal leaders, Tribal administrators, and Tribal members to obtain input and ensure that Tribal voices were honored in developing the TBHA.

The TBHA was a collaborative effort among tribes, Tribal leaders, national and regional Tribal organizations, SAMHSA Regional Administrators, SAMHSA staff members, and Federal partners. Three specific Tribal organizations – National Indian Health Board, National Council of Urban Indian Health, and National Congress of American Indians – were instrumental in supporting, advancing, and disseminating the TBHA. Although it is difficult to identify all supporters by name, the TBHA would not have been possible without all of you.

Tribal Leaders

Tribal Leaders

SAMHSA owes a debt of gratitude to Joe Garcia (Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo) whose vision initiated the TTAC discussion and who passionately spoke about the importance of Tribal leaders’ voices in framing a behavioral health agenda for Tribal nations.

SAMHSA also appreciates the leadership and guidance from other Tribal leaders on the TTAC whose collective voices helped shape and guide completion of the TBHA: Timothy Ballew II (Lummi Indian Nation), Brooks Big John (Lac du Flambeau Tribe), Amber Crotty (Navajo Nation), Anthony J. Francisco, Jr. (Tohono O’odham Nation), Andy Joseph, Jr. (Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation), Juana Majel-Dixon (Pauma Band of Luiseno Mission Indians), Keith Massaway (Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians), and Vernon Miller (Omaha Tribe of Nebraska).

The insight and guidance provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary’s Tribal Advisory Committee (STAC) and SAMHSA Tribal Technical Advisory Committee (TTAC) during many discussions about behavioral health and in particular, suicide in Indian Country, were invaluable in shaping the TBHA.

Updating the Tribal Behavioral Health Agenda

Learn more about the importance of the Tribal Behavioral Health Agenda.

Last Updated

Last Updated: 02/06/2024

Last Updated